Physiological and biochemical properties of three



Yüklə 159.95 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü159.95 Kb.

Journal of Sustainability Science and Management 

Volume 10 Number 1, June 2015: 66-75

ISSN: 1823-8556

© Penerbit UMT

PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THREE 

CULTIVARS OF WAX APPLE (Syzygium samarangense [Blume] Merrill 

& L.M. Perry) FRUITS 

MOHAMMAD MONERUZZAMAN KHANDAKER

1

*, A. I. ALEBIDI



2

, ABM SHARIF HOSSAIN

3



NASHRIYAH MAT



1

 AND AMRU NASRULHAQ BOYCE

4

1

School of Agriculture Science and Biotechnology, Faculty of Bioresource and Food Industry, Universiti Sultan Zainal Abidin, 

Tembila Campus, 22200 Besut, Terengganu, Malaysia. 

2

Department of Pomology, College of Food and Agricultural Sciences, 

King Saud University, KSA, Saudi Arabia. 

3

Biotechnology Program, Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Hail, 

Hail, KSA. 

4

nstitute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

*Corresponding author: moneruzzaman@unisza.edu.my

Introduction

The  wax  apple  (Syzygium  samarangense)  is 

a  non-climacteric  tropical  fruit  species.  It  is 

also  known  as  wax  apple,  rose  apple  or  java 

apple.  Its  pear-shaped  fruits  are  usually  pink, 

light-red,  red,  green,  sometimes  greenish-

white,  or  cream-colored  and  are  generally 

crisp,  with  a  subtly  sweet  taste  or  aromatic 

flavor (Morton, 1987). The species presumably 

originated  in  Malaysia  and  other  South-east 

Asian  countries.  It  is  widely  cultivated  and 

grown throughout Malaysia and in neighboring 

countries  such  as  Thailand,  Indonesia  and 

Taiwan  (Moneruzzaman  et  al.,  2011). 

Currently in Malaysia it is cultivated mainly as 

a smallholding business ranging from 1 to 5 ha 

for each farmer. The cultivated area throughout 

the  country  is  estimated  at  about  2000  ha 

in  2005  (Shu  et  al.,  2006).  In  Malaysia,  the 

species  shows  a  great  potential  to  develop  as 

an export fruit industries.

There  are  three  species  of  Syzygium, 

namely  the  water  apple  (Syzygium  aquem)

Malay  apple  (Syzygium  malaccense)  and  wax 

apple  (Syzygium  samaragense)  bear  edible 

fruits. Wax apple contains fruit with more round 

and oblong in shape and less watery compare to 

the  other  Syzygium  species  and  the  fruits  are 

eaten raw with salt or cooked as sauce. The wax 

apple fruit has a very low respiration rate, with 

10–20 mg CO

2

/kg h at 20°C, although they are 



highly  perishable  fruits  (Akamine  and  Goo, 

1979). The composition of wax apple per 100 

g edible portion is water with more than 90% 

portion, protein 0.7 g, fat 0.2 g, carbohydrates 

4.5  g,  fibre  1.9  g,  vitamin A  253  IU,  vitamin 

B1 and B2 with traces amount, vit-C 8 mg, and 

energy  with  80  kJ/100  g  (Wills  et  al.,  1986). 

Fruit  growth  and  development  are  associated 

with  the  morphological,  anatomical  and 

physiological changes of the plant (El-Otmani 



et  al.,  1987).  Fruit  maturation  is  associated 

with changes in rind texture, juice composition 

and  taste  (El-Otmani  et  al.,  1987).  Felker  et 

al., (2002) reported that the major variation in 

fruit quality is not related to the environment 



Abstract: A study under field condition was carried out to evaluate physiological and biochemical 

properties of three cultivars of wax apple (Syzygium samarangense) namely ‘Jambu Madu Red’, 

‘Masam Manis Pink’ and ‘Giant Green’. Physicochemical parameters, such as stomatal conductance, 

fruit  development,  pigmentation,  fruit  shape,  yield,  total  soluble  solids  (TSS),  titratable  acidity 

(TA), sugar acid ratio, vitamin-C (vit-C), chlorophyll, carotene and anthocyanin content, in three 

cultivars  of  wax  apple  were  investigated. The  highest  stomatal  conductance,  color  development 

and yield were recorded in ‘Jambu Madu Red’ cultivar. Lowest amount of TA, highest TSS, sugar 

acid ratio and carotene content were also observed in this cultivar. Earlier color development, fruit 

maturity, good shape, highest vit-C and anthocyanin content were found in ‘Masam Manis Pink’. 

Meanwhile, the highest chlorophyll ab and total chlorophyll (chl



ab

) content and late maturation 

fruit were recorded in ‘Giant Green’ Cultivar. Stomatal conductance showed positive correlation 

with  yield  and  fruit  biomass.  It  is  concluded  that  ‘Jambu  Madu  Red’  and  ‘Masam  Manis  Pink’ 

cultivars are comparatively better yield than those of ‘Giant Green’ cultivar grown under tropical 

field conditions.

Keywords: Wax apple, yield, TSS, TA, chlorophyll, carotene, fruit development.

6.indd   66

5/25/15   3:13 PM


PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THREE CULTIVARS OF WAX APPLE 

67

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75

or edaphic factors but rather ascribed to genetic 

factors.  Color  is  probably  the  most  important 

quality factor depending on light, temperature, 

position on the tree, growing stage, leaf: fruit 

ratio  number  (Shu  et  al.,  2001).  Chang  et 

al.,  (2003)  stated  that  sucrose,  glucose  and 

fructose  are  important  quality  parameters 

that influence the anthocyanin biosynthesis in 

wax  apple  fruits.  The  flowers,  which  contain 

tannins,  desmethoxymatteucinol,  5-O-methyl-

40-desmethoxymatteucinol,  oleanic  acid, 

and  b-sitosterol,  are  used  in  Taiwan  to  treat 

fever  and  halt  diarrhea  (Morton,  1987). 

Ethanolic  leaf  extract  of  wax  apple  exhibited 

immunostimulant  activity  (Srivastava  et 



al.,  1995),  the  hexane  extract  was  found  to 

relax  the  hyper  motility  of  the  gut  (Ghayur 



et  al.,  2006),  while  the  alcoholic  extract  of 

the  stem  bark  showed  antibacterial  activity 

(Chattopadhayay  et  al.,  1998).  The  fruit  of 

wax apple can also be used to treat high blood 

pressure and several inflammatory conditions, 

including  sore  throat.  It  was  also  reported 

as  useful  fruits  antimicrobial,  antiscorbutic, 

carminative,  diuretic,  and  astringent  (Rivera 

and  Obón,  1995).  The  fruit  pulp  of  Masam 

Manis  Pink  cultivar  of  wax  apple  is  a  rich 

sources  of  phenolics  content,  flavonoids  and 

several  antioxidant  compounds  (Simirgiotis 



et  al.,  2007).  It  was  also  reported  that  edible 

fruits of wax apple may have potential benefits 

for  human  health  because  the  presence  of 

polyphenolic antioxidants in it.

For  the  commercial  purpose,  the 

difference in fruit quality among the cultivars 

is important in order to grade the fruit. Since 

there are no report that has been published on 

the  physiological  and  biochemical  quality  on 

the  cultivars  of  wax  apple,  this  project  was 

conducted  with  the  aims  to  evaluate  the  fruit 

development,  pigmentation  and  quality  on 

different  cultivars  of  wax  apple  based  on  the 

physiological  and  biochemical  measurements 

of the three cultivars Jambu Madu Red, Masam 

Manis Pink and Giant Green of wax apple. 



Methodology

Experimental Site

The experiments were carried out in an orchard 

located  at  a  commercial  farm  in  Banting, 

Selangor  (2

30N,  112



30E  and  1

0

28  N,  111



0

 

20E)  at  an  elevation  of  about  45  m  above 



sea  level.  The  area  was  covered  by  hot  and 

humid  tropical  climatic  condition.  The  soil 

in the orchards is peat with pH 4.6 (Ismail et 

al.,  1995).  The  experiments  were  conducted 

in  between  the  year  of  2009  to  2010.  The 

experiments were carried out in the first season 

from  October  2009  to  February  2010,  and  in 

the second seasons from April to August 2010. 

Plant Material

Twelve years old wax apple plants in the field 

were selected for the study. The planted trees 

were in a 4.5 ft × 4.5 ft hexagonal arrangement 

and received the same intercultural operation; 

fertilization,  irrigation  and  insecticide 

application. Three wax apple cultivars namely; 

‘Giant Green’, ‘Masam Manis Pink’ and ‘Jambu 

Madu Red’ were used in the study. Three trees 

per  cultivar  were  selected  and  used  for  fruit 

sampling  for  each  season. Thirty  six  uniform 

branches (four branches per tree) of about the 

same length, and diameter, and approximately 

the same number of leaves from nine trees were 

selected for fruit harvesting. The experiments 

consist of 3 treatments (cultivar), with twelve 

replications and four uniform branch was taken 

as an experimental unit. The selected uniform 

branches were tagged properly at the beginning 

of  flower  opening  until  fruit  maturation.  The 

experiments  were  arranged  in  a  complete 

randomized design. 



Measurement  of  Physiological  Parameters 

(Stomatal  Conductance,  Fruit  Development, 

Fruit Biomass and Color Development).

Leaves  of  selected  uniformed  branches  were 

used  for  stomatal  conductance  measurement 

that was done at 11.00 am under fully sunshine 

condition  during  fruit  developmental  stage. 

Stomatal conductance was measured by using a 

6.indd   67

5/25/15   3:13 PM



Mohammad Moneruzzaman Khandaker et al. 

 

 

 

68

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75



Titrable Acidity (TA) 

The fruit juice was extracted by using a Phillips 

HR1833  Juicer  Extractor. The  fruit  juice  was 

titrated with 0.1 M NaOH and the results were 

expressed in terms of percentage of citric acid 

which was calculated by using the Bhattarai and 

Gautam  (2006)  formula.  Thus  TA  percentage 

can be calculated as following,



                  N

b

× V

b

×E

a

× d  100

TA (%) =------------------------------

                             V

s

Where N


b

= normality of the base, V

b

= volume 



of the base, E

a

= mill equivalent weight of citric 



acid, V

S

= volume of sample and df = dilution 



factor.

Total Soluble Solids (TSS) and Acidity Ratio

Total  soluble  solids  (TSS)  of  fruit  is  one  of 

the  parameters  that  strongly  affect  consumer 

acceptability  of  a  variety.  The  total  soluble 

solids  (TSS)  value  was  determined  at  25°C 

by  using  portable  hand  refractometer,  8469 

(Atago Co. LTD., Tokyo, Japan) and expressed 

the  value  as  °Brix. The  pulp  of  the  fruit  was 

homogenized  by  using  a  blender.  A  small 

fraction  of  the  homogenous  fruit  pulp  was 

centrifuged  at  4000  ×g  for  10  min,  and  the 

clear supernatant was analyzed chemically for 

determinate  the  TSS.  The  sugar  acid  ratio  of 

the fruit juice is given as the ratio of TSS/TA.



Total Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin-C) Content

Total  ascorbic  acid  (vit-C)  content  was 

determined  by  adopting  the  method  modified 

by  Hashimoto  and  Yamafuji  (2006).  Five  g 

of  fruit  pulp  was  homogenized  with  cold  5% 

metaphosphoric acid and then filtered through 

the cloth sheet. A 0.8 mL of filtrate was then 

reacted with the mixture of 0.4 mL of 2% di-

indophenol, 0.4 mL of 2% thiourea and 0.4 mL 

of  1%  dinitrophenol  hydrazine. After  that  the 

mixture was incubated at 37 °C for 3 hours and 

then 2 mL of 85% sulphuric acid was added. 

The solution was again left at room temperature 

for 30 minutes and the absorbance at 540 nm 

was  then  recorded  using  spectrophotometer. 

portable Leaf Porometer, (Modal SC-1, USA). 

Fruit  shape  (length  and  diameter  ratio)  is  an 

important component of the visual fruit quality 

and can be influenced by several factors. Fruit 

shape  was  classified  by  visual  inspection 

as  round,  round-flattened,  oblate  [spheroid; 

length:  diameter  ratio  (L:  D)  ˃1.5],  oblong 

(blossom end larger than stem-end; L: D 1.5–

2), pyriform (having a secondary constriction; 

L:  D  1.5–2),  elliptical  (blossom-  and  stem-

end  equal  size;  L:  D  2–3),  and  elongate  (L: 

D˃ 3) (Miriam et al., 2008). Fruit length, fruit 

diameter and fruit growth was measured with 

the Vernier caliper. Total yield were determined 

by  total  number  and  weighing  mature  fruits 

per  individual  plant.  Fruit  dry  biomass  was 

determined by weighing the pulp mass at 0% 

moister  content.  The  skin  color  of  the  fruits 

was measured by using a Minolta colorimeter, 

CR-300,  Konica,  (Japan).  Color  parameters 

such  as  “L”  (lightness),  “a”  (greenness  to 

redness) and “b” (blueness to yellowness) were 

determined at three different spots at the top, 

middle and end of the fruits. The changing in 

color of the tagging fruits was measured at the 

stage of fruit development from pit stage until 

harvest.  Fruit  sample  colors  were  calculated 

and expressed in L*, a*, b* Hunter parameter, 

by using the formula (L* x a*) / b*. Fruit length 

and diameter ratio was measured immediately 

after harvested from the tree. 



Measurement of Biochemical Parameters 

Fruits  of  different  cultivars  were  randomly 

harvested from the selected outside branches at 

fully ripening stage during the first and second 

fruiting seasons of the trees. Fruit maturity was 

measured by observing the skin color of wax 

apple  cultivars.  Harvesting  was  carried  out 

manually in the early morning with a minimum 

mechanical  injury.  Fully  ripened  fruits  were 

kept in a refrigerator at 4ºC with 80-90% RH 

for used in biochemical analysis. A total of 24 

fruits were taken randomly from each cultivar 

for use in the analysis. 

6.indd   68

5/25/15   3:13 PM


PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THREE CULTIVARS OF WAX APPLE 

69

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75

Table 1: Fruit development of different cultivars of Syzygium samarangense

Cultivar                                     

Stomatal

Conductance (Gs)  

Bud 

development  

Flower opening 

& anthesis

Fruit

development

.........................................................................................

mol H

2

Om

-2

s

-1

              Fruit set, Cell division, Cell expansion & Maturation

‘Giant Green’                                                               

0.031± 05b

24±5 day


3±2 day

50±5DAA


‘Masam Manis Pink’                                                     

0.036 ±11b

18±4 day

3±2 day


38±4DAA

‘Jambu Madu Red’                                           

0.039±13a

20±5 day


3±2 day 

45±5DAA


**

ns

ns



**

Total vit-C content was expressed as mg vit-C 

per 100 g fresh weight.

Chlorophyll, Carotene and Anthocyanin Content

In this study, the chlorophyll in the fruits skin 

was  measured  at  the  fully  ripening  stage. 

The  chlorophyll  of  fruits  was  determined 

by  methods  described  by  Hendry  and  Price 

(1993).  The  total  carotene  and  anthocyanin 

contents  of  the  hydrophilic  extracts  were 

measured by using the pH-differential method 

with  cyanidin-3-glucoside  used  as  a  standard 

(Rodriguez-Saona et al., 2001).



Statistical Analysis

The  experimental  design  was  a  completely 

randomized  design  (CRD)  with  twelve 

replicates. The data from the two seasons were 

pooled and analyzed using MSTAT-C statistical 

software.  One  way  ANOVA  was  applied  to 

evaluate  the  significant  difference  between 

cultivars  for  each  parameters  studied.  Least 

significant difference (Fisher’s protected LSD) 

was  calculated,  and  F-test  at  (p  =  0.05)  was 

determined as the significant level.

Results and Discussion

Physiological Measurement

Stomatal Conductance

Stomatal conductance affects the photosynthesis 

rate by regulating CO

2

 fixation in leaf mesophyll 



tissue. Accumulation of dry matter content in the 

plants  depends  on  the  stomatal  conductance. 

With regard to the stomatal conductance of the 

leaves, ‘Jambu Madu Red’ cultivar produced a 

significantly difference from the ‘Giant Green’ 

and ‘Masam Manis Pink’ cultivars.  The result of 

this study indicated that, stomatal conductance 

measured  in  a  sunny  day  at  11.00  am  was 

highest (0.039 mol H

2

O m



-2

s

-1



) in ‘Jambu Madu 

Red’,  followed  by  conductance  of  0.036  mol 

H

2

O m



-2

s

-1



 in ‘Masam Manis Pink’. The lowest 

stomatal conductance 0.031 mol H

2

O m


-2

s

-1



 was 

recorded  in  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar  (Table1). 

Stomatal conductance also depends on cultural 

conditions. Nahar and Takeshi (2002) observed 

that the using of synthetic auxin (figaron) with a 

lower concentration had increased the stomatal 

conductance  but  with  a  higher  concentration 

had decreased the conductance in soybean.



Fruit Development (Number of Day Flowering 

Opening to Maturity)

The  variations  for  bloom  to  maturity  time 

of  apple  cultivars  have  been  reported  by 

Westwood (1978) and it was 135 and 150 days 

in  ‘McIntosh’  and  ‘Golden  Delicious’  apple 

cultivars  respectively.  In  this  study,  for  bud 

development,  ‘Masam  Manis  Pink’  cultivar 

requires  18  ±  4  days  small  tiny  bud  to  open 

and ‘Jambu Madu Red’ requires 20 ± 5 days, 

whereas, ‘Giant Green’ cultivars requires 24 ± 

5 days (Figure 1).  There were no differences 

among  the  cultivars  from  flower  opening  to 

anthesis periods. It takes more or less 3 days.  

The  fruit  developmental  period  after  anthesis 

varied significantly with different cultivars of 

Syzygium samarangense. Results showed that 

Means ( ± S.E) within the same column followed by the same letter, do not differ significantly according to 

LSD test at ά=0.01 ns, non-significant * Significant at 0.05 levels, ** Significant at 0.01 levels

6.indd   69

5/25/15   3:13 PM


Mohammad Moneruzzaman Khandaker et al. 

 

 

 

70

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75

‘Masam  Manis  Pink’  cultivar  had  the  earliest 

fruit development and maturity approximately 

38  days  after  anthesis  followed  by  ‘Jambu 

Madu Red’ cultivar with nearly 45 days (Figure 

1).  On  the  other  hand,  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar 

had late maturity which about 50 days to reach 

harvest stage from anthesis.      

Our  findings  supported  the  results  of 

Morton  (1987)  who  reported  that  the  average 

period from anthesis to berry maturity in wax 

apple cultivars is about 35 to 50 days. 

Fruit Development (Length Diameter Ratio of 

the Fruit)

Length  and  diameter  ratio  of  the  wax  apple 

varied significantly among the three cultivars. 

The  highest  length  diameter  ratio  (1.78)  was 

recorded  in  “Jambu  Madu  Red”  cultivar, 

followed by ‘Giant Green’ with a L/D ratio of 

1.21, whereas, the lowest (1.0) length diameter 

ratio  was  recorded  in  ‘Masam  Manis  pink’ 

cultivar (Figure 1 & Table 2). 

Color Development

Color is an important aspect of both fresh and 

processed  fruits  particularly  for  commercial 

reasons. Colors in the fruits reflect the presence 

of  certain  biologically  active  phytochemical 

compounds and antioxidants that reportedly can 

promote good health. The development of red 

pigmentation in the skin of maturing wax apple 

fruits  is  the  result  of  a  massive  accumulation 

of  anthocyanin  content  and  chlorophyll 

degradation  during  the  maturation  period 

(Zhang et al., 2008). Positive values of a* and 

b*, as observed in this work, are attributed to 

carotenoids or anthocyanins present in the skin.

Fruits  of  wax  apple  produced  the 

significance  difference  of  skin  color  among 

the  three  cultivars.  Figure  2  shows  that  fruit 

Figure 1: Photograph showing fruit development and ripening of different cultivars of Syzygium samarangense

6.indd   70

5/25/15   3:13 PM



PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THREE CULTIVARS OF WAX APPLE 

71

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75

color  development  was  drastically  change  in 

the  fruits  of  ‘Masam  Manis  Pink’  cultivar  by 

exhibiting the greatest percentage of skin color 

between 14 and 35 DAA. It was also observed 

that on day seven the pink and red color of the 

fruits of the ‘Masam Manis Pink’ and ‘Jambu 

Madu  Red’  cultivar;  beginning  to  appear,  but 

in  ‘Giant  Green’  cultivar,  the  color  begins  to 

develop  at  three  weeks  after  anthesis. At  the 

35

th



  day  of  observation,  the  ‘Masam  Manis 

Pink’  cultivar  fruits  displayed  at  most  99% 

pink  color  and  fruits  of  ‘Jambu  Madu  Red’ 

cultivar showed about 95% color development, 

whereas, ‘Giant Green’ cultivar was only 14% 

(Figure  2).    Figure  1,  showed  that  ‘Masam 

Manis  Pink’  and  ‘Jambu  Madu  Red’  cultivar 

fruits  produced  significantly  different  in  skin 

color  development  from  the  fruit  of  ‘Giant 

Green’ cultivar. 



Fruit Biomass Development (Yield) 

The results of this study showed that ‘Masam 

Manis  Pink’  and  ‘Jambu  Madu  Red’  cultivar 

produced  the  highest  number  of  fruits  per 

plants than the ‘Giant Green’ cultivar (data not 

shown).  The  total  yield  (kg/tree)  was  highest 

(76.66  kg)  in  the  ‘Jambu  Madu  Red’  cultivar 

followed by ‘Masam Manis Pink’ cultivar with 

a  yield  of  74.67  kg/tree,  whereas  minimum 

yield  (58  kg/  tree)  was  recorded  in  ‘Giant 

Green’  cultivar  (Figure  3).  These  differences 

were  found  to  be  statistically  significant 

(P>0.05) among the different cultivars of wax 

apple.


The  results  were  in  agreement  with  that 

of  Shu  et  al.,  (1998)  who  observed  that  trees 

of  S.  samarangense  yielded  about  700  fruits 

per  plant  with  the  fruit  weight  varies  among 

cultivars.  Chiu  (2003)  reported  that  wax 

apple (pink) is a heavy producer plant on well 

fertilized good soils that can produce more than 

200 fruit clusters per trees, with 4-5 fruits per 

cluster when reach maturity. They also reported 

that  average  fruit  weight  of  ‘Masam  Manis 

Pink’ variety is about 100 g per fruit.

Correlation  between  Stomatal  Conductance 

and Biomass

Stomatal conductance affects the photosynthesis 

rate  by  regulating  CO

2

  fixation  in  leaf 



mesophyll  tissue,  that’s  ultimately  affects 

the  photosynthesis  and  yield  of  the  crops. 

Accumulation  of  dry  matter  content  in  plants 

depends on stomatal conductance.  The results 

of this study showed that stomatal conductance 

had  a  strong  correlation  (R

=  0.88)  with  the 



fruit  biomass  development  of  wax  apple. 

Highest  stomatal  conductance  (Gs)  and  fruit 

biomass yield were observed in ‘Jambu Madu 

Red’  cultivar  followed  by  ‘Giant  Green’ 

cultivar,  whilst  ‘Masam  Manis  Pink’  cultivar 

had  the  lowest  photosynthetic  and  dry  fruit 

biomass  yields  (Figure  4). The  results  of  this 

study were in line with the result of Nahar and 

Takeshi (2002) which found that the stomatal 

conductance  of  leaf  regulates  the  dry  matter 

accumulation and yield in soybean. 

Figure 2: Colour development in the fruit skin of three  

cultivars  of  Syzygium  samarangense.  DAA  =  Day 

After Anthesis

Figure  3:  Fruit  weight  (kg/tree)  of  three  cultivars  of 

Syzygium samarangense under field conditions

6.indd   71

5/25/15   3:13 PM


Mohammad Moneruzzaman Khandaker et al. 

 

 

 

72

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75



Biochemical Analysis

Titratable Acidity (TA)

Various  organic  acids  have  been  reported 

present in fruits and these include citric, malic, 

acetic,  fumaric,  tartaric  and  lactic  acids.  The 

main  acid  accounting  for  titratable  acidity  in 

fruits is citric acid (Melgarejo et al., 2000). It 

was reported that the decrease in fruit acidity 

was coincided with an increase in sugar content 

of the fruits. The results for the TA analysis is 

shown in Table 2. Our results clearly indicated 

that  TA  was  significantly  affected  by  genetic 

of  different  cultivars.  The  lowest  amount  of 

TA (0.78%) was observed in the ‘Jambu Madu 

Red’ cultivar, followed by ‘Giant Green’ (0.83 

%)  and  ‘Masam  Manis  Pink’  (0.90%).  Our 

results  are  in  agreement  with  the  results  of 

Supapvanich et al., (2011) which reported that 

the range of TA in fresh cut wax apple was 0.75 

-0.80 %  of citric acid. 

Total Soluble Solids (TSS) and TSS/TA Ratio

TSS  content  of  fruit  was  not  statistically 

different  among  the  cultivars  of  wax  apple 

(Table 2). It can be seen that the soluble solids 

content  in  ‘Jambu  Madu  Red’  was  wide- 

ranging  from  5.63  to  12.5%  Brix.  From  this 

study, it was observed that TSS content of the 

fruits  did  not  varied  significantly  among  the 

fruits within the same cultivar (Table 2). 

The  significant  changes  of  sugar  acid 

ratio is the key factor affecting quality of the 

wax apple cultivars. As shown in Table 2, the 

sweetness index (sugar acid ratio) of fruits was 

significantly affected by the different cultivars 

of wax apple. The ‘Jambu Madu Red’ cultivar 

increased the sugar acid ratio by 18%, followed 

by  the  ‘Giant  Green’  with  increases  of  5% 

relative to the ‘Masam Manis Pink’.



Vitamin-C Content

Vit-C  content  in  fruits  varies  among  crop 

species  and  is  affected  by  environmental 

factors, maturity, plant vigor and the age of the 

plant. Figure 5 shows that Vit-C content varied 

significantly  among  of  different  cultivars  of 

wax apple. The highest amount of vit-C content 

(5.7 mg/100g) was recorded in ‘Masam Manis 

Pink’ cultivar followed by ‘Jambu Madu Red’ 

and ‘Giant Green’ cultivar with a vit-C content 

of 5.53 and 5.45 mg/100g respectively (Figure 

5). Similar range of vitamin-C in fresh cut wax 

apple fruit was observed by Supapvanich et al., 

(2011).


Table 2: Content of different pigments in ripening fruit of three cultivars of Syzygium samarangense

Cultivar                                                               

L/D

ratio

Titratable 

acidity (TA) (%)

TSS

(% Brix) 

TSS/TA

ratio

‘Giant Green’                                                                                      

1.21 ±0.01b                           

0.83 ± 0.05b

8.56±0.23a

10.31± 1.10a

‘Masam Manis Pink’                                                     

1.0 ±0.040c

0.90 ± 0.04a       

8.89±1.18a               09.88± 0.98b

‘Jambu Madu Red’                                           

1.78 ±0.07b

** 

0.78 ± 0.04b   



*

    


9.06±0.17a             

ns

11.61±1.15a



*

Means (±S.E) within the same column followed by the same letter, do not differ significantly according to 

LSD test at ά=0.01 ns, non-significant * Significant at 0.05 levels, ** Significant at 0.01 levels

Figure 4: Correlation between the stomatal conductance 

and dry biomass yield of cultivars of wax apple

6.indd   72

5/25/15   3:13 PM


PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THREE CULTIVARS OF WAX APPLE 

73

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75



Chlorophyll Content

It is well documented in the literature that during 

ripening, the skin of fruits changes from green 

to a different brighter color. The most obvious 

change  which  take  place  is  the  degradation 

of  chlorophyll  content  and  accompanied  by 

the synthesis of other pigments usually either 

anthocyanin or carotenoids. It was observed that 

the  chlorophyll  content  reduce  loss  gradually 

according to the color turning changes of the 

fruits.  The  results  showed  that  ‘Giant  Green’ 

cultivar  had  a  significantly  difference  of 

chlorophyll  (a,  b  and  ab)  content  compared 

to the ‘Jambu Madu Red’ and ‘Masam Manis 

Pink’ cultivars. The highest (3.43 mg/L) total 

chlorophyll content in fruit skin was recorded 

in ‘Giant Green’ cultivar followed by ‘Jambu 

Madu  Red’  and  ‘Masam  Manis  Pink’  cultivar 

with  a  chlorophyll  content  of  1.33  mg/L  and 

0.31 mg/L respectively. 



Carotene Content

Carotenoids are the precursors of vitamin A, and 

those commonly occurring in nature include α

and  γ  carotene,  lycopene  and  cryptoxanthin 

(Goodwin,  1986).  Among  these,  β-carotene 

precursors,  a  major  proportion  of  vitamin  A 

activity is analysed to represent the content of 

carotene in the fruits. The results of this study 

showed that the cultivars of S. samarangense 

produced the significant difference of carotene 

content  among  themselves.  Table  3,  showed 

that  ‘Jambu  Madu  Red’  cultivar  fruits  has 

the  highest  (6.23  mg/L)  carotene  content  as 

compared  with    ‘Masam  Manis  pink’  and 

‘Giant Green’ cultivar with carotene content of 

3.16 and 1.83 mg/L respectively. 



Anthocyanin Content

Anthocyanin pigments are responsible for the 

red,  purple,  and  blue  colors  of  many  fruits, 

vegetables,  cereal  grains,  and  flowers.  As  a 

result,  research  on  anthocyanin  pigments  has 

intensified  recently  because  of  their  possible 

health benefits as dietary antioxidants (Ronald, 

2001).  The  anthocyanin  content  in  ‘Masam 

Manis Pink’ and ‘Jambu Madu Red’ cultivars 

were significantly different from Giant Green 

cultivar.  ‘Masam  Manis  Pink’  and  ‘Jambu 

Madu  Red’  cultivars  produced  3.05  and  2.78 

mg/L  of  anthocyanin  respectively,  meanwhile 

‘Giant  Green’  cultivar  produced  0.95  mg/L 

which  is  the  lowest  amount  of  anthocyanin 

contents in the species. Khandaker et al., (2012) 

also  reported  similar  amount  of  anthocyanin 

Table 3: Content of various pigments in ripening fruit of three cultivars of Syzygium samarangense



Cultivar                                                               

Chlorophyll-a

(mg/L)            

Chlorophyll-b 

(mg/L)            

Total 

chlorophyll 

(mg/L)            

Carotene

(µg/g)           

Anthocyanin

(mg/100g)

‘Giant Green’                                                                                      

2.12±0.05a

1.31±0.13 a

3.43±0.18a

3.83±0.15c

  9.5±0.15b

‘Masam Manis 

Pink’                                                     

0.13±0.04c

0.16±0.08c                         0.31±0.09c

5.16±0.31b

30.5±0.20a

‘Jambu Madu 

Red’                                           

0.72±0.07b

** 

0.61±0.05b



** 

1.33±0.09b

** 

6.23±0.78a 



** 

27.8±0.15a

** 

Means (±S.E) within the same column followed by the same letter, do not differ significantly according to 



LSD test at ά=0.01 ns, non-significant * Significant at 0.05 levels, ** Significant at 0.01 levels

Figure  5:  Vit-C  content  in  different  cultivars  of 



Syzygium samarangense

6.indd   73

5/25/15   3:13 PM


Mohammad Moneruzzaman Khandaker et al. 

 

 

 

74

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75

content in jambu madu with hydrogen peroxide 

treatments.  Anthocyanin  content  in  the 

fruits  also  varies  within  the  cultivar  which  is 

depending on the conditions of the environment 

like light, temperature, growth substances etc.  

The  observations  recorded  in  the  present 

investigation suggested that the three cultivars 

of wax apple varied markedly with respect to 

physiological  and  biochemical  characteristics 

under  field  conditions.  These  differences 

appeared due to their genetic variations among 

the  cultivars  and  the  ‘Jambu  Madu  Cultivar’ 

showed the better quality.

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by grants from the 

University  of  Malaya,  50603,  Kuala  Lumpur, 

Malaysia  (Project  No.RG002/09BIO)  and 

Universiti  Sultan  Zainal  Abidin,  Tembila 

Campus,  22200  Besut,  Terengganu  (Project 

No. UniSZA/14/GU/024).

References

Akamine, E. K. & Goo, T. (1979). Respiration 

and Ethylene Production in Fruits of Species 

and  Cultivars  of  Psidium  and  Species  of 



Eugenia.  Journal  of  American  Society  of 

Horticultural Science, 98: 381-383.

Bhattarai, D. R. & Gautam, D. M. (2006). Effect 

of  Harvesting  Method  and  Calcium  on 

Post- harvest  Physiology of Tomato. Nepal 



Agricultural Research Journal, 7: 37-41.

Chang Y. J., Chung, M. Y., Chu, C. C., Tseng M.  

N.,  &  Shu,  Z.  H.  (2003).  Developmental 

Stages   Affect Characteristics of Wax Apple 

Fruit  Skin  Discs  Cultured  with  Sucrose-

with  Special  Reference  to  Color.  Scientia 



Horticulturae, 98: 397-407.

Chattopadhayay, E. D., Sinha, B. K. and Vaid, 

L.  K.  (1998).  Antibacterial  Activity  of 

Syzygium  Species.  Fitoterapia,  119(4): 

365-367.


Chiu,  C.  C.  (2003).  Comparison  on  the 

Horticultural Characteristics of Big Fruited 

Lines  of  Wax    Apples.  M  Sc  Thesis, 

Research  institute  of  tropical  Agriculture 

and  international  Cooperation,  National 

Pingtung  University  of  Science  and 

Technology, 98.

El-Otmani,  M.,  Arpaia,  M.  L.  &  Coggins, 

J.  C.  W.  (1987).  Developmental  and 

Topophysical  Effects  on  the  Alkanes  of 

Valencia  Orange  fruit  Epicuticular  Wax. 

Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, 

35: 42-46. 

Felker,  P.,  Soulier,  C.,  Leguizamon,  G.,  & 

Ochoa,  J.  A.  (2002).  Comparison  of  the 

Fruit  Parameters  of  12  Opuntia  Clones 

Grown in Argentina and the United States. 



Journal of Arid Environment, 52: 361-370.

Ghayur, M. N., Gilani, A. H., Khan, A., Amor. 

E.  C.,  Villasenor,  I.  M.  &  Choudhary,  M. 

I. (2006). Presence of Calcium Antagonist 

Activity  Explains  the  Use  of  Syzygium 

Samarangense  in  Diarrhoea.  Phytotherapy 



Research, 20(1): 49-52.

Goodwin, T. W. (1986). Metabolism, Nutrition 

and  Functions  of  Carotenoids.  Annual 

Review Nutrition6: 273-297.

Hashimoto,  S.  &  Yamafuji,  K.  (2006).  The 

Determination 

of 


Diketo-L-gulonic 

Acid,  Dehydro-L22    Ascorbic  Acid,  and 

1-ascorbic Acid in the Same Tissue Extract 

by 2, 4-dinitrophenol Hydrazine  Method. 



Journal of Biological Chemistry, 174: 201-

208.


Hendry, G. A. F. & Price, A. H. (1993). Stress 

Indicators:  Chlorophylls  and  Carotenoids. 

In:  Hendry,  G.A.F.,  Grime,  J.P.  (Eds.), 

Methods  in  Comparative  Plant  Ecology. 

London: Chapman & Hall. 148-152.

Ismail, B. S., Kader A. F. & Omar, O. (1995). 

Effects  of  Glyphosphate  on  Cellulose   

Decomposition  in  Two  Soils.  Folia 

Microbiologica, 40(5): 499-502.

Khandaker, M. M., Boyce, A. N. & Osman, N. 

(2012). The Influence of Hydrogen Peroxide 

on  the  Growth,  Development  and  Quality 

of  Wax  Apple  (Syzygium  samarangense

[Blume]  Merrill  &  L.M.  Perry  var.  jambu 

madu)  fruits.  Plant  Physiology  and 

Biochemistry, 53: 101-110.

6.indd   74

5/25/15   3:13 PM


PHYSIOLOGICAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THREE CULTIVARS OF WAX APPLE 

75

J. Sustain. Sci. Manage. Volume 10 (1) 2015: 66-75

Melgarejo, P., Salazar, D. M. & Artés, F. (2000). 

Organic Acids  and  Sugars  Composition  of   

Harvested  Pomegranate  Fruits.  European 

Food Research and Technology, 211:185-190.

Miriam,  K.,  Paris,  A.  E.,  Juan,  E.,  Zalapa,  E., 

James, D., McCreight, E. & Jack, E. (2008). 

Staub  Genetic  Dissection  of  Fruit  Quality 

Components  in  Melon  (Cucumis  melo  L.) 

Using a RIL Population Derived from Exotic 



3  Elite  US  Western  Shipping  Germplasm. 

Molecular Breeding, 22: 405-419

Moneruzzaman K. M., Al-Saif, A. M., Alebidi, 

A. I., Hossain, A. B. M. S., Normaniza, O. 

and Boyce, A. N. (2011). An Evaluation of 

the Nutritional Quality Evaluation of Three 

Cultivars of Syzygium samarangense under 

Malaysian  Conditions.  African  Journal  of 

Agricultural Research, 6(3): 545-552.

Morton,  J.  (1987).  Loquat.    In:  Morton,  J.F. 

(Ed.).  Fruits  of  Warm  Climates.  Miami, 

FL., Inc., Winter vine, NC, 103-108.

Nahar,  B.  S.  &  Takeshi,  I.  (2002).  Effect  of 

Different  Concentrations  of  Figaron  on 

Production and  Abscission of Reproductive 

Organs,  Growth  and  Yield  in  Soybean 

(Glycine max L). Field Crop Research, 78: 

41-50.


Rivera  D,  &  Obón,  C.  (1995).  The  Ethno 

Pharmacology  of  Madeira  and  Porto 

Santo  Islands,  A  Review.  Journal  of 

Ethnopharmacology, 46: 73-93.

Rodriguez-Saona,  L.  E.,  Giusti,  M.  M.  & 

Wrolstad, R. E. (2001). Color and Pigment 

Stability  of  Red  Radish  and  Red-fleshed 

Potato  Anthocyanins  in  Juice  Model 

Systems, Journal of Food Science, 64: 451-

456.

Ronald,  E.  W.  (2001).  The  Possible  Health 



Benefits  of  Anthocyanin  Pigments  and 

Polyphenolics. Department of Food Science 

and  Technology,  Oregon  State  University, 

Corvallis. 

Srivastava, R., Shaw, A. K. & Kulshreshtha, D. 

K. (1995). Triterpenoids and Chalcone from    



Syzygium  samarangense.  Photochemistry, 

38(3): 687-689.

Shü,  Z.  H.,  Liaw,  S.  C.,  Lin,  H.  L.  &  Lee, 

K.  C.  (1998).  Physical  Characteristics 

and  Organic  Compositional  Changes  in 

Developing  Wax Apple  Fruits.  Journal  of 



Chinese  Society  of  Horticultural  Science, 

44: 491-501.

Shu, Z. H., Meon, R., Tirtawinata, & Thanarut, 

C.  (2006).  Wax  Apple  Production  in 

Selected  Tropical  Asian  Countries.  ISHS.  

Acta Horticulturae (ISHS), 773: 161-164.

Shu, Z. H., Chu, C. C., Hwang, L. C. & Shieh, C. 

S. (2001). Light, Temperature and Sucrose 

 

After  Color,  Diameter  and  Soluble  Solids 



of  Disks  of  Wax  Apple  Fruit  Skin.  Hort 

Science, 36: 279-281. 

Simirgiotis, M. J., Adachi, S., Satoshi, T., Yang, 

H., Kurt, A., Reynertson, A., Margaret, J., 

Basile, R. G.,    Roberto, I. B., Weinstein, J.,  

Edward, J & Kennelly, K. (2007). Cytotoxic 

Chalcones and Antioxidants from the Fruits 

of  Syzygium  samarangense  (Wax  apple), 

Food Chemistry, 107: 813-819.

Supapvanich,  S.,  Pimsaga,  J.  &  Srisujan,  P. 

(2011). Physicochemical Changes in Fresh-

cut Wax     Apple (Syzygium samarangenese 

[Blume]  Merrill  &  L.M.  Perry)  During 

Storage, Food Chemistry, 127: 912-917.

Westwood,  M.  N.  (1978).  Temperate-zone 

Pomology.  USA:  W.H.  Freeman  and 

Company, San Francisco. Oregan. 1993.

Wills, R. B. H., Lim, J. S. K. & Greenfield, H. 

(1986).  Composition  of Australian  Foods. 

31.  Tropical  and  Sub-tropical  Fruit.  Food 

Technology of Australia38(3): 118-123.

Zhang, W., Zheng, X. L. J., Wang, G., Sun, C., 

Ferguson I. & Chen, K. (2008). Bioactive 

Components  and  Antioxidant  Capacity  of 

Chinese Bayberry (Myrica rubra Sieb. and 

Zucc.)  Fruit  in  Relation  to  Fruit  Maturity 

and  Postharvest  Storage.  European  Food 

Research Technology, 227:1091-1097.

6.indd   75



5/25/15   3:13 PM


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə