Opr rail Development Public Environmental Review



Yüklə 11.14 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə9/41
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü11.14 Kb.
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   41
part of this Proposal). Clearing and grubbing will occur progressively, approximately one month 
prior to these investigations. 
Clear and Grubbing 
Q3 2011 – Q4 2012 
Areas of environmental or cultural significantce will be demarcated.  Graders, bulldozers and 
scrapers will be used to clear the Rail Corridor prior to construction.  Vegetation and topsoil 
cleared and stockpiled for rehabilitation purposes. This will occur continuously along the rail line. 
Temporary Facilities 
Q2 2011 to Q3 2012 
Temporary facilities such as construction camps, workshops, sleeper factory and laydown areas 
will be established to support construction of the rail.  
Bulk Earthworks and 
Rail Formation 
Construction (including 
culverts and bridges) 
Q4 2011 – Q2 2013 
Following clearing and grubbing, earthmoving equipment (e.g. graders, scrapers, loaders, 
rollers and water carts etc) will be mobilised for construction of the rail embankment and 
formation, culverts and bridges. Construction material will be sourced from quarries and borrow 
areas and placed in a manner to withstand the eventual weight of rail operations. 
Blasting 
Q2 2011 – Q3 2012  
Blasting will be required in traversing areas of rock and in the construction of cuttings. This will 
occur progressively along the rail formation. 
Borrow Pits and 
Quarries 
Q3 2011 – Q2 2013 
A number of borrow pits and at least three quarries are required to provide material for Proposal 
construction. 
Bridge construction 
Q4 2011 – Q1 2013 
Nine bridges will be constructed along the rail. Independent bridge construction crews will be 
engaged for this work. 
Sleeper and Track 
Laying 
Q2 2012 – Q3 2013 
Sleeper and track laying will occur progressively from the 34 km point of the Proposal. Pre-
welded track in lengths of approximately 440 m will be transported by train via the progressively 
extended track. Rehabilitation will occur progressively in conjunction with track laying. 
Signs, communication 
and signals (including 
cable laying) 
Q1 2012 – Q4 2013 
Signals and communications will be incorporated into the track during and after construction and 
will include signal lights at level crossings and switch pads. 
Commissioning 
Q2 2013 to Q1 2014 
Commissioning will comprise the trial running of light high-rail vehicles, followed by a series of 
incrementally loaded trains until fully loaded trains are run and the rail track is opened for full 
operation. 
Demobilisation and 
Final Rehabilitation 
Q1 2014 
Rehabilitation of all excess disturbed areas will have been commenced within 12 months of 
construction completion. 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
37 

EXISTING ENVIRONMENT 
5.1 
REGIONAL SETTING 
As  the  Proposal  Area  extends  some  570  km  north  east  from  Oakajee  to  Jack  Hills,  environmental 
conditions within the Rail Corridor vary considerably.  The main factors contributing to this change 
are  distance  from  the  coast,  drainage  patterns,  geology  and  soils.    In  the  following  sections, 
descriptions generally relate to ‘coastal’ or ‘inland’ to cover the range of conditions. 
5.1.1 
Climate 
Bureau of Meteorology (BoM) data indicates that the Mid‐West region experiences a Mediterranean 
type  climate,  with  hot  dry  summers  and  mild  wet  winters  near  the  coast,  becoming  progressively 
drier  and  warmer  inland  (BoM,  2009).    Climatic  data  from  Geraldton  and  Meekatharra 
meteorological stations represents the climatic extremes for the Proposal Area (Figure 5‐1 and Figure 
5‐2) 
5.1.1.1 
Rainfall 
Data from the BoM indicates that Geraldton’s rainfall averages 460 mm per annum, peaking during 
the winter months (Figure 5‐1).  Being further inland, Meekatharra’s rainfall is more variable over the 
year but generally averages 237 mm (Figure 5‐2).  
5.1.1.2 
Temperature 
Maximum temperatures in summer average between 30°C near the coast and 38°C inland with the 
hottest  months  being  January  and  February,  while  in  winter  maximums  average  19°C  across  the 
Proposal Area during June and July (BoM, 2009). 
 
Figure 5‐1  Mean annual rainfall and temperature for Geraldton (BoM 2009) 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Month
T
em
p
er
atu
re (C
)
0
20
40
60
80
100
120
140
R
ain
fa
ll (
mm)
Rainfall
Temperature

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
38 
 
Figure 5‐2  Mean annual rainfall and temperature for Meekatharra (BoM 2009) 
5.1.1.3 
Wind 
Geraldton’s wind climate is dominated by the effects of the land‐sea interface where offshore land 
breezes  are  common  in  the  morning,  whilst  afternoon  sea  breezes  are  common  in  the  warmer 
months.  Meekatharra also experiences land breezes from the interior, with a tendency to be drying 
and hot in the summer and without the relief of the coastal sea breeze (BoM, 2009).  Wind roses for 
Geraldton and Meekatharra are presented in Figure 5‐3 and Figure 5‐4 respectively.   
 
 
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
45
Jan
Feb
Mar
Apr
May
Jun
Jul
Aug
Sep
Oct
Nov
Dec
Month
T
em
p
erat
u
re
 (
C
)
0
5
10
15
20
25
30
35
40
R
ai
n
fa
ll
 (
m
m
)
Rainfall
Temperature

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
39 
 
 
 
Figure 5‐3  9am and 3pm wind roses from Geraldton weather station 

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
40 
 
 
Figure 5‐4  9am and 3pm wind roses from Meekatharra weather station 
5.1.2 
Biogeography 
The  Interim  Biogeographic  Regionalisation  for  Australia  (IBRA)  classifies  the  continent  into  regions 
(bioregions)  of  similar  geology,  landform,  vegetation,  fauna  and  climate  (Department  of 
Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, 2009).  According to IBRA (Version 6.1) the Proposal Area 
intersects the Geraldton Sandplains (GS2), the Yalgoo (YAL2) and the Murchison bioregions.  Each of 
the IBRA regions is further divided into sub‐regions as described below and mapped on Figure 5‐5.   

 
OPR Rail Development 
 
Public Environmental Review 
 
41 
5.1.2.1 
Geraldton Sandplains 
Near the coast, the Proposal traverses the Geraldton Hills sub‐region of the GS2 Bioregion.  The sub‐
region comprises mainly proteaceous scrub‐heaths, rich in endemics, with the small regional reserves 
along the coast and inland.  Extensive York Gum and Jam woodlands occur on outwash plains, and 
heaths with emergent Banksia, Actinostrobus and York Gum woodlands on alluvial plains.  Dominant 
land uses are dry land agriculture (65.8% by area), conservation (13.8% by area) and rural residential 
(DEC,  2002).  This  subregion  has  approximately  16%  of  its  pre‐European  vegetation  remaining 
(Shephard 2002). 
5.1.2.2 
Tallering 
The  Proposal  traverses  the  central  YAL2  sub‐region  where  the  grazing  of  native  pastures  is  the 
predominant land use (approximately 77% by area). The sub‐region is characterised by low woodland 
or  tall  shrublands  of  mulga  (Acacia  aneura)  on  red  loams.    The  undulating  sandplains  support 
scattered mulga and mallee (Eucalyptus kingsmills) over hummock grasslands.  Mixed communities 
of  low  open  woodlands  of  mulga  and  bowgada  with  heath  and  spinifex  are  characteristic  of  the 
sandplains (Payne, et. al., 1998).  The YAL2 sub‐region has 719 recorded plant species, 27 of which 
are  listed  as  Declared  Rare  Flora  or  Priority  species.  This  subregion  has  approximately  98.9%  of  its 
pre‐European vegetation remaining (Shephard 2002). 
5.1.2.3 
Western Murchison 
The  easternmost  portion  of  the  Proposal,  including  the  Jack  Hills  Loop  and  the  Weld  Range  Link, 
extends  into  the  Western  Murchison  sub‐region.    The  vegetation  of  the  sub‐region  comprises  low 
mulga  woodlands,  often  rich  in  ephemerals  (usually  with  bunch  grasses),  with  saltbush  shrublands 
occurring  on  calcareous  soils.    Hummock  grasslands  are  common  on  the  Sandplains  (DEC,  2002). 
Pastoralism is the dominant land use (96% coverage by area) and although Shephard (2002) indicates 
that effectively all of the sub‐region retains native vegetation, degradation is widespread as a result 
of grazing by pastoral stock and other introduced herbivores. This subregion has approximately 100% 
of its pre‐European vegetation remaining (Shephard 2002). 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
42
Figure 5‐5  IBRA Regions associated with the Proposal 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
43
5.1.3 
Land Systems 
Rogers  (1996)  conducted  an  inventory  of  soil  and  land  resources  of  the  Geraldton 
Agricultural Region.  51 soil‐landscape systems were described, based on geology, landform 
and  soil  characteristics.    The  Proposal  Area  incorporates  eleven  of  Rogers’  soil‐landscape 
systems.    Table  5‐1  identifies  these  systems  and  the  proportion  of  their  total  extent  that 
occurs within the Study Area. 
Table 5‐1  Soil landscape systems occuring within the Proposal Area 
Soil Landscape system 
Total Area (ha) 
Area in Proposal Area 
(ha) 
Percent of Total System (%) 
Binnu 138843 
8947 
6.44 
Casuarina 70117 
430 0.61 
Dartmoor 115013 
15678 
13.63 
Eradu 145118 
7183 
4.95 
Greenough 17976 
4620 25.70 
Moresby 26697 
2144 
8.03 
Mt Horner 
29451 
395 
1.34 
Northampton 83511 
5348  6.40 
Quindalup 3077 
564 
18.32 
Sugarloaf 57582 
2021 
3.51 
Tamala 13572 
2156 
15.89 
A comprehensive inventory of the land systems of the Murchison region has been developed 
based  on  biophysical  characteristics  such  as  geology,  landforms,  vegetation  and  soils.    The 
methodology  was  initially  applied  by  Curry  et  al  (1994)  in  the  Murchison  River  Catchment 
and surrounds, and then by Payne  et al. (1998) in  the Sandstone‐Yalgoo‐Paynes Find area.  
Each  land  system  is  classified  into  a  particular  land  type  defined  by  the  landforms  and 
vegetation it contains.  As the technique has been applied only within the Murchison region, 
the portion of the Rail Corridor beyond this region is described using soil landscape systems, 
as described above.  
The  Study  Area  encompasses  30  land  systems,  all  of  which  are  considered  to  be  well 
represented  beyond  the  Study  Area.    All  land  systems  within  the  Study  Area  and  the 
proportion of each land system being affected are shown in Table 5‐2. 
The most common land systems within the Proposal Area, each comprising over 10% of the 
entire  area,  are  the  Challenge,  Tindalarra  and  Yanganoo  systems.    At  approximately  10% 
each of their overall extent, the Weld and Yarrameedie land systems are proportionally the 
most represented within the Study Area.  
5.1.1 
Topography 
The Mid‐West Region can broadly be divided into a coastal plain, a coastal plateau, and an 
interior plateau, and the Proposal Area spans all three. The coastal plain is approximately 20 
kilometres wide and is characterised by undulating sand‐dunes.  The coastal plateau ranges 
from approximately 50 m to 300 m above sea level, and is a fairly flat sandplain, with some 
ridges and mesas.  The interior plateau is generally of lower relief, and is more variable, with 
paleodrainage valleys between escarpments.  
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
44
Table 5‐2  Land systems occurring within the Study Area 
Land System 
Total Area (ha) 
Area in Proposal Area 
(ha) 
Percent of total Land 
System (%) 
Belele 578,300 
4,352 
0.7 
Beringarra 262,436 
1,422  0.5 
Challenge 1,010,000 
17,211  1.7 
Cunyu 329,933 
1,545 
0.5 
Ero 215,007 
3,907 
1.8 
Flood 159,252 
2,999 
1.9 
Gabanintha 251,455 
2,688  1.1 
Joseph 464,045 
809 
0.2 
Jundee 660,224 
4,363 
0.7 
Kalli 1,115,901 
16,124 
1.4 
Koonmarra 569,874 
11,997  2.1 
Mileura 261,223 
1,454 
0.6 
Millex 47,825 
2,867 
6.0 
Millrose 
109,649 1,317 
1.2 
Mindura 440,593 
3,156 
0.7 
Mulline 19,688 
89 
0.4 
Nerramyne 
250,958 5,752 
2.3 
Norie 
211,177 2,393 
1.1 
Pindar 
151,876 646 
0.4 
Sherwood 1,579,691 
9,636  0.6 
Tallering 32,949 
1,045 
3.2 
Tindalarra 713,173 
29,231 4.1 
Violet 584,096 
1,981 
0.3 
Waguin 
317,146 586 
0.2 
Weld 37,235 
3,604 
9.7 
Wiluna 258,978 
814 
0.3 
Yandil 494,525 
3,055 
0.6 
Yanganoo 2,019,907 
35,446  1.7 
Yarrameedie 68,324 7,045  10.3 
Yewin 45,709 
1,692 
3.7 
5.1.2 
Geology 
The Proposal Area traverses two major geomorphologic units, the northern Perth Basin and 
the Yilgarn Craton which are separated by the Darling Fault.  The Perth Basin is a north to 
north‐northwest  trending,  onshore  and  offshore  sedimentary  basin  extending  about  1,300 
km along the south‐western margin of the Australian continent (Geoscience Australia, 2008). 
The  Yilgarn  Craton  is  the  oldest  and  largest  craton  in  Australia  and  comprises  a  gently 
undulating landscape characterised by rock of Archaean origin, chiefly granite with north to 
northwest belts of greenstone rock formation.  
The greenstone formations comprise ranges of hills widely separated by flat plains derived 
from  colluvium  and  alluvium.    Prevailing  topography  is  a  result  of  extensive  weathering  of 
the underlying geological provinces (Anand and Paine, 2002).  Weld Range and Jack Hills are 
two of the greenstone belt ridges representing the northern extent of the Yilgarn Craton and 
these feature comprise mainly haematite, magnetite and silica Banded Iron Formation (BIF) 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
45
rock.  BIF is relatively erosion resistant and thus has resulted in the rocky outcrops and steep 
ridges characteristic of the area (Anand and Paine, 2002). 
Most of the Mid‐West region lies within the Murchison Province, which is the most western 
of  the  three  granite‐greenstone  terrains  in  the  Archaean  Yilgarn  Craton.  In  the  north  and 
northwest,  the  Murchison  Province  is  in  tectonic  contact  with  the  Narryer  Gneiss  of  the 
Western Gneiss Terrain, whilst to the northeast the granite‐greenstone rocks are overlain by 
Proterozoic  sediments  of  the  Nabberu  Basin.  Overlying  the  basement  rocks,  in  particular 
along the palaeodrainages, are alluvial, colluvial and valley calcrete deposits of Cainozoic age 
(Johnson and Commander, 2006). 
The  geology  is  characterised  by  northwest  to  northeast  trending  granite‐greenstone  belts 
that display low to  medium‐grade metamorphism,  which have been  intruded by east‐west 
dolerite dykes of Proterozoic age. The greenstones are comprised of metamorphic, igneous 
and sedimentary rocks that have been highly sheared and fractured. The granites tend to be 
relatively massive, except for local shearing along margins or joints. These basement rocks 
are poorly exposed in the Study Area due to the low relief, widespread superficial cover, and 
extensive deep weathering (Aquaterra, 2009b). 
Sedimentary  rocks  of  the  Northern  Perth  Basin  underlie  the  western  portion  of  the  Mid‐
West  region.  The  inland  extent  of  these  sediments  is  marked  by  the  Darling  Fault.  In  the 
west,  sediments  of  both  the  Perth  and  Carnarvon  Basins  flank  the  granitic  Northampton 
Block (Johnson and Commander, 2006).   
The  Northampton  Block  is  a  relatively  small  area  of  Proterozoic  crystalline  basement  that 
occurs in the west.  The metamorphosed granulite, granite and migmite rocks form part of a 
linear ridge that separates the Perth and Carnarvon Basins. 
The  sediments  of  the  North  Perth  Basin  occur  to  the  west  of  the  Darling  Fault  and  Yilgarn 
Craton.    The  Phanerozoic  sediments,  including  the  Yarragadee  Formation,  Parmelia 
Formation and Tumblagooda Sandstone, are deposited as a series of interbedded sandstone, 
siltstone, claystone and shale (Johnson and Commander, 2006).   
The  Permian  sediments  of  the  Carnarvon  Basin  consist  of  a  series  of  sandstone, 
conglomerate, siltstone, claystone, carbonaceous shale and some tillites.  At the coast and in 
the  southern  part  of  the  Carnarvon  Basin,  there  are  prominent  outcrops  of  the  Silurian 
Tumblagooda Sandstone (Johnson and Commander, 2006). 
Further details of the regional geology of the Mid‐West region are presented in Appendix 4 
(Aquaterra, 2009b).  Hydrogeology is discussed in Section 5.2.4.1 
5.1.3 
Soils 
The  dominant  soil  types  in  the  Mid‐West  are  shallow  loams  with  a  red‐brown  hardpan.  
These are associated with yellow earth in the Murchison areas, and rocky stony soils.  Soils 
overlay red‐brown hardpan to 1.5 m depth, others overlay remnants of lateritic profiles and 
frequently have limestone gravel.  Soils on hard rock are stony. 
5.1.3.1 
Acid Sulfate Soils 
To  assist  in  clarifying  the  potential  for  acid  sulfate  soils  (ASS)  occurrence  along  the  rail 
alignment, Oakajee Port and Rail (OPR) commissioned a desk‐based investigation of ASS risk 
along  a  potential  alignment  (GHD,  2010).    A  low  to  moderate  ASS  risk  was  determined  for 
the majority of Study Area, with moderate to high risk areas (predominantly associated with 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
46
alluvium,  and  isolated  salt  pans)  also  identified  at  several  locations.    The  full  results 
(including detailed maps) can be found in Appendix 5, and are summarised as follows:  
 
41.9% of areas no to low risk: Areas with this classification comprise strata that are 
not  known  to  normally  pose  significant  ASS  risks.  Examples  from  the  site  include 
igneous  rocks  (granite,  gabbro),  meta‐sedimentary  rocks  (migmatite,  schist),  and 
sedimentary rocks (sandstone); 
 
42.0%  of  areas  low  to  moderate  risk:  Areas  with  this  classification  are  comprised 
mostly of low risk strata, along with limited areas of strata that are known to pose 
potential ASS risks (for example alluvium/salt pan deposits). Examples from the site 
include areas of exposed basement rocks (e.g. granite) interspersed with colluvium, 
or minor quantities of alluvium; and 
 
16.1%  of  areas  moderate  to  high  risk:  Areas  with  this  classification  comprise 
significant  quantities  of  strata  that  are  known  to  pose  significant  potential  ASS 
risks.  Examples  from  the  site  include  large  areas  of  superficial  deposits  such  as 
colluvium  that  contain  extensive  areas  of  alluvium  materials  and/or  salt  pan 
deposits. 
With consideration of the anticipated excavation depths along the alignment (based on 
preliminary cut and fill data provided by OPR dated 12 January 2010), the risks were revised 
as follows: 
 
91.2% no to low risk; 
 
7.5% low to moderate risk; and 
 
1.3% moderate to high risk. 
5.1.4 
Conservation Estates / Significant Areas 
Of the IBRA subregions crossed by the Proposal Area, 0.01 ‐ 5% of the Tallering and Western 
Murchison subregions are protected under the national reserve system, while the Geraldton 
Hills subregion has a much higher percent of 15 ‐ 30% protected (DEWHA, 2008). 
The Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC) announced new conservation lands 
in the Gascoyne, Murchison and south west regions in September 2007. These included the 
pastoral  land  area  (whole  or  part)  of  the  ‘Gascoyne‐Murchison  Strategy’  and  the  freehold 
land area in the south west. Most of the acquired pastoral leases and a few of the freehold 
areas are proposed to be reserved as unclassified conservation parks under the Conservation 
and Land Management Act 1984.  
The Proposal Area crosses four current or proposed conservation reserves listed in Table 5‐3 
(Figure 5‐6).  Four others have been recently excised from the Proposal Area (are no longer 
part of the Proposal Area). 
The  Proposal  Area  does  intersect  the  Moresby  Range  Strategy  Area,  approximately  six  km 
from  the  coast,  but  the  Moresby  Range  Strategy  (WAPC  2009)  makes  an  allowance  for  an 
infrastructure corridor through this area. 
 
 
 
 

 
OPR Rail Development 
Public Environmental Review 
 
 
 
 
 
 
47
1   ...   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   ...   41


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə