Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə33/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   ...   41

 Management Strategies 
Table 7‐40 details the proposed social and economic management strategies for the Proposal, which 
are designed to meet the objectives detailed in Table 7‐39.  Note that land access negotiations with 
individual  landholders  will  provide  the  forum  to  identify  and  deal  with  issues  such  as  dissection  of 
farm paddocks. 
Table 7‐40  Proposed social and economic management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant 
EMP 
Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Rail Safety and Risk will be managed according to the Rail Safety Act 1998 
including risk assessment and safety provisions for all level crossings. 
-  
Design, 
Construction 
& Operation 
Safety 
Manager 
In accordance with access agreements and leases negotiated with the State, 
signage will be erected and maintained to alert members of the public to risks 
and hazards and exclude them from construction and operational areas. 
Traffic MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Public 
Relations 
Manager 
Include Public Risk in Risk Assessment and Risk Management programmes 
-  
Construction 
& Operation 
Public 
Relations 
Manager 
Public notices shall be communicated prior to any works taking place that may 
affect public access. 
-  
Construction 
& Operation 
Public 
Relations 
Manager 
Prepare and implement a Traffic Management Plan that includes designated 
traffic areas, measures for safe traffic interactions with the public and 
arrangements with local government and Main Roads WA.  The plan will 
include the following actions: 
  at intersections with public access roads, maintain a visual inspection and 
cleanup routine to minimise dust spill and spread onto public roads; 
  traffic will be minimised at public access areas; and 
  specify ongoing consultation arrangements with Local Shires and Main 
Roads WA. 
Traffic MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager, 
Public 
Relations 
Manager 
7.14.6 
Predicted Outcome 
Risks to the public from rail/road interactions are expected to be managed to as low as reasonably 
achievable  by  using  grade  separation  (bridges)  at  major  crossings  and  industry  standard  safety 
warning systems at other crossings.  The public will be excluded from construction areas. 
Application  of  industry  best  practice  preventative  controls  to  hazardous  materials  such  as  risk 
assessment and the application of storage and handling standards, incident reporting and remedial 
capacity are expected to reduce risks to the public to a level that is insignificant. 
Recreational  use  of  the  Proposal  Area  is  minor.    Workforce  education  processes  are  expected  to 
reduce the risk of unacceptable workforce impacts on recreational assets to negligible.  Increase in 
accessibility to areas is not expected to lead to significant recreational use pressures. 
Dissection of farm paddocks and inconvenience for farm operations is expected to be managed via 
land access negotiations with individual landholders. 
 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
226

MATTERS OF NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL SIGNIFICANCE 
8.1 
INTRODUCTION 
8.1.1 
Background 
The  Environmental  Protection  and  Biodiversity  Conservation  Act  1999  (EPBC  Act)  is  the  Australian 
Government’s key environmental legislation and is administered by the Department of Environment, 
Water,  Heritage  and  the  Arts  (DEWHA).  The  EPBC  Act  provides  a  legal  framework  to  protect  and 
manage nationally and internationally important flora, fauna and ecological communities and places 
of heritage (DEWHA 2009). 
There are seven matters of National Environmental Significance (NES) to which the EPBC Act applies: 
 
world heritage sites; 
 
national heritage sites; 
 
wetlands  of  international  importance  (Ramsar  wetlands,  named  after  the  treaty  in  which 
they are listed); 
 
nationally Threatened Ecological Communities (TECs) and species; 
 
migratory species; 
 
commonwealth marine areas; and 
 
nuclear actions. 
The objectives of the EPBC Act are to: 
 
conserve Australia’s biodiversity; 
 
protect biodiversity internationally by controlling the international movement of wildlife; 
 
provide a streamlined environmental assessment and approvals process where matters of 
NES are involved; 
 
protect our world and national heritage; and 
 
promote ecologically sustainable development. 
8.1.2 
Assessment Process 
Under the EPBC Act a project or proposal (referred to as an ‘action’) will require approval from the 
Australian  Government  Environment  Minister  if  the  action  has,  will  have,  or  is  likely  to  have,  a 
significant impact on a matter of NES. 
A significant impact is one that has a notable consequence on the matter of NES. Whether or not an 
action  is  likely  to  have  a  significant  impact  depends  upon  the  context,  intensity,  duration  and 
geographic extent of the action, as well as the sensitivity, value and quality of the environment which 
is to be impacted. 
The proponent must undertake a self assessment of the action to decide whether or not the action is 
likely to have a significant impact on any matters of NES, taking into consideration direct and indirect 
impacts and whether proposed mitigation is effective enough to reduce the level of impact below the 
significant  impact  threshold.  The  EPBC  Act  Policy  Statement  1.1  ‐  Significant  Impact  Guidelines  on 
Matters of NES (2009b) provides direction to proponents in the form of criteria to assist in deciding 
whether a referral to the Minister is necessary. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
227
Should the action be considered to have a significant impact upon a matter of NES, the proponent 
must  make a referral  to the  Minister for approval.  The referral  must ascertain the location, nature 
and extent of any potential impacts, and any mitigation measures. This referral is then released to 
the  public  for  comment,  which  is  assessed  and,  if  relevant  to  the  EPBC  Act,  is  taken  into 
consideration. The Minister or his delegate will then decide whether the environmental impacts of 
the  Proposal  are  such  that  it  should  be  assessed  under  the  EPBC  Act.  The  referral  process  is 
illustrated in Figure 3‐1.  
If  the  Minister  decides  that  the  action  is  likely  to  have  a  significant  impact  and  requires  approval 
under  the  EPBC  Act  then  the  Proposal  is  considered  a  ‘controlled  action’.  The  Western  Australian 
(WA)  government  has  a  bilateral  agreement  with  the  Commonwealth  which  allows  the  State  to 
assess the action under the approval process accredited by the declaration.   
If the Minister decides that the action is not likely to have a significant impact on a matter of NES, 
then the action does not require an approval under the EPBC Act (it is a ‘not controlled action’). In 
this  case  the  Minister  may  decide  that  an  action  does  not  require  approval,  because  it  will  be 
undertaken in a particular manner that does not impact upon the matter of NES. 
8.1.3 
Summary of Proposed Action Relevant to EPBC Act Consideration 
The  Proposal  may  potentially  impact  on  a  number  of  EPBC  Act  listed  threatened  flora  and  fauna 
species. As a result Oakajee Port and Rail (OPR) has referred the action to DEWHA for consideration. 
OPR met with DEWHA in August 2009 and May 2010 to discuss the matters of NES relevant to the 
Proposal, the level of assessment undertaken and proposed management strategies. OPR considers 
that  the  Proposal  is  a  controlled  action  due  to  the  presence  of  threatened  species  within  the 
Proposal Area, in particular the potential for impacts on the Western Spiny‐tailed Skink.   
8.2 
LISTED THREATENED SPECIES AND ECOLOGICAL COMMUNITIES 
8.2.1 
Identification of species 
An EPBC Act Protected Matters search was conducted on 8 April 2010 for the Proposal Area which 
identified  26  threatened  species.    Of  these,  only  6  fauna  species  and  11  flora  species  have  the 
potential to occur within the Proposal Area.  
8.2.1.1 
Fauna 
Fauna species that may occur within the Proposal Area include: 
 
Acanthiza iredalei iredalei (Slender‐billed Thornbill): Vulnerable; 
 
Calyptorhynchus latirostris (Carnaby’s Black‐Cockatoo): Endangered; 
 
Macronectes giganteus (Southern Giant‐Petrel): Endangered; 
 
Macronectes hallii (Northern Giant‐Petrel): Vulnerable; 
 
Thalassarche cauta cauta (Shy Albatross): Vulnerable; and 
 
Egernia stokesii badia (Western Spiny‐tailed Skink): Endangered. 
The remaining nine fauna species identified in the Protected Matters Report include three whale 
species, three turtle species and three shark species, none of which are relevant, as the Proposal is 
strictly terrestrial.  
Fauna surveys (Ecologia 2009b & 2010b) recorded the following EPBC listed fauna within the Study 
Area (Figure 8‐1): 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
228
 
Acanthiza iredalei iredalei (Slender‐billed Thornbill): Vulnerable; 
 
Egernia stokesii badia (Western Spiny‐tailed Skink): Endangered; and 
 
Leipoa ocellata (Malleefowl) (secondary evidence only): Vulnerable. 
Note that on Figure 8‐1 the Slender‐billed Thornbill is not shown as it was not recorded during the 
recent Ecologia surveys, but was recorded during a previous survey.  The location of the sighting is 
shown on Figure 8‐2. 
No individuals of Southern Giant‐Petrel, Northern Giant‐Petrel and Shy Albatross have been recorded 
or  are  expected  to  occur  within  the  Proposal  Area  due  to  the  distance  from  the  coast.  Therefore, 
these species have not been considered any further. 
Carnaby’s  Black  Cockatoo  was  not  recorded  during  Ecologia  surveys.    The  species  is  endemic  to 
south‐west WA, but in coastal areas the distribution is understood to extend as far north as Kalbarri, 
which is approximately 100 km north of the Oakajee port.   
Carnaby’s  Black‐Cockatoo  breeds  almost  exclusively  in  the  wheatbelt  in  large  hollows  in  eucalypt 
trees  (Johnstone  and  Storr  1998;  Shah  2006)  and  is  not  expected  to  breed  in  the  coastal  region 
around Oakajee (Barrett et al. 2003). 
Although  not  recorded  within  the  Study  Area,  Carnaby’s  Black‐Cockatoo  has  been  recorded  near 
Oakajee, from Howatharra (10 km east of Oakajee in 1983), as well as more southern locations such 
as Geraldton and Dongara. 
Heading  east  along  the  rail  alignment  from  the  Port,  the  known  distribution  therefore  extends 
approximately less than 50 km inland, which is entirely within the freehold area of the corridor, and 
within  the  Geraldton  Hills  subregion.    The  Proposal  Area  therefore  passes  through  the  north‐east 
extension of the range of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo. 
Carnaby’s  Black  Cockatoo  is  not  expected  to  use  the  Proposal  Area  for  breeding  (Ecologia  2010), 
however there is the potential for this species to use the Proposal Area as a feeding visitor. In general 
feeding habitat within the Proposal Area is low quality, and is limited to a few small remnants which 
are unlikely to be a main food source for Carnaby’s cockatoo.   
Up to 100 ha of vegetation clearing will be required in the freehold area.  Of the eleven Geraldton 
Sandplains vegetation units occurring in the Study Area, five contain plants of a genus known to be a 
food source of Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo.  These units combine to make up 1% (2308 ha) of the Study 
Area, and are as follows: 
 
Gh1 (contains hakea); 
 
Gy1 (contains banksia, sparse/ open); 
 
Gp1 (contains Hakea – degraded community); 
 
Gf1 (contains isolated hakea); and 
 
Gc2 (contains grevillia). 
Based on the indicative rail alignment the following clearing of these vegetations units is predicted: 
 
Gh1 ‐ 0% impacted; 
 
Gy1 ‐ 0.8% impacted (4.1 ha); 
 
Gp1 ‐  1.9% impacted (17.2 ha); 
 
Gf1 ‐ 1.0% impacted (7.2 ha); and 
 
Gc2 ‐ 6.2% impacted (0.8 ha). 
The above equates to a total predicted disturbance of 29.3 ha, or 1.3% of the total area within the 
Study Area suitable as a food source for Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo.  It is also expected that these 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
229
vegetation units would extend outside of the Study Area, however vegetation mapping at that scale 
is not available. 
Woodland and heath, particularly amongst the Moresby Range, includes favourable food plants such 
as Dryandra, Hakea, and Banksia.  The Proposal Area has been amended to avoid the Moresby Range 
Nature Reserve. 
Section  7.2  includes  details  of  how  clearing  of  remnant  vegetation  will  be  avoided  or  minimised 
throughout the freehold area, which includes potential Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo habitat. 
Clearing within the freehold area will be restricted to an average disturbance width of 100 m when 
the corridor passes through areas of native vegetation, and vegetation will not be cleared except for 
the purposes of the rail alignment, and for access tracks if alternative routes are not practicable. 
8.2.1.2 
Flora 
The flora species identified by the Protected Matters Search tool include: 
 
Caladenia bryceana subsp.cracens (Northern Dwarf Spider‐orchid): Vulnerable; 
 
Caladenia elegans (Elegant Spider‐orchid): Endangered; 
 
Caladenia hoffmanii (Hoffman’s Spider‐orchid): Endangered; 
 
Caladenia wanosa (Kalbarri Spider‐orchid): Vulnerable; 
 
Drummondita ericoides (Moresby Range Drummondita): Endangered; 
 
Eremophila viscida (Varnish Bush): Endangered; 
 
Eucalyptus blaxellii (Howatharra Mallee): Vulnerable; 
 
Eucalyptus cuprea (Mallee Box): Endangered; 
 
Hypocalymma longifolium: Endangered; 
 
Pityrodia augustensis (Mt Augustus Foxglove): Vulnerable; and 
 
Ptilotus fasciculatus (Fitzgerald’s Mulla‐mulla): Endangered. 
Of  these,  only  the  Hoffmans’  Spider  Orchid,  Moresby  Range  Drummondita  and  Howatharra  Mallee 
have been recorded in or near the Study Area (Figure 8‐1). 
Vegetation  and  flora  surveys  of  the  Study  Area  did  not  identify  any  individuals  of  Northern  Dwarf 
Spider‐orchid,  Elegant  Spider‐orchid,  Kalbarri  Spider‐orchid,  Moresby  Range  Drummondita,  Varnish 
Bush,  Mallee  Box,  Hypocalymma  longifolium,  Mt  Augustus  Foxglove  or  Fitzgerald’s  Mulla  Mulla.  
Further  assessment  of  the  potential  for  these  species  to  occur  within  the  Proposal  Area  using 
Florabase and DEC databases provides the following information in relation to these species. 
The  Northern  Dwarf  Spider‐orchid  is  known  from  15  populations  which  range  from  Northampton 
(southern point of distribution) to Kalbarri (northern most point of distribution).  The Proposal Area is 
located approximately 50 km south of the known distribution of the species.  It is therefore unlikely 
that the Northern Dwarf Spider‐orchid occurs within the Proposal Area. 
The Elegant Spider‐orchid is known to occur in eight populations found west‐northwest and east of 
Northampton.  This distribution lies well outside the boundary of the Proposal Area and therefore is 
not likely to occur. 
Despite  extensive  targeted  surveys,  the  Kalbarri  Spider  Orchid  has  not  been  recorded  within  or 
around  the  Study  Area.    This  species  generally  occurs  on  sandstone  outcrops,  often  on  the  upper 
edges of gorges.  Near Mullewa, the species inhabits deep, yellow loamy sand beneath tall shrubs of 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
230
Jam  (Acacia  acuminata)  and  hakea,  with  emergent  mallee.    Potential  habitat  for  this  species  may 
include Gp1, Gp2, Gf2, Yp2, and Yf1, totalling 13, 879 ha within the Study Area. 
The flowering time of the Kalbarri Spider Orchid is August to September.  In 2009 phase one quadrat 
sampling was being carried out in the Study Area in August, and Phase two surveying which targeted 
threatened flora and unknown species was undertaken between August and October, covering the 
entire flowering period for this species.  Phase 2 employed transects to cover large areas of the Study 
Area, with 1,250 km of transects walked, covering 2,364 ha of the Study Area.   No individuals of this 
species were identified.  Therefore it is considered highly unlikely that this species occurs in the Study 
Area. 
The  Moresby  Range  Drummondita  occurs  in  the  Moresby  Range,  north  of  Geraldton.  The  known 
populations occur over a linear range of approximately 20 km.  These populations occur on a nature 
reserve, private property and a recent addition to the conservation estate.  The preferred Moresby 
Range  habitats  are  not  intersected  by  the  Proposal  Area,  therefore  it  is  unlikely  that  the  species 
occurs within the Proposal Area.  In addition, no specimens were recorded by Ecologia (2010a) during 
its flora and vegetation survey for OPR.   
Varnish  Bush  has  a  historical  linear  range  of  approximately  290 km  between  Pindar,  the  northern 
limit of distribution, to Carnamah, Latham, Ballidu, Koorda and Merriden at the southern limit.  The 
Proposal  Area  is  positioned  north  of  Pindar,  well  outside  of  the  northern  limit  of  the  species 
distribution.  It is therefore unlikely that the species occurs within the Proposal Area. 
Mallee  Box  is  confined  to  a  small  area  around  Northampton,  from  north  of  Galena  to  south  of 
Northampton.  The distribution of the species is not intersected by the Proposal Area.  It is therefore 
unlikely that the species occurs within the Proposal Area. 
Hypocalymma  longifolium  is  known  to  occur  in  five  populations 
within  a  60 km  range  between 
Yerina Spring (north‐east of Port Gregory) and Murchison River (north of Kalbarri).  The Proposal 
Area  is  located  approximately  110 km  south  of  the  southern  limit  of  the  species’  known 
distribution. It is therefore unlikely that the species occurs within the Proposal Area.
 
A  search  of  Florabase  indicates  that  the  Mt  Augustus  Foxglove  is  known  only  to  occur  in  two 
locations within the Gascoyne IBRA region, in the Mt Augustus area (northeast of Carnarvon) and Mr 
Fraser in the Robinson Range (northeast of Meekatharra).  The nearest known location of this species 
is  approximately  130 km  from  the  Proposal  Area.    It  is  therefore  unlikely  that  the  species  occurs 
within the Proposal Area.   
Fitzgerald’s  Mulla  Mulla  occurs  in  a  number  of  locations  along  a  linear  range  from  one  location 
northeast of Geraldton, to multiple locations surrounding Carnamah, Coorow and Kondinin and the 
wheatbelt region of southern WA.  A total of 11 sub‐populations are known.  With the exception of 
the  one  location  to  the  northeast  of  Geraldton,  identified  on  Florabase,  all  other  locations  lie  well 
outside  the  boundary  of  the  Proposal  Area.    While  it  is  possible  that  the  species  occurs  within  the 
Proposal Area, it was not recorded during flora and vegetation surveys by Ecologia (2010a). 
No  nationally  listed  TEC  exist  in  the  Proposal  Area  (Ecologia,  2010a)  and  none  were  identified  as 
potentially occurring using the Protected Matters Search Tool.  
 
 

Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
02
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
6900000mN
200000mE
40km
7000000mN
7100000mN
6900000mN
7000000mN
7100000mN
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
200000mE
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F014.dgn
LEGEND
Existing Rail Network
Major Road
Watercourse
Coastline
Topography
Study Area
Notes:
National Environment Significant Species supplied by Ecologia Environment
National Environment
Significant Species
Western Spiny-tailed Skink (black form)
Egernia Stokesii badia
Malleefowl
Leipoa ocellate
Tringa nebularia
Rainbow Bee-eater
Merops ornatus
Common Greenshank
Geraldton
Geraldton
OakajeeOakajee
MeekatharraMeekatharra
KalbarriKalbarri
Mount MagnetMount Magnet
MullewaMullewa
Caladenia hoffmanii
Eucalyptus blaxelii
Jack Hills
Jack Hills
Weld RangeWeld Range
Figure 8-1  Matters of NES within the Proposal Area

!
(
!
(
Ge
ra
ld
to
n
SB
TB
 M
2
SB
TB
 W
el
d
Le
ge
nd
!
(
Sl
en
de
r-b
ille

Th
or
nb
ill 
Lo
ca
tio
ns
Pr
oj
ec
t A
re
a
Ra
il A
lig
ne
m
en
t
C
oo
rd
in
at

Sy
st
em
N
am
e:
 G
D

19
94
 M
G

Zo
ne
 5
0
Pr
oj
ec
tio
n:
 T
ra
ns
ve
rs

M
er
ca
to
r
D
at
um
: G
D

19
94
1   ...   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə