P. G. Department of Chemistry, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India



Yüklə 0.49 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix02.07.2017
ölçüsü0.49 Mb.

www.derpharmachemica.com



Available online a

 

 



 

 

 

 

Scholars Research Library

 

 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6(3):261-271



 

(http://derpharmachemica.com/archive.html)

 

 

 



 

ISSN 0975-413X

 

CODEN (USA): PCHHAX

 

 

261



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Thermal, physico-chemical, in vitro anti-microbial and DNA 



cleavage investigations of newly synthesized Co(II), Ni(II) and 

Cu(II) complexes of O, N donor Schiff base 

 

Sangamesh A. Patil



*a

, Bhimashankar M. Halasangi

a

, Shivakumar S. Toragalmath

a



Prema S. Badami



 

a

P.G. Department of Chemistry, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka, India 

b

Department of Chemistry, S. S. Khuba College of Science, Basavakalyan, Karnataka, India 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

ABSTRACT 

 

Cobalt(II),  Nickel(II),  Copper(II)  complexes  have  been  synthesized  with  newly  synthesized  biologically  active 

ligand.  The novel ligand has been  synthesized by the  condensation  of  2-amino-4-methyl-5-carbethoxy-1,3-thiazole 

and 8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin. The probable structure of the complexes has been proposed on the basis 

of  analytical  and  spectroscopic  data  (IR,  UV-Vis,  ESR,  ESI-mass  and  TG-DTA).  Electro  chemical  study  of  the 

complexes has also been recorded. The elemental analyses of the complexes confine to the stoichiometry of the type 

ML

2

.2H

2

O [M=Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II)]. The Schiff base and its metal(II) complexes have been screened for their 

antibacterial  (Staphylococcus  aureus  (MRSA),  Escherichia  coli,  Salmonella  typhi)  and  antifungal  activity 

(Aspergillus niger, Candida albicans, Aspergillus flavus) by MIC method. The DNA cleavage is studied by agarose 

gel electrophoresis method. 

 

Keywords: Synthesis; Thiazole; Coumarin; DNA Cleavage; Metal complex. 

_____________________________________________________________________________________________ 

 

INTRODUCTION 



 

The  Schiff  bases  and  their  metal  complexes  are  found  to  be  of  greater  interest  in  coordination  chemistry  [1-3]. 

Various cobalt, nickel and copper metal complexes were reported to have antimicrobial activity [4-5]. Moreover, the 

enhancement  in  the  biological  activity  and  the  decrease  in  the  cytotoxicity  of  both  metal  ion  and  ligand  can  be 

achieved  by  the  incorporation  of  transition  metal  into  the  Schiff  bases  [6].    The  interaction  of  transition  metal 

complexes with DNA have extensively been studied for their usage as probes for DNA structure and their potential 

application in chemotherapy [7-8]. One of the important DNA related activities of the transition metal complexes is 

that, some of the complexes show the ability to cleave DNA. Recently, Cu(II) complexes have been reported to be 

active in DNA strand scission [9-11]. 

 

Thermal  analyses techniques play  an important role in the phase  of structural elucidation of  metal complexes [12-



14]. In particular, thermo-gram gives the ample information regarding coordination of H

2

O and Cl, Br etc. 



 

Thiazole  heterocycles  are  present  in  numerous  molecules  of  interest  to  the  natural  product,  synthetic  organic, 

agricultural, and medicinal chemistry communities. Examples comprise the Bistratamide natural products [15], the 


Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

262



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

herbicide CMPT and antibiotic Thiostrepton. Thiazole and many substituted thiazoles possess interesting biological 



activities  probably  conferred to them  by  the  strong  aromaticity  of  their  ring  system [16]  and  also  very  interesting 

class of compounds because of their wide range of application as an antimicrobial [17], anti-inflammatory [18], anti-

degeneratve [19] and anti-HIV activities [20]. In addition to the thiazole, coumarins and their derivatives portrayed 

the structural variety and significant biological and pharmacological properties as well.  Many of these compounds 

possess antbacterial, antifungal and insecticidal activities. The hydroxy coumarins are typical phenolic compounds 

and  therefore  act  as  potent  metal  chelators  and  free  radical  scavengers.  They  are  powerful  chain-breaking  anti-

oxidants.  Metal  complexes  of  coumarin  derivatives  have  extensively  been  investigated  and  reported  from  our 

laboratory. 



 

MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

 Instrumentation 

All the chemicals purchased were of reagent grade and used without purification, TLC was performed on the TLC 

plates procured from Merk.  

 

The  IR  spectra  of  the  ligand  and  its  Co(II),  Ni(II)  and  Cu(II)  complexes  were  recorded  on  a  HITACHI-270  IR 



spectrophotometer in the 4000-250 cm

-1

 region in KBr disks. The electronic spectra of the complexes were recorded 



in  DMSO  on  a  VARIAN  CARY  50-BIO  UV-spectrophotometer  in  the  region  of  200-1100  nm.  The 

1

H  NMR 



spectrum of ligand was recorded in DMSO-d

on BRUKER 400 MHz spectrometer at room temperature using TMS 



as  an  internal  reference.  ESI  mass  spectra  were  recorded  on  LCMS  2010,  SHIMADZU,  JAPAN.  The  mass 

spectrometer  was  operated  in  the  +ve  ion  mode.  The  electrochemistry  of  Cu(II)  complexes  were  recorded  on 

CHI1110A-electrochemical  (HCH Instruments) analyzer (Made  in U.S.A). Thermo  gravimetric  analysis data were 

measured  from  room  temperature  to  1000°C  at  a  heating  rate  of  10°C/min.  The  data  were  obtained  by  using  a 

PERKIN-ELMER DIAMOND TG/DTA instrument. Molar conductivity measurements were recorded on a ELICO-

CM-82  T  conductivity  bridge  with  a  cell  having  cell  constant  0.51  and  magnetic  moment  of  the  complexes  was 

carried out by using Faraday balance. Resorcinol was procured from Sigma Aldrich Chemical Company, further 7-

hydroxy-4-methyl-coumarin,  8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methyl-coumarin  and  2-amino-4-methyl-5-carbethoxythiazole 

were prepared as described in the literature [21-22]. 

 

 Synthesis of 2-amino-4-methyl-5-carbethoxythiazole 

Ethyl-2-chloro  acetoacetate  (0.1  mol.)  and  thiourea  (0.1  mol.)  are  dissolved  in  ethanol  and  refluxed  for  3-4  hrs. 

Then,  the  reaction  mixture  was  cooled  to  room  temperature  and  made  alkaline  with  conc.  ammonium  hydroxide. 

The  precipitated  2-amino-4-methyl-5-carbethoxythiozole  was  filtered  and  recrystallized  from  ethanol  (Yield  80%, 

M.P. 175- 177 

o

C.)  



 

 

 



Fig. 1. Synthetic route of ligand 

 

 

O

O



O

Br

N



H

2

NH



2

S

S



N

O

O



NH

2

Ethanol



Reflux

+

S



N

O

O



NH

2

O



O

O

O



H

O

OH



O

N

S



N

O

O



+

Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

263



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Synthesis of ligand 

A  mixture  of  2-amino-4-methyl-5-carbethoxythiazole  and  8-formyl-7-hydroxy-4-methylcoumarin  in  1:1  molar 

proportions was boiled under reflux for 2-3 h in methanol as a medium containing few drops of concentrated HCl. 

The  product  was  separated,  filtered,  washed  with  alcohol  and  recrystallized  from  ethanol.  Thin  layer 

chromatography  (in 1:3  ratio eluent  of  ethyl  acetate  and  hexane)  revealed the  presence  of  single pure  Schiff  base. 

(M.P.- 198- 199 

o

C). Flow chart of synthesis of ligand is shown in Fig. 1. 



 

Synthesis of metal complexes 

An  alcoholic  solution  (25mL)  of  Schiff  base  (2  m  mol.)  was  refluxed  with  1  m  mol  of  metal  (II)  chlorides  [M= 

Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II)] in ethanol (25mL) on steam bath for 1h. Then, 2 m mol. of sodium acetate was added and 

refluxing  was  continued  for  another  3h.  The  separated  complexes  were  filtered,  washed  thoroughly  with  water, 

ethanol and ether and finally dried in vacuum over fused CaCl

2



 

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 

 

All the complexes  are colored, stable in air and non-hygroscopic solids.  All the  complexes are insoluble in  water, 



sparingly soluble in organic solvents and completely soluble in DMSO and DMF. The elemental analyses show that, 

the  cobalt(II),  nickel(II)  and  copper(II)  complexes  have  1:2  stoichiometry  of  the  type  ML

2

.2H


2

O.  The  molar 

conductance values are too low to account for any dissociation of the complexes in DMF. Hence, all the complexes 

are  regarded  as  non-electrolytes  in  DMF.  The  metal  contents  were  estimated  gravimetrically  by  the  standard 

methods  [23].  Carbon,  hydrogen,  nitrogen  and  sulphur  were  estimated  by  C,  H,  and  N  analyzer.  Analytical, 

magnetic and conductivity data of the complexes are depicted in Table-1. 



 

Table- 1. Elemental analyses of ligand and its metal complexes along with magnetic moment and conductance data 

 

Sl. No. 


Compound 

C (%) 


H (%) 

N(%) 


S (%) 

Metal 


µ

eff 


 in BM 

Molar conductance 

Ligand(LH) 



58.103 

(58.064) 

4.323 

(4.301) 


7.633 

(7.526) 


8.637 

(8.602) 


 

---- 


 

---- 


 

Co(II) 



Complex 

51.899 (58.064) 

4.232 

(4.062) 


6.703 

(6.690) 


7.901 

(7.646) 


7.241 

(7.048) 


4.93 

4.3 


Ni(II) 


Complex 

51.901 


(51.674) 

4.223 


(4.066) 

6.599 


(6.698) 

7.932 


(7.655) 

6.890 


(6.937) 

3.29 


4.9 

Cu(II) 



Complex 

52.579 


(51.367) 

4.443 


(4.042) 

6.873 


(6.658) 

7.799 


(7.609) 

7.452 


(7.491) 

1.72 


3.5 

Values given in the parenthesis are calculated values. 

 

FTIR Spectral studies 

Infrared frequencies along with their tentative assignments for the ligand and its complexes are presented in Table-2.  

The FTIR spectrum of ligand exhibits broad weak band in the region of 3053 cm

-1

 could be attributed to the intra-



molecular  hydrogen  bonded  –OH.  The  medium  to  high  intensity  band  at  1632  cm

-1

  is  assigned  to 



ν(C=N)  of 

azomethine group.  Two ester groups,  one  from  coumarin lactone has  given peak at  1739 cm

-1

 due to v(C=O) [24] 



and another carbonyl stretching of carbethoxy group of thiazole moity at 1707 cm

-1

. The medium stretching band at 



1097 cm

-1

 observed in free ligand is ascribed to v(C-S-C) of thiazole ring [25]. High intensity band present at 1275 



cm

-1-


 with an additional band around 1515 cm

-1

 region is due to stretching of phenolic C-O. 



 

The observed changes, in case of Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes, are as under. 

 

A broad and weak band in the region of 3053 cm



-1

, assigned to H- bonded –OH in Schiff base remained disappeared 

in  all  the  complexes.  The  high  intensity  band  due to  phenolic  C-O,  appeared in  the region  1275cm

-1

  in the  Schiff 



base, appeared as a medium to high intensity band around 1390 cm

-1

 in complexes. These comparative observations 



support the formation  M-O  bond via deprotonation. The band at 1515cm

-1

 in the  Schiff  base shifted to  1526 cm



-1

suggesting the behavior of phenolic oxygen as monodentate. The medium intensity band appeared at 1632 cm



-1

,

 



due 

to 


ν(C=N)  in  Schiff  base,  showed  lower  shift  in  the  complexes.  The  lower  shift  in  the  v(C=N)  of  Schiff  base 

indicates that, the imine group is coordinated to the metal (II) ions through nitrogen atom. And is further confirmed 

by the 

γ(M-N) in the region of 473-460 cm



-1

. The band located at 1739 cm

-1

 and 1707 cm



-1

 due to lactonyl 

γ(C=O) 

of  coumarin  moiety  and  carbethoxy  v(C=O)  respectively  of  Schiff  base  remained  unchanged  in  complexes, 



indicating the absence of their involvement in coordination. The same thing is with v(C-S-C) indicating  S  atom is 

not involved in coordination. The presence of coordinated water molecules in the complexes are confirmed by the 



Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

264



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

observed broad band in the region of 3433-3430 cm



-1 

 [26] and two weaker bands in the region 836-833 cm

-1

 and 


779-759 cm

-1

 due to 



ν(-OH) rocking and wagging mode of vibrations respectively [27].  

 

Thus, the IR spectral data results provide strong evidences for the coordination of potential bidentate ligand with the 



metal (II) ions. 

 

Table - 2. Important IR frequencies (in cm

-1

) of ligand and its metal complexes 

 

Sl. No. 


Coordinated water 

γ(OH) 


Lactonyl 

γ(C=O) 


γ(C=N) 

H bonded 

-OH stretching 

Phenolic 

γ(C-O) 

γ(M-N) 


--- 


1739 

1632 


3053 

1275 


---- 

3430 



1740 

1598 


---- 

1340 


460 

3430 



1740 

1593 


---- 

1331 


470 

3432 



1738 

1599 


---- 

1338 


473 

 

 

1

H NMR spectral study 

The H


1

NMR spectrum of Schiff base exhibits singlet at 11.89 ppm, 10.43 ppm and 6.28 ppm due to phenolic –OH, 

azomethine proton (CH=N) and C-3 proton of coumarin ring respectively.  And another two singlets at 2.38 ppm to 

2.49 ppm are due to methyl protons of coumarin and thiazole rings. Two doublets at 7.91-7.93 ppm and 6.95- 6.98 

ppm  are  attributed  to  C-5  and  C-6  protons  of  coumarin  ring.  The  quartet  and  triplet  peaks  at  4.12-  4.18  ppm  and 

1.20- 1.25 ppm are assigned to methylene and methyl protons of carbethoxy group of thiazole ring respectively. 



 

Electronic spectral studies 

Electronic absorption spectra of all compounds were recorded in DMSO over the range 200- 1100 nm.  

 

The  electronic  spectra of  Co(II)  complex  shows two  absorption  bands,  one  at  549  nm  (18213  cm



-1

)  with  medium 

intensity due to 

4

T



1g

 (F) 


→ 

4

T



2g

 (F) (


ν

1

), and another at 910 nm (10989 cm



-1

) with low intensity due to 

4

T

1



g (F) 

→ 

4



T

1

g (P) (



ν

3

), which are the characteristic bands of octahedral Co(II) complexes. 



 

The  Ni(II)  complex showed  three  bands  at  942  nm  (10612  cm

-1

),  612 nm  (16326  cm



-1

) and  377 nm  (26476  cm

-1

)

 



attributed  to  the 

3

A



2g

 



3

T

2g



  (

ν

1



), 

3

A



2g

 

→ 



3

T

1g



  (F)  (

ν

2



)    and 

3

A



2g

 

→ 



3

T

1g



  (P)  (

ν

3



)  transitions  respectively,  which 

indicate the octahedral geometry around Ni(II) ion.  

 

And Copper (II) complexes showed band in the 684 nm (14619 cm



-1

) and 561 nm (17,825 cm

-1

), regions which may 



be ascribed to 2B

1

g



→2Eg and 2B

1

g



→2B

2

g transitions, respectively, corresponding to distorted octahedral geometry 



around Cu(II) ions.  

 

Magnetic studies 

The  magnetic  moments  obtained  at  room  temperature  are  listed  in  Table-  1.  The  Co(II)  complex  shows  magnetic 

moment  of  4.93  BM.  This  value  is  within  the  expected  range  of  4.7-5.2  [28-29]  BM  for  octahedral  complexes. 

Hence, the Co(II) complex has octahedral configuration. The Ni(II) complex shows magnetic moment of 3.29 BM. 

It is  reported that, the octahedral  Ni(II)  complex  exhibits magnetic  moment in  the  range  of  2.5-3.5  BM  [30].  The 

Cu(II)  complex  shows  magnetic  moment  1.72  BM  is  slightly  higher  than  the  spin-only  value,  expected  for  one 

unpaired  electron,  which  offers  possibility  of  an  octahedral  geometry  [31].  Magnetic  moment  values  suggest  the 

octahedral geometry around metal (II) ions. 



 

ESR spectral studies 

The  ESR  spectral  studies  of  Cu(II)  complex  provide information  regarding  metal ion  environment.  The  g

║ 

and  g


 

values have been found to be 2.1481 and 2.0404 respectively. The g



av

 value calculated comes out to be 2.0763. The 

trend, g

║ 

˃ g



┴,

 showed that the electron is localized in d

x2-y2

.The g


av

 value was calculated to be 2.0763, this deviation 

g

av

 from that of free electron (2.0023) is due to the covalence property [32]. This is again supported by Kivelson and 



Neiman, where g

ǁ

 of less than 2.3 indicates covalent environment. The parameter ‘G’, determined as G = (g



-2) / (g


┴ 

-2)  is  found  to  be  3.6658  which  is  less  than  4  suggesting  the  considerable  interaction  in  the  solid  state.  The  ESR 

spectral data clearly suggests that, the Cu(II) complex has distorted octahedral geometry around it. The spectrum is 

showed in Fig. 2. 

 


Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

265



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

 



 

Fig. 2. ESR spectrum of Cu(II) complex 

 

ESI- mass spectral study 

The  ESI-  mass  spectrum  of  Cu(II)  complex,  as  a  representative,  has  been  studied  and  depicted  in  Fig.  3.  The 

spectrum shows a molecular ion peak M

+

 at m/z 841 which is equivalent to its molecular weight [ML



2

. 2H


2

O]

 +



. And 

the peak at 873 is due to the methanol adduct of complex molecule. 

           

The  same  pattern  has  been  observed  in  case  of  all  the  complexes.  The  ESI  mass  spectrum  of  Ni(II)  and  Co(II) 

complexes gave molecular ion peaks at m/z 836 and 837.So, the ESI- mass spectra of all the complexes provide one 

of the supportive data for the formation of octahedral complexes. 

 

 

 

Fig. 3. ESI-mass spectrum of Cu(II) complex 

 

Thermal study 

All the prepared complexes were studied for their thermal behavior over the temperature range of 10-1000 

o

C under 



nitrogen  atmosphere.  The  thermograms  of  Co(II),  Ni(II)  &  Cu(II)  complexes  are  shown  in  Fig.  4,  5  &  6.  All  the 

three metal complexes underwent decomposition in three considerable steps. As a representative, Co(II) complex is 

discussed in detail. 

 


Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

266



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Step- 1. Mass loss in the first step, as depicted in the thermogram of Co(II) complex, is due to two water molecules 

coordinated to the metal ion in the temperature ranging from 150-200 

0

C. The peak is exothermic [33]. Empirically, 



it can be written as under.  

 

Co(C



36

H

30



N

4

O



10

S

2



).2H

2

O     −−−−−−−−−−



˃   Co(C

36

H



30

N

4



O

10

S



2

)-2H


2

 



Step- 2. The exothermic peak in the temperature range of 260- 350 

o

C shows the decomposition of thiazole moieties 



from the ligand. The peak value centered at 275 

o

C. Empirically [34], it can be written as under. 



 

Co(C


36

H

30



N

4

O



10

S

2



)     −−−−−−−−−−

˃   Co(C


22

H

14



O

6

)-C



14

H

16



N

4

O



4

S

2



 

 

Step-  3.  The remaining coumarin part of ligand  ligand underwent  decomposition in the temperature ranging from 

390- 490 

o

C and the exothermic peak value is centered at 468 



o

C [35]. And this decomposition can empirically be 

shown as under. 

 

Co(C



22

H

14



O

6

).2H



2

O     −−−−−−−−−−

˃   Metal oxide-C

14

H



16

N

4



O

4

S



2

 

 



TG-DTA curves of Ni(II) complex show weight losses in three steps. In the first step, in the temperature range 155- 

180 


o

C is attributed to the combined mass loss of one lattice celled two coordinated water molecules. The mass loss 

at second step is observed in the temperature range 350- 370 

o

C is attributed to the loss of thiazole moiety. The mass 



loss  at  third  step  at  399 

o

C  is  attributed  to  the  elimination  of  coumarin  moiety.  Thus,  the  TG/DTA  study  of 



complexes gave strongest evidence in the elucidation of geometry of metal complexes. 

 

Fig. 4. Thermogram ofCo(II) complex 



 

Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

267



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

 



 

Fig. 5. Thermogram of Ni(II) complex 

 

 

 

Fig. 6. Thermogram of Cu(II) complex 

 

Electrochemistry 

Electrochemical  properties  of  the  complexes  were  studied  in  dimethyl  sulfoxide  (DMSO)  containing  0.05  M  n-

Bu

4



NClO

4

 as the supporting electrolyte. 



 

The ligand was found to be electro-inactive, hence it is called is an ‘‘innocent’’ ligand. And Cu(II) complex, in its 

cyclic voltammogram, has displayed a reduction peak at E

pc 


= 0.5831 V with a corresponding oxidation peak at E

pa

 = 



0.3119 V. The peak separation of this couple (

∆E

p



) is 0.2712 V at 0.1V and increases with scan rate. 

Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

268



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Fluorescence study 

The  emission  spectra  of  the  ligand  and  its  Co(II),  Ni(II)  and  Cu(II)  complexes  were  investigated  in  DMSO  and 

reported in Fig 7. 

 

The ligand was characterized by an emission band around 500 nm. The Co(II) complex has shown an emission band 



at  452  nm,  Ni(II)  complex  at  467  nm  and  Cu(II)  complex  at  449  nm.  In  case  of  complexes,  the  intensity  of  the 

emission band is decreased. This decrease in the intensity of the emission is due to the quenching property of metal 

ions. 

300


400

500


600

nm

Co Ex-352(EM), 



Ni Ex-268(EM)

Cu(EM)



Ligand(EM)

0

10



 

Fig. 7. Fluorescence spectra of ligand and its metal complexes in DMF solution 

 

RESULTS 



 

In vitro antimicrobial activity 

Many authors have studied [36-38] biological properties of transition metal compounds of coumarin derivatives.  

 

Antimicrobial results of ligand and its metal complexes are presented in Table- 3. Schiff base showed some activity 



against Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi. We could notice the enhancement in the 

activity when it is stitched with Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II). Cu(II) complex, in particular, has showed better activity 

against  both  bacteria  and  fungi.  This  higher  antimicrobial  activity  of  metal  complexes,  compared  to  ligand,  is 

probably due to change in structure due to  coordination  and  chelating tends to make metal  complexes act as  more 

potent and powerful bacteriostatic agent. Thus, inhibiting growth of micro-organisms [39]. 

 

DNA cleavage  

Fig.  8  shows  results  of  oxidative  DNA  cleavage  experiments  were  carried  out  with  the  ligand  and  its  metal 

complexes.  Control  experiments  categorically  revealed  that,  untreated  DNA  does  not  show  any  cleavage  (Fig.8, 

Lane C), whereas all the metal complexes exhibited cleavage activity on DNA.  

 

The difference in the migration is observed in all the lanes of our synthesized compounds compared to the control 

DNA of E. coli (Lane C). This shows the control DNA alone does not show any apparent cleavage, whereas Co(II), 

Ni(II)  and  Cu(II)  complexes  have  shown.  The  results  indicated  the  important  role  of  metal  ions  in  isolated  DNA 

cleavage reaction. From these results, we infer that Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes act as  potent nuclease agent. 

And with this, we can conclude that, the compounds inhibit the growth of pathogens by cleaving the genome. 



 

 

 

 

 

 

Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

269



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

Table- 3. Antibacterial and Anti fungal activities of ligand and its metal complex 



 

 

Compounds 



Conc.                     

(µg ml


-1

 



 

Growth inhibition against bacteria 

( in mm) 

Growth inhibition against  Fungi 

( in mm) 

 

 



 S. aureus 

E. coli 

S. typhi 

A. niger 

C. albicans 

A. flavus 

 

Ligand(LH) 



100 

200 


400 



12 

14 


16 

17 


11 









 

 

Co complex 



 

100 


200 

400 


 

10 



12 

 

11 



11 

11 


 



10 

 



 





 



 

 



Ni complex 

 

100 



200 

400 


 

10 


10 

13 


 

11 


12 

12 


 

10 



11 

 



 





 



 

 



Cu complex 

 

100 



200 

400 


 

14 


15 

18 


 

15 


16 

19 


 

11 


12 

14 


 



 



 





 

 

Gentamycin(Std) 



 

100 


200 

400 


 

20 


24 

25 


 

23 


26 

28 


 

16 


21 

25 


 

--- 


--- 

--- 


 

--- 


--- 

--- 


 

--- 


--- 

--- 


 

Amphotericin(Std) 

100 

200 


400 

--- 


--- 

--- 


--- 

--- 


--- 

--- 


--- 

--- 


11 


12 

11 


12 

14 


12 



 

 

 

M: standard molecular weight marker, C: control DNA of E. coli, Other lanes are of respective metal complexes treated with DNA of E. coli. 

Fig.8. DNA cleavage activity on genomic DNA of E. coli 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

270



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

 



 

 

Where M= Co(II), Ni(II) and Cu(II) 

Fig. 9. Proposed structure of Metal complexes 

 

CONCLUSION 

 

The synthesized ligand acts as a bidentate ligand which coordinates through the azomethine nitrogen atom and the 



oxygen atom of phenolic group via deprotonation to metal ion. The bonding of ligand to metal ion was confirmed by 

the  analytical,  IR,  electronic,  magnetic,  ESR,  ESI-  mass  studies.  Electrochemical  study  of  Cu(II)  complex  can 

provide the degree of the reversibility of one electron transfer reaction and it has quasi-reversible character. Among 

the  Co(II),  Ni(II) and Cu(II) complexes,  Cu(II) shows better antimicrobial activity towards Staphylococcus aureus 



(MRSA),  Escherichia  coli,  Salmonella  typhi.  From  DNA  cleavage  study  it  can  be  concluded  that,  the  compound 

inhibits the growth of the pathogenic organism by cleaving the genome.  

 

The observations of all the analytical and spectral data put together made us to propose a most probable structure as 



shown in Fig. 9, in which the complex has the stoichiometry of the type [ML

2

.2H



2

O] {where M = Co(II), Ni(II), and 

Cu(II)}  

 

Acknowledgements 

The  authors  are  grateful  to  USIC  and  Dept.  of  Chemistry,  Karnatak  University,  Dharwad  for  providing  spectral 

facilities. IISc  Bangalore  and  IIT  Bombay  are  gratefully  thanked  for  recording  of  NMR  and  ESR  spectra.  We  are 

thankful  to  Biogenics  Hubli,  for  carrying  out  and  providing  biological  activity  data.  One  of  the  authors 

Bhimashankar M. Halasangi is grateful to University Grant Commission, New Delhi, India, for awarding Research 

Fellowship in Science for Meritorious Students. 

 

REFERENCES 

 

[1]


 

A. Hills, D. L. Hughes, G.J. Leigh, J.R. Sanders, J. Chem. Soc. Dalton Trans.1991, 325-329. 

[2]

 

R. Knoch, A. Wilk, K.J. Wannowius, D. Reinen, H. Elias, Inorg. Chem.1990, 29, 3799-3805. 



[3]

 

F.A. Bottino, P. Finocchiaro, E. Libbertini,  J. Coord. Chem.1988, 16, 341-345 



[4]

 

U. El-Ayaan, A.A.-M. Abdel-Aziz, Eur. J. Med. Chem., 2005, 40, 1214–1221.  



[5]

 

M. Sonmez, I. Berber, E. Akbas, Eur. J. Med. Chem.2006, 41, 101–105 



[6]

 

Z. Travnicek, M. Malon, Z. Sindelar, K. Dolezal, J. Rolcik, V. Krystof, M. Strnad, J. Marek,  J. Inorg. Biochem., 



2001, 84, 23–32. 

[7]


 

Y. Li, Y. Wu, J. Zhao, P. Yang, J. Inorg. Biochem.2007, 101, 2, 283-290. 

[8]

 

X. Wang, H. Chao, H. Li, X. Hong, L. Ji, X. Li, J. Inorg. Biochem.2004, 98, 3, 423-429. 



[9]

 

J. Liu, T. Zhang, T. Lu, L. Qu, H. Zhou, Q. Zhang, L. Ji,  J. inorg. Biochem.2002, 91, 1, 269-276 



[10]

 

V.G. Vaidyanathan, B.U. Nair, J. Inorg. Biochem.2003, 93, 3-4,  271. 



[11]

 

P.R. Reddy, K.S. Rao, B. Satyanarayana, Tetrahedron Lett.2006, 47,  41, 7311-7315. 



[12]

 

 M.S. Refat, J Therm Anal Calorim.2010, 102, 3, 1095-1103 



[13]

 

 S. M. Mostashari, S. Baie, J Therm Anal Calorim.2010, 99, 2, 431-436 



S

N

N



O

O

O



O

O

S



N

N

O



O

O

O



O

M

OH



2

OH

2



Sangamesh A. Patil et al 

Der Pharma Chemica, 2014, 6 (3):261-271 

_____________________________________________________________________________

 

271



 

www.scholarsresearchlibrary.com

 

[14]



 

A. M. Garrido Pedrosa, M. J. B. Souza, D. M. A. Melo and A. S. Araujo, J Therm Anal Calorim.2007, 87, 2, 

351-355 

[15]


 

S. You, J.W. Kelly, Chem. Eur. J.2004, 10, 71-75. 

[16]

 

G. Kornis, “Comprehensive Heterocyclic Chemistry”, A.R. Katritzky Ed., Pregamon press, 1984, Vol 6, Part B, 



545-578. 

[17]


 

Z.H. Chohan, A. Scozzafava, C.T. Supuran, J. Enzyme. Inhib. Med. Chem., 2003, 18, 259–263 

[18]

 

A. Geronikaki, D. Hadjipavlou-Litina, M. Amourgianou, IL Farmaco., 2003, 58, 489–495  



[19]

 

A.M. Panico, A. Geronikaki, R. Mgonzo, V. Cardile, B. Gentile, I. Doytchinova, Bioorg. Med. Chem., 2003, 11, 



2983–2989. 

[20]


 

G.  Maass,  U.  Immendoerfer,  B.  Koenig,  U.  Leser,  B.  Mueller,  R.  Goody,  E.    Pfaff,  Antimicrob.  Agents 



Chemother., 1993, 37, 2612–2617 

[21]


 

K.M. Boy and J.M. Guernon, Tetrahedron Lett.2005, 46, 13, 2251-2252. 

[22]

 

G.B. Bagihalli, P.G. Avaji, P.S. Badami and S.A. Patil, J. Coord. Chem.2008, 61, 2793–2806 



[23]

 

Vogel A.I. A Text Book of Quantitative Inorganic Analyses, ELBS Longman’s Green and Co. Ltd., London, 3



rd

 

Edn. 1962



[24]

 

W.J. Geary, Coord. Chem. Rev.1971, 7, 81-122. 



[25]

 

T. Karabasanagouda,  A. V. Adhikari, R. Dhanwad & G. Parameshwarappa, Indian J. Chem.2008,  47B, 144-



152 

[26]


 

S.A. Patil, S.N. Unki, P.S. Badami , Med Chem Res. DOI 10.1007/s00044-011-9932-6. 

[27]

 

P.R. Shukla, V.K. Singh, A.M. Jaiswal, J. Narain, J. Ind. Chem. Soc.1983, 60, 321-324. 



[28]

 

S. Chandra, R. Kumar, R. Singh, A.K. Jain, Spectrochim. Acta Part A, 2006, 65, 852-858 



[29]

 

F.A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 5



th

 Edn. Wiley, New York 1988

[30]

 

F.A. Cotton, G. Wilkinson, Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 5



th

 Edn. Wiley, New York 1988

[31]

 

P. Akilan, M. Thirumavalavan, M. Kandaswamy, Polyhedron2003, 22, 3483-3492 



[32]

 

T.  Rosu, E. Pahontu, C. Maxim, R. Georgescu, N. Stanica, A. Gulea, Polyhedron2011, 30, 154-162 



[33]

 

 S.A. Patil, S.N. Unki, P.S. Badami, J Therm Anal Calorim.,  2013, 111, 1281–1289 



[34]

 

 M. G. Abd El Wahed, E. M. Nour, S. Teleb and S. Fahim, J Therm Anal Calorim.2004, 76, 343-348  



[35]

 

G.B. Bagihalli, P.G. Avaji, S.A. Patil, P.S. Badami, Eur. J. Med. Chem.2008, 43, 2639. 



[36]

 

A. Kukarni, P.G. Avaji, G.B. Bagihalli, S.A. Patil, P.S. Badami, J. Coord., Chem.2009, 62, 481-492 



[37]

 

S.A. Patil, V.H. Naik, A.D. Kulkarni, P.S. Badami, Spectrochim. Acta Part A2010, 75, 347-354. 



[38]

 

Z.H. Chohan, A. Scozzafava, C.T. Supuran, J. Enzym. Inhib. Med. Chem.2003, 18, 259-263. 



 

 

 



 

 

 





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə