Peter g. Wilson



Yüklə 165.17 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü165.17 Kb.

Reproductive bet-hedging in a rare yet widespread

rainforest tree, Syzygium paniculatum (Myrtaceae)

aec_2353

936..944


KATIE A. G. THURLBY,

1,2,3


PETER G. WILSON,

1

* WILLIAM B. SHERWIN,



2

CAROLYN CONNELLY

1

AND MAURIZIO ROSSETTO



1

1

National Herbarium of NSW, Royal Botanic Gardens and Domain Trust, Mrs Macquaries Road,



Sydney, NSW 2000, Australia (Email: peter.wilson@rbgsyd.nsw.gov.au),

2

School of Biological, Earth



and Environmental Sciences, and

3

School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of



New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Abstract

The rare rainforest tree species, Syzygium paniculatum, is the only known Australian species of the genus

to produce seeds that regularly have multiple embryos. Evidence from other species suggests that this is a case of

adventitious polyembryony, with the embryos arising from maternal nucellar tissue. In the present study we use

microsatellite data to determine whether sexual reproduction does occur and, if it does, to investigate the relative

fitness of asexual versus sexual seedlings. Genotyping suggested that the species is a polyploid and our results found

very little genetic diversity within and among populations (with a total of nine genotypic combinations across the

entire species). The only significant variation was between the three northernmost populations and the other eight

populations sampled. Analysis of individual embryos showed that sexually derived embryos did occur in some seeds

but that these were not necessarily the fittest. In general, the seedling from the largest embryo is the first to emerge

and maintains a competitive advantage over the other seedlings from the same seed. We discuss the ramifications

of the low levels of genetic diversity and consider whether there is a direct relationship between polyembryony and

the inferred polyploidy of the species. We consider the possible advantages of reproductive bet-hedging but also

highlight the susceptibility of a species with low genetic diversity to extreme stochastic events. Syzygium paniculatum

occurs in areas heavily impacted by human activity and these findings should contribute to improved management

of this threatened species.



Key words: agamospermy, clonality, littoral rainforest, polyembryony, polyploidy, Syzygium.

INTRODUCTION

Sexual versus asexual reproduction

The major benefit of sexual reproduction is generally

believed to be the ability of an organism to produce

new and potentially advantageous combinations of

genes, an advantage that is only available to obligate

asexual species through somatic mutation. However,

sexual reproduction can also be disadvantageous. A

sexual parent transmits only 50% of its genes to its

offspring, which could potentially lead to the break-

down of favourable genic combinations and the loss of

local adaptation (Otto 2009).

Asexual reproduction may provide genetic and

ecological advantages, particularly in the short term

(e.g. van Dijk & van Damme 2000). These advan-

tages might include the ability to persist in condi-

tions unfavourable for sexual reproduction, such as

strong pollen limitation in species-rich communities

(Whitton et al. 2008); they could also increase the

survival of advantageous genotypes, enable a geno-

type to sequester space and monopolize resources

(including establishment of new populations from a

single individual), or provide the potential to accu-

mulate variability through extended lifespan (Cal-

laghan et al. 1992; Hörandl 2004; Houliston &

Chapman 2004; Paun et al. 2006; Vallejo-Marín et al.

2010; van der Merwe et al. 2010). As a result, some

asexual species are as genetically diverse and wide-

spread as sexual species (Gitzendanner & Soltis

2000; Paun et al. 2006). Asexual reproduction also

poses possible disadvantages, particularly if it results

in loss of genetic diversity. Reduced genetic variation

and drift (Harper 1978; Eckert et al. 1999; Paun



et al. 2006) can result in the loss of short-term fitness

and of long-term adaptive potential (Richards 2003;

Zhang & Zhang 2007).

Interestingly,

models

show


that

the


benefits

of sex may be obtained through facultative sexual

*Corresponding author.

Accepted for publication December 2011.



Austral Ecology (2012) 37, 936–944

bs_bs_banner

© 2012 The Authors

doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia


reproduction without the cost (Green & Noakes

1995).This suggests that the combination of a range of

reproductive mechanisms may provide the benefits of

both sexuality and asexuality while reducing overall

costs (Green & Noakes 1995; Paun et al. 2006; Vallejo-

Marín et al. 2010).



Agamospermy

One particular case of asexual reproduction is agamo-

spermy, the production of seed without sex (Talent

2009). It is a mechanism that affords offspring the

advantages of seed production normally only available

to sexually produced progeny: protection, disease

resistance, dormancy and improved dispersal (Rich-

ards 2003; Silvertown 2008).

Sex can exist simultaneously with agamospermy

because most forms of agamospermy require the initial

development of a sexual embryo or, at the very least,

fertilization and development of the endosperm

(Ganeshaiah et al. 1991; Koltunow & Grossniklaus

2003; Whitton et al. 2008). So, in some polyembryonic

seeds, sexual embryos may persist alongside the devel-

oping agamospermic embryos (Ganeshaiah et al.

1991; Asker & Jerling 1992; Richards 2003; Whitton

et al. 2008). However, stable coexistence of both

sexual and asexual progeny may be difficult to accom-

plish within a single population (Silvertown 2008)

because embryos must compete for the resources

afforded by the endosperm. As a result, the percentage

of fruits containing sexual embryos will vary depend-

ing on the outcome of this competition (Roy 1953,

1961; Narayanaswami & Roy 1960; Naumova 1992;

Whitton et al. 2008). Studies in Citrus indicate that the

zygotic embryo develops rather slowly, and may be

outcompeted by the more vigorous nucellar embryos

and fail to survive in seeds where many of these occur

(Koltunow 1993).

Study system

The rare Australian rainforest tree Syzygium panicu-



latum Gaertn. (Myrtaceae) may prove to have a

complex mating system, combining multiple repro-

ductive mechanisms. Fruits contain a single seed

which is usually polyembryonic, a trait not seen in

any other Australian native Syzygium species. Poly-

embryony can arise by several means. One possible

mechanism is cleavage polyembryony (the separation

of a zygote into two or more units; see Webber

1940), although this happens more often in gymno-

sperms than angiosperms (Batygina & Vinogradova

2007). It is most likely that polyembryony in S. pan-

iculatum is due to agamospermy, as has been docu-

mented in some Asian Syzygium species (Roy 1953,

1961). In adventitious polyembryony the embryos

are genetically identical and are derived from the

integument or the nucellus (the parts of the ovule

adjacent to the embryo sac). The embryos in S. pan-



iculatum vary in size and often have markedly

unequal storage cotyledons. Embryos with cotyledons

of this type are cryptocotylar and germination is

often hypogeal.



Syzygium paniculatum is locally rare and represented

by small populations distributed across a geographical

range of about 400 km (Fig. 1). Because of its mode of

reproduction, the species is likely to have low diversity,

which may be detrimental to fitness. Understanding

the relative contribution of sexual and asexual repro-

duction might help us to understand the causes of

rarity in S. paniculatum, and this species may provide a

means for exploring the consequences of mating

mechanisms on the expansion or decline of rare

species. To better understand the impact of sexual

reproduction on rarity, current distribution and long-

term potential, this study aims to test the hypotheses

arising from the following points:



Fig. 1.

Distribution and sampling sites of Syzygium



paniculatum. The asterisks identify collection sites along the

New South Wales coast.

R E P R O D U C T I V E B E T- H E D G I N G I N SYZYGIUM PANICULATUM

937


© 2012 The Authors

doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia


1.

Despite its wide distribution range, the rare



S. paniculatum has low genetic diversity. The level

and distribution of genetic diversity are important

elements in the development of appropriate con-

servation planning for this species.

2.

As suggested by other studies, there are asso-



ciations between polyembryony, apomixis and

polyploidy.

3.

If both sexual and asexual reproduction mecha-



nisms are identified, it is expected that they

could result in differential levels of fitness (as

measured by germination success and seedling

growth).


MATERIALS AND METHODS

Study species and sampling

Syzygium paniculatum is a small to medium rainforest tree

that is restricted to littoral rainforest of New South Wales

(NSW, Australia), occurring in disjunct populations along a

long, narrow, linear coastal strip (approx. 400 km N–S

and

<20 km inland) in five geographically separated areas

(Fig. 1). Syzygium paniculatum is listed as endangered in the

state Threatened Species Conservation (TSC) Act 1995 (NSW)

and vulnerable in the Federal Environment Protection and



Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act 1999, partly because

population sizes are small, rarely exceeding 20 individuals. It

has dark dense foliage and produces white flowers in summer

and bright-pink to magenta fruit from late summer into

autumn. As in most Myrtaceae, the floral morphology sug-

gests a generalist pollination syndrome and this has been

demonstrated in other Syzygium species by Hopper (1980)

and Crome and Irvine (1986), who recorded a wide range of

floral visitors. However, little is known about fruit dispersal in

S. paniculatum; the fruits are palatable, but we saw no evi-

dence of birds or small mammals feeding on them during

fieldwork for this study.

Sampling was aimed at obtaining an extensive account of

the genetic diversity across the geographical distribution of

the species. Eleven populations were sampled across the

known range of S. paniculatum (Fig. 1). As populations were

generally small, samples from all accessible individuals iden-

tified in this study and during previous surveys (Mills 1996;

A.N. Rodd, pers. comm., 2008) at each of the listed sites

were collected. In total, samples from 79 adult trees were

obtained. The largest population consisted of 31 individuals,

with all other populations comprising one to 12 individuals.

Leaf samples were freeze-dried or silica-gel-dried, and stored

at

-20°C for later DNA extraction. Total genomic DNA was



extracted using DNeasy 96 plant kits (Qiagen, Hilden,

Germany).



Molecular analyses

Nine nuclear simple sequence repeat (nSSR) markers spe-

cifically developed for S. paniculatum were used, based on

the PCR and genotyping conditions reported in Thurlby



et al. (2011). Genotyping traces were analysed using Gen-

emapper v4.0 (Applied Biosystems). To test genotyping

accuracy, PCRs were repeated for each primer across 20%

of the individuals. Fewer than 5% of repeats identi-

fied errors needing confirmation with further PCR and

genotyping.

During the development of the SSR markers, it was

noticed that multiple loci produced polyploid amplification

patterns (Thurlby et al. 2011). In order to confirm the

polyploid nature of S. paniculatum and to verify the number

of alleles per locus, genotyping traces were obtained for

three


other

Syzygium

species:


Syzygium

corynanthum

(F.Muell.) L.A.S.Johnson, Syzygium francisii (F.M.Bailey)

L.A.S.Johnson and Syzygium jambos (L.) Alston. Of the

four Syzygium species tested, S. corynanthum and S. fran-



cisii showed one (homozygous) or two (heterozygous)

alleles for all loci tested, as is expected for a diploid organ-

ism. The third species, S. jambos, a known tetraploid (cited

as Eugenia jambos in Roy 1953, and Eugenia jambolana in

Singhal et al. 1985), displayed four alleles at locus SP33

and three alleles at locus SP43.1. Four alleles were also

amplified at locus SP33 and three alleles at locus SP38 and

SP54 for S. paniculatum, suggesting that the study species is

also a polyploid.

Genetic diversity

Because of the unconventional nature of the genotyping data

obtained for S. paniculatum, genetic variation within and

between populations was measured using both an allelic

approach (where alleles present at each locus were scored by

size) and a binary approach (where all alleles were scored as

either present or absent).

The program

atetra (van Puyvelde et al. 2009) was used

for the allelic approach.

atetra performs Monte Carlo simu-

lations to account for probable combinations of allele copy

number in polyploid datasets with partial heterozygotes.

Genetic diversity statistics were calculated including Hardy-

Weinberg expected heterozygosity (He) and Shannon-

Weiner diversity index (H

′) (Nei 1987), Nei’s measure of

population differentiation (G

ST

), the interpopulational gene



diversity in relation to intrapopulational gene diversity (R

ST

),



and Gene Diversity (Dm) (Nei 1973) as well as Nei’s

Genetic Distance (D) (Nei 1972, 1978).

Using the binary approach (each allele for each locus was

scored as either present or absent across all individuals),

principal coordinates analysis (PCoA; calculated at popula-

tion level because of the limited number of genets through-

out

the


sample)

and


analysis

of

molecular



variance

(AMOVA) were calculated using the program GenAlEx v6.3

(Peakall & Smouse 2006).

Polyembryony and relative fitness

Experimental trials were conducted to investigate the origin

of embryos, the viability of embryos and the relative fitness of

offspring. Albeit scarce, fruit was collected during the two

collecting seasons over which the study was conducted

938


K . A . G . T H U R L B Y ET AL.

© 2012 The Authors

doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia



(2008, 2009) from four populations, Abrahams Bosom

Reserve (AB), Towra Point Nature Reserve (TP), The

Entrance Peninsular (TE) and Cams Wharf (CW) (Fig. 1).

Over both seasons, 129 seeds were dissected and embryos

counted, and the 68 collected in the second season were also

weighed. An unpaired t-test was performed to determine

whether the difference in size between embryo 1 (largest by

weight and/or first to germinate) and all other embryos in the

seed was statistically significant.

Fifty-one whole seeds (13 with single embryos) and seven

seeds with embryos separated, with a total of 30 embryos,

were germinated in controlled conditions at the Australian

Botanic Garden, Mount Annan, NSW. Seeds were sown

fresh on agar plates (non-aseptic 8g L

-1

, non-nutrient) and



germinated at 20°C on a cycle of 12-h light, 12-h dark.

Germinated seedlings were measured for leaf number and

height at regular intervals. Using an unpaired t-test, height,

leaf number and branch number across weeks were com-

pared between seedling 1 and all other seedlings in the seed.

A linear regression analysis was then performed in Microsoft

Excel for embryo weight versus seedling height at 21 weeks.

The above statistical methods were repeated using only indi-

viduals that had been genotyped, to look for correlations

between height, seed size and sexuality.



Sexuality and relative fitness

Leaf material was collected from the germinated seedlings

from AB, TP, TE and CW (16 family groups – 10 samples

from monoembryonic seeds and 21 samples from six poly-

embryonic seeds) in addition to collections of wild seedlings

from Captain Cook Drive (CC) (three samples) and

Wamberal Lagoon Nature Reserve (WL) (four samples).

Leaf material from maternal parents and seedlings was geno-

typed to determine sexual or asexual origin. Once recombi-

nant (‘sexual’) or asexual origin was determined, means were

calculated for height of seedling 1 (sexual) versus height

of embryo 1 (asexual) and a t-test performed to determine if

the difference between sexual and asexual embryos was

significant.



RESULTS

Genetic diversity

A total of 39 alleles were found across nine nSSR

markers, with the number of alleles per locus ranging

from one (SP116) to six (SP33, SP54, SP85.1). Allele

size range was greatest in SP33 (28 bp), while a single

allele was amplified for SP116 across the entire species

(Appendix S1). Average within-population diversity

measures for S. paniculatum were He

= 0.466 and

H

′ = 0.740. The 79 adult individuals representing 11



populations and the entire geographical range of

S. paniculatum produced only nine genotypic combi-

nations from those 39 alleles.

The most common genotype (genotype 1) was

present in 56 (71.79%) individuals across six popu-

lations: CW, TE, WL, TP, CC and Conjola National

Park (CN) (Appendix S1). At four of these popula-

tions – CW, TE, TP and CC – four unique secondary

genotypes were also found (one genotype in each

population found in one individual). The secondary

genotype found at TP was the only genotype present

at AB; this genotype possessed only a single base pair

change in length (Appendix S1). Four populations

possessed a single unique genotype that was not

found in any other populations. These were the three

northernmost populations, Green Point (GP), Salts

Bay (SB) and Sugarloaf Point (SP), as well as

Ourimbah Creek Valley (OC), which was the popu-

lation furthest from the coast. Genotypes were

distributed along a longitudinal gradient with north-

ernmost genotypes displaying the most allelic devia-

tions from genotype 1 (Appendix S1).

All analyses supported significant differentiation

between a southern group of eight populations and the

three northern populations. The within-north and

north versus south G

ST

, R



ST

, D and D

m

values were



higher than the within-south values, suggesting much

higher genetic differentiation and diversity in the

northern populations.

The PCoA (Fig. 2) showed the southern popula-

tion group to be strongly differentiated from the

northern populations. Analysis of molecular variance

comparing northern and southern regions partitioned

the variance with 4% (PhiRT 0.762; P



< 0.01) within

populations, 19% (PhiPT 0.956; P



< 0.01) among

populations

and

77%


(PhiPR

0.816;


P

< 0.01)

Fig. 2.

Principal coordinates analysis plot for Syzygium



paniculatum populations illustrating pairwise genetic dis-

tance between the 11 populations sampled. Principal coor-

dinates analysis was produced from a binary distance

matrix and performed in GenAlEx. Southern populations

(Abrahams Bosom Reserve (AB), Cams Wharf (CW),

Captain Cook Drive (CC), Conjola National Park (CN),

Towra Point Nature Reserve (TP), Wamberal Lagoon

Nature Reserve (WL), Ourimbah Creek Valley (OC) and

The Entrance Peninsular (TE)) are grouped together

(shown in figure by dotted line), while the northernmost

populations (Green Point (GP), Salts Bay (SB) and Sugar-

loaf Point (SP)) remain distinctly separated from the south-

ern group.

R E P R O D U C T I V E B E T- H E D G I N G I N SYZYGIUM PANICULATUM

939

© 2012 The Authors



doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia



between regions. Conjola National Park and GP were

excluded because AMOVA does not allow populations

with only one individual.

Polyembryony and relative fitness

Seed


dissections

confirmed


polyembryony

in

S. paniculatum with embryo number ranging from one

to nine per seed (mean

= 3.08; = 129). Seeds that

contained only one embryo totalled 28.8% of all seeds

dissected; however, this is likely to be an overestima-

tion of monoembryony as many undifferentiated cell

structures (potential embryos) were observed at the

time of dissection and there was evidence of embryos

having been attacked by insect larvae.

The majority of polyembryonic seeds contained

one large embryo (embryo 1) and any subsequent

embryos were much smaller. An unpaired t-test on

the 58 second-year seeds for which embryos were

weighed revealed a significant difference between the

weight of embryo 1 and embryo 2 (two-tail t

= 10.06,

d.f.


= 52, P

< 0.001) and embryo 1 and all other

embryos in the seed (two-tail t

= 6.15, d.f. = 52,

P

< 0.001).

All 58 seeds (51 whole and seven dissected) germi-

nated, with multiple seedlings arising from the polyem-

bryonic seeds. In 90.3% of seeds, embryo 1 became

seedling 1 (the tallest seedling) for the duration of the

measurement period (Fig. 3 summarizes the results for

the three measurements). An unpaired t-test showed

that mean height for seedling 1 across the entire mea-

surement period was significantly different from that

of all other seedlings (two-tail t

= 20.96, d.f. = 93,

P

< 0.001). A linear regression analysis performed on a

smaller subset of weighted embryos showed a signifi-

cant association between embryo weight and seedling

height (R

2

= 0.573; P



< 0.001). Leaf number and

branch number followed the same pattern as height

throughout the period of measurement, with seedling 1

having the highest leaf number and branch number

(Fig. 3). However, while differences in leaf number

were


significant

(two-tail



t

= 15.02,


d.f.

= 93,


P

< 0.001), differences in branch length across the

entire measurement period were not significant.



Sexuality and relative fitness

All seedlings tested were from the southern group of

eight S. paniculatum populations where little or no

diversity was found within or between populations. In

general, a higher proportion of sexuality was found in

offspring from populations at the northernmost end of

the southern genetic group of populations (CW and

TE; Appendix S2). The term ‘asexual’ is used here

with caution to represent offspring that were identical

to the parent plant. Considering that testing for

linkage disequilibrium in polyploid organisms is

problematic, similar patterns could be obtained in

the unlikely event of all loci being linked (e.g. P

cgen


(Sydes & Peakall 1998) suggests that the likelihood

of genotype 1 to occur so many times by chance

through recombination among the adult individuals

is P

= 2.4 ¥ 10

-7

). The term ‘sexual’ is used to repre-



sent offspring that differed from the parent plant

and were likely to be recombinant. Seedlings from

both

monoembryonic



and

polyembryonic

seeds

showed both sexuality and asexuality in almost all



combinations (Appendix S2). Seven out of nine seed-

lings from monoembryonic seeds were sexual, and five

of seven polyembryonic seeds produced one sexual

–10


0

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

80



Rest

First


Leav

es

 (



N

o.

)



–1

0

1



2

3

4



5

6

7



B

ranc


hes

 (N


o.

)

–5



0

5

10



15

20

25



30

35

40



45

50

H



ei

ght


 (c

m

)



a) 

b) 


c) 

6 weeks


12 weeks

21–22 weeks



Fig. 3.

Box


plots

summarizing

measured

values


at

6, 12 and 21/22 weeks for first seedling (grey shading)

and the rest of the seedlings (no shading): (a) data for

leaf number, (b) data for branch number, (c) data for

height.

940


K . A . G . T H U R L B Y ET AL.

© 2012 The Authors

doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia



seedling. Out of 38 offspring genotyped, 26 (72.7%)

were asexual and the remaining 12 were sexual

(Appendix S2).

Of the 12 sexual seedlings, one seedling possessed

an allele that was not found elsewhere across the

samples taken of the species. An additional five pos-

sessed alleles that were not found in samples taken

from the population the seedling originated from, but

were found elsewhere across the species. Two of

these, one from AB (from a monoembryonic seed)

and one from CC, contained only a single base-pair

allelic change in a single locus (potentially a somatic

mutation rather than sexual recombination; van der

Merwe et al. 2010; Gross et al. 2012). The remain-

ing six showed changes in heterozygosity (parent

was heterozygous or partially heterozygous and off-

spring was partially heterozygous or homozygous;

Appendix S2).

Sexual seedlings were not always tallest and sexual

seedling 1 was not significantly taller than asexual

seedling 1. In polyembryonic seeds that contained one

sexual and one asexual embryo, the tallest germinated

seedling was sexual. However, in polyembryonic seeds

that contained more than two embryos (one being

sexual), the tallest germinated seedling was asexual.

An unpaired t-test for mean height of sexual seedling 1

(tallest sexual seedling from a polyembryonic seed)

and mean height of asexual seedling 1 (tallest asexual

seedling from a polyembryonic seed) was not signifi-

cant, suggesting that sexuality does not directly influ-

ence seedling height.

DISCUSSION

Distribution of diversity

Syzygium paniculatum is an atypical rare species,

comprising a few small populations that cover a geo-

graphical range of about 400 km. In comparison to a

related species of similar geographical range within

Australia, Syzygium nervosum DC. (Shapcott 1998),

S. paniculatum has extremely low genetic diversity

with a large number of individuals having identical

genotypes. Syzygium paniculatum also displays distinct

partitioning of genetic diversity. In particular, the three

northern populations (GP, SB and SP) each displayed

distinctive genotypes, suggesting the presence of a

strong genetic and geographical divide between the

northern populations and the larger southern group

of populations. The genetic diversity evident in

S. paniculatum populations does not appear to relate to

population size, with both the largest and smallest

populations existing within the southern, less geneti-

cally diverse region.

Loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic

divergence along the latitudinal gradient could be the

result of vicariance and drift caused by the combined

effect of the expansion/contraction cycles of the Qua-

ternary and more recent anthropogenic pressures

(Floyd 1990; Payne 1991). Additionally, the lower

divergence among the southern populations (includ-

ing multiple populations containing many ramets of

the one genet) suggests that the southern distribution

could be the result of a small number of founder

events (as previously described in Erythroxylum pusil-

lum for example; van der Merwe et al. 2010). The

production of dispersible asexually produced seed

could have facilitated the fast spread of genetically

identical individuals across the southern distribution

of this tree. Thus, in these genetically depleted popu-

lations new diversity is most likely to arise via migra-

tion from the north, by occasional sexual events, or

through somatic mutation (van der Merwe et al.

2010; Gross et al. 2012).

Polyploidy and polyembryony

The usual ploidy level in the Myrtaceae is diploid

(Rye

1979; Vijayakumar



&

Subramanian

1985;

Rye & James 1992), but polyploidy is a frequent occur-



rence in some genera, and in Syzygium it has been

recorded in S. jambos and Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels

(NicLughadha & Proenca 1996). Our genotypic data

indicate that S. paniculatum is a polyploid. An increase

in ploidy levels has been frequently associated with

apomixis (Rye 1979; Nogler 1984; Bierzychudek

1987; Mogie 1992; Roche et al. 2001; Richards 2003;

Bicknell & Koltunow 2004). Carman (1997) sug-

gested a positive correlation between polyploidy and

apomixis, and proposed the hypothesis that polyem-

bryony and other reproductive anomalies ‘result from

asynchronously-expressed duplicate genes in polyp-

loids, mesopolyploids, or paleopolyploids’. On the

other hand, Asker and Jerling (1992) indicated that,

in general, adventitious embryony is much more

common in diploids than in polyploids.The hypothesis

mentioned by Whitton et al. (2008), that pollen limi-

tation might selectively favour adventitious embryony,

does not seem applicable here; the temperate littoral

rainforest communities where this species occurs are

not sufficiently species-rich to significantly reduce

pollinator visitation.

Whitton et al. (2008) also suggested that both

apomixis and polyploidy may be selectively favoured

in allopolyploid hybrids as a mechanism to avoid

hybrid breakdown. Soltis and Soltis (2000) reported

that most polyploid plant species that have been

examined


using

molecular

markers

‘have


been

shown to be polyphyletic, having arisen multiple

times from the same diploid species’, but we found

R E P R O D U C T I V E B E T- H E D G I N G I N SYZYGIUM PANICULATUM

941

© 2012 The Authors



doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia



no evidence that this was the case with S. panicula-

tum. Preliminary sequencing of other taxa could

not identify likely parental sources for an allo-

polyploid origin scenario for this species (data not

presented).



Sexual versus asexual reproduction and fitness

This study has shown that S. paniculatum seedlings

can be of sexual or asexual origin, but that successful

recombinant events are relatively uncommon. Most

forms of apomixis require fertilization to trigger the

production of single or multiple asexual embryos and

sexual embryos can persist in the seed alongside devel-

oping adventive embryos (Ganeshaiah et al. 1991;

Asker & Jerling 1992; Koltunow & Grossniklaus 2003;

Richards


2003; Whitton

et al. 2008). However,

because sexual and asexual embryos must compete for

the available endosperm resources, the sexual embryo

is sometimes outcompeted (Roy 1953; Naraya-

naswami & Roy 1960; Whitton et al. 2008). We found

that when seeds in S. paniculatum contained two

embryos, the largest was the sexual embryo, but in

seeds containing more than two embryos the sexual

embryo was never the largest. This suggests that the

sexual embryo might be outcompeted by proliferation

of asexual embryos.

Embryo weight is correlated with seedling size, but

with no evidence of genetic influence on seedling size.

The largest embryo always produces a significantly

larger seedling, but the largest embryo is not always

the sexual one. Large seeds (or embryos) provide seed-

lings with an energy source that is important for

increased shade tolerance for seedlings germinating

under dense canopies and for increasing height

where light gradients exist (Leishman & Westoby

1994; Myers & Kitajima 2007). Considering that

S. paniculatum embryos have storage cotyledons, it is

likely that the largest seedling is produced by the

embryo with the largest energy store, rather than by

the one with the sexual origin.



Bet-hedging: survival strategies for

Syzygium paniculatum

A number of studies (Wollemia nobilis Peakall et al.

2003; Elaeocarpus williamsianus Rossetto et al. 2004;

Eidothea hardeniana Rossetto & Kooyman 2005) have

shown that rare rainforest trees can successfully

persist through historical environmental changes with

low diversity because of persistence mechanisms

such as asexual reproduction. Despite low popula-

tion numbers and low genetic diversity in wild popu-

lations, S. paniculatum is currently persisting locally

as well as producing viable, dispersible sexual and

asexual seed.

Although sexual individuals do not always survive

in preference to asexual ones, this rainforest tree

could be hedging its bets with the potential to receive

the benefits of both reproductive mechanisms (Kol-

tunow 1993). In the long term, sexual events might

enhance the adaptive potential of S. paniculatum,

while asexual events give it the capacity to persist

locally and capitalize on expansion opportunities

even if sexual reproduction fails. Additionally, the

polyploid nature of S. paniculatum in effect creates an

added buffering system whereby the potential rate

at which fit alleles are lost through sexual recombi-

nation


is

reduced. Finally, polyembryony

could

also minimize the impact of insect seed predators.



In a recent study, Juniper and Britton (2010)

detected a minimum of three seed predators in fruits

of this species: one weevil (Sigastus sp.), one wasp

(Anselmella miltoni) and the Guava moth (Coscinopty-



cha improbana). Interestingly, these authors noted

that despite fruits and seeds being severely damaged

at times, some seedlings still emerged.

Regardless, low population numbers and low diver-

sity still make S. paniculatum susceptible to extreme

stochastic events (such as current threats like myrtle

rust; see Carnegie & Cooper 2011), especially with

limited evidence for sexual individuals surviving in the

wild. While the species is currently able to persist

locally and colonize new habitat, suitable new habitat

may no longer exist because of extensive clearing of

littoral rainforests. In the future, artificial cross-

fertilization and fitness experiments will enable us to

test the relative fitness of specific genotype com-

binations and further support decision making in a

translocation scenario.



ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

We acknowledge the Australian Flora Foundation for

funding, Chris Allen, Sven Delaney, Louise Lutz-

Mann,


Margaret

Heslewood,

Robert

Kooyman,


Hannah McPherson, Rohan Mellick, Amanda Rolla-

son, Tony Rodd, Paul Rymer and Marlien van der

Merwe for technical support and/or advice, and

reviewers and editors for their useful comments.



REFERENCES

Asker S. E. & Jerling L. (1992) Apomixis in Plants. CRC Press,

Boca Raton.

Batygina T. B. & Vinogradova G. Y. (2007) Phenomenon of

polyembryony. Genetic heterogeneity of seeds. Russ. J. Dev.

Biol. 38, 126–51.

942


K . A . G . T H U R L B Y ET AL.

© 2012 The Authors

doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia



Bicknell R. A. & Koltunow A. M. (2004) Understanding apo-

mixis: recent advances and remaining conundrums. Plant



Cell 16, S228–45.

Bierzychudek P. (1987) Patterns in plant parthenogenesis. Expe-



rientia 41, 1255–64.

Callaghan T. V., Carlsson B. A., Jonsdottir I. S., Svensson B. M.

&

Jonasson


S.

(1992)


Clonal

plants


and

environ-


mental change: introduction to the Proceedings and

summary. Oikos 63, 341–7.

Carman J. G. (1997) Asynchronous expression of duplicate

genes in angiosperms may cause apomixis, bispory, tet-

raspory, and polyembryony. Biol. J. Linn. Soc. Lond. 61,

51–94.


Carnegie A. J. & Cooper K. (2011) Emergency response to the

incursion of an exotic myrtaceous rust in Australia.



Australas. Plant Pathol. 40, 346–59.

Crome F. H. J. & Irvine A. K. (1986) ‘Two Bob Each Way’: the

pollination and breeding system of the Australian rain forest

tree Syzygium cormiflorum (Myrtaceae). Biotropica 18, 115–

25.

Eckert C. G., Dorken M. E. & Mitchell S. A. (1999) Loss of sex



in clonal populations of a flowering plant, Decodon verticil-

latus (Lythraceae). Evol. Ecol. 53, 1079–92.

Floyd A. G. (1990) Australian Rainforests in New South Wales.

Surrey Beatty & Sons, Chipping Norton.

Ganeshaiah K. N., Shaanker R. U. & Joshi N. V. (1991) Evolu-

tion of polyembryony: consequences to the fitness of mother

and offspring. J. Genet. 70, 103–27.

Gitzendanner M. & Soltis P. (2000) Patterns of genetic variation

in rare and widespread plant congeners. Am. J. Bot. 87,

783–92.

Green R. F. & Noakes D. L. G. (1995) Is a little bit of sex as good



as a lot? J. Theor. Biol. 174, 87–96.

Gross C. L., Nelson P. A., Haddadchi A. & Fatemi M. (2012)

Somatic mutations contribute to genotypic diversity in

sterile and fertile populations of the threatened shrub, Gre-



villea rhizomatosa (Proteaceae). Ann. Bot. doi: 10.1093/aob/

mcr283.


Harper J. L. (1978) The demography of plants with clonal

growth. In: Structure and Functioning of Plant Populations

(eds A. J.W. Freysen & J.W. Woldendorp) pp. 27–48. North-

Holland Publishing, Amsterdam.

Hopper S. D. (1980) Pollination of the rainforest tree Syzy-

gium tierneyanum (Myrtaceae) at Kuranda, Northern

Queensland. Aust. J. Bot. 28, 223–37.

Hörandl E. (2004) Comparative analysis of genetic divergence

among sexual ancestors of apomictic complexes using

isozyme data. Int. J. Plant Sci. 165, 615–22.

Houliston G. J. & Chapman H. M. (2004) Reproductive

strategy and population variability in the facultative

apomict Hieracium pilosella (Asteraceae). Am. J. Bot. 91,

37–44.

Juniper P. A. & Britton D. R. (2010) Insects associated with the



fruit of Syzygium paniculatum (Magenta Lillypilly) and

Syzygium australe (Brush Cherry). Aust. J. Entomol. 49, 296–

303.


Koltunow A. M. (1993) Apomixis: embryo sacs and embryos

formed without meiosis or fertilization in ovules. Plant Cell



5, 1425–37.

Koltunow A. M. & Grossniklaus U. (2003) Apomixis: a devel-

opmental perspective. Annu. Rev. Plant Biol. 54, 547–

74.


Leishman M. R. & Westoby M. (1994) The role of large seed size

in shaded conditions: experimental evidence. Funct. Ecol. 8,

205–14.

Mills K. (1996) Illawarra Vegetation Studies: Littoral Rainforest in



Southern NSW, Inventory, Characteristics and Management.

Illawarra Vegetation Studies (1). Coachwood Publishing,

Jamberoo.

Mogie M. (1992) The Evolution of Asexual Reproduction in Plants.

Chapman & Hall, London.

Myers J. A. & Kitajima K. (2007) Carbohydrate storage

enhances seedling shade and stress tolerance in a Neotropi-

cal forest. J. Ecol. 95, 383–95.

Narayanaswami S. & Roy S. K. (1960) Embryo sac development

and polyembryony in Syzygium cumini (Linn.) Skeels. Bot.

Not. 113, 273–84.

Naumova T. (1992) Apomixis in Angiosperms: Nucellar and Integu-



mentary Embryony. CRC Press, Boca Raton.

Nei M. (1972) Genetic distance between populations. Am. Nat.



106, 283–92.

Nei


M.

(1973)


Analysis

of

gene



diversity

in

subdi-



vided populations. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 70, 3321–

3.

Nei M. (1978) Estimation of average heterozygosity and genetic



distance from a small number of individuals. Genetics 89,

583–90.


Nei M. (1987) Molecular Evolutionary Genetics. Columbia Uni-

versity Press, New York.

NicLughadha E. & Proenca C. (1996) A survey of the reproduc-

tive biology of the Myrtoideae (Myrtaceae). Ann. Mo. Bot.



Gard. 83, 480–503.

Nogler G. A. (1984) Gametophytic apomixis. In: Embryology of



Angiosperms (ed. B. M. Johri) pp. 475–518. Springer-Verlag,

Berlin.


Otto S. P. (2009) The evolutionary enigma of sex. Am. Nat. 174,

1–14.


Paun O., Greilhuber J., Temsch E. M. & Hörandl E. (2006)

Patterns, sources and ecological implications of clonal

diversity in apomictic Ranunculus carpaticola (Ranunculus

auricomus complex, Ranunculaceae). Mol. Ecol. 15, 897–

910.


Payne R. (1991) New findings of the rare tree Syzygium panicu-

latum (Myrtaceae) in the Wyong area, New South Wales.

Cunninghamia 2, 495–8.

Peakall R., Ebert D., Leon J. S., Meagher P. F. & Offord C. A.

(2003) Comparative genetic study confirms exceptionally

low genetic variation in the ancient and endangered relictual

conifer, Wollemia nobilis (Araucariaceae). Mol. Ecol. 12,

2331–43.


Peakall R. & Smouse P. E. (2006) GENALEX 6: genetic analysis

in Excel. Population genetic software for teaching and

research. Mol. Ecol. Notes 6, 288–95.

Richards A. J. (2003) Apomixis in flowering plants: an over-

view. Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond., B, Biol. Sci. 358, 1085–

93.


Roche

D., Hanna

W. W.

&

Ozias-Akins



P.

(2001)


Is

supernumerary

chromatin

involved


in

gametophytic

apomixis of polyploid plants? Sex. Plant Reprod. 13, 343–

9.

Rossetto M., Gross C. L., Jones R. & Hunter J. (2004) The



impact of clonality on an endangered tree (Elaeocarpus wil-

liamsianus) in a fragmented rainforest. Biol. Conserv. 117,

33–9.


Rossetto M. & Kooyman R. M. (2005) The tension between

dispersal and persistence regulates the current distribution

of rare palaeo-endemic rain forest flora: a case study. J. Ecol.

93, 906–17.

Roy S. K. (1953) Embryology of Eugenia jambos L. Curr. Sci. 8,

249–50.

R E P R O D U C T I V E B E T- H E D G I N G I N SYZYGIUM PANICULATUM



943

© 2012 The Authors

doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x

Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia



Roy S. K. (1961) Embryology of Eugenia fruticosa L. Proc. Natl

Acad. Sci. India Section B 31, 80–7.

Rye B. L. (1979) Chromosome number variation in the Myrta-

ceae and its taxonomic implications. Aust. J. Bot. 27, 547–

73.


Rye B. L. & James S. H. (1992) The relationship between dys-

ploidy and reproductive capacity in Myrtaceae. Aust. J. Bot.



40, 829–848.

Shapcott A. (1998) Vagile but inbred: patterns of inbreeding and

the genetic structure within populations of the monsoon

rain forest tree Syzygium nervosum (Myrtaceae) in Northern

Australia. J. Trop. Ecol. 14, 595–614.

Silvertown J. (2008) The evolutionary maintenance of sexual

reproduction: evidence from the ecological distribution of

asexual reproduction in clonal plants. Int. J. Plant Sci. 169,

157–68.

Singhal V. K., Gill B. S. & Bir S. S. (1985) Cytology of woody



species. Proc. Indiana Acad. Sci. 94, 607–17.

Soltis P. S. & Soltis D. E. (2000) The role of genetic and genomic

attributes in the success of polyploids. Proc. Natl Acad. Sci.

USA 97, 7051–7.

Sydes M. & Peakall R. (1998) Extensive clonality in the

endangered shrub Haloragodendron lucasii (Haloragaceae)

revealed by allozymes and RAPDs. Mol. Ecol. 7, 87–

93.

Talent N. (2009) Evolution of gametophytic apomixis in flower-



ing plants: an alternative model from Maloid Rosaceae.

Theory Biosci. 128, 121–38.

Thurlby K. A. G., Connelly C., Wilson P. G. & Rossetto M.

(2011) Development of microsatellite loci for Syzygium pan-

iculatum (Myrtaceae), a rare polyembryonic rainforest tree.

Conserv. Genet. Resour. 3, 205–8.

Vallejo-Marín M., Dorken M. E. & Barrett S. C. H. (2010)

Ecological and evolutionary consequences of clonality for

plant mating. Annu. Rev. Ecol. Evol. Syst. 41, 193–213.

van der Merwe M., Spain C. S. & Rossetto M. (2010) Enhanc-

ing the survival and expansion potential of a founder

population through clonality. New Phytol. 188, 868–

78.


van Dijk P. & van Damme J. (2000) Apomixis technology and the

paradox of sex. Trends Plant Sci. 5, 81–4.

van Puyvelde K., van Geert A. & Triest L. (2009) ATETRA, a

new software program to analyse tetraploid microsatellite

data: comparison with TETRA and TETRASAT. Mol. Ecol.

Resour. 10, 331–4.

Vijayakumar N. & Subramanian D. (1985) Cytotaxono-

mical studies in South Indian Myrtaceae. Cytologia 50,

513–20.


Webber J. M. (1940) Polyembryony. Bot. Rev. 6, 575–

98.


Whitton J., Sears C. J., Baack E. J. & Otto S. P. (2008) The

dynamic nature of apomixis in the Angiosperms. Int. J. Plant



Sci. 169, 169–82.

Zhang Y. & Zhang D. (2007) Asexual and sexual reproduc-

tive strategies in clonal plants. Front. Biol. China 2, 256–

62.


SUPPORTING INFORMATION

Additional Supporting Information may be found in

the online version of this article:

Appendix S1. Summary of adult genotypic data.

Appendix S2. Summary of genotypic data from

parents and offspring.

944

K . A . G . T H U R L B Y ET AL.



© 2012 The Authors

doi:10.1111/j.1442-9993.2011.02353.x



Austral Ecology © 2012 Ecological Society of Australia


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə