Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə6/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   41

Environmental 
Factor 
EPA Objective 
Existing Environment 
Potential Impacts 
Environmental Management 
Predicted Outcome 
  Prepare and implement a Traffic Management 
Plan that includes designated traffic areas, 
measures for safe traffic interactions with the 
public and arrangements with local 
government and Main Roads WA.   
  Rail Safety and Risk will be managed 
according to the Rail Safety Act 1998 including 
risk assessment and safety provisions for all 
level crossings. 
Increase in accessibility to 
areas is not expected to 
lead to significant 
recreational use 
pressures. 
 Dissection 
of 
farm 
paddocks and 
inconvenience for farm 
operations is expected to 
be managed via land 
access negotiations with 
individual landholders. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
xx 
Environmental Management Framework 
An  ISO  14001:2004  based  Environmental  Management  System  (EMS)  will  be  finalised  prior  to 
commencement of construction of the Proposal. 
The  EMS  will  provide  the  fundamental  tools  of  risk  identification  and  control  through  the  guiding 
principles of the OPR Corporate Environmental Policy. Continuous improvement in the EMS will be 
achieved through regular review, routine audits and an annual management review of the system. 
Specific  environmental  aspects  of  the  construction  and  operation  of  the  Proposal  will  be  managed 
through the implementation of Environmental Management Plans (EMPs), developed as part of the 
EMS.    These  EMPs  will  also  include  details  of  monitoring  that  will  be  undertaken,  performance 
standards  applied  to  the  results  and  reporting  requirements.  The  EMPs  will  be  regularly  reviewed 
and updated, in alignment with the ISO 14001:2004 continuous improvement approach. 
Critical environmental factors relevant to the Proposal will be incorporated into the EMPs, including: 
 
Aboriginal and non‐indigenous cultural heritage; 
 
ASS; 
 
air quality; 
 
vegetation and flora; 
 
fauna; 
 
hazardous materials and contamination; 
 
noise and vibration; 
 
recreational access; 
 
surface water and groundwater; and 
 
sustainable resource management – covering waste, power and water management. 
A  Safety  Management  System  will  be  developed  separately  but  will  be  aligned  to  the  EMS 
framework.  The  Safety  Management  System  will  take  the  lead  on  Emergency  Response  issues, 
including spill management, with support via the EMS. 
Summary and Conclusion 
The development of the Proposal shall not impact upon any TEC, PEC or DRF. Based on predictions of 
clearing  using  the  indicative  Rail  Corridor  alignment  five  out  of  the  87  species  of  Priority  Flora 
recorded within the Study Area will be impacted, to a maximum of 3.8% of their known population.  
Additional surveys prior to disturbance will be commissioned for those species with the highest risk 
of being significantly impacted. 
There will be minimal disturbance to significant vegetation communities.  Significant Beard and Burns 
(1976) associations will be cleared by a maximum of 0.2% of their pre‐European extent.  A minimum 
of 92% of significant Ecologia (2010a) vegetation units will remain unaffected by the Proposal. 
The Proposal does not impact upon any existing conservation reserves, with the exception of Reserve 
16200,  which  has  been  vested  in  the  Minister  for  Water  for  the  conservation  of  water  supply  and 
conservation of flora and fauna.  Approximately 14.6% of Reserve 16200 will be impacted.   
The  expected  maximum  disturbance  to  the  Narloo,  Woolgorong  and  Twin  Peaks  proposed 
conservation reserves, is 0.2%, 0.2% and 1.3% respectively.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
xxi 
The development of the Proposal may result in the direct loss of some fauna due to accidental strikes 
of trains; however it is likely that over time local fauna will avoid the immediate area.  No significant 
impacts are expected to fauna listed under the EPBC Act and/or the WC Act, including the Malleefowl 
and Western Spiny‐tailed Skink. Significant impacts on SRE species is considered unlikely due to the 
linear  nature  of  the  infrastructure  and  the  reduced  disturbance  footprint  within  the  freehold  area.  
No significant impacts are expected for subterranean fauna as no significant excavations or long term 
abstraction of large volumes of groundwater. 
There  may  be  minor,  localised  impacts  to  the  surface  hydrology  in  some  areas,  including  drainage 
shadow effects in sheetflow areas, and localised ponding along drainage lines.  The drainage shadow 
is  expected  to  be  limited  to  the  general  disturbance  envelope,  due  to  the  use  of  environmental 
culverts.  The  predicted  outcome  is  no  significant  indirect  impacts  to  sheetflow  dependent 
vegetation, such as Mulga. 
The  majority  of  groundwater  abstraction  within  the  Proposal  Area  will  be  short‐term  and/or 
relatively small volumes over a number of locations, which will substantially reduce the likelihood of 
unacceptable  impact.    All  groundwater  use  will  be  licensed  under  the  RIWI  Act  which  will  ensure 
sustainable use. 
The  preferred  Rail  Corridor  alignment  has  been  selected  to  minimise  the  number  of  receptors 
impacted.    The  Proposal  will  result  in  three  residences  receiving  noise  in  excess  of  the  limit  set  in 
State  Planning  Policy  5.4,  and  seven  residences  receiving  noise  in  excess  of  target  criteria  (WAPC 
2009b).  Noise mitigation measures may include external noise barriers, internal sound proofing and 
building.  Consultation with affected landholders will determine the appropriate mitigation measures 
to be taken. 
Dust emissions are expected primarily during construction of the Proposal.  Emissions will be short‐
term and subject to best practice dust controls.   
The  waste  and  hazardous  material  issues  relating  to  this  Proposal  are  similar  to  those  faced  and 
managed  by  many  other  remote  operations  in  WA.    Significant  risk  reduction  will  be  achieved 
through the application of industry standard preventative controls, storage and handling standards, 
incident reporting and remedial capacity.   
It  is  anticipated  that  the  Proposal  will  contribute  approximately  0.02%  of  Australia’s  annual 
Greenhouse Gas emissions.  Emissions will be reported under the NGER Act, and OPR will be required 
to participate in the proposed Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme. 
Management  measures  will  minimise  the  risk  of  inadvertent  disturbance  to  registered  and 
unregistered Aboriginal heritage sites; however the Proposal will directly impact a number of sites.  
Permission  will  be  sought  under  the  AH  Act  for  disturbance  to  any  registered  site.    Management 
measures will minimise the risk of inadvertent disturbance to registered and unregistered sites. OPR 
will continue to liaise with Native Title claimants in the area and work towards creating sustainable 
opportunities for Aboriginal people. 
The design, alignment, and position of the Rail Corridor on lower relief land will prevent significant 
impacts  to  general  visual  amenity  in  agricultural  and  pastoral  landscapes  and  from  the  sensitive 
location  of  the  Moresby  Range.    Disturbance  minimisation  and  rehabilitation  will  minimise  any 
impacts to visual amenity as a result of the Proposal. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
xxii 
This page has been left blank intentionally 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 


INTRODUCTION 
1.1 
BACKGROUND 
The idea of developing a deepwater port at Oakajee, about 24 kilometres (km) north of Geraldton in 
Mid‐West Region of Western Australia (WA) has a long history having been initially identified as early 
as the 1960’s (anecdotally).  In the 1980s when it was raised as an adjunct to a proposed Kimberley 
based  bauxite  mining  project.  In  1997,  the  WA  Environmental  Protection  Authority  (EPA)  provided 
advice  to  the  then  State  Government  Minister  for  the  Environment  on  environmental  issues 
associated with development of a deepwater port at Oakajee. A subsequent proposal from the then 
WA Government Minister for Resources Development led to assessment of the Oakajee deepwater 
port concept by the EPA, resulting in the release, on the 25
th
 February 1998,  of Ministerial Statement 
469  (MS  469)  by  the  then  Minister  for  the  Environment.  MS  469  established  the  legally  binding 
environmental conditions under which the Oakajee deepwater port development could proceed, the 
original  term  of  the  environmental  approval  extending  to  the  25
th
  February  2003.  The  term  of 
environmental approval for the Oakajee deepwater port pursuant to MS 469 has subsequently been 
extended on several occasions, the current expiry date being the 25
th
 February 2013.  
Historically,  establishment  of  the  Oakajee  Port  has  been  linked  to  expansion  in  the  mining  sector, 
originally the proposed Kimberley based bauxite project and more recently, growth of the Mid‐West 
iron  ore  mining  sector.  The  number  of  Mid‐West  iron  ore  projects  currently  being  progressed  has 
increased  the  impetus  for  development  of  the  Oakajee  port.  The  State  Government  initiated  a 
competitive  tendering  process  from  consortia  interested  in  developing  the  port  and  associated 
infrastructure, Oakajee Port and Rail Pty Ltd (OPR) being the successful bidder.  
OPR’s  development  proposals  for  the  Oakajee  deepwater  port  and  associated  infrastructure 
comprise  the  following  distinct  components,  the  approvals  for  which  are  being  obtained  (or  have 
already been obtained) through separate environmental impact assessment (EIA) processes: 
 
Oakajee Deepwater Port Development – approved under Statement 469; 
 
Port Terrestrial Development – subject of separate Public Environmental Review (PER); and  
 
Rail Development – subject of this PER. 
This document addresses only the Oakajee Rail Development Proposal (the Proposal). This proposal 
is for the infrastructure required to develop and operate a 45 Mtpa iron ore export facility as a first 
stage.   
It  is  understood  that  the  Government  of  WA  has  plans  to  further  develop  the  Oakajee  area  as  a 
multi‐user, multi‐product port when there is a demand for further import and export facilities serving 
the region and in particular the Oakajee Industrial Estate.   
Development beyond OPR’s 45 Mtpa iron ore project (the subject of this PER) will be the subject to 
future approvals processes and stakeholder consultation. 
1.1.1 
Proposal Context 
On  the  20
th
  March  2009  the  State  Government  of  WA  and  OPR  entered  into  a  State  Development 
Agreement  (SDA).  This  SDA  provided  OPR  exclusive  rights  to  build  Oakajee  Port  and  a  northern 
railway line.  
In  accordance  with  section  11  of  the  Public  Works  Act  1902  (PW  Act),  the  Governor,  by  Order  in 
Council,  has  declared  the  railway  a  Public  Work  and  has  authorised  the  Public  Transport  Authority 
(PTA)  of  WA  to  undertake,  construct  or  provide  a  railway  line  and  associated  infrastructure  to  link 
iron ore mines in the mid‐west region of WA with a deepwater port to be constructed at Oakajee. 
The Proposal is therefore a Public Work as defined by Section 2 of the PW Act. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 

On  the  24
th
  July  2009,  the  PTA  authorised  OPR  to  undertake  feasibility  works  within  the  Proposal 
Area on its behalf, in accordance with the power under section 182 of the Land Administration Act 
1997.  Final  approval  of  the  railway  corridor  by  the  Government  is  currently  pending  and  minor 
variations to the corridor are still possible. 
The Proposal will be located within a 4 km corridor in the pastoral area and 3.2 km corridor in the 
freehold  area,  2  km  and  1.6  km  respectively  either  side  of  a  centreline  that  is  to  be  defined  by  a 
Special  Act  of  Parliament.  Any  reference  to  the  Proposal  Area  in  this  document  is  relevant  to  the 
Special Act Corridor (SAC), unless stated otherwise. 
1.2 
PURPOSE OF THIS DOCUMENT 
OPR has liaised with the Office of the EPA (OEPA) and the previous EPA Service Unit (EPASU) of the 
Department  of  Environment  and  Conservation  (DEC),  regarding  EIA  requirements  for  the  Proposal.  
The EPA have determined that the Proposal will be assessed pursuant to the provisions of Part IV of 
the Environmental Protection Act 1986 (EP Act) at a PER level. 
OPR  has  established  that  the  Proposal  is  to  be  considered  a  controlled  action  and  will  therefore 
require assessment pursuant to the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 
(EPBC Act).  The Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA) has determined 
that  under  the  terms  of  a  bilateral  agreement  on  EIA  between  the  State  and  Commonwealth 
Governments, the WA EPA’s EIA process will satisfy Commonwealth requirements.  
This PER has been prepared in accordance with requirements pursuant to both the WA EP Act and 
the  Commonwealth  EPBC  Act.    The  PER  conforms  to  the  scope  outlined  in  OPR’s  Environmental 
Scoping Document (ESD) for the Proposal as agreed with EPA and DEWHA in July 2010.  
Table  1‐1  lists  the  ESD  study  requirements  and  the  relevant  sections  of  the  PER  where  these  have 
been addressed. 
The PER has also been prepared in accordance with the following documents: 
  EIA (Part IV Division 1) Administrative Procedures 2002 of the EP Act; and 
  Guidelines  for  Preparing  a  PER/Environmental  Review  and  Management  Programme  (EPA, 
2009b). 
This  PER  provides  EPA  and  DEWHA  with  information  on  the  Proposal  and  demonstrates  how  the 
impacts  of  the  Proposal  on  the  key  environmental  factors  (including  relevant  matters  of  National 
Environmental Significance (NES)) will be mitigated and managed.  In this regard, OPR has committed 
to  the  implementation  of  Environmental  Management  Plans  (EMPs)  addressing  the  Proposal’s 
potential construction and operational impacts. 
The PER will be subject to a four week public review period.  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 

Table 1‐1  ESD requirements 
Factor 
Investigations undertaken 
PER documentation to Include 
PER 
Section 
Reference 
Vegetation 
and Flora 
• 
Level 2 survey (single phase – 
performed  by Ecologia Environment 
(Ecologia) from 2007 to 2009), 
consistent with EPA Position 
Statements 2, 3 & 9 and Guidance 
Statement No. 51. 
• Threatened flora survey – performed by 
Ecologia in 2009.  Access restriction on 
Meka Station – currently excluded from 
survey. 
• Threatened flora details available for 
surveys conducted on previous 
alternate alignments by Ecologia  in 
2006/2007. 
• 
Identification of declared and 
environmental weed species.   
• Identification of any areas outside of 
surveyed areas that may be disturbed. 
Survey findings, including vegetation mapping, 
and mapping of conservation significant 
species and vegetation;   
5.2.1 
General impact assessment, including 
assessment of impact of fire risk and vegetation 
dependant on surface water sheetflow 
7.2 
Evaluation of local and regional significance 
and impacts on conservation significant flora 
species, particularly Declared Rare Flora (DRF) 
and Priority Flora species;  
7.2 & 8 
Evaluation of impacts on significant vegetation 
communities, particularly the Moresby Range 
Priority Ecological Community (PEC) 
7.2 
Definition of autumn survey in the Moresby 
Range including the PEC area, plus spring 
survey for Caladenia hoffmanii 
Appendix 1 
Definition of approach to borrow pits and 
quarries including further spring vegetation and 
flora survey work to cover all disturbance areas 
including borrow pits, quarries, groundwater 
bores should these need to be outside the 
existing survey envelope; 
7.2 & 7.9 
Impact assessment, including assessment of 
impact of the rail infrastructure on vegetation 
dependant on surface water sheetflow; 
7.2 & 7.5 
Control measures for weed management; 
7.2 
Management measures to reduce impact on 
vegetation. 
7.2 
Fauna 
•  Level 2 vertebrate fauna survey (by 
Ecologia from 2006 to 2009) of the 
Proposal Area has been conducted
consistent with EPA Position Statement 
No. 3 and Guidance Statement No. 56. 
•  Identification of threatened fauna that 
could potentially utilise the Proposal 
Area. 
•  SRE Surveys conducted in May/June, 
July and October 2009 (Ecologia), 
consistent with EPA Position Statement 
No. 3 and Guidance Statement No. 20 
and 56. 
•  Risk assessment on potential impact to 
subterranean fauna undertaken based 
on a review of existing fauna records 
mapped against land system and soil 
landscape systems (Ecologia, 2010e). 
Survey findings, including vertebrate and 
invertebrate fauna, short-range endemics  
(SREs) 
5.2.2 
Assessment of impacts and risks relating to 
subterranean fauna, SREs and conservation 
significant fauna 
7.3 & 8 
Plans for any further fauna survey or other work, 
particularly to cover areas outside the existing 
survey envelope 

Impact assessment, including evaluation of local 
and regional significance 
7.3 & 8 
Quantify extent of habitat reduction with 
particular reference to conservation significant 
species such as the Slender-billed Thornbill, 
Carnaby’s Black Cockatoo, Malleefowl and 
Western Spiny-tailed Skink 

Management measures to reduce impact on 
fauna and fauna habitat. 
7.3 
Details of any additional surveys performed for 
the Western Spiny‐tailed Skink 

Conservation 
Significant 
Areas 
•  Investigated alignment with no direct 
impacts on A class reserves. 
•  During design phase, measures by 
which potential impacts can be reduced 
have been investigated and will be 
implemented as practicable. 
•  Documentation of residual impacts. 
Review of conservation tenure and values within 
close proximity to footprint 
5.1.7 
Impact assessment 
7.4 
Management measures to reduce impact on 
conservation areas and proposed conservation 
areas. 
7.4 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 

Factor 
Investigations undertaken 
PER documentation to Include 
PER 
Section 
Reference 
Surface 
Hydrology 
•  Assessment of surface water flows, 
based on desktop review and field visit 
(Aquaterra, 2009a). 
•  Identification of drainage sensitive 
vegetation (Ecologia) and assessment 
of design options to minimise risk of 
vegetation impacts. 
• Drainage design criteria 
Impact assessment including potential impacts 
on natural drainage systems and sensitive 
vegetation communities, and potential impacts of 
drainage systems on infrastructure 
7.5 
Management measures to reduce impact on 
natural surface water flows, surface water 
quality, surface-water flow dependant vegetation 
and drainage, impacts on infrastructure 
7.5 
Groundwater 
•  Assessment of water requirement for 
construction and operational phases of 
the Proposal (Aquaterra, 2009b). 
•  Assessment of groundwater availability 
to meet demand (Aquaterra, 2009b). 
Review of water requirements for Proposal 
4.4.6 
Impact assessment,  including assessment of 
potential impact of abstraction on the 
groundwater resource, sustainability of 
abstraction and on groundwater-dependent 
biological values 
7.6 
Management measures to minimise water 
requirements and reduce impacts on 
groundwater 
7.6 
Noise, Light 
and Vibration 
•  Baseline noise assessment undertaken 
by Lloyd George Acoustics (2010). 
•  Noise modelling undertaken by Lloyd 
George Acoustics (2010), including 
comparison against relevant criteria 
(WA Planning Commission’s (WAPC’s) 
State Planning Policy 5.4 (SPP5.4): 
Road and Rail Transport Noise and 
Freight Consideration in Land Use 
Planning). 
Baseline noise and noise modelling results
Impact assessment including compliance with 
statutory requirements for noise relating to 
sensitive receptors 
7.7 
Consideration of impacts from light and vibration 
7.7 
Management measures to reduce impacts on 
sensitive receptors 
7.7 
Air Quality 
Potential sources of dust and 
management strategies identified. 
Impact assessment 
7.8 
Management measures to avoid dust generation 
and reduce impacts on sensitive receptors. 
7.8 
Soil Quality 
A desktop risk assessment for acid sulfate 
soils (ASS) has been undertaken for the 
Proposal Area (GHD, 2010). 
Impact assessment based on risk assessment 
review 
7.9 
Management measures, including site 
rehabilitation strategies and sampling and 
analysis strategies for ASS, if required. 
7.9 
Waste 
Identification of the types of waste likely to 
be generated by the Proposal. 
Impact assessment 
7.10 
Management measures, including waste 
avoidance, minimisation, and disposal. 
7.10 
Greenhouse 
Gases (GHG) 
Identification of GHG emitting facilities / 
activities and likely quantities / 
minimisation strategies. 
Impact assessment - quantify expected GHG 
emissions from construction and operation
 
7.11 
Management measures – including addressing 
the requirements of EPA Guidance Statement 
No. 12. 
7.11 
Aboriginal 
Heritage 
Surveys with all affected Native Title 
claimants have commenced and are 
ongoing. 
Identification of registered sites 
5.3.5 
Discussion of the heritage assessment / 
consultation process 
7.12 
Discussion of disturbance approach – i.e. 
preference to avoid, however, where this is not 
possible seek approvals to disturb under the 
Aboriginal Heritage Act 1972 (AH Act) 
7.12 
Management measures, including use of 
exclusion zones, clearing permitting system and 
Aboriginal heritage monitors. 
7.12 
Visual 
Amenity 
Visual amenity modelling undertaken by 
Calibre Engenium Joint Venture in 2009 & 
2010. 
Identification of sensitive viewsheds 
7.13 
Impact assessment 
7.13 
Management measures with reference to the 
Visual Landscape Planning in WA (WAPC, 
2008). 
7.13 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə