Phytochemical screening and evaluation of biological activity of root extracts



Yüklə 222.72 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü222.72 Kb.

IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

753 



INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF RESEARCH IN PHARMACY AND CHEMISTRY 

 

Available online at 

www.ijrpc.com 

 

PHYTOCHEMICAL SCREENING AND EVALUATION 

OF BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF ROOT EXTRACTS 

OF 

SYZYGIUM SAMARANGENSE 

M. Madhavi* and M. Raghu Ram 

Department of Botany & Microbiology, Acharya Nagarjuna University,  

Guntur, Andhra Pradesh, India.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

Since  ancient  times,  about  80  %  of  individuals 



use  traditional  medicine,  which  has  chemical 

compounds  derived  from  medicinal  plants

1,  2



Several  hundred  plant  species  and  herbs  in  the 



form of whole plant, crude extract or purification, 

purified  constituents  are  used  in  indigenous 

system  of  medicines  and  are  of  great 

importance  to  the  health  of  individual  and 

communities,  which  have  ultimately  evaluated 

into  the  modern  therapeutic  science.  Medicinal 

plants  are  important  source  of  life  saving  drugs 

for majority of the world population

3, 4



  



Research Article 

ABSTRACT 

Phytochemical  constituents  are  non-nutritive  plant  chemicals  that  have  preventive  and  curative 

properties of disease. The use of plants and phytochemicals, both with known biological properties, 

can  be  of  great  significance  in  therapeutic  treatment.  The  present  study  includes  phytochemical 

screening and quantification of secondary metabolites and their biological activities of root extract 

of  Syzygium samarangense. Phytochemical  screening  of  the  plant  root  extracts  with  ethyl  acetate, 

methanol  and  water  showed  the  presence  of  flavonoids,  terpenoids  and  phenolic  compounds.  In 

aqueous  extracts,  Terpenoids  with  highest  quantity  (81.923  micrograms  per  gram  extract)  were 

estimated, whereas flavonoids are present only in methanolic extract and with an estimated quantity 

of 33.687 µg /per gram extract. Anti oxidant, anti inflammatory, and anti diabetic activity of these 

root  extracts  reveal  that  methanoilc  extracts  with  flavonoids  showed  the  high  antioxidant,  anti 

inflammatory  and  antimicrobial  activity  than  the  aqueous  and  ethyl  acetate  extract.  Highest 

antidiabetic activity was observed in aqueous extract. Antimicrobial activity study reveals that gram 

positive bacterial strains are more sensitive than the gram negative bacteria to all the three types of 

root extracts. The present study reveals that the root extract of Syzygium samarangense is a potential 

source for phytochemicals for traditional use as therapeutics.  



 

Keywords: Syzygium samarangense (wax jambu), flavonoids, terpenoids.  

 


IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

754 

 

Fig. 1: Syzygium samarangense (wax jambu) plant and fruit 

 

Syzygium  samarangense  (common  name  -  wax 

jambu) is a plant species in the family Myrtaceae 

which is widely cultivated in the tropics

5-13

. There 


are lot of traditional claims has been reported of 

leaves, root, bark, fruits of the plant

14-17

. Various 



Pharmacological  Activities  like  Antidiarrhoeal 

Activity, 

Anticholinesterase 

Activity, 

Immunopharmacological 

Activity, 

Cytotoxic 

Activity,  Anti  hyperglycaemic  activity,  Analgesic 

and Anti- Inflammatory activity are reported with 

various  parts  of  the  plant

18-25

.  And  also 



Investigators 

have 


found 

their 


principal 

constituent  to  be  tannins,  Quercetin  glycosides, 

monoterpenes  secondary  metabolites  those 

involved  in  pharmacological  properties

26,  27



Traditionally  the  root  bark  decoction  of  the 



Syzygium  samarangense  is  used  in  dysentery 

and amenorrhea and also used as abortifacient. 

Root is used as diuretic and is given to alleviate 

edema.  Malayans  use  powdered  dried  root 

preparations  for  itching.  As  plant  root  has 

significant  therapeutic  uses,  this  study  is  aimed 

to  screen  the  phytochemicals  of  the  root  and 

study of its biological activities.  

The literature review proves that the plant is rich 

with  many  medicinal  and  bioactive  compounds 

like flavanoids, phenolic compounds, glycosides, 

terpinoids  etc.  various  studies  are  reported 

these  compounds  in  various  areal  parts  of  the 

plant. K. M. Moneruzzaman et al

14

, reported the 



flavonoids  (914.1  mg/100g)  and  phenolic 

(326.67  mg  GAE/100g)  content  from  the 

Syzygium samarangense plant  where  in  our 

study  root  is  reported  as  3mg/100grams.    Wu 



YZ 

et 

al

24



investigated 

the 


chemical 

constituents  from  the  branches  and  leaves  with 

95%  ethanol,  then  partitioned  with  petroleum 

ether,  chloroform  and  ethyl  acetate.  M.O. 



Edema 

et 

al

36



studied 

on 


Syzygium 

samarangense juice extracts and evaluated high 

amounts  of  saponins  content  (4.77%).  Mario  J. 



Simirgiotis  et  al

37

,  reported  the  six  quercetin 



glycosides on the methanolic extracts of the pulp 

and 


seeds 

of 


the 

fruits 


of 

Syzygium 

samarangense Merr. & Perry (Blume). Vasanthi 

et  al

38

,  reported  the  total  phenolic  content 



(162.58±0.51 Î¼g/mg), total flavonoid contents 

(310μg/mg)  of  Syzygium  samarangense  Fruit 

extract  (SSFE)  where  the  study  with  roots  are 

reported  46.944  µg  and  23.056  µg  per  gram  in 

methanolic  and  water  extract  respectively.  G.  R 

Nair  et  al

39

,  reported  the  two  flavonol 



glycosides. Ghayur  MN  et  al  [40], reported four 

flavonoids  isolated  from  the  hexane  extract. 



Evangeline  C.  Amor  et  al

18

,  isolated  four  rare 



C-methylated  flavonoids  with  a  chalcone  and  a 

flavanone  the  compounds  from  the  hexane 

extract  of  the  leaves.  Dennis  D.  Raga  et  al

41



isolated  the  Cycloartenyl  stearate  (1a),  lupenyl 

stearate  (1b),  sitosteryl  stearate  (1c),  and  24-

methylenecycloartanyl  stearate  (1d)  (sample  1) 

from  the  air-dried  leaves.  Samy  MN  et  al

42



isolated  three  new  compounds  (one  new 



cyanogenic  glucoside)  from  a  MeOH  extract  of 

the leaves. Rachana Srivastava et al

43

, isolated 



the  new  triterpene,  methyl  3epibetulinate  in  its 

native  form  and  4′,6′dihydroxy2′  methoxy3′, 

5′dimethyl  chalcone  along  with  ursolic  acid, 

jacoumaric  acid  and  arjunolic  acid  have  been 

isolated from the aerial parts. However the study 

with root extracts reported that root reported with 

high  terpenoid  content  which  is  not  reported 

earlier.  And  it  is  also  reported  that  root  is 

another  alternate  source  for  flavonoid  and 

phenoilc groups. Anti oxidant, anti inflammatory, 

and  anti  diabetic  activity  of  these  three  root 

extracts  conducted  in  order  to  study  the 

biological  activity  of  the  plant.  Anti  oxidant 

activity  of  the  extract  was  conducted  by  DPPH 

scavenging 

activity. 

Results 

reveal 


that 

methanolic  extracts  which  consist  of  flavonoids 

has  shown  the  high  antioxidant  activity 


IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

755 

(88.021%)  (table-3  and  graph  A)  than  the 

aqueous  and  ethyl  acetate  extracts  at  40  µg/ml 

extract  concentration.  Similar  studies  are 

reported by the Fonseca  A  et  al

44

, investigated 



the antioxidant activity (0.9 μMol TROLOX®/mg) 

of the fruit. Vasanthi  et  al

38

,  reported that IC50 



value  of  antioxidant  activity  of  the  fruit  extract 

found  to  be  140  Î¼g/ml  in  standard  (Lascorbic 

acid),  280  Î¼g/ml  in  SSFE  by  DPPH  and 

ABTS.+ scavenging activity found to be the IC50 

value  175  Î¼g/ml  and  250  Î¼g/ml  respectively. 

No  one  has  reported  with  root  extracts  and 

found  that  similar  antioxidant  activity  as  fruit. 

Antidiabetic activity (table-4 and graph  B) of the 

root  extracts  was  studied  by  In vitro 

α

-  amylase 



inhibition activity by Spectrophotometric method. 

Results  showed  that  dose  dependent  inhibition 

was  observed  with  all  the  samples  where  as 

aqueous extract (92.626%) exhibited the highest 

activity  than  remaining  two  extracts.  No 

antidiabetic  activity  studies  are  reported  with  S. 



SamarangenseAnti inflammatory activity (table-

5) of the root also studied with all three extracts 

and among them methanolic extracts (84.552%) 

showed the highest anti inflammatory activity.  In 

literature  Shabnam  Mollika  et  al

45

,  reported 



evaluated  the  moderate  effect  anti-inflammatory 

activity  of  the  methanolic  extract  of  leaves  in 

mice. Dennis  D.  Raga  et  al

41

, reported that the 



leaves  exhibited  potent  analgesic  and  anti-

inflammatory activities at effective doses of 6.25 

mg/kg body weight and 12.5 mg/kg body weight, 

respectively.  This  reveals  theat  no  one  has 

reported  the  anti  inflammatory  activity  with  root 

and  potential  activity  was  reported  in  our  study. 

Antimicrobial activity result (table-6 and figure-3) 

reveals  that  Gram-positive  bacteria  were  more 

sensitive  than  Gram-negative  ones  towards  the 

plant  extracts  studied.    Bacillus  subtilis  and 



Staphylococcus  aureus  strains  are  shown  more 

inhibition  zone  than  gram  negative  Escherichia 



coli,  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa,  Salmonella 

typhi.  Previous  studies  are  also  reported  the 

antimicrobial  activity  of  the  different  areal  plant 

extracts.  S. 

Adeola 

Adesegun 

et 

al

46



evaluated  the  antimicrobial  effect  of  the  volatile 

oil  from  the  leaf  of  Syzygium  samarangense  on 



Escherichia  coli.  Abd  Aziz  et  al

47

,  evaluated 



antimicrobial  properties  of  ethanolic  extracts  of 

the  leaves  of  minimum  inhibitory  concentration 

(MIC) value was determined to be 20 mg/mL. K. 

Venkata  Ratnam  et  al

48

,  evaluated  the 



antimicrobial  properties  of  fruits,  against  certain 

bacterial and fungal strains with petroleum ether 

and  methanol  extracts  found  to  be  effective  on 

both Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. 



M.O.  Edema  et  al

36

, reported that juice extracts 



have  significant  (P<0.05)  antimicrobial  activities 

against  Escherichia  coli,  Salmonella  typhi  and 



Candida  albicans.  Consolacion  Y.  Ragasa  et 

al

49

,  elucidated  the  dichloromethane  extract  of 



the leaves exhibited moderate antifungal activity 

against  C.  albicans,  low  activity  against  T. 

mentagrophytes  and  low  antibacterial  activity 

against  E.  coli,  S.  aureus  and  P.  aeruginosa.  It 

was  inactive  against  B.  subtilis  and  A.  niger.  In 

comparison  with  the  literature  studies  root 

extracts  of  S.  samarangense  also  have 

significant  antimicrobial  active  compounds  with 

low  minimum  inhibition  concentration.  Studies 

proved  that  compounds  in  plant  extracts  have 

potential  activity  against  gram  positive  bacteria 

than gram negative.  

 

MATERIAL AND METHODS 

Chemicals:  The  solvents  used  for  root 

extraction  are  Methanol  and  Ethyl  Acetate.  The 

reagents  used  for  phytochemical  screening  and 

estimation were of laboratory reagent grade and 

were  purchased  for  Merck  chemicals  private 

limited,  Mumbai,  Fisher  scientific,  Mumbai  and 

SD  fine  chemicals  Mumbai.  Distilled  water  has 

been  used  for  aqueous  extraction.  Alpha 

amylase  enzyme  was  purchased  from  Sigma 

Aldrich chemicals, Ofloxacin drug. 

 

Apparatus: 

Denver 


electronic 

balance, 

TECHCOMP 

  UV  2301  Double  Bean  UV 



Visible  Spectrophotometer  with  HITACHI  2.2 

software, 

Tech-comp 

UV 


visible 

spectrophotometer, 

soxhlet 

extraction 

apparatus, heating mantle, incubator, autoclave.   

 

Sample  collection:  Root  material  of  Syzygium 



samarangense plants were collected from farms 

in  various  places  of  East  Godavari  district, 

Andhra Pradesh, India. The roots are separated 

and allowed to shade dry.  The root sample  was 

ground and powdered for solvent extraction.  

 

Solvent 

extraction: 

The 


phytochemicals 

present in the roots of the collected plants were 

isolated  using  different  solvents  like  ethyl 

acetate,  methanol  and  water  in  a  series  of 

extraction  method  from  low  polarity  to  high 

polarity using soxhlet extraction method. 



 

Microbial test strains for antibiotic activity 

The  bacterial  strains  used  for  screening  of 

antimicrobial  activity  are  Salmonella  typhi, 

Escherichia  coli,  Pseudomonas  aeruginosa, 

Bacillus subtilis. 


IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

756 

Phytochemical  analysis  of  the  root  extracts  was 

performed by following standard methods 



 

Preliminary phytochemical screening 

1. Test for steroids 

Salkowski Test 

Few drops of concentrated sulphuric acid are 

added  to  the  plant  extract,  shaken  and  on 

standing; lower layer turns red in colour. 



Liebermann Burchard’s Test

 

To the extract, few drops of acetic anhydride 

was  added  and  mixed  well.  1  ml  of 

concentrated sulphuric acid is added from the 

sides  of  test  tube,  a  reddish  brown  ring  is 

formed at the junction of two layers. 

 

2. Tests for triterpenoids 

Salkowski Test 

Few drops of concentrated sulphuric acid are 

added  to  the  extract,  shaken  and  on 

standing,  lower  part  turns  golden  yellow 

colour. 

Lieberman Burchard’s Test

 

To the extract, few drops of acetic anhydride 

was  added  and  mixed  well.  1  ml  of 

concentrated sulphuric acid is added from the 

sides  of  test  tube,  a  red  ring  indicates 

triterpenes. 



Ischugajiu Test 

Excess  of  acetyl  chloride  and  pinch  of  zinc 

chloride  are  added  to  the  extract  solution, 

kept  aside  for  reaction  to  subside  and 

warmed  on  water  bath,  cosin  red  colour  is 

produced. 



Brickorn and Brinar Test 

To  the  extract,  few  drops  of  chlorosulfonic 

acid in glacial acetic acid (7:3) are added, red 

colour is produced.  

 

3. Test for Saponins 

Foam Test 

Small  amount  of  extract  is  shaken  with  little 

quantity of water; the foam produced persists 

for  10  minutes.  It  confirms  the  presence  of 

saponins. 

Haemolysis Test 

To  2ml  of  1.8%  Sodium  chloride  solution  in 

two test tubes, 2ml distilled water is added to 

one  and  2ml  of  1%  extract  to  the  other,  5 

drops  of  blood  is  added  to  each  tube  and 

gently  mixed  with  the  contents.  Haemolysis 

observed  under  the  microscope  in  the  tube 

containing the extract indicates the presence 

of saponins. 

 

 



4. Test for Steroidal Saponin 

The extract is hydrolysed with sulphuric acid and 

extracted  with  chloroform.  The  chloroform  layer 

is tested for steroids. 

 

5. Tests for Triterpenoidal Saponin 

The extract is hydrolysed with sulphuric acid and 

extracted  with  chloroform.  The  chloroform  layer 

is tested for triterpenoids. 

 

6. Tests for Alkaloids 

Mayer’s Test

 

The  acid  layer  when  mixed  with  Mayer’s

 

reagent (Potassium  mercuric  iodide  solution) 



gives creamy white precipitate. 

Dragendroff’s Test

 

The  acid  layer  with  a  few  drops  of 

Dragendroff’s

  reagent  (Potassium  bismuth 

iodide) gives reddish brown precipitate. 

Wagner’s Test

 

The acid layer when mixed with few drops of 

Wagner’s  reagent  (solution  of  iodide  in

 

potassium  iodide)  gives  brown  to  red 



precipitate. 

Hager’s Test

 

The acid layer when mixed with few drops of 

Hager’s reagent (Saturated solution of pricric

 

acid) gives yellow coloured precipitate. 



 

7. Tests for Carbohydrates 

Fehling

’s Test

 

The  extract  when  heated  with  Fehling’s  A 

and  B  solutions  gives  an  orange  red 

precipitate showing the presence of reducing 

sugar. 

Molisch

’s Test

 

The extract is treated  with Molisch’s reagent

 

and  concentrated  sulphuric  acid  along  the 



sides  of  the  test  tube,  a  reddish  violet  ring 

shows the presence of carbohydrate. 



Benedict’s test

 

The  extract  on  heating  with 

Benedict’s 

reagent,  brown  precipitate  indicates  the 

presence of sugar. 

Barfoed’s Test

 

Barfoed’s  reagent  is  added  and  boiled  on 

water 

bath 


for 

few 


minutes; 

reddish 


precipitate  is  observed  for  the  presence  of 

carbohydrate. 

 

8. Test for Flavonoids 

Shinoda Test 

The  extract  solution  with  a  few  fragments  of 

magnesium 

ribbon 


and 

concentrated 

hydrochloric  acid  produced  magenta  colour 

after few minutes. 



IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

757 



Ferric chloride test 

Alcoholic  solution  of  extract  reacts  with 

freshly  prepared  ferric  chloride  solution  and 

given blackfish green color. 



Lead Acetate Test 

Alcoholic  solution  of  extract  reacts  with  10% 

lead  acetate  solution  and  given  yellow 

precipitate. 



 

9. Test for Glycosides 

Anthraquinone test 

Drug  is  powdered  and  extracted  with  either 

ammonia or caustic soda. The aqueous layer 

shows pink color 



Keller-killiani test 

This  is  for  cardiac  glycosides.  The  extract 

and  0.4  glacial  acetic  acid  are  mixed  with 

ferrous  chloride  and  0.5  mi  of  concentrated 

sulphuric  acid.  The  acetic  acid  layer  shows 

blue color. 

 

10. Test for Phenolic Compounds 

Ferric chloride test 

Treat  the  extract  with  ferric  chloride  solution 

then  blue  color  appears  if  hydrolysable 

tannins are  present  and green color appears 

if condensed tannins are present. 

Gelatin test 

To  the  test  solution  add  1%  gelatin  solution 

containing 10% NaCl,  and  then  precipitate is 

formed. 


Test for chlorogenic acid 

Treat the test solution with aqueous ammonia 

and  expose  to  air  gradually,  green  color  is 

developed. 



 

Quantitative 

analysis 

of 

Phenoilc 

Compounds 

The  total  phenolic  content  in  different  solvent 

extracts  was  determined  with  the  Folin- 

Ciocalteu’s reagent (FCR). In the procedure, 1ml 

of  extract  was  mixed  with  0.4  ml  FCR  (diluted 

1:10  v/v).  After  5  min  4  ml  of  sodium  carbonate 

solution  was  added.  The  final  volume  of  the 

tubes were made up to 10 ml with distilled water 

and  allowed  to  stand  for  90  min  at  room 

temperature.  Absorbance  of  sample  was 

measured  against  the  blank  at  765nm  using  a 

spectrophotometer.  A  calibration  curve  was 

constructed  using  gallic  acid  solution  as 

standard  and  total  phenolic  content  of  the 

extract  was  expressed  in  terms  of  milligrams  of 

gallic acid per gram of dry weight. 



 

Determination of total flavonoid content 

Total  flavonoid  content  was  determined  using 

aluminium chloride (AlCl

3

) according to a known 



method using quercetin as a standard. The plant 

extract  (1  ml)  was  added  to  3  ml  distilled  water 

followed  by  5%  NaNO

2

  (0.  3ml).  After  5  min  at 



25°C,  AlCl

3

  (0.3  ml,  10%)  was  added.  After 



further  5  min,  the  reaction  mixture  was  treated 

with  2.0  ml  of  1  M  NaOH.  Finally,  the  reaction 

mixture  was  diluted  to  10ml  with  water  and  the 

absorbance  was  measured  at  510  nm.  A 

calibration 

curve 


was 

constructed 

using 

quercetin  solutions  as  standard  and  total 



phenolic content of the extract was expressed in 

terms of milligrams of quercetin per gram of dry 

weight. 

 

Quantitative estimation of terpenoids 

To  1ml  of  plant  extract  2  ml  of  chloroform  was 

mixed  in  extract  of  plant  sample  and  3  ml  of 

sulphuric  acid  were  added  in  sample  extract. 

Reddish  brown  color  was  obtained  in  the  test 

tube. Final volume in the test tube was made up 

to  10ml  with  water.  The  absorbance  of  the 

formed  color  was  measured  at  538nm  against 

reagent  blank  prepared  similarly  without  plant 

extract.  Linalool 

was 


used 

as 


standard 

terpenoid. 

 

Measurement  of  Antioxidant  Activity  using 

DPPH method 

The  antioxidant  activity  of  the  different  root 

extracts  was  determined  on  the  basis  of  their 

scavenging activity of the stable 1, 1- dipheny1-

2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH) free radical. DPPH is a 

stable  free  radical  containing  an  odd  electron  in 

its  structure  and  usually  utilized  for  detection  of 

the  radical  scavenging  activity  in  chemical 

analysis.  lml  of  each  solution  of  different 

concentrations  (1-500g/m1)  of  the  extracts  was 

added  to  3  ml  of  0.004%  ethanolic  DPPH  free 

radical 


solution. 

After 


30 

minutes 


the 

absorbance  of  the  preparations  were  taken  at 

517  nm  by  a  UV  spectrophotometer  which  was 

compared with the corresponding absorbance of 

standard  ascorbic  acid  concentrations  (1-

500µg/m1).The method described by Hatano  et 



al  was  used  to  measure  the  absorbance  with 

some  modifications.  Then  the  %  inhibition  was 

calculated by the following equation: 

 

                               



                                          

                   

     

 


IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

758 



Antidiabetic activity 

In  vitro  study  α

-  amylase  inhibition  activity 

by Spectrophotometric method 

1ml of alpha amylase and 1 ml of plant extract in 

a  test  tube  and  incubated  at  37 

C  for  10  min. 



After  pre-incubation,  1ml  of  1%  (v/v)  starch 

solution  was  added  to  each  tube  and  incubated 

at 37◦C for 15min. The reaction was terminated 

with 2 mL DNSA reagent, placed in boiling water 

bath  for  5min,  cooled  to  room  temperature, 

diluted,  and  the  absorbance  measured  at  546 

nm.  The  control  reaction  representing  100% 

enzyme activity did not contain any plant extract. 

To  eliminate  the  absorbance  produced  by  plant 

extract,  appropriate  extract  controls  were  also 

included.

  

 



% inhibition of alpha amylase by each plant extract can be calculated using the formula: 

                

                                                          

                           

      

 

 



Anti  inflammatory  Activity  by  Albumin 

denaturation Assay 

A solution of 0.2% W/V of BSA was prepared in 

Tris  buffer  saline  and  PH  was  adjusted  to  6.8 

using glacial acetic acid. Stock solutions of plant 

extract  were  prepared  by  using  methanol  as  a 

solvent.  From  these  stock  solutions  6  different 

concentrations of 10-500µg/ml were prepared by 

using  methanol  as  a  solvent.  50µl  of  each 

extract was transferred to Eppendorf tubes using 

1ml  micro  pipette.  5ml  of  0.2%  W/V  BSA  was 

added  to  all  the  above  Eppendorf  tubes.  The 

control  consists  of  5ml  0.2%  W/V  BSA  solution 

with 50 µl methanol. The test tubes were heated 

at  72°  C  for  5  minutes  and  then  cooled  for  10 

minutes. The absorbance of these solutions was 

determined  by  using  UV/Vis  Double  beam 

spectrophotometer 

(Elico 


SL-196) 

at 


wavelength  of  660nm.  The  %  inhibition  of 

precipitation  (denaturation  of  the  protein)  was 

determined  on  a  %  basis  relative  to  the  control 

using the following formula. 

 

 



 

 

Antimicrobial Activity 

Root  extracts  of  Syzygium  samarangense  were 

tested  by  agar  well-diffusion  method  to 

determine  the  antimicrobial  activity.  Nutrient 

agar  (NA)  plates  were  seed  inoculated.  Wells 

(10mm  diameter  and  about  2  cm  a  part)  were 

made  in  each  of  these  plates  using  sterile  cork 

borer.  Stock  solution  of  each  plant  extract  was 

prepared  at  a  different  concentrations  1000, 

500,  200,  100,  50,10µg/  ml  in  different  plant 

extracts  viz.  Methanol,  ethyl  acetate,  water. 

About 100 µl of different concentrations of plant 

solvent  extracts  were  added  with  sterile  syringe 

into  the  wells  and  allowed  to  diffuse  at  room 

temperature  for  2hrs.  Control  experiments 

comprising  inoculum  without  plant  extract  were 

set  up.  The  plates  were  incubated  at  37°C  for 

18-24  h.  The  diameter  of  the  inhibition  zone 

(mm)  was  measured  and  the  activity  index  was 

also calculated. Triplicates were maintained and 

the  experiment  was  repeated  thrice,  for  each 

replicates  the  readings  were  taken  in  three 

different fixed directions and the average values 

were  recorded.  Oflaxacin  drug  was  used  as 

standard  antibacterial  agent  and  compared  with 

the standard results. 



 

RESULT AND DISCUSSION 

Secondary metabolites present in the  plants are 

responsible  for  the  biological  activities  such  as 

hypoglycaemic, 

antidiabetic, 

antioxidant, 

antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anticarcinogenic, 

antimalarial, anticholinergic, antileprosy etc. The 

preliminary  screening  of  phytochemicals  and 

evaluation  of  bioactive  may  lead  to  medicinal 

plant  drug  discovery  and  development  of 

phytomedicine.  In  the  present  study  the  root  of 



Syzygium  samarangense  (wax  Jambu)  was 

screened 

for 

determination 



of 

it’s 


phytochemicals 

in 


three 

different 

solvent 

systems.  Among  the  three,  aqueous  extracts 

were  proved  to  contain  more  number  of 

compounds  than  other  two  solvents  extracts.  In 

aqueous 

extract, 

alkaloids, 

carbohydrates, 

saponins,  tannins,  roteins  and  aminoacids, 

terpenoids, phenolic compounds were identified. 

Tannins, 

Flavonoids, 

terpenoids, 

Phenolic 

Compounds  were  indentified  in  the  methanolic 


IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

759 

extract. In Ethyl  acetate extract only Terpenoids 

are  identified.  In  continuation  quantitative 

analysis  of  the  extracts  has  conducted  to 

estimate  terpenoids,  phenolic  compounds  and 

flavonoids (table 1 and fig 2).  

 

Terpenoids  were  detected  with  highest  quantity 



(81.923  micrograms  per  gram  extract)  in 

aqueous  extracts  than  other  phytochemicals. 

Terpenoids  were  detected  with  48.461µg 

quantity  in  methanolic  extract  and  35.385  µg  in 

ethyl  acetate  extract.  Whereas  flavonoids  are 

only present in methanolic extract and amount of 

flavanoid  quantified  was  33.687  µg  /per  gram 

extract.  Similarly  phenolic  compounds  were 

reported  in  methanolic  and  water  extracts  with 

estimates  as  30.156µg/g  and  23.056  µg  per 

gram  extract  respectively.  Our  results  were  in 

agreement  with  findings  of  the  medicinal  value 

of  plants  lies  in  some  chemical  substances  that 

have  definite  physiological  functions  in  the 

human  body.  Different  phytochemicals  have 

been  found  to  possess  a  wide  range  of 

medicinal  properties,  which  may  help  in 

protection against various diseases.  

 

CONCLUSION 

In  the  present  investigation,  primary  and 

secondary  metabolites  of  the  root  were 

qualitatively and quantitatively analyzed then the 

biological 

activity 

(anti 

oxidant, 



anti 

inflammatory,  and  anti  diabetic)  was  studied. 

Further  evaluation  of  phytochemicals  and  their 

activity  is  needed  for  knowing  the  nutritional 

potential as well as helpful in manufacturing new 

drugs. 


 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

The  author  is  thankful  to Head, Dept.  of  Botany 

&  Microbiology,  ANU  for  providing  the  facilities 

and  also  thankful  to  management,  Hindu 

College 

of 


Pharmaceutical 

sciences 

for 

permitting to do research analysis. 



 

  

 



Table 1:  Phytochemical screening of root extracts of Syzygium samarangense 

S. No. 

Name of the tests 

Ethyl acetate extract 

Methanolic extract 

Water extract 

Alkaloids 



-ve 

-ve 


+ve 

Carbohydrates 



-ve 

-ve 


+ve 

Glycosides 



-ve 

-ve 


-ve 

Saponins 



-ve 

-ve 


+ve 

Tannins 



-ve 

+ve 


+ve 

Proteins & Aminoacids 



-ve 

+ve 


+ve 

Flavanoids 



-ve 

+ve 


-ve 

Terpenoids 



+ve 

+ve 


+ve 

Phenolic Compounds 



-ve 

+ve 


+ve 

 

 



 

 

 



Flavanoid test                                                           Terpenoid test 

 

 



Fig. 2: images of phytochemical screening of root extract of Syzygium samarangense (flavonoids, 

terpenoids tests) 

IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

760 

 

Table 2:  Quantitative analysis of root extracts of S. samarangense 

Phytochemical 

Extract 

Amount found µg / g of extract 

 

Terpenoids 



Ethyl Acetate 

35.385 


Methanolic 

48.461 


Aqueous 

81.923 


Flavonoids 

Methanolic 

33.687 

Phenolic Compounds 



Methanolic 

30.156 


Water 

23.056 


 

 

Table 3:  Antioxidant activity (% DPPH scavenging activity) of S. samarangense root extracts 



S. No. 

Concentration in µg/ml 

Ascarbic Acid 

EtOAc Extract 

MeOH 

Extract 

Water 

Extract 



13.262 

2.246 


6.417 

3.422 


22.460 



4.492 

18.930 


8.449 



37.005 

13.155 


33.155 

18.930 


56.684 



21.283 

49.519 


28.449 

10 



74.011 

33.155 


76.898 

45.134 


20 


89.519 

52.620 


78.930 

63.422 


40 


90.695 

60.535 


88.021 

75.508 


 

 

 



 

% DPPH Activity 

 

Graph A:  Comparative graph of DPPH assay of S. samarangense root extracts 

 

 



 

Table 4:  

α

- amylase inhibition activity of S. samarangense root extracts 

S. No. 

Concentration of Sample 

EtOAc Extract 

MeOH Extract 

Water Extract 

% of α

-Amylase  inhibition 

5µg/ml 



7.709 

13.408 


17.207 

10µg/ml 



9.385 

20.223 


28.603 

15µg/ml 



11.173 

26.033 


41.341 

20µg/ml 



21.341 

34.637 


52.849 

25µg/ml 



30.168 

51.285 


59.665 

50µg/ml 



38.436 

75.307 


76.201 

100µg/ml 



51.285 

79.218 


86.480 

200µg/ml 



55.866 

88.715 


92.626 

 

0



0.2

0.4


0.6

0.8


1

0

20



40

60

Abs



o

rba

nce

 

Concentration in µg/ml 

Conc Vs Abs 

Ascarbic


Acid

EtOAc


Extract

MeOH


Extract

Water


Extract

0

20



40

60

80



100

0

10



20

30

40



50

%DP

P

H

 inh

ibi

tio

n

 

Concentration in µg/ml 

Conc Vs % DPPH Inhibition  

Ascarb


ic Acid

EtOAc


Extract

IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

761 

 

 

Graph B: Comparative graph of α



- amylase inhibition activity of S. samarangense root extracts 

 

Table 5: Anti inflammatory activity of S. samarangense by Albumin denaturation assay 

S. No. 

Concentration of 

Sample 

EtOAc Extract 

MeOH Extract 

Water Extract 

% Albumin denaturation 

10µg/ml 



5.241 

27.724 


15.724 

50µg/ml 



13.793 

35.034 


19.724 

100µg/ml 



23.724 

44.000 


29.379 

200µg/ml 



36.414 

55.448 


50.069 

400µg/ml 



54.621 

68.828 


60.138 

500µg/ml 



60.827 

84.552 


70.759 

 

Table 6: Anti microbial activity of S. samarangense root extracts 

S. No. 

Test organism 

Size of zones (in mm)  

methanolic 

ethyl acetate 

aqueous 

Standard  

1000 µg/ml 

1000 µg/ml 

1000 µg/ml 

500 µg/ml 



Salmonella typhi 

12.7 

….

 



5.6 

19.5 




Escherichia coli 

19.2 


11.2 

17.5 


28.7 



Pseudomonas aeruginosa 

15.3 

8.7 


11.6 

21.2 




Bacillus subtilis 

19.5 


14.3 

16.5 


31.5 

 

 

1) Salmonella typhi    2) Escherichia coli   3) Pseudomonas aeruginosa  4) Bacillus subtilis 

 

Fig. 3: Antimicrobial activity results of S. samarangense root extracts 

0

20



40

60

80



100

0

2



4

6

8



10



α



a

m

y

la

se 

inh

ibi

tio

n

 

Concentration in µg/ml 

α- amylase inhibition activity 

EtOAc Extract

MeOH Extract

Water Extract



IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

762 



REFERENCES 

1.  "Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. 

L.M.Perry". 



World 

Checklist 

of 

Selected  Plant  Families  (WCSP).  Royal 

Botanic  Gardens,  Kew.  Retrieved  14 

Mar 2016 

 via The Plant List. 



2.  Julia  F.  Morton  (1987).  "Java  apple". 

Fruits  of  Warm  Climates.  Miami,  FL: 

Florida Flair Books. pp. 381

382. 


3.  "Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. 

&  L.M.Perry".  Germplasm  Resources 



Information  Network  (GRIN).  Retrieved 

14 Mar 2016. 

4. 

Peter, Tina; Padmavathi, D (28 October 



2011).  "Syzygium  Samarangense:  A 

Review On Morphology, Phytochemistry 

&  Pharmacological  Aspects"  (PDF). 

Asian  Journal  of  Biochemical  and 

Pharmaceutical  Research1  (4):  155. 

Retrieved 1 June 2015. 

5.  Whitman,  William  F.Five  Decades  with 

Tropical  Fruit,  a  Personal  Journey

Stuart,  Florida:  Quisqualis  Books  in 

cooperation 

with 


Fairchild 

Tropical 

Garden. 2001. Print 

6.  "Syzygium  samarangense,  Syzygium 



javanicum, 

Eugenia 

javanica". 

toptropicals.com.  N.d.  Web.  9  Dec. 

2014. 


7.  "Syzygium 

samarangense." 

worldagroforestrycenter.org

Web. 


Mar. 2015. 

8.  Whitman,  William  F.  CSIR.  1976.  The 

Wealth  of  India:  Raw  materials.  Vol  X 

Sp-W. CSIR. 

9.  Jensen  M.  1995.  Trees  commonly 

cultivated  in  South-East  Asia:  An 

illustrated  field  guide.  RAP  publication: 

1995/38.Bangkok, Thailand. 229pp. 

10.  Martin  FW,  Campbell  CW  &  Ruberte 

RM.  1987.  Perennial  edible  fruits  of 

tropics:  an  inventory.  US  Department  of 

Agriculture,  Agriculture  Handbook  No. 

642. 252 pp. 

11.  Okuda, TT, Yoshida, Hatamo, T, Yazaki, 

K,  &  Ashida,  M.  1982.  Ellagitannins  of 

the  Casuarinaceae,  Stachyuraceae  and 

Myrtaceae. 

Phytochemistry. 

21(12): 


2871-2874. 

12.  Panggabean 

G.1992. 

Syzygium 

aqueum 

(Burm.f.) 



Alst., 

Syzygium 

malaccense  (L.)  M.  &  P,  and  Syzygium 

samarangense  (Blume)  M.  &  P.  In 

Coronel,  R.E.,  et  al.  (Eds.):  PROSEA. 

No.  2:  Edible  fruits  and  nuts.  Prosea 

Foundation,  Bogor,  Indonesia.  pp.  292-

294. 


13.  Walter  A,  Sam  C.  2002.  Fruits  of 

Oceania.  ACIAR  Monograph  No.  85. 

Canberra.329 pp. 

14.  A.M.  Al-Saif,  H.  Sharif,  M.T.  Rosna  & 

K.M. Moneruzzaman., African Journal of 

AgriculturalResearch., 

2011, 


6(15), 

3623. 


15.  M.N. Ghayur, A.H. Gilani, A. Khan, E.C. 

Amor, I.M. Villaseñor & M.I. Choudhary., 



Phytother Res., 2006, 20(1), 49. 

16.  K.A.  Reynertson,  M.J.  Basile  &  E.J. 

Kennelly.,  Ethnobotany  Research  & 

Applications., 2005,3, 25. 

17.  A.W.  Whistler,  W.  Arthur.,  Species 



Profiles 

for 

Pacific 

Island., 

Agroforestrywww.traditionaltree.org 

[online], 2010. 

18.  C.A.  Evangeline,  M.V.  Irene,  A.N. 

Sarfraz,  Sabir  &  M.C.  Iqbal.,  Philippine 

Journal of Science., 2005, 134 (2), 105. 

19.  Y.C. Kuo, L.M. Yang & L.C. Lin.,  Planta 



Med., 2004, 70(12), 1237. 

20.  Amor,  E.  Villaseñor,  Irene,  Antemano, 

Rowena  et  al.,  Pharmaceutical  Biology 

(Formerly 

International 

Journal 

of 

Pharmacognosy)., 2007, 45., 777. 

21.  M.H. 

Resurreccion-Magno, 

I.M. 


Villaseñor,  N.  Harada  &  K.  Monde., 

Phytother Res., 2005, 19(3), 246. 

22.  K.V.  Ratnam  &  V.R.  Raju.,  Advances  in 



Biological Research., 2008, 1-2, 17. 

23.  D.D.  Raga,  C.L.  Cheng,  K.C.  Lee, W.Z. 

Olaziman,  V.J.  De  Guzman,  C.C.  Shen 

et  al.,  Z  Naturforsch.,  2011,  66  (5-6), 

235. 

24.  T. Soubir & Sheng Wu Gong Cheng Xue 



Bao., 2007, 23(2), 257. 

25.  A.R. Kurt, Y. Hui, J. Bei, J.B. Margaret & 

J.K.  Edward.,  FoodChemistry.,  2008, 

109, 883. 

26.  C.A.  Evangeline,  M.V.  Irene,  Y.  Amsha 

&  C.  Iqbal.,  Prolyl  Endopeptidase 



Inhibitors from Syzygium samarangense 

(Blume).,  Merr.  &  L.  M.  Perry.  Z. 

Naturforsch, 2004, 59c, 86. 

27.   A.G.  Nair,  S.  Krishnan,  C.  Ravikrishna 

&  K.P.  Madhusudanan.,  Fitoterapia., 

1999, 70, 148. 

28.  Dey  PM  and  Harborne  J  B.  Methods  in 

Plant  Biochemistry:  Academic  Press; 

London, 1987.  

29.  Evans  WC.  Pharmacognosy,13th  Ed, 

Balliere 

 Tindall; London, 1989.  



IJRPC 2015, 5(4), 753-763                                         Madhavi et al.

 

                        ISSN: 2231



2781



 

 

763 

30.   Evans 

WC. 


Trease 

and 


Evans 

Pharmacognosy,  14th  Edition,  Bailiere 

Tindall  W.B.  Sauders  company  ltd; 

London,  1996,  224 

  228,  293 



  309, 


542 

 575.  



31.  Parekh  J  and  Chanda  SV.  In  vitro 

antimicrobial  activity  and  phytochemical 

analysis  of  some  Indian  medicinal 

plants. Turk J Biol. 2007;31:53-58.  

32.  Katasani 

Damodar. 

Phytochemical 

screening,  quantitative  estimation  of 

total 

phenolic, 



flavanoids 

and 


antimicrobial 

evaluation 

of 

trachyspermum  ammi.  J  Atoms  and 



Molecules. 2011;1(1):1

8. 



33.  Hatano,  T.,  H.  Kagawa,  T.  Yasuhara 

and  T. 


Okuda,  1988. 

Two  new 

flavonoids  and  other  constituents  in 

licorice  root:  their  relative  astringency 

and  radical  scavengingeffects.  Chem. 

Pharm. Bull., 36: 1090-2097. 

34.  Varun  Kumar  Prabhakar.,  International 

Journal  of  Scientific  and  Research 

Publications, Volume 3, Issue 8, August 

2013 


35.  Williams  LAD,  Connar  AO,  Latore  L  et 

al.  The  in  vitro  anti-denaturation  effects 

induced 

by 


natural 

products 

and 

nonsteroidal  compounds  in  heat  treated 



(immunogenic) bovine serum albumin is 

proposed  as  a  screening  assay  for  the 

detection 

of 


anti-inflammatory 

compounds,  without the use of animals, 

in the early stages of the drug discovery 

process.  West  Indian  Med  J,  57:  327 

 

331, (2008) 



36.  M.O. 

Edema 


et 

al, 


Comparative 

evaluation  of  bioactive  compounds  in 



hibiscus 

sabdariffa 

and 


syzygium 

samarangense  juice  extracts,  African 

Crop  Science  Journal,  Vol.  20,  No.  3, 

pp. 179 

 187. 



37.  Mario  J.  Simirgiotis  et  al,  Cytotoxic 

chalcones  and  antioxidants  from  the 

fruits  of  a  Syzygium  samarangense 

(Wax  Jambu),  Food  Chem.  2008  Mar 

15; 107(2): 813–

819. 


38.  Vasanthi  et  al,  In  vitro  antioxidant 

activity  of  Syzygium  samarangense 

merr.  et  perry.  Fruit  extract,  Journal  of 

Pharmacy  Research;2

012,  Vol.  5  Issue 

6, p 3426. 

39.  A. G. R Nair et al, New and rare flavonol 

glycosides  from  leaves  of  Syzygium 

samarangense, 

in 

FITOTERAPIA 

70(2):148-151 · APRIL 1999. 

40.  Ghayur  MN  et  al,  Presence  of  calcium 

antagonist  activity  explains  the  use  of 

Syzygium  samarangense  in  diarrhea, 

Phytother Res. 2006 Jan;20(1):4952.

 

41.  Dennis  D.  Raga  et  al,  Bioactivities  of 



Triterpenes and a Sterol from Syzygium 

samarangense,  Z.  Naturforsch.  66  c

235 


 244 (2011). 

42.  Samy  MN  et  al,  Taxiphyllin  6'Ogallate, 

actinidioionoside 

6'Ogallate 

and 


myricetrin 2″Osulfate from the leaves of 

Syzygium  samarangense  and  their 

biological  activities,  Chem  Pharm  Bull 

(Tokyo). 2014;62(10):10138.

 

43.  Rachana 



Srivastava 

et 


al, 

Plant 


chemistry  Triterpenoids  and  chalcone 

from 


Syzygium 

samarangense, 

Phytochemistry,  Volume  38,  Issue  3, 

February 1995, Pages 687

689. 



44.  Fonseca  A  et  al,  Antioxidant  activity  of 

ethanol extract of the fruit of the species 



Syzygium samarangense (WAX APPLE) 

.  J  Pharm  Pharmacogn  Res  (2014) 

2(Suppl. 1):S59 

45.  Shabnam  Mollika  et  al,  Evaluation  of 

Analgesic,  Anti-Inflammatory  and  CNS 

Activities  of  the  Methanolic  Extract  of 



Syzygium  samarangense  Leave,  Global 

Journal  of  Pharmacology  8  (1):  39-46, 

2014. 

46.  S.  Adeola  Adesegun  et  al,  Essential  Oil 



of  Syzygium  samarangense;  A  Potent 

Antimicrobial  and  Inhibitor  of  Partially 

Purified  and  Characterized  Extracellular 

Protease  of  Escherichia  coli  25922  , 

British  Journal  of  Pharmacology  and 

Toxicology 4(6): 215-221, 2013. 

47.  Abd  Aziz  et  al,  Screening  of  selected 

Malaysian  plants  against  several  food 

bore  pathogen  bacteria,  International 

Food  Research  Journal  18(3):  1195-

1201 (2011). 

48.  K.  Venkata  Ratnam  et  al,  In  vitro 

Antimicrobial  Screening  of  the  Fruit 

Extracts  of  Two  Syzygium  Species 

(Myrtaceae),  Advances  in  Biological 

Research 2 (1-2): 17-20, 2008. 

49.  Consolacion  Y.  Ragasa  et  al,  Chemical 

constituents 

of 

Syzygium 

samarangense,  Der  Pharma  Chemica, 

2014, 6(3):256-260. 



 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə