Past cultural restrictions in anita rau badami'S 'can you hear the night bird call?' And 'tamarind mem’



Yüklə 319.77 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/2
tarix02.07.2017
ölçüsü319.77 Kb.
  1   2

PAST CULTURAL RESTRICTIONS IN ANITA RAU BADAMI'S 'CAN YOU 

HEAR THE NIGHT BIRD CALL?' AND 'TAMARIND MEM’

INTRODUCTION

Indian writing in English is an integral part of world literature. 

The history of English literature dates back to at least the early 

th

19   century.  It  began  to  range  from  the  most  useful  and 



functionary prose to the most motivated and determined 

verse-epics on the other hand. Its beginning had received 

their  impetus  from  three  sources  the  British  Government's 

educational reforms, the endeavour of missionaries, and the 

response  and  acceptance  of  English  language  and 

literature by upper class Indians. In this modern era, it had 

acquired recognition and respect all over the world. 

Contribution of Women Writers 

Women writers play a major segment of the contemporary 

Indian writing in English. The latter part of the last decade of 

By

the twentieth century witness a substantial growth of Indian 



English novels by a number of novelists who have enriched 

the Indian English literature. These novelists, have begun to 

write  like  their  Indian  predecessors  in  1950s,  1960s  and 

1980s,  unfalteringly  about  the  multi-layered  Indian 

experience, on Indian rural life in colonial and post-colonial 

time, and also they deal with human problems and cultural 

issues  in  Indian  sub-continent,  the  problem  of  women  in 

particular.

Fiction, being the most characteristic and powerful form of 

literary  expression,  has  acquired  a  prestigious  position  in 

Indian  English  literature.  Women  writers  like  Kamala 

Markandaya,  Ruth  Prawar  Jhabvala,  Anita  Desai, 

Nayantara  Sahgal,  Veena  Paintal  and  Nergis  Dalal  have 

M.Phil Scholar, Scott Christian College, Nagercoil.

ABSTRACT

The objective of the thesis is to bring out the trauma of the immigrants who are stuck up by the nostalgic and glorious past 

in their alien world. The cultural and social restrictions faced by the characters who live in their separate but intertwined 

worlds are brought in a detailed manner. Anita Rau Badami, one of the newest writers in the field of diasporic literature 

even with her a few literary writings has been able to carve a niche for herself in the literary world. Badami has dealt with 

the complex problems faced by women. Tamarind Mem depicts the relationship between a mother and a daughter 

who are trying to make sense of their past with different perceptions. The novel unfolds how the past cultural restrictions 

shape the personal lives and aspirations of the characters. Can You Hear the NightBird Call? Badami narrates the lives of 

three women which are linked together through their experience of violence. In other words, the novel spans sixty years in 

the history of the Sikh community in Punjab and Canada. 

In “Introduction” the purpose and aim of the present study is stated. It details some of the major events in the life of the 

author  and  her  achievements  which  are  relevant  for  the  understanding  of  her  characters,  vision  of  life  and  her 

development  as  artist.  “Estranged  Relationship”  deals  with  the  problems  prevailing  in  the  family  of  the  two  novels 

Tamarind Mem and Can You Hear the Nightbird Call? Familial relationship is a universal issue and it has attracted the 

attention of many writers. “Shakiness of Memory” deals with the nostalgic reminisences in the two selected novels for 

discussion which psychologically affect the characters. Memory is a thought of something that one remembers from the 

past. “Conflicting Cultures” deals with the problems of the immigrants in a foreign land. Immigration is the movement of 

people to another country or region to which they are not native in order to settle there. Finally “Summation” recounts all 

the findings made in the various areas of the current research and also includes a discussion of further research areas 

viable in respect of the writer. 

Keywords: Nostalgia, Partition, Culture, Relationship.

S. JOHNY


ARTICLES

8

l

i-manager’s Journal o  English Language Teaching  Vol.    No. 4



2014

l

n



,

 4

   October - December 

added  new  dimensions  and  depth  to  Indian  fiction  in 

English.  The emergence of these women writers marks the 

birth of an era, which promises a new deal for the Indian 

fiction  in  English.  They  particularly  share  experiences  of 

Indian women in general and presented them into fictional 

form.  Women's inner self, their agonies, pleasures, cultural 

conflicts  are  better  and  more  truly  depicted  by  these 

women novelists.

The  corpus  of  Partition  literature  which  has  rightly  being 

termed as the “Literature of Anguish” has evoked a great 

body of work to literature. Historians, political analysts and 

social  scientists  have  put  forward  heartrending 

chronological  accounts  of  when,  why,  what  and  how. 

Literature lays aside history, and try to interrogate the entire 

issue differently and are more concerned with what out of it 

and what after it. They seek to foreground another history - 

the  history  of  untold  suffering,  misery  before  and  after 

Partition,  and  human  agonies  and  traumas  which 

accompanied Partition. A large number of creative writers 

in English, Hindi, Punjabi, Bengali, Urdu, Sindhi and scores of 

regional languages have been exploring Partition reading 

in their works, an activity which continues even today.

Women  have  been  worst  victims  of  Partition;  their  untold 

story  finds  expression  by  women  writers  including  the 

Punjabi  writer  Amrita  Pritam's  Pinjar,  Bengali  writer 

Jyotirmoyee  Devi's  Epaar  Ganga,  Opar  Ganga,  Parsee 

writers  like  Dina  Mehta's  And  Some  Take  a  Lover,  Bapsi 

Sidhwa's  Ice-Candy-Man,  Urdu  writers  like  Qurratulain 

Hyder's  Aag  ka  Darya  and  Attia  Hussain's  Sunlight  on  a 

Broken  Column,  deal  with  the  theme  of  Partition  from  a 

woman's  point  of  view.  They  attempt  to  foreground 

women's  experience  during  Partition  which  has  largely 

been ignored by many others.  In this context, Amrita Pritam 

laments the atrocities on women, calling upon Waris Shah 

who composed the immortal love legend Heer Ranjha, to 

sum up the victimization of women. There are several other 

Indian-English  partition  novels,  the  better  known  among 

them  being  Khushwant  Singh's  Train  to  Pakistan

Balchandra  Rajan's  The  Dark  Dancer,  Manohar 

Malgonkar's A Bend in the Ganges, Shiv K. Kumar's A River 

with Three Banks and Chaman Nahal's Azadi, each one of 

which deals with the theme of partition in its own distinctive 

way.

Anita Rau Badami, one of the newest writers in the field of 



diasporic literature, even with her a few literary writings, has 

been able to carve a niche for herself in the literary world. 

Swagata Bhattacharya links homeland and diasporas of 

the author as:



Badami's own resolution of the crisis of being diasporic 

is  eloquently  expressed  in  her  affirmation  of  the 

blessings of double vision. 'We are both doomed and 

blessed,'  she  says,  'to  be  suspended  between  two 

worlds,  always  looking  back,  but  with  two  gorgeous 

places to inhabit, in our imaginations and our hearts.' 

(145).

Modern  diasporic  Indian  writers  can  be  divided  into  two 

groups. First one comprises of those who have spent a part 

of their life in India, and have carried the baggage of their 

life in India and the others have carried the baggage of 

their  native  land  offshore.  For  them,  according  to  Stuart 

Hall,  homeland  refers  to  a  set  of  conditions  or  state  of 

being, a condition or state to be striven for, emulated, or 

constructed, or a place of destination to which they hope 

to reemigrate, resettle, prosper and retire as V.S Naipaul, 

Salman  Rushdie,  Rohinton  Mistry,  Amitav  Ghosh,  Hanif 

Kureishi,  Ramabai  Espinet,  Jhumpa  Lahiri,  K.S  Manian, 

Sudesh Mishra, Shani Mootoo, Bharati Mukerjee, Mira Nair, 

Shyam  Selvadurai,  Sam  Selvon,  Subramani,  and  M.G. 

Vassanji. The other group comprises those who have been 

brought up or settled since childhood outside India. They 

view homeland from abroad as an exotic place of their 

origin.  The  writers  of  the  former  group  have  a  literal 

displacement, whereas those belonging to the latter group 

find themselves rootless. In an article “Three Meanings of 

Diaspora”  Steven  Vertovec  had  discussed  diasporas, 

especially South Asian diasporas, as “social forms, as types 

of  consciousness,  and  as  modes  of  cultural  production. 

Diasporas and homelands are produced and constructed 

through narratives” (144).

1. Purpose of the Study

It is imperative on the part of the researcher to place on 

record  here  some  of  the  major  but,  pertinent  critical 

interpretations so far made about Badami and her works. 

Raj  Sree  says  that  “Badami's  novels  can  be  studied  by 

ARTICLES

9

l

i-manager’s Journal o  English Language Teaching  Vol.    No. 4



2014

l

n



,

 4

   October - December 

placing her works in the larger context of these writers' works. 

But, Badami's depiction of homeland is neither exotic nor 

nostalgic.  She  tries  to  present  the  homeland  with  all  its 

struggles and turmoils, its rotten politics and atrocious riots” 

(27-8).

2. Nature of the Novels Selected



Of the novels selected for discussion, Tamarind Mem and 

Can  You  Hear  the  Nightbird  Call?,  the  researcher  deals 

with the sufferings and hardships met by the characters, 

when they leave their land inorder to be rooted in an alien 

land.  Also,  she  points  out  the  various  facets  which  the 

characters  undergo  for  their  survival.  Tamarind  Mem 

depicts the relationship between a mother and a daughter 

who  are  trying  to  make  sense  of  their  past  with  different 

perceptions. The novel unfolds the past cultural restrictions, 

which  shape  the  personal  lives  and  aspirations  of  the 

characters. The endless conflicts between the mother and 

the daughter lie at its core: “An engaging depiction of a 

daughter's longing to know her mother and of our tendency 

to see things the way we want rather than the way they are” 

(Sidhu)

Many  characters  in  the  novel  are  comparable  to  the 

author's own life, like Kamini Moorthy in Tamarind Mem who 

is  an  inhabitant  of  India  now  residing  in  Canada.  Like 

Badami's own life revolved around the railway colonies of 

India,  so  does  the  novel  which  is  set  in  both  India  and 

Canada.  Just  as  the  author  who  did  not  have  a  stable 

childhood  because  of  her  father's  transfers,  who  was 

working as a mechanical engineer in railways so is Kamini's 

father  works  for  railroads.  Though  Badami  is  grown  up 

surrounded by the stories her family told, she strongly claims 

that this story is not an autobiography. She simply initiated 

writing through memories of her past that later came out to 

be  a  fictional  story.  She  has  followed  the  technique  of 

storytelling  in  the  novel,  which  in  fact  has  served  her 

purpose well.

3. Revealings of the Novels Selected

The novel is bisected into two halves, and described from 

two viewpoints, the first half from Kamini's and the second 

from her mother Saroja's. Storytelling envelopes the novel 

from the beginning to the end, which happens at many 

stages in varied ways. The basic structure is very interesting 

because  the  two  main  characters  namely  Kamini  and 

Saroja never come face to face. Their interaction comes 

only through storytelling. Both of them are entirely isolated 

from  each  other  and  they  just  narrate  their  stories  in 

flashback. Saroja delights her fellow passengers with stories 

while travelling through India by train, after her husband is 

no more and her two daughters namely Kamini and Roopa 

have settled abroad. She recollects the happenings of her 

strange  marriage,  displacement  from  one  station  to 

another, her childhood home, her shattered desire to be a 

doctor, the biased behaviour of her parents and relatives, 

and  finally  her  relationship  with  the  mechanic  Paul  da 

Costa who had offered her a substitute to her estranged 

marriage. 

Kamini,  on  the  other  hand  in  Canada,  remembers  her 

childhood days spent in the railway colonies in India, the 

moments she had spent at her grandparents' house, with 

Roopa her younger sister and finally her all-time effort to 

understand her mother. She does so by narrating the stories 

to  herself  from  her  Calgary  Apartment  and  recalling  the 

other stories narrated to her during her childhood. Claim of 

memories  on  both  the  mother  and  the  daughter,  from 

childhood through maturity, the love and loss, reflect the 

same  past  through  different  recollections  and  different 

circumstances. “In large measure, it is at least as much a 

book about the universal habit of storytelling as it is about 

the misunderstandings that arise between a mother and 

daughter and the reconciliations that the time and maturity 

effect” (Sidhu).

In the next novel taken up for discussion Can You Hear the 

NightBird Call? Badami narrates the lives of three women 

which  are  linked  together  through  their  experience  of 

violence. In other words, the novel spans sixty years in the 

history  of  the  Sikh  community  in  Punjab  and  Canada. 

Events like the Partition of India in 1947, the assassination of 

Indira Gandhi which is followed by anti-Sikh riots in 1984, the 

radical  Sikh  separatist  movement  for  Khalistan,  and  the 

bombing of the Air India Flight in 1985, form the backdrop 

of this novel, highlighting the devastation of innocent lives 

that fall victims to violence which they have done nothing 

to provoke. The background of this novel is recounted by 

the author as:

ARTICLES

10

l

i-manager’s Journal o  English Language Teaching  Vol.    No. 4



2014

l

n



,

 4

   October - December 

We were heading down to Delhi by bus next morning; 

we  didn't  cancel  our  plans  because  we  thought, 

What's going to happen? On the way, any Sikhs that 

were on the bus were being asked to get off by the bus 

driver and told to go home because it was safer for 

them at home or in a hotel somewhere rather than in 

bus.  The  bus  driver  had  a  sense  of  what  might  be 

happening along the way. And sure enough, all along, 

in all the little towns along the way, we could see spires 

of smoke. We could see shops burning, presumably 

shops  that  were  owned  by  Sikhs.  There  were  these 

elements in society who were taking out their anger 

over the murder of Indira Gandhi on local Sikhs. We 

actually saw a Sikh man being tossed over a culvert 

into  a  dry  riverbed,  and  he  had  apparently  been 

burned  alive,  and  he  was  dead  by  that  point. 

(Tancock).

The author does not let history eclipse the characters in her 

story, because she skilfully adds nuances which highlight 

the  pain  and  sorrow  that  engulf  their  personal  lives.  She 

brings to light the violence which is an inescapable part in 

the personal and social lives of her characters, through the 

tumultuous  political  events.  The  protagonist  Sharanjeet 

Kaur who is later called as Bibi-ji, an Indian immigrant to 

Canada manages to change her economic condition by 

using her beauty and feminine wiles in order to ensnare a 

rich groom who has been actually promised to her plain 

looking elder sister, Kanwar. The other character Leela from 

Bangalore,  white  and  Indian  by  race,  Hindu  by  religion, 

follows her high-caste husband to Canada, along with their 

two children, in 1967. Finally, Badami focuses on another 

Sikh,  Nimmo,  Bibi-ji's  long-lost  niece,  whose  entire  birth 

family disappeared when she was five years old, during the 

brutal Partition of India and Pakistan. It is her appalling fate 

to lose her second family, her husband and children, in the 

bloody anti-Sikh riots following Indira Gandhi's death, and 

then, her whole grasp on reality.

“Estranged Relationship” deals with the problems prevailing 

in the family of the two novels Tamarind Mem and Can You 

Hear  the  Nightbird  Call?  Familial  relationship,  which  is  a 

universal issue has attracted the attention of many writers. 

In  Tamarind  Mem,  the  researcher  tells  the  estranged 

relationship of Saroja and her husband Vishwamoorthy, a 

senior railway officer who travels to many places and the 

reader  finds  lack  of  communication  between  them.  It 

depicts  the  typical  Indian  familial  relationship  in  a 

patriarchal  system.  Saroja  longs  to  take  revenge  on  her 

husband and has an illicit relationship with Paul da Costa. 

The husband's absence from home creates a void in the 

family leading to a lot of problems. On the other hand the 

relationship between the mother Saroja and her daughter 

Kamini is a strange one for they have different perceptions 

about life. Kamini's childhood is not good with her mother 

as her mother always supports her younger sister Roopa.

In  Can  You  Hear  the  Nightbird  Call?  too  the  researcher 

shows the estranged relationship of Bibi-ji with her mother 

and her sister. Bibi-ji's stealth of her sister's fiance and the son 

of her niece Nimmo, make their relationship a little more 

strange.  Then  Leela's  estranged  relationship  with  her 

mother and relatives started when she was referred by her 

family as half-half and makes her feel marginalized by the 

world. Assuming her mother as a ghost, her childhood life 

was spoiled. The researcher vividly depicts such problems 

in Indian livelihood through the characters. 

“Shakiness  of  Memory ”  deals  with  the  nostalgic 

reminisences  in  the  two  selected  novels  for  discussion 

which psychologically affect the characters. Memory is a 

thought of something that one remembers from the past. 

The reminiscences of an immigrant who is standing alone 

in  an  alien  world,  remembering  the  childhood  days  are 

clearly  depicted  by  the  researcher.  In  Tamarind  Mem

Kamini the daughter finds that her childhood memories are 

not happy moments. On the other side, the mother also 

had  nostalgic  childhood  memories.  She  is  strongly 

disturbed by her married life as her husband travels from 

place to place due to his work. After her husband's death 

and the settling of her two daughters, she goes on a journey 

remembering her past. 

Like the Tamarind Mem, the three women in Can You Hear 



the  Nightbird  Call?  are  also  possessed  by  their  past 

memories. Both Bibi-ji and Leela are displaced from their 

homeland to a foreign land where Bibi-ji is haunted by the 

childhood  memories  and  Leela  too  had  cherished 

memories of her married life and perished memories of her 

ARTICLES

11

l

i-manager’s Journal o  English Language Teaching  Vol.    No. 4



2014

l

n



,

 4

   October - December 

childhood  as  she  was  considered  as  half-half  by  her 

relatives. The researcher beautifully presents the pain of a 

person through the character Nimmo, who gives away her 

son Jasbeer to her aunt Bibi-ji and also had lost her mother, 

husband and daughter in the anti-Sikh Riot. Nimmo starts to 

live in her nostalgia of her family and the writer sensitively 

has built the character. The betrayed memories pierce the 

heart of Bibi-ji who takes away the man of her sister. She 

feels so bad in her married life. The researcher says that 

even  though  one  is  filled  with  riches,  one  cannot  live  a 

peaceful  life  with  haunted  memories.  Isolation, 

marginalization and alienation are also dealt with by the 

researcher  through  the  characters  Bibi-ji,  Nimmo  and 

Leela.


“Conflicting  Cultures”  deals  with  the  problems  of  the 

immigrants in a foreign land. Immigration is the movement 

of people to another country or region of which they are not 

native but they go in order to settle there. In Tamarind Mem

Kamini immigrates to Canada because of her job and she 

suffers  from  loneliness.  Still  she  likes  the  country  which  is 




Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə