Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə35/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   41

Le
ge
nd
!
(
Bl
ac

W
es
te
rn
 S
pi
ny
-ta
ile

Sk
in

Lo
ca
tio
ns
 (R
eg
io
na
l S
ur
ve
y)
!
(
Bl
ac

W
es
te
rn
 S
pi
ny
-ta
ile

Sk
in

Lo
ca
tio
ns
 (P
re
vio
us
 R
ec
or
ds
)
Pr
op
os
ed
 P
ro
je
ct
 A
re
a
C
oo
rd
in
at

Sy
st
em
N
am
e:
 G
D

19
94
 M
G

Zo
ne
 5
0
Pr
oj
ec
tio
n:
 T
ra
ns
ve
rs

M
er
ca
to
r
D
at
um
: G
D

19
94
A
4
Fi
gu
re
: 6
Pr
oj
ec
t I
D

D
ra
w
n:
 A
H
D
at
e:
   
23
/0
6/
10
K
0
50
10
0
Ki
lo
m
et
re
s
1:
2,
30
0,
00
0
Ab
so
lu
te
 S
ca
le
 - 
U
ni
qu

M
ap
 ID
: A
20
5
Re
co
rd

an

pr
ed
ic
te

Di
st
rib
ut
io

of
 
Eg
er
ni

st
ok
es
ii
Figure 8-3  Regional Western Spiny-tailed Skink survey results

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
240
8.2.2.3 
Malleefowl 
Malleefowl (Leipoa ocellata) are ground dwelling birds, known for constructing large mounds of soil 
and vegetation in which they incubate their eggs (Plate 8‐2).  They are usually found in arid to semi‐
arid  shrublands  consisting  of  mallee  or  mallee  heath  communities  and  can  sometimes  occur  in 
eucalyptus or mulga woodlands (DEWHA 2010b).   
The  Malleefowl  is  listed  as  Vulnerable  under  the  EPBC  Act  and  as  fauna  that  is  rare  or  likely  to 
become extinct in WA.  The decline of this species is due to loss and fragmentation of habitat due to 
agricultural clearing, degradation of remnant habitat and predation by foxes (Ecologia 2010b). 
 
Plate 8‐2  Malleefowl (Leipoa ocellata) (Benshemesh 2007) 
Malleefowl tracks and a recently used mound were found in a small area of low, dense acacia scrub 
with  accumulated  leaf  and  wood  debris  on  sandy  soil,  located  a  few  kilometres  northwest  of  the 
Proposal  Area  centreline  (Ecologia  2010b).    A  targeted  survey  was  undertaken  adjacent  to  this 
location and identified an old nest that had not been used for several years.  This nest mound was in 
an  area  considered  to  be  no  longer  suitable  for  habitat  due  to  its  open  nature  and  lack  of 
accumulated debris.   
A Malleefowl call was heard at OPR‐F1 (Figure 5‐23) some distance from the location of the trapping 
grid.  A transect was walked toward the direction of the call but failed to record further evidence of 
the species.  Habitat in the area where the call was heard was generally eucalypt woodland (although 
not mallee form), with some areas of thick leaf litter. 
Further searches in the wider area surrounding the tracks did not identify any individuals or evidence 
of Malleefowl presence.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
241
The  preferred  habitat  of  Malleefowl  is  large  dense  thickets  of  mallee  or  mulga  on  sandy  soils,  dry 
inland scrub, and shrubland communities. The species is also often recorded along tracks. 
This  habitat  area  contains  both  Yy1  (Acacia  ramulosa  var.  linophylla  and  Acacia  ramulosa  var. 
ramulosa open tall shrubland) and Yf5 (Acacia eremaea sparse tall shrubland, over mixed Chenopod 
spp.  low  shrubland)  vegetation,  which  are  mapped  over  4923  ha  and  8049  ha  of  the  Study  Area 
respectively.  It is unknown what percentages of these vegetation associations contain enough dense 
understory and leaf litter accumulation to provide potential habitat for Malleefowl (Ecologia 2010). 
There  is  a  possibility  that  Malleefowl  utilise  the  Proposal  Area,  due  to  the  evidence  of  tracks.  
However,  suitable  habitat  is  patchy  and  limited,  and  has  been  well  surveyed  for  Malleefowl.    This 
information combined with a lack of active mounds results in a low likelihood that this species is a 
breeding resident in the Proposal Area (Ecologia 2010). 
Will the action lead to a long‐term decrease in the size of an important population of a species? 
While no individuals were observed during the fauna survey, a recently used mound was identified 
and a call was heard approximately 2.6 km from the centreline of the Proposal Area.  The location of 
the recently used mound is therefore located well outside of the area of disturbance. It is possible 
that more than one pair of birds breed in an area of suitable habitat around OPR‐D (Figure 5‐23).  
A targeted survey was undertaken along a 4.7 km length of the Proposal Area centreline adjacent to 
this location and identified an old nest that had not been used for several years.   
Malleefowl are known to spend up to eleven months of the year in nest building and maintenance 
and  as  a  result  spend  most  of  their  time  in  the  vicinity  of  the  nest.    As  the  male  bird  defends  the 
mound, its range is usually smaller than that of the female.  Some pairs may reuse the same mound 
for  many  years  in  succession  while  other  pairs  may  move.    Malleefowl  may  also  move  during  the 
non‐breeding season.  The home range varies considerably from 0.5 km
2
 to 4.6 km
2
 (DEWHA 2010).  
Given  the  low  population  size  (100,000  individuals  nationwide),  scattered  distribution  and  long 
generation length, impacts to individual birds could have far‐reaching consequences.  Land clearing 
may  cause  destruction  of  nest  mounds,  and  adult  birds  may  also  be  displaced  or  abandon  nest 
mounds as a result of construction activities or train noise.  If birds are displaced, their potential for 
future  breeding  will  depend  upon  their  ability  to  find  suitable  alternative  habitat  nearby.    Should 
suitable  alternative  habitat  not  be  found,  this  may  impact  on  the  population  viability  in  the 
Murchison region. 
OPR  commits  to  not  disturbing  any  active  Malleefowl  mound.    Where  a  nest  is  discovered  that 
cannot be avoided, the nest will be disturbed only once all Malleefowl adults and chicks have left the 
nest.  If this is not possible OPR will apply for Ministerial permission to disturb.  
Will the action reduce the area of occupancy of an important population? 
It is possible that more than one pair of Malleefowl breeds in the area of suitable habitat identified in 
OPR‐D  (Figure  5‐23).    Nest  destruction  may  reduce  the  area  of  occupancy  of  these  breeding  pairs, 
particularly if suitable alternative habitat is available.   
OPR  commits  to  not  disturbing  any  active  Malleefowl  mound.    Where  a  nest  is  discovered  that 
cannot be avoided, the nest will be disturbed only once all Malleefowl adults and chicks have left the 
nest.  If this is not possible OPR will apply for Ministerial permission to disturb.  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
242
Will the action fragment an existing important population into two or more populations? 
The  proposed  action  is  unlikely  to  fragment  an  existing  important  population  into  two  or  more 
populations.  Malleefowl will most likely be capable of crossing the rail embankment.  There is a risk 
of potential train strike, however this is unlikely as the noise generated by approaching trains should 
act as a deterrent.  Fauna passages and bridges along the length of the Rail Corridor will also enable 
opportunity for Malleefowl to cross the rail line.  
Will the action adversely affect habitat critical to the survival of the species? 
While a recently used mound was identified and a call was heard, there is limited potential habitat 
within  the  Proposal  Area.    It  is  possible  that  the  small  amounts  of  potential  habitat  within  the 
Proposal  Area  may  be  adversely  affected;  however,  OPR  commits  to  not  disturbing  any  active 
Malleefowl mound.   
Will the action disrupt the breeding cycle of an important population? 
The  Proposal  may  potentially  disrupt  the  breeding  cycle  of  a  small  number  of  this  species.  OPR 
commits to not disturbing any active mound, however should land clearing cause the destruction of 
unused nest mounds that are used repeatedly by a mating pair, it is possible that the breeding cycle 
of  that  pair  may  be  impacted.    The  viability  of  that  breeding  pair  would  then  depend  upon  the 
availability of alternative suitable habitat.  Noting the survey results and limited habitat potentially 
impacted, there is a low likelihood that an important population will be impacted. 
Will the action modify, destroy, remove or isolate or decrease the availability of quality of habitat 
to the extent that the species is likely to decline? 
Limited  potential  Malleefowl  habitat  is  available  within  the  Proposal  Area.    Should  land  clearing 
result in the destruction of mounds or habitat, it is possible that the viability of the population in the 
Murchison region may be impacted.   
Will  the  action  result  in  invasive  species  that  are  harmful  to  a  vulnerable  species  becoming 
established in the vulnerable species’ habitat? 
The proposed action is unlikely to introduce invasive species that are harmful to Malleefowl. 
The decline of Malleefowl is largely due to: 
 
loss and fragmentation of habitat due to agricultural clearing; 
 
degradation of remnant habitat; and 
 
predation by foxes. 
Construction of a Rail Corridor is not considered likely to result in an increase in the level of fox 
predation on Malleefowl that may be present in the Proposal Area.   
Will the action introduce disease that may cause the species to decline? 
The proposed action is unlikely to introduce disease that may cause the Malleefowl to decline. 
Will the action interfere substantially with the recovery of the species? 
The  action  may  potentially  impact  on  one  or  more  breeding  pairs  of  Malleefowl.    Given  that  no 
Malleefowl were sighted within the Study Area, the determination of likelihood of their occurrence in 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
243
the Proposal Area is based upon the presence of a recently used mound (which the Proposal will not 
disturb), unused mounds, a call and tracks.   
8.2.2.4 
Hoffman’s Spider Orchid 
Caladenia hoffmanii is a tuberous perennial herb growing from 0.13 m to 0.3 m high usually found in 
clay,  loam,  laterite  and  granite,  rocky  outcrops,  hillsides,  ridges,  swamps  and  gullies.    Flowers  are 
produced from August to October and are green, yellow and red (Ecologia 2010a).  C. hoffmanii was 
recorded by Ecologia at two locations in the Freehold section of the Proposal Area in the vegetation 
communities Gh1 and Gh2 (refer to Appendix 1).  Known individuals and populations of C. hoffmanii 
will not be impacted by the Proposal.   
The  locations  of  Hoffman’s  Spider  Orchid  are  shown  in  Figure  8‐1.    The  Proposal  will  not  directly 
impact  this  species.    The  design  of  the  Rail  Corridor  alignment  will  ensure  that  no  indirect  impacts 
(drainage, dust etc) will influence populations of this species. 
8.2.2.5 
Howtharra Mallee 
Eucalyptus blaxelii is one of four species in the Loxophlebae series of Eucalyptus.  E. blaxellii grows in 
sand  over  laterite,  or  brown  clay  on  sandstone  hills  or  creek  flats  which  are  widespread  at  the 
western  end  of  the  Proposal  Area.  433  E.  blaxelli  plants  were  recorded  at  143  locations  in  the 
freehold section of the Study Area, in association with vegetation communities Gh1, Gh2 and Gh3.  A 
map showing locations of E. blaxelli can be found in Figure 8‐1.  A more detailed map can be found in 
Appendix 1.  Coordinates for recorded locations of E. blaxelli can be found in Appendix 1. 
As these habitats are moderately widespread in the region and as the percentage of total individuals 
is  moderate  (16.4%)  in  the  Proposal  Area,  it  indicates  a  low  to  moderate  local  endemism  for  this 
species.  E.  blaxellii  does  not  appear  to  be  locally  restricted  with  records  spanning  70 km  and  one 
outlier to 170 km. 
Most  known  populations  of  the  species  are  secure  as  they  occur  in  areas  that  are  unsuitable  for 
farming due to the inaccessibility of the steep slope. 
A nomination to remove this species from the listing of Declared Rare Flora was submitted to the WA 
Threatened  Species  Scientific  Community  and  as  a  result  it  has  now  been  altered  to  a  Priority  4.  
Regardless,  known  locations  of  E.  Blaxelii  will  be  avoided  by  the  Proposal.  The  design  of  the  Rail 
Corridor alignment will ensure that no indirect impacts (drainage, dust etc) will influence populations 
of this species. 
8.2.2.6 
Moresby Range Drummondita 
Drummondita  ericoides  is  endemic  to  the  Geraldton  Sandplains  bioregion  and  is  known  from  212 
individuals  at  twelve  locations  and  nine  populations.  1.9%  of  the  total  numbers  of  plants  were 
recorded  inside  the  Proposal  Area  and  0.9%  are  in  conservation  reserves.  It  is  estimated  that  the 
potential habitat recorded by Ecologia for this species covers 804 ha (vegetation units Gh1, Gh2 and 
Gh3) within the Study Area. 
DEC’s Moresby Range Drummondita Interim Recovery Plan (DEC, 2004) states that the main threats 
include inappropriate fire regimes and high levels of human activity. 
D. ericoides grows on low heath on sandstone and laterite slopes, ridges and gullies of the Moresby 
Range in brown loam or sandy loam and clay soils in areas not suitable for agriculture and so has not 
been so highly cleared. 
Known individuals and populations of D. ericoides will not be impacted by the Proposal. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
244
8.3 
MEASURES TO AVOID OR REDUCE IMPACTS 
While the Proposal Area typically consists of a corridor up to 4 km wide, and approximately 200,000 
ha, the actual disturbance will be much smaller, as the total area of disturbance (7000 ha) equates to 
approximately 3% of the total land area contained within the Proposal Area.  Areas disturbed during 
construction, but not required for permanent operations will be rehabilitated following construction.  
This will include areas used for borrow and quarries. 
OPR is  committed to ensuring that all  proposed disturbance areas have been suitably surveyed for 
NES  species  prior  to  disturbance.
 
The  survey  information  will  be  included  in  OPR  databases  and 
documentation  to  ensure  that  OPR  will  not  disturb  NES  species  or  their  habitat  beyond  the 
disturbance areas approved through the Commonwealth and State approval processes.  Should NES 
species  be  found  during  construction  in  locations  where  impacts  are  unavoidable,  OPR  will  seek 
Ministerial permission to disturb.
   
8.3.1 
Performance Management 
OPR has  developed environmental management objectives, targets and performance indicators for 
NES fauna (Table 8‐1). 
Table 8‐1  NES fauna management objectives, targets and performance indicators 
OPR Management Objective 
Target 
Performance Indicators 
Protect NES fauna. 
 
No disturbance to NES fauna and their 
habitats beyond the disturbance areas 
described in the PER. 
 
Ground Disturbance Permits 
 
Pre-disturbance fauna surveys  
 
Fauna injury/death register 
 Incident 
Register 
 Rehabilitation 
criteria 
 
Fauna habitat constraint maps 
 
Conservation Significant Fauna 
Database 
Prevent the introduction or spread of 
introduced fauna, and control species 
currently present. 
 
No introduction of domestic 
animals or pets. 
 
No introduction of feral animals or 
increase in numbers of existing 
feral animal species. 
 Incident 
Register 
 
Success of feral animal controls 
 Landfill 
inspections 
 
8.3.1 
Management Strategies 
OPR will implement the management strategies identified in Table 8‐2 to reduce  potential impacts 
on NES species. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
245
Table 8‐2  Matters of NES general management strategies 
Management Strategies 
Relevant 
EMP 
Phase 
Responsible 
Persons 
Where practicable, rocky outcrops and large trees will be left in situ for 
fauna habitat. 
Fauna MP 
Design & 
Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Minimise trench length where practicable.  Should trenching be required 
for distances in excess of 1000 m, inspect trenches and excavations 
outside of construction envelopes regularly and where any trenching is 
to remain open overnight, provide fauna ramps and inspect before work 
resumes the next morning to remove any trapped fauna 
Fauna MP 
Construction 
Construction 
Manager, 
Environment 
Manager 
All disturbance areas have or will be surveyed for EPBC protected 
species prior to disturbance.  The survey information will be included in 
OPR databases and documented to ensure that OPR will not disturb 
species or their habitat beyond the disturbance areas approved in the 
PER.  Should these species be found during construction in locations 
where impacts are unavoidable, OPR will minimise the disturbance in 
those areas and will seek permission to disturb. 
Fauna MP 
Construction 
Construction 
Manager, 
Environment 
Manager 
Turkeys nest dams will be fenced to restrict access by fauna. Fauna 
escape methods such as wire mesh will be fixed within turkeys nests to 
allow fauna egress.  
Fauna MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
No domestic animals or pets will be permitted on site 
Fauna MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
Feral animal controls will be specified in the Fauna Management Plan.  
Control strategies will be developed consistent with regional and local 
feral animal control initiatives. 
Fauna MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Environmental 
Manager 
Include NES fauna protection specifications in all construction related 
contracts 
Fauna MP 
Construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Induct all workforce on NES fauna identification and encounter 
procedures (including feeding, littering, interaction etc) 
Fauna MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
Apply and enforce speed limits to vehicles within potential NES fauna 
habitat 
Fauna MP 
Construction 
& Operation 
Construction 
Manager, 
Operations 
Manager 
Rehabilitation requirements will include the provision of suitable fauna 
habitat 
Vegetation 
and Flora 
MP 
Post-
construction 
Construction 
Manager 
Following  an  assessment  of  matters  of  NES  identified,  it  is  considered  that  the  impact  of  the 
proposed  action  upon  populations  of  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink  and  Malleefowl  during  the 
construction  and  operation  of  the  Proposal  are  of  most  relevance  and  require  additional 
management measures. 
8.3.2 
Western Spiny‐tailed Skink 
A mapping exercise (see Appendix 2a or 2d) was undertaken to identify potential habitats to ensure 
the  Proposal  does  not  significantly  impact  upon  populations  of  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink.    During 
the  design  phase  the  rail  alignment  was  deviated  around  known  Western  Spiny‐tailed  Skink 
populations where possible. 
Measures to mitigate impacts to the species during construction and operation include: 
 
with the exception of the Rail Corridor, no disturbance will occur within a 200 m buffer of 
most known Egernia stokesii badia habitat.  For the two known populations located close to 
the rail centreline, a buffer of 50 to 60m will be maintained and the construction 
disturbance width will be limited to an average of 100 m; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
246
 
any handling of Egernia stokesii badia will be undertaken by a suitably licensed reptile 
handler; 
 
all personnel involved in ground disturbing works are required to attend a site specific 
induction which will include guidelines in avoiding impacts to the species; 
 
OPR have developed fact sheets for all conservation significant flora and fauna species 
recorded along the rail including Western Spiny‐tailed Skink with photographs of typical 
habitat and form; 
 
all known locations of Western Spiny‐tailed Skink will be made available to personnel for 
upload into GPS equipment to ensure avoidance; 
 
fauna underpasses will be constructed under the rail line at the two locations where the 
Rail Corridor is located within 50 ‐ 60 m of known populations.  This will allow movement to 
be maintained between populations; 
 
provision of fauna passages below the rail lines to allow movement within the populations 
to continue in the two locations of centreline proximity identified during the survey; and 
 
translocation of individuals to habitats away from the development prior to construction, if 
required. 
1   ...   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə