Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə8/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   41

Community Benefits 
 
over 1,000 jobs a year during construction; 
 
over 60 direct employees during operation; 
 
population increases that will lead to greater investment in community amenities such as 
schools, housing and health care; 
 
improved road safety and amenity through reductions in heavy truck road traffic; 
 
provision  of  local  training  opportunities  (through  public  and  private  technical  educational 
providers); 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
14 
 
opportunities  for  the  indigenous  community  through  the  development  of  agreements 
addressing  indigenous  involvement  (e.g.  employment,  training  and  contracting 
arrangements); and 
 
community business development opportunities. 
Economic benefits 
 
a total of at least 12,000 direct and indirect jobs a year in WA expected due to increased 
economic activity; 
 
expected increase in household expenditure as a result of population growth expected of 
$16 million per year; 
 
flow‐on  effects  to  other  industries  such  as  construction,  materials,  transport,  retail  and 
recreation; and 
 
$1.5 billion a year to Gross State Product. 
2.3 
ALTERNATIVES CONSIDERED 
Planning  for  further  development  of  the  Mid‐West  region  has  included  consideration  of  various 
options  for  enhancing  capacity  for  the  movement  and  export  of  bulk  commodities  through 
Geraldton.    Initially,  Proposals  centred  on  the  expansion  of  ship  loading  facilities  at  the  existing 
Geraldton  Port.    However,  the  growth  of  Geraldton  as  a  regional  residential  centre  around  the 
existing  port  and  associated  infrastructure  constrains  opportunities  for  future  expansion  of  bulk 
export facilities at the port.  This, combined with difficulties associated with deepening of the existing 
port  to  accommodate  larger  vessels,  has  led  to  recognition  of  the  need  to  develop  alternative 
facilities to service the growing needs of the Mid‐West region for additional port capacity. The overall 
development  proposed  by  Oakajee  Port  and  Rail  (OPR)  represents  a  combined  Government  and 
private sector commitment to satisfying this need.  
Until the OPR’s port, port terrestrial and rail developments are operational, most significant outputs 
from the growing Mid‐West iron ore mining sector will continue to be hauled by road to Geraldton 
for  export  through  the  existing  port.    The  attendant  inefficiencies,  risks  and  costs  have  excluded 
consideration of road transport as an alternative to the Proposal.  
2.3.1 
Proposal Area Alignment 
The  proposed  alignment  of  the  Proposal  Area/Special  Act  Corridor  (SAC)  has  been  the  subject  of 
considerable  investigation  and  consultation  with  key  stakeholders.    For  example,  the  current  SAC 
alignment has been modified to exclude remnant native vegetation, vegetation reserves and known 
Declared  Rare  Flora  locations  through  the  Wokatherra  Gap.    The  alignment  was  also  modified  in 
consideration  of  possible  future  developments  that  would  see  a  rail  link  between  Narngulu  and 
Oakajee.  Similarly, the route reflects consideration of the proposed location of the Murchison Radio‐
Astronomy  Observatory  proposal  with  the  alignment  selected  to  be  further  south  and  east  than 
would have been the case without consideration of this alignment.  As detailed design proceeds, the 
planning of the rail centreline will take into account finer details such as the location of residences, 
heritage sites and specific ground conditions.   
These constraints have been balanced against constraints of topography/grade, rock outcrops, fixed 
entry  points  into  the  Oakajee  Industrial  Estate,  alignments  for  crossing  major  roads  and 
watercourses.  The constraints of topography and grade are the most significant at a macro planning 
level. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
15 
The most significant factors were as follows: 
 
strategic options (e.g. minimising rail distance between the port and mining operations); 
 
topography (grade and requirement for cut and fill); 
 
Murchison Radio‐Astronomy Observatory (and associated buffer requirements); 
 
port and mine interfaces; 
 
geotechnical conditions; 
 
conservation estates; 
 
waterways and areas of inundation; 
 
conservation significant flora, fauna and vegetation communities; and 
 
Aboriginal heritage sites. 
Following  a  competitive  tender  process,  OPR  and  the  WA  Government  signed  an  exclusive  State 
Development Agreement in March 2009 for the construction of a rail link to the Oakajee Port based 
on this route that OPR nominated. 
2.4 
NO DEVELOPMENT OPTION 
The fundamental implication of not proceeding with the Proposal is that its strategic, community and 
economic benefits, as outlined in Section 2.2, will not be achieved. 
An  important  consequence  of  not  progressing  the  Proposal  is  that  the  development  of  transport 
infrastructure  to  support  Mid‐West  mining  operations  will  be  fragmented  and  likely  to  depend  on 
truck  movement  of  ore  to  either  Geraldton  or  Oakajee  for  export.    For  the  following  reasons,  this 
outcome is considered likely to produce greater long‐term environmental, road safety and economic 
impacts than the rail option: 
 
inefficiency and ongoing costs of road for bulk good movements in the region; 
 
high frequency of large road trains will impact on other road  users, with a greater risk of 
accident and injury, and increased road maintenance requirements; and 
 
greater fuel consumption, spillage and emission profile of road transport. 
A “no development option” would result in either; the stranding of Mid‐West mines (including Weld 
Range, Jack Hills and Karara) export products from the market place and/or more trucks on Mid‐West 
roads to either the Geraldton and/or Oakajee Ports. The latter transport option would likely result in 
the  delivery  of  lesser  tonnages  to  port  than  the  mines  are  now  contemplating  and  consequent 
inefficiencies in resource development.  This option is likely to severely impact the economic viability 
of the mining projects. 
 

Geraldton
Geraldton
DongaraDongara
MorawaMorawa
YalgooYalgoo
Mount MagnetMount Magnet
CueCue
MeekatharraMeekatharra
MullewaMullewa
MurchisonMurchison
OakajeeOakajee
Corridor
Corridor
Rail Rail
Proposed
Proposed
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F001.dgn
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
KalbarriKalbarri
DenhamDenham
WilunaWiluna
SandstoneSandstone
Jack HillsJack Hills
Weld RangeWeld Range
Robinson RangeRobinson Range
Wiluna WestWiluna West
Tallering PeakTallering Peak
KoolanookaKoolanooka
KararaKarara
Extension HillExtension Hill
Cashmere DownsCashmere Downs
Mount GibsonMount Gibson
Carnarvon
Carnarvon
KarrathaKarratha
NewmanNewman
Project Area
Project Area
Geraldton
Geraldton
PERTHPERTH
KalgoorlieKalgoorlie
AlbanyAlbany
WESTERN
AUSTRALIA
50km
Location of Proposed
Rail Alignment
Figure 2-1 Proposal Area

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
17 

PROPOSAL APPROVALS 
3.1 
STATE STATUTORY ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ASSESSMENT 
As outlined in Section 1.1, the Proposal was referred to the Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) 
in  October  2009.    On  the  9
th
  November  2009  the  EPA  advertised  that  the  Proposal  would  be  the 
subject  of  a  Public  Environmental  Review  (PER)  level  of  assessment,  including  a  four  week  public 
review  period.    No  appeals  were  made  against  the  EPA’s  decision  regarding  assessment  of  the 
Proposal. 
OPR submitted a draft Environmental Scoping Document (ESD) in February 2010 which detailed the 
potential environmental issues raised by the Proposal and planned environmental studies.  The ESD 
included  a  preliminary  assessment  of  the  potential  environmental  impacts,  and  the  preliminary 
management  strategies  proposed.    The  EPA  approved  the  ESD,  subject  to  several  minor 
amendments, in July 2010. 
This  PER  document  has  addressed  all  the  environmental  factors  and  studies  identified  in  the 
approved ESD, the PER has been released for a public review period of four weeks, during which time 
the public may make submissions to the EPA regarding the Proposal.   
At  the  completion  of  the  four  week  public  review  period,  the  EPA  will  provide  copies  of  the 
submissions to OPR, who is required to prepare a summary of the key issues and matters raised and 
provide responses that are to the satisfaction of the EPA. 
The  EPA  will  assess  the  Proposal  taking  into  account  the  PER  document,  submissions,  OPR’s 
responses  and  external  advice,  and  will  develop  and  submit  a  report  to  the  Minister  for  the 
Environment.  The report will address the relevant environmental factors and conditions to which the 
implementation of the Proposal should be subject. 
The  Minister  for  the  Environment  will  then  publish  and  circulate  the  report.    In  accordance  with 
Section 100(2) of the Environmental Protection Act 1986 (EP Act), any person may lodge an appeal 
with  the  Minister  for  the  Environment  against  the  content  and/or  recommendations  of  the  EPA 
assessment report within 14 days of publication. 
Figure  3‐1  provides  an  overview  of  the  formal  State  and  Commonwealth  Environmental  Impact 
Assessment (EIA) processes, pursuant to the EP Act and EPBC Act. 
3.2 
 
COMMONWEALTH STATUTORY ENVIRONMENT IMPACT ASSESSMENT 
Under the EPBC Act a project or proposal (referred to as an ‘action’) will require approval from the 
Australian  Government  Environment  Minister  if  the  action  has,  will  have,  or  is  likely  to  have,  a 
significant impact on a matter of NES. 
A significant impact is one that has a notable consequence on the matter of NES. Whether or not an 
action  is  likely  to  have  a  significant  impact  depends  upon  the  context,  intensity,  duration  and 
geographic extent of the action, as well as the sensitivity, value and quality of the environment which 
is to be impacted. 
DEWHA determined that the Proposal can be accessed through the State assessment process, which 
is accredited under the bilateral agreement between the State and Federal governments.  Under the 
bilateral agreement, this PER and an assessment report from the State process will provide the basis 
for review of potential impact on matters of National Environmental Significance (NES) and approval, 
if appropriate, by the Federal Environment Minister.  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
18 
DEWHA has advised that the relevant matters of NES are: 
 
Slender‐billed Thornbill (Acanthiza iredalei iredalei); 
 
Western Spiny‐tailed Skink (Egernia stokesii badia); 
 
Malleefowl (Leipoa ocellata); 
 
Hoffman’s Spider Orchid (Caladenia hoffmanii); 
 
Howtharra Mallee (Eucalyptus blaxelii); and 
 
Moresby Range Drummondita (Drummondita ericoides). 
An  ESD  that  described  the  proposed  scope  of  investigations  and  content  of  the  PER,  including 
reference  to  matters  of  NES,  was  reviewed  and  commented  on  by  DEWHA.    This  PER  has  been 
prepared in accordance with the ESD.   
The Proposal’s effects on these species have been addressed (refer to Section 8) and it is considered 
unlikely to have a significant impact.  Nevertheless, to enable DEWHA to assess the potential impacts 
of  the  Proposal  on  the  EPBC  Act  listed  species,  the  PER  has  been  developed  with  the  objective  of 
satisfying Australian Government EIA requirements through an accredited State assessment process 
undertaken  pursuant  to  the  bilateral  agreement  on  EIA  between  the  Australian  and  State 
Governments.  
The  Commonwealth  Statutory  EIA  process  will  only  be  completed  upon  completion  of  the  State 
Statutory EIA. 
Figure 3‐1 provides an overview of the EIA process pursuant to the EP Act and EPBC Act under the 
bilateral agreement. 
 
 
 

Refer the Project
to EPA
STATE APPROVALS PROCESS
COMMONWEALTH APPROVALS PROCESS
Refer the project
to DEWHA
Project designated as
a “Controlled Action”
EPA determines level of
assessment as Public
Environmental Review (PER)
Preparation of PER document
Appeal(s) to the Minister
Minister determines appeals
Minister issues statement
Two week public appeals
period on level of assessment
EPA approves release of
PER for public review
Proponent prepares
environmental scoping document
and submits to EPA
EPA agrees to environmental scoping
document as basis for PER
DEWHA review
aggreement with
scoping document
EPA undertakes assessment
and reports to the Minister
for the Environment
Minister consults with decision
making authorities on whether or
not and in what manner the
proposal may be implemented
EPA report and
recommendations published for
public review
Public review of PER (4 weeks)
Public Submissions
Proponent responds to
Public Submissions
Notify and publish decision
Minister issues Approval
Assessment report prepared
for Environmental Minister
Minister seeks views of
relevant Commonwealth Ministers
DEWHA review of PER
State assessment process
Accredited under a 
Bilateral Agreement
Source: EPA 2002 
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
3.01
g1660_Pub_PER_P_F053.ai
Environmental Impact Assessment Process
Figure 3-1  EP Act and EPBC Act assessment and approval process

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
20 

PROPOSAL DESCRIPTION 
4.1 
DEFINITION OF THE PROPOSAL 
Figure 4‐1 and Figure 4‐2 provide a simplified outline of the Proposal while Figure 4‐3 and Figure 4‐4 
present the Proposal in greater detail. 
In conjunction with Figure 4‐2, Table 4‐1 describes the Proposal’s key characteristics which will form 
an appendix to the Ministerial Statement issued for the Proposal.  
Table 4‐1  Proposal key characteristics  
Non-spatial elements 
Description 
Proposal Life 
In excess of 50 years 
Throughput 
45 Mtpa of iron ore 
Train Operations 
Diesel electric locomotives, up to 200 wagons (approximately 2 km in length) with a 
carrying capacity of approximately 20,000 tonnes.  Approximately 18 train movements 
per day (9 each way). 
Operating hours 
24 hours/day, 365 days/year 
Accommodation 
Construction: 6 camps capable of holding up to 3000 personnel in total 
Operation: Up to 2 camps holding up to 80 personnel in total 
Construction timeframe 
Approximately 36 months 
Groundwater requirements  
Construction: approximately 3.5 GL (total over 36 months),  
Operation: approximately 140 ML per year 
Spatial elements 
Description 
Approximate 
footprint 
Rail Corridor 
Includes approximately 570 km of rail line including a 10 – 15 km 
spur, 20 km spur line near Mullewa , access roads, rail crossings, rail 
loops, rail sidings optic fibre cable, water pipeline, approximately 
nine bridges. Final operating disturbance width of 50 – 80 m 
4500 ha 
Construction activities 
Including borrow pits, ballast quarries, turkey’s nests, associated 
access roads 
1450 ha 
Supporting facilities 
Including accommodation camps, lay down areas, communication 
towers, water supply (up to 50 km from the Special Act Corridor), 
workshops, associated access roads 
1050 ha 
Total area of native vegetation 
clearing 
Maximum of 100 ha of native vegetation clearing within the freehold 
area 
100 ha 
Approximately 5900 ha of native vegetation clearing within the 
pastoral area 
5900 ha 
Total area of disturbance 
Of which approximately 6000 ha is native vegetation 
7000 ha 
4.2 
LOCATION 
Oakajee Port and Rail proposes to construct a multi‐user rail facility linking the Oakajee Port and the 
expanding  iron  ore  mining  operations  within  the  Mid‐West,  Murchison  and  Gascoyne  regions  of 
Western Australia (WA).  Oakajee is approximately 24 kilometres (km) north of Geraldton, while the 
iron ore deposits which will be exported through the port are located several hundred kilometres to 
the north‐east and south‐east of Geraldton. 
The rail infrastructure subject of this Public Environmental Review (PER) (Figure 4‐2) commences at 
the western boundary of Reserve 16200 (traversed by the North West Coastal Highway (NWCH)), and 
extends approximately 530 km in a north easterly direction from Oakajee to the mining operations at 
Jack Hills.  The Proposal includes a spur line to the Weld Range (approximately 10‐15 km in length), 
and the Mullewa spur (approximately 20 km in length). 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
21 
Areas of regulatory consideration within the Proposal Area include: 
• 
the buffer for the Murchison Radio‐astronomy Observatory on the Boolardy pastoral lease; 
• 
the Dampier to Bunbury Gas Pipeline corridor; and 
• 
land  subject  to  several  tenements,  including  those  granted  under  the  Iron  and  Steel  (Mid 
West) Agreement Act 1997 near Tallering Peak. 
 
 
Figure 4‐1  Indicative fill and cut cross sections of the Rail Corridor 
 

Geraldton
Geraldton
DongaraDongara
MorawaMorawa
YalgooYalgoo
Mount MagnetMount Magnet
CueCue
MeekatharraMeekatharra
MullewaMullewa
MurchisonMurchison
OakajeeOakajee
Corridor
Corridor
Rail Rail
Proposed
Proposed
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F001.dgn
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
KalbarriKalbarri
DenhamDenham
WilunaWiluna
SandstoneSandstone
Jack HillsJack Hills
Weld RangeWeld Range
Robinson RangeRobinson Range
Wiluna WestWiluna West
Tallering PeakTallering Peak
KoolanookaKoolanooka
KararaKarara
Extension HillExtension Hill
Cashmere DownsCashmere Downs
Mount GibsonMount Gibson
Carnarvon
Carnarvon
KarrathaKarratha
NewmanNewman
Project Area
Project Area
Geraldton
Geraldton
PERTHPERTH
KalgoorlieKalgoorlie
AlbanyAlbany
WESTERN
AUSTRALIA
50km
Location of Proposed
Rail Alignment
Figure 4-2 Overview of Proposal Area

Meekatharra
Meekatharra
KalbarriKalbarri
Mount MagnetMount Magnet
MullewaMullewa
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
02
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
6900000mN
200000mE
40km
7000000mN
7100000mN
6900000mN
7000000mN
7100000mN
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
200000mE
300000mE
400000mE
500000mE
600000mE
700000mE
g1660_Pub_PER_R_F021_01
Notes:
Project Overview
ProposedProposed
ConservationConservation
ProposedProposed
ConservationConservation
NatureNature
ReserveReserve
NationalNational
ParkPark
GeraldtonGeraldton
OakajeeOakajee
Jack HillsJack Hills
Weld RangeWeld Range
Greenough
Greenough
River
River
Murchison
Murchison
Murchison
Murchison
River
River
RiverRiver
Sanford
Sanford
RiverRiver
Figure 4-3  General arrangement plan of the Proposal (1 of 2)

Oakajee
Mullewa
Mullewa
Northampton
Northampton
LOCALITY
OakajeeOakajee
Figure No:
CAD Resources File No:
Drawn:
CAD Resources
g1660_Pub_PER_P_F021_02
01
0
Scale
MGA94 (Zone 50)
6950000mN
6850000mN
6950000mN
6850000mN
250000mE
250000mE
350000mE
350000mE
450000mE
450000mE
Road Road
Mt Magnet Mt Magnet
Geraldton
Geraldton
Yalgoo
Yalgoo
20km
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
WoolgorongWoolgorong
Pastoral leasePastoral lease
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
WoolgorongWoolgorong
Pastoral leasePastoral lease
Proposed Conservation ParkProposed Conservation Park
Twin Peaks Pastoral LeaseTwin Peaks Pastoral Lease
Proposed Conservation ParkProposed Conservation Park
Narloo Pastoral LeaseNarloo Pastoral Lease
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
Yuin Pastoral LeaseYuin Pastoral Lease
East YunaEast Yuna
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
WandanaWandana
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
Bindoo HillBindoo Hill
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
UrawaUrawa
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
Moresby RangeMoresby Range
WokatherraWokatherra
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
ProposedProposed
Conservation ParkConservation Park
Moresby RangeMoresby Range
WokatherraWokatherra
Nature ReserveNature Reserve
OakajeeOakajee
Refer toRefer to
EnlargementEnlargement
Enlargement
Notes:
DEC Estates data supplied by Department of Environment and Conservation
Project Overview
Freehold / Pastoral Interface
Figure 4-4   General arrangement plan of the Proposal area (2 of 2)

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
25 
4.3 
LAND TENURE 
The  Proposal  Area  traverses  the  following  seven  local  Government  areas,  the  City  of 
Geraldton/Greenough,  and  the  Shires  of  Chapman  Valley,  Mullewa,  Murchison,  Yalgoo,  Cue  and 
Meekatharra (Figure 4‐5). 
 
Figure 4‐5  Local Government Areas 
Approximately  25%  of  the  Proposal  Area  comprises  rural  freehold  land,  which  has  been  largely 
cleared  for  agriculture,  and  the  remainder  is  predominantly  pastoral  land,  which  is  dominated  by 
grazing and mining activities.  
The  primary  stakeholders  potentially  impacted  by  the  Proposal  are  249  land  parcels  held  by  79 
freehold parties and 17 pastoral leases. 
Land use and zoning varies within the Proposal Area.  In the north eastern portion, the Rail Corridor 
traverses a mixture of exploration and mining tenements and pastoral land.  As the corridor extends 
south,  land  use  progresses  from  predominately  cattle  or  sheep  pastoral  stations,  to  broad  scale 
cropping, to more intense horticultural and orchard areas and lifestyle lots (hobby farms) adjacent to 
the coast.  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
26 
4.4 
PROPOSAL COMPONENTS 
The principal components of the Proposal are summarised in Table 4‐1, and are further discussed in 
Sections 4.4.1 to 4.4.7.
  
4.4.1 
Trains 
The Proposal entails the use of trains of up to 2.2 km in length, comprising up to approximately 200 
wagons with two standard gauge locomotives.  The locomotives will be diesel electric units.   
It is anticipated that approximately 20,000 tonnes will be carried per fully‐laden train. 
The maximum train speed for (locomotives hauling wagons) is anticipated to be 80 km/hr, with 100 
km/hr possible for locomotives without any wagons.  Grade restrictions for a loaded train are 0.36% 
(1 in 275). 
Train  movement  frequency  will  depend  on  the  tonnage  output  from  each  mine,  and  will  vary 
depending on location.  In defining the Proposal, train movements have been estimated at up to 18 
train  movements  (nine  return  trips)  per  day.    Lower  train  movements  will  occur  in  the  eastern 
sections of the Proposal. 
A  potential  rail  route  to  the  southern  mines  including  Koolanooka,  Karara  and  Extension  Hill  could 
connect to the proposed alignment but is not included in the scope of the Proposal and is therefore 
not addressed in the PER. 
The railway as proposed is capable of servicing between 80 and 100 million tonnes per annum.  To 
assist  in  accommodating  this  tonnage,  the  track  has  been  designed  to  allow  for  larger  trains  and 
potentially  increased  wagon  axle  loading.    These  tonnage  rates  are  in  excess  of  what  is  currently 
proposed by OPR and therefore does not form part of this PER. 
4.4.2 
Rail Formation and Track 
The  Proposal  includes  the  development  of  up  to  approximately  570  km  of  rail  formation,  track 
(including rail embankments and cuttings) and associated infrastructure. 
The rail formation comprises the following: 
 
approximately 530 km mainline from OIE to Jack Hills Mine including mine loop; 
 
at  approximately  410  km  from  the  port;  a  10  to  15  km  link  to  the  Weld  Range  iron  ore 
deposit including mine loop (known as the Weld Range Spur); and 
 
at approximately 90 km from the port; a 20 km link to the existing WestNet rail to Mullewa 
(known as the Mullewa Spur). 
The overall Proposal Area alignment  is shown on  Figure 4‐2, while  cross sections of the typical rail 
formation are shown on Figure 4‐1.   
The key aspects of the rail formation and track are summarised below: 
 
the earthworks for the railway will require balancing cut to fill along the rail route where 
feasible,  to  minimise  the  creation  of  spoil  or  the  need  to  import  fill.    Rail  embankment 
construction material will be sourced from borrow pits and rail cuttings as summarised in 
Section  4.4.3.    The  sub‐ballast  capping  will  require  superior  earthwork  materials  sourced 
from selected borrow pits; 
 
the majority of the rail line will require earthworks less than 2 metres (m) deep; 
 
the average height of the railway embankment for the fill section is approximately 1.8 m; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
27 
 
in the cut section of the railway the average depth to the top of the rail is approximately 2.3 
m; 
 
typical  widths  will  also  vary,  particularly  where  additional  area  is  required  for  sidings, 
stockpile of material and laydown areas; 
 
the haul road / permanent rail maintenance access road will generally run adjacent to and 
parallel  to  the  rail  formation.    A  fibre  optic  cable  corridor  and  water  pipeline  will  run 
parallel to the railway line at the edge of the Rail Corridor; 
 
signalling  structures  and  road  crossings  will  be  provided  where  necessary.  Signals  will  be 
powered by solar energy; 
 
concrete railway sleepers are expected to be manufactured at  existing WA  sleeper  plants 
and/or at a new sleeper factory to be established on site; and 
 
rail  will  be  shipped  into  Geraldton  in  individual  lengths  and  then  trucked  to  the  two  rail 
welding depots.  Rail will then be welded together for stringing into the track.  The sleepers 
will be hauled by work trains along sections of the completed rail to the track construction 
front. 
4.4.3 
Rail Construction Materials 
The earthworks for the railway will require balancing cut to fill along the rail route where practical, to 
minimise  the  creation  of  spoil  or  the  need  to  import  fill.    Where  there  is  a  shortfall  of  fill  material 
from cuttings, borrow pits will be used to supply material.  Total fill requirements are approximately 
11  million  cubic  metres  (m
3
),  with  cut  material  providing  up  to  4  million  m
3
,  although  not  all  cut 
material will be suitable.  Borrow areas will therefore be required to supply approximately 7 million 
m
3

4.4.3.1 
Borrow Areas 
Approximately  11  million  m
3
  of  construction  material  is  required  for  the  rail  embankments.    It  is 
expected  that  over  half  of  this  material  will  be  sourced  from  borrow  areas  situated  along  the  Rail 
Corridor (with the exception of areas constrained by environmental or heritage values).  The number 
and  size  of  pits  developed  within  each  borrow  area  will  vary  depending  on  the  volume  of  borrow 
material required for each section of the railway formation. 
The exact locations of the borrow pits within the larger Proposal Area are subject to ground‐truthing 
and  further  geotechnical  investigations.    Again,  until  the  further  studies  have  been  completed,  the 
specific biophysical impacts of the pits cannot be quantified.  Nevertheless, OPR have committed to 
several environmental constraints to be applied when selecting borrow pit areas, and management 
measures  to  ensure  that  the  borrow  areas  are  adequately  managed  and  rehabilitated.    These 
constraints are discussed in detail in Section 7. 
Some  borrow  pits  will  need  to  be  retained  along  the  rail  formation  to  meet  ongoing  maintenance 
requirements.    The  retained  sites  will  be  at  intervals  of  approximately  20  km  or  will  be  high 
quality/high  yield  borrow  pits  in  the  vicinity  of  rail  formation  sections  that  contain  substantial 
embankments. 
4.4.3.2 
Ballast Quarries 
Rail ballast will sourced from a minimum of two (most likely three) quarries.  Rock will be quarried, 
crushed and screened at each of the sites to produce ballast of the required specification, and will be 
transported  by  road  to  the  rail  formation.  OPR  is  also  investigating  alternative  sources  of  material 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
28 
suitable for the production of ballast to the specification required, including waste rock from mining 
operations near Cue. 
The exact location of the quarry areas is the subject of further geotechnical investigations, however it 
is  possible  that  some  or  all  of  the  three  quarries  will  fall  outside  of  the  SAC.    These  areas  and 
potential  groundwater  supply  areas  represent  the  only  locations  where  the  Proposal  Area  extends 
outside of the boundaries of the SAC.   
Potential locations of those quarries located outside the SAC are shown in Appendix 10, however it 
should be noted that not all of these locations will be used (a maximum of three).  The areas shown 
in Appendix 10 are a boundary within which a quarry(ies) and all access tracks may be located, i.e. 
only  a  small  portion  of  the  areas  shown  will  be  cleared  (approximate  total  of  150  hectares  (ha), 
approximately 50 ha per quarry). 
Potential quarry locations  will  be subject to flora and fauna surveys prior to  disturbance to ensure 
environmental impacts do not exceed that which is approved.  
The ballast quarries will either be new operations (developed by OPR), or private licensed operations. 
Based on Proposal requirements, it is anticipated that output from the quarries will be approximately 
1.5  million  tonnes  of  ballast
 
during  the  Proposal  construction  phase,  resulting  in  a  disturbance 
footprint (including access to the respective sites) of about 50 ha per quarry (i.e. a total disturbance 
footprint of approximately 150 ha
 
will result from establishment of three quarries if all three quarries 
are developed). 
Additional  rock  requirements  (separate  to  ballast)  will  be  sourced  from  railway  cutting  materials 
(refer to Section 4.4.2) and borrow areas (refer to Section 4.4.3).   
Quarrying  contracts  will  include  provision  of  surplus  ballast  for  rail  maintenance  but  depending  on 
the quantities of viable hard rock remaining on completion of construction, one or both of the ballast 
quarries will need to be retained to meet ongoing maintenance ballast requirements. 
4.4.4 
Drainage Structures 
The Study Area contains both episodic creeks and rivers and sheetflow zones.  There is the potential 
for flooding across much of the Study Area which is usually the result of tropical cyclone activity. 
DoW uses guiding principles to ensure that proposed development in flood prone areas is acceptable 
with regards to major flooding.  The proposed development is required to have adequate protection 
from 100 year Average Recurrence Interval (ARI) flooding, and it also must not detrimentally impact 
on  the  existing  100  year  ARI  flooding  regime  of  the  general  area.    These  principles  have  been 
incorporated into the design of the rail, bridges, culverts and associated infrastructure. 
4.4.4.1 
Bridges 
As  the  Rail  Corridor  traverses  various  watercourses  and  waterways,  the  Proposal  will  necessitate 
construction of a number of bridges.  Preliminary assessments indicate that up to nine bridges will be 
required  (Figure  4‐7).    Bridge  locations  have  been  chosen  to  minimise  the  hydraulic  impact  of  the 
bridge  and  the  associated  earthworks.  Typical  bridge  design  is  illustrated  on  Figure  4‐6.    Table  4‐2 
summarises current anticipated bridge structures and locations. Additional bridges may be required 
pending final engineering design. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
29 
Table 4‐2  Potential bridge requirements 
Crossing Name 
Minimum Structure 
Foundation Type 
Chapman River 
70 m Bridge 
Spread footings / Piled 
Chapman River East 1 
60 m Bridge 
Piled 
Chapman River East 2 
60 m Bridge 
Spread footings / Piled 
Greenough River 1 
105 m Bridge 
Spread footings / Piled 
Greenough River 2 
105 m Bridge 
Piled 
Bangemall Creek 
60 m Bridge 
Spread footings 
Sanford River South 
100 m Bridge  
Piled 
Sanford River North 
100 m Bridge 
Piled 
Ilkabiddy Creek 
60 m Bridge 
Piled 
The  bridges  will  be  designed  for  a  100  year  ARI  flood  and  a  2000  year  ARI  design  flood  without 
structural damage.   
 
Figure 4‐6  Typical bridge design 
Two  vehicular  bridges  will  be  constructed  to  separate  road  and  rail  traffic.    These  bridges  will  be 
located at the current NWCH and near the intersection of Chapman Valley and Morrell Road. These 
bridges are discussed further in Section 4.4.5.  
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
30 
Figure 4‐7  Potential bridge locations 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
31 
4.4.4.2 
Culverts 
The  Proposal  will  require  culverts  at  all  significant  drainage  crossings  that  do  not  require  a  bridge 
structure (over 1000 in total).  All culverts will be designed for 100 year ARI design flow capacity, with 
the rail alignment not to be overtopped below a 100 year ARI flow event. 
A  combination  of  corrugated  steel  pipes  and  reinforced  box  culverts  will  be  used.  Engineering 
culverts will be a minimum of 900 millimetre (mm) diameter. Where the potential for erosion is high, 
appropriate  infrastructure  for  erosion  control,  such  as  gabions,  rip  rap  rock  protection  or  reno 
mattresses  will  be  installed.    A  typical  cross  section  of  the  culverts  to  be  installed  along  the  rail  is 
illustrated in Figure 4‐8. 
In addition to culverts at defined water courses, a significant number of ‘environmental’ culverts are 
proposed to allow sheetflow of water that may otherwise be interrupted by the railway formation. 
These will be typically 600 mm in diameter and installed at regular intervals along the length of the 
railway to maintain these drainage flows and minimise drainage shadow effects. 
In  addition  to  their  drainage  function,  these  ‘environmental’  culverts  may  also  function  as  small 
fauna underpass points (refer to Section 7.3). 
 
Figure 4‐8  Cross section of a culvert 
4.4.4.3 
Road drainage 
It  is  proposed  drainage  across  roads  will  be  maintained  by  allowing  the  road  to  follow  the  natural 
contours of the landscape, and it will resemble a typical floodway in most instances. 
4.4.5 
Vehicular Bridges 
The current alignment of the NWCH traverses Reserve 16200.  OPR proposes to realign the highway 
within the designated Road Reserve so that it skirts the eastern boundary of Reserve 16200.  Road 
traffic  on  the  NWCH  will  be  grade  separated  from  the  rail  traffic,  with  a  two  lane  (one  in  each 
direction) vehicular bridge to be constructed over the rail formation. 
A  similar  vehicular  bridge  will  be  constructed  where  the  Proposal  intersects  with  Chapman  Valley 
Road. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
32 
4.4.6 
Supporting Infrastructure 
4.4.6.1 
Engineering Facilities 
Construction 
The following engineering facilities will be required for construction: 
 
Rail welding depots – one of these depots will be located close to the construction depot, 
and  if  another  is  required  it  is  expected  to  be  located  near  the  midpoint  of  the  rail 
alignment; 
 
a  new  sleeper  factory  may  be  established  at  the  construction  depot,  or  sleepers  will  be 
transported from existing factories; 
 
sleeper and ballast stockpile areas will be created at suitable locations; 
 
a track construction depot; and 
 
construction offices. 
These  facilities  will  be  located  within  the  Proposal  Area  and  will  be  sited  in  accordance  with 
environmental and heritage criteria set in Section 7.  The sleeper construction plant will be required 
to  comply  with  the  Environmental  Protection  (Concrete  Batching  and  Cement  Product 
Manufacturing)  Regulations  1998.    These  regulations  will  ensure  that  potential  environmental 
impacts associated with this facility are appropriately managed. 
Operation 
The following engineering facilities will be required for operations: 
 
a track maintenance depot – including a workshop, ablutions facilities, crib room, hardstand 
areas and small dangerous goods facilities; 
 
rolling  stock  maintenance  workshop  and  rail  yard  –  sized  to  accommodate  the  required 
fleet; and 
 
a shed at the rail loop for minor servicing of trains. 
These facilities are expected to be located on land previously cleared for construction. 
4.4.6.2 
Construction and Maintenance Camps 
It is anticipated that the Proposal will involve the  construction of up  to six temporary construction 
camps  along  the  rail  alignment.    These  will  mostly  be  within  the  SAC,  within  close  proximity  to 
existing shire roads and will be sized to accommodate a total of 3000 personnel across all camps at 
peak occupancy. 
The specific camp locations will be confirmed through further field investigations during the contract 
stage.  Environmental and heritage constraints will apply to the selection of the camp locations.   
Each  construction  camp  will be subject to Local  Government approvals and comprise the following 
infrastructure: 
 
sewage treatment plant (subject to Part V approvals under the EP Act if throughput exceeds 
20 m
3
/day); 
 
single person accommodation units with private ensuite facilities; 
 
communication facilities; 
 
recreational facilities; 
 
mess rooms; 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
33 
 
containerised diesel generator; 
 
fuel storage area (subject to Dangerous Goods licence); 
 
waste storage area; 
 
water supply system and water tanks; 
 
laundry facilities; 
 
first aid room; and 
 
office facilities. 
All camp landscaping will use local flora and vegetation species.  
Upon  completion  of  rail  construction,  one  or  two  of  the  camps  will  be  partially  retained  for 
maintenance purposes during operation as required. 
4.4.6.3 
Access Roads 
A  permanent  rail  maintenance  access  track  will  be  constructed  adjacent  to  the  rail.    This 
maintenance  track  will  initially  be  developed  as  a  haul  road  corridor  approximately  20  m  wide, 
suitable  for  bulk  haulage  of  earthworks  materials  and  for  general  construction  traffic.    Upon 
completion of the rail construction work, the haul road will be upgraded to form a 10 m wide road 
and associated shoulders and embankments.  The final width of this road corridor will be within the 
initial 20 m disturbance width.  To reduce the permanent impact footprint, separation between the 
road and rail formation will be minimised consistent with safety and operational requirements (e.g. 
to ensure suitable visibility and accommodate rail and river crossings). 
Other temporary roads and tracks will be established to provide access to camp sites, borrow pits, 
construction  water  facilities,  laydown  areas  and  other  temporary  infrastructure  facilities.    All  such 
roads  and  tracks  not  required  for  rail  operation  will  be  decommissioned  and  rehabilitated  on 
completion of construction.  
4.4.6.4 
Laydown Areas 
Laydown areas will be established along the Rail Corridor at strategic locations (bridge sites, passing 
loops etc) for the storage of construction materials such as ballast, sleepers and culvert pipes.  Areas 
not required to be retained for operational purposes will be rehabilitated following the completion of 
construction. 
Additional laydown areas may be required to accommodate  the construction and operation of site 
offices and workshops. 
4.4.6.5 
Power and Fuel 
Fuel will be stored in accordance with Dangerous Goods Licences and Australian Standard AS1940 ‐ 
The storage and handling of flammable and combustible liquids.  
Rail Construction 
Power  for  rail  construction  will  be  provided  by  a  series  of  diesel  fired  generators  located  where 
required.    Total  estimated  diesel  fuel  consumption  for  the  construction  phase  of  the  Proposal  is 
approximately 48 million litres (ML), based on engineering modelling of proposed activities. This will 
include requirements for the construction camps, vehicles, earthmoving equipment and generators 
over the estimated 36 month construction period. 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
34 
Rail Operation 
OPR anticipates purchasing Tier 2 emission level locomotives, as these meet more stringent emission 
standards  than  the  Tier  1  locomotives  currently  required  under  Australian  regulations.    These 
locomotives emit lower NOx and SOx emissions and are more fuel efficient.  Modelling undertaken to 
date indicates that the fuel efficiency will be approximately one litre per tonne of ore from Jack Hills, 
which  is  comparable  to  fuel  efficiency  levels  on  Pilbara  train  operations,  which  also  operate  under 
more  stringent  emissions  standards.    Further  modelling  will  be  undertaken  prior  to  operation  to 
increase the accuracy of preliminary estimations.   
Accommodation Camps 
The  construction  and  permanent  (maintenance)  camps  will  not  be  located  in  close  proximity  to 
existing power supplies.  Power requirements will be met by containerised diesel generators at each 
camp site. 
Based  on  an  average  occupancy  of  200  ‐  800  personnel  per  camp  for  six  camps  over  a  period  of 
around 36 months, the total fuel consumption at the construction camp sites will be around 4 ML of 
diesel fuel, using one containerised diesel generator at each site.   
4.4.6.6 
Water Supply 
Establishment of a secure, short‐term water supply is essential for the construction of the Proposal.  
Water  supplies  will  be  required  to  service  the  entire  length  of  the  Proposal  for  compaction  of  fill 
material and dust suppression along the access road.  In addition, high quality water supplies will be 
required for concrete batching and for each of the construction camps that will be established.  The 
following water supply characteristics will apply to the Proposal: 
 
Water  quality  along  the  Study  Area  is  generally  brackish.  The  quality  of  groundwater  is 
highly  variable  throughout  the  area  and  increased  salinity  is  observed  towards  drainage 
lines.    All  water  quality  parameters  for  groundwater  sampled  were  within  the  ANZECC 
(2000)  Livestock  Watering  Guidelines,  except  for  one  monitoring  bore  (102_MB1).  It  is 
considered that this water quality will be appropriate for construction activities.   Water for 
construction camps will be treated to meet the required quality levels for potable water. 
 
The Proposal includes a water supply pipeline that will run the length of the Rail Corridor.  
This pipeline will allow a continual water supply to all areas of construction, including those 
areas where groundwater supplies are limited.  This water will be pumped to turkeys nests, 
which will be located at regular intervals along the Rail Corridor 
 
It  is  anticipated  that  up  to  200  bores  will  be  drilled,  developed  and  operated  to  meet 
Proposal  construction  water  requirements.    It  is  expected  that  some  bores  and  turkeys 
nests will be retained for use during maintenance operations 
 
Due  to  the  potential  for  high  costs  and  risks  associated  with  developing  isolated  water 
supply points along the Proposal Area, future rail construction water supply investigations 
will also investigate areas with greater supply potential located up to 50 km away from the 
Proposal  Area,  such  as  concentrating  on  potential  groundwater  resources  located 
approximately  300  km  inland  from  the  coast.    Access  to  these  groundwater  sources  will 
form part of the Proposal. 
 
OPR may also investigate potential water supply sources in the areas around 150 km inland 
from the  coast.  OPR are initiating discussions with existing users in this area, such as Mt 
Gibson  Iron,  regarding  potential  ‘excess’  water  available  from  their  operations  (such  as 
dewatering).    There  also  remains  the  potential  to  equip  existing  bores,  such  as  the 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
35 
Kingstream  bores  (which  are  located  outside  the  Proposal  Area),  however  further 
investigations into sustainable yield of these bores would be required.  
 
There is the potential to use water sourced from the desalination plant at the Oakajee Port 
for the western sections of the Proposal.  The desalination plant does not form part of this 
PER. 
 
Earthworks  will  account  for  the  bulk  of  water  demand,  with  most  of  the  water  used  for 
conditioning of fill materials, maintenance of haul roads and dust suppression 
 
Proposal  construction  water  requirements  are  anticipated  to  equate  to  a  total  water 
demand of 3.5 Gigalitres (GL) over the estimated 36 month construction period.  
 
Operational  water  requirements  will  be  relatively  low  and  primarily  relate  to  track 
maintenance  and  embankment  repair  works.    An  annual  water  demand  of  140  ML  is 
estimated and will be sourced from groundwater. 
 
Construction  Camps  –  potable  water  will  be  required  for  operation  of  the  construction 
camps and for concrete batching for rail sleepers and bridge construction.  It is estimated 
that  total  potable  water  consumption  over  the  construction  period  will  amount  to 
approximately  350  ML  per  year  and  will  be  sourced  from  the  closest  suitable  production 
bores. 
 
Permanent Maintenance Camp – annual operational potable water demand is expected to 
decrease  to  around  8  ML  per  year  for  maintenance  camp  purposes  and  will  be  primarily 
sourced  from  the  closest  suitable  Proposal  production  bores.    Rainfall  tanks  may  also  be 
used as a supplement water source when available. 
4.4.6.7 
Communication/Signals 
Communication  and  signalling  requirements  include  a  fibre  optic  cable  (for  signalling,  internet  and 
telephony) and signalling (operation of trains, asset protection and rail crossings). 
Installation of fibre optic cable (approximately 10 m from the edge of the operational corridor) will 
be required for the full length of the rail.  Disturbance areas caused by these activities will generally 
be  allowed  to  regenerate  or  will  be  rehabilitated,  following  installation  and  commissioning.  
Permanent access will however be retained to all cable pits. 
4.4.7 
Workforce and Operations 
Operations will occur 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  Construction is expected to primarily occur 
during daylight hours; however in some cases construction may be required on a 24‐hour basis. 
OPR is developing and implementing a local content policy to encourage local participation in supply 
and  contracting  activities,  as  well  as  direct  workforce.    Both  construction  and  operation  require 
specialist  and  skilled  workers,  and  OPR  will  apply  the  local  content  policy  where  those  skills  are 
locally available. Additional staff are likely to fly in and out from Perth or Geraldton. 
A  key  to  attracting  and  retaining  personnel  is  to  provide  suitable  accommodation.  OPR  plans  to 
provide  comprehensive  facilities  (including  recreation  facilities)  to  help  maintain  construction  and 
operation workforce morale. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
36 
4.5 
CONSTRUCTION SEQUENCE 
Table  4‐3  summarises  the  anticipated  sequence  of  construction  for  the  rail  and  associated 
infrastructure.    Final  timing  will  depend  on  a  range  of  factors,  including  financing  and  further 
investigation work.   
Table 4‐3  Indicative sequence of construction 
Construction Activity 
Description 
Detailed Surveying and 
Investigation 
Quarter (Q) 2 2011 – Q3 2012 
Engineering, environmental, hydrological and heritage investigations are used to determine 
routing constraints and specific construction techniques. Once the route is finalised, final 
engineering details will be confirmed. 
Continuous geotechnical surveys and investigations will be conducted along the rail line (not 
1   ...   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə