Possible Extinctions, Rediscoveries, and New Plant Records within the Hawaiian Islands



Yüklə 131.09 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü131.09 Kb.

Possible ExtinctionsRediscoveries, and New Plant Records

within the Hawaiian Islands

1

K



eNNetH

R. W


ooD

2

National Tropical Botanical Garden, 3530 Papalina Road, Kalaheo, 



Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i 96741, USA; email: kwood@ntbg.org

eleven possible new extinctions are reported for the Hawaiian flora, in addition to 5 island

records, 3 range rediscoveries, 1 rediscovery, and 1 new naturalized record. the remark-

able range rediscoveries of Ctenitis squamigera (Dryopteridaceae) and Lysimachia filifo-



lia (Primulaceae) give hope toward their future conservation, as both are federally listed

as endangered and were undocumented on Kaua‘i for ca 100 years. Yet there is great con-

cern over numerous possible plant extinctions in Hawai‘i. two extinctions were recently

reported from Kaua‘i (i.e., Dubautia kenwoodii and Cyanea kuhihewa) (Wood 2007), and

an additional 11 are now reported to have no known living individuals in the wild. Species

abundance will naturally fluctuate, yet for very rare taxa there is little room for decline.

the ongoing decline of native pollinators (Kearns et al. 1998) and seed dispersers (Mil -

berg & tyrberg 1993), in combination with other primary extrinsic factors such as inva-

sive nonnative plants, predation by introduced vertebrates, loss and fragmentation of nat-

ural habitats, and devastation by severe storms, are leading to an increase in extinctions

throughout the islands of oceania (Sakai et al. 2002; Wood 2007; Kingsford et al. 2009).

the assertion of extinction is potentially fallible and can only be inferred from absence of

sighting or collection records (Solow & Roberts 2003). Although extensive field surveys

have failed to produce evidence that these possibly extinct taxa still occur in the wild,

there  is  still  suitable  habitat  and  future  field  surveys  are  being  planned  and  funded.

Because of the enormity of Hawai‘i’s conservation dilemma, it is urgent that we have the

most current information possible (Wagner et al. 1999). this paper is a call for biologists

and conservation agencies to make concerted efforts to familiarize, re-find, and attempt to

acquire conservation collections of these elusive species, many of which are hard to rec-

ognize, especially when they are not in flower or fruit. 



Campanulaceae

Clermontia grandiflora Gaudich. 

subsp. maxima Lammers



Rediscovery

Lammers (1991) described Clermontia grandiflora subsp. maxima from a single collec-

tion made in 1973 on the windward slopes of Haleakalā in montane cloud forest (i.e.,

Gagné & Montgomery 386), with no other collections reported since then. Lammers notes

the new taxon differs from all other specimens of C. grandiflora by its much larger flow-

ers  and  he  indicates  that  C.  grandiflora has  seldom  been  collected  above  1275  m.

Collections that fit Lammers diagnosis of C. grandiflora subsp. maxima, especially fila-

ments  8.0–8.6  cm  long,  were  made  at  ca.  1700  m  elev.  in  Hanawī,  just  west  of  the

91

Records of the Hawaii Biological Survey for 2011. Edited by

Neal L. Evenhuis & Lucius G. Eldredge. Bishop Museum

Occasional Papers 113: 91–102 (2012)

1. Contribution no. 2012-014 to the Hawaii Biological Survey.

2. Research Associate, Department of Natural Sciences, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, Hawai‘i

96817-2704, USA.



Helele‘ike‘ōhā headwaters. evidently trees of C. grandiflora in this region have various

floral structures that range in their linear measurements to fit both C. grandiflora subsp.



munroi and C. g. subsp. maxima, dependent on floral anthesis. Further research is needed

to better understand the quantitative differences that may separate these two taxa. 



Material examined. MAUI: east Maui, Hanawī, above State Camp, just west of Helele‘ike‘ōhā

headwaters,  Metrosideros-Cheirodendron  montane  wet  forest  associated  with  Kadua  axillaris,



Broussaisia arguta, Melicope clusiifolia, rich in pteridophytes, 20+ trees along 1700 m (5600 ft) con-

tour trail, 3 m tall, moderately branched, in flower and fruit, observed with C. arborescens and C.



tuberculata, 4 oct 1997, Wood 6788 (PtBG, US); loc. cit., 5 oct 1997, Wood 6798 (PtBG); loc. cit.,

5 oct 1997, Wood 6799 (NY, PtBG).



Cyanea eleeleensis (H. St. John) Lammers

Possibly extinct

Harold  St.  John  (1987)  originally  described  this  species  as  a  Delissea,  and  Lammers

(1992) subsequently transferred it over to Cyanea. Wagner et al. (1999) noted this species

to be endangered and the USFWS (2010) has recently listed it as endangered. only known

from Wainiha Valley, Kaua‘i, where Charles Christensen made the holotype collection, no

living individuals of this species are currently known.



Material  examined. KAUA‘I:  Wainiha  Valley,  on  side  of  intermittent  stream  below  Pali

‘ele‘ele, shaded gulch in wet forest, 700 ft elev., 19 Jul 1977, Christensen 261 (holotype, BISH).



Cyanea kolekoleensis (H. St. John) Lammers

Possibly extinct and taxonomic note

originally placed in Delissea by Harold St. John (1987), and later transferred to Cyanea

by Lammers (1992), Cyanea kolekoleensis has always been considered rare and restrict-

ed to the Wahiawa Mountains of southern Kaua‘i where biologists monitored four sites

totaling less than ten individuals. Last observed in a gulch to the northeast of Hulua peak

in 1996, there are currently no living individuals known of this Kaua‘i endemic.



Cyanea  kolekoleensis was  previously  thought  to  be  an  unbranched  shrub,  and  its

berries  and  seeds  were  unknown.  three  additional  herbarium  collections  deposited  at

PtBG after Lammers (1992) made the new combination allow for a more expanded cir-

cumscription. Seed size and non-rugose testa morphology support its placement within



Cyanea.

Cyanea kolekoleensis (H. St. John) Lammers, Novon 2: 130. 1992. Basionym: Delissea kolekoleen-

sis H. St. John, Phytologia 63: 344. 1987. tYPe: U. S. A. Hawaiian Islands. Kaua‘i: Wahiawa Valley,

765 m, 23 Sep 1979, S. Perlman 498 (holotype, BISH; isotypes, BISH — 2 sheets).

Shrub,  single  stemmed  or  few  branched,  1.5–2  m  tall,  glabrous.  Lamina  narrowly  elliptic,

15.5–30 cm long, 2.7–5.7 cm wide, upper surface green, glabrous, lower surface greenish white,

glabrous or the midrib minutely and sparsely pubescent, margin minutely serrulate, apex acuminate,

base cuneate, petiole terete, 3.5–10 cm long, 4 mm diam., glabrous. Inflorescence 4–8-flowered,

glabrous, peduncle deflexed, 10.5–20 cm long, 2–4 mm diam., rachis 3–6.5 cm long, pedicels sharply

recurved, 18–27 mm long, reduced in length toward apex of rachis; hypanthium obconic or obovoid,

6–13 mm long, 6–11 mm diam., densely short-pubescent; calyx lobes narrowly triangular or deltoid,

1.5–3 mm long, 1.5–3.5 mm wide, the apex acute; corolla bilabiate, white shading to purple on the

lobes, 50–52 mm long, densely short-pubescent, tube curved, 30–39 mm long, 5.5–9 mm diam., cleft

dorsally for ½ its length, dorsal lobes linear, 13–19 mm long, 1.5–3 mm wide, acute at apex; ventral

lobes linear, 10–15 mm long, 1.5–3 mm wide, acute at apex; staminal column exserted; filaments

3.7–4.9 cm long, purple, glabrous; anther tube dark purple, 9–11 mm long, 2.5–4.0 mm diam., the

lower 2 anthers with tufts of white hairs at apex. Berry (slightly immature) globose, 7 mm long, yel-

low-green with persistent calyx lobes. Seeds (immature), testa tan-brown, striate-verruculate, 0.5–0.7

mm long × 0.3–0.5 mm diam.

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 113, 2012

92


Material examined. KAUA‘I: Kōloa Distr, Līhu‘e-Kōloa Forest Reserve, northwest of Wahiawa

Bog, along tributary of Wahiawa Stream, northwest of stream and southeast of Hulua, wet forest domi-

nated by MetrosiderosAntidesmaCyrtandra spp., and Athyrium, with Diplazium and Deparia, single

stemmed shrub of 5 ft, along edge of stream, leaves dark, semi-glossy green above with whitish-green

midrib,  below  silvery,  whitish-green  with  yellow-green  midrib,  inflorescence  pendulous,  fruit  erect,

650–730 m elev., 7 Dec 1988, Flynn & Wood 3229 (PtBG); Wahiawa, south of Kapalaoa, below and

along west ridge, Metrosideros wet forest with Psychotria hexandra, Kadua affinis, Perrottetia sand-

wicensis, Broussaisia arguta, Cibotium glaucum, Diplazium sandwichianum, Diplopterygium, Psidium

cattleianum,  Rubus  rosifolius,  Pritchardia  flynnii,  Labordia  lydgatei,  Myrsine  linearifolia,  Dubautia

imbricata, Cyrtandra pickeringii, Platydesma rostrata, 2 meter tall, branching 2–3 times, leaves dull

green above, pale below, petiole and costa yellow-green, peduncle light green, corolla white with purple

stripes, 805 m elev., 8 Sep 1998, Wood et al. 7470 (PtBG); Wahiawa drainage, side drainage below rope

trail, Metrosideros-Dicranopteris lowland wet forest with Cheirodendron, Kadua affinis, Broussaisia,



Ilex  anomala,  Pittosporum  glabrum,  wind  swept  forest  and  shrublands  along  upper  ridges,  threats

include pigs, Rubus rosifolius, Psidium cattleianum, 3 clumps multi-trunked, up first side gulch north of

main stream, east side of gulch.  760 m elev., 26 Mar 1993, Wood 2119 (PtBG); Wahiawa Mts., north-

east of Hulua, near Waimea-Kōloa District boundary, Metrosideros-Cheirodendron spp. lowland  wet

forest  with  Broussaisia,  Melicope,  Kadua,  Freycinetia,  Pritchardia,  Antidesma,  Psychotria,  Elapho -

glossum, Viola helenae, Cyrtandra, Hesperomannia, Dubautia imbricata, Dicranopteris, 1 plant ob -

served in gulch with 2 seedlings, plant 6 ft, with flowers, 2420 ft elev., 6 Sep 1991, Perlman et al. 12235

(F, PtBG, US); Wahiawa Mts., Kapalaoa Peak, gulch south of peak, Metrosideros- Dicranopteris lin-

earis wet forest with Cheirodendron, Broussaisia, Machaerina angustifolia, Dubautia laxa, Polyscias,

Embelia, Myrsine, Scaevola, Psychotria, Labordia waialealae, Syzygium sandwicensis, Sadleria, Rubus

rosifolius, Dubautia imbricata, Perrottetia, 2440 ft. elev., 4 oct 1996, Perlman et al. 15606 (PtBG).

Convolvulaceae

Merremia

two species of Merremia were recorded by Wagner et al. (1990: 563) as being natural-

ized in the Hawaiian Islands, namely M. aegyptia (L.) Urb. and M. tuberosa (L.) Rendle.

Imada et al. (2000: 11) report a third species, M. umbellata (L.) Hallier f. as being fully

naturalized on windward o‘ahu and Merremia peltata (L.) Merr. is now recorded for the

first time as being naturalized in the archipelago. the four Merremia species in Hawai‘i

can be separated by characters given in the following key.

Key to Merremia in the Hawaiian Islands

1. Leaves palmately lobed to palmately compound (2).

1. Leaves neither palmately lobed nor compound (3).

2(1). Leaves palmately compound; plants usually reddish hirsute … M. aegyptia

2.  Leaves palmately lobed but not compound; plants glabrous … M. tuberosa

3(1). Leaves peltate (except rarely on distal leaves), rounded at base … M. peltata

3. Leaves not peltate, truncate to cordate or hastate at base … M. umbellata

Merremia peltata (L.) Merr.

New naturalized record

this twining vine with broadly ovate-orbicular, peltately attached leaves has not been pre-

viously recorded as naturalized in the Hawaiian Islands. It is currently reported in two

locations ½ mile apart in Wainiha Valley, Kaua‘i, where it is a rampant climber covering

numerous acres and quickly smothering vegetation. Fosberg & Sachet (1977) describe its

distribution as Indo-Pacific, from Africa to tahiti [Society Islands]. My observation of

this species in Micronesia leads me to believe that Merremia peltata is a very serious inva-

sive species that should be closely watched and managed here in Hawai‘i. 

HBS Records for 2011 — Part II: Plants

93


Material examinedKAUA‘I: Wainiha Valley, south side of river, between power house and

Maunahina, sterile, 152 m elev., 27 oct 1999, Keith Robinson s.n. (BISH, PtBG).



Dryopteridaceae

Ctenitis squamigera (Hook. & Arn.) Copel. 

Range rediscovery

Ctenitis squamigera was historically recorded from Kaua‘i, o‘ahu, Moloka‘i, Lana‘i, and

Maui (HBMP 2011), but considered possibly extinct on Kaua‘i (Palmer 2003: 102). Amos

Heller made the only collection on Kaua‘i in 1896 above Waimea at 2000 ft elev. He notes

that the plant was on the face of a perpendicular rock in gulch and exposed directly to the

afternoon sun. Heller also indicates that C. squamigera was not observed in other loca-

tions during his research on Kaua‘i (Heller 1897). After 115 years of not being observed

on Kaua‘i, recent field research within mesophytic forests of Kōke‘e has unveiled two

new locations for this federally listed endangered fern, namely Nu‘ololo and Awa‘awa-

puhi Valleys. the following collections represent this exciting rediscovery.

Material examinedKAUA‘I: Nu‘ololo, north facing slopes above drainage, Metrosideros-Acacia

montane mesic forest, 70–80% canopy cover, ca. 80% understory, 35–40 degree slope, 40 degree north

aspect, up to 20 m tall canopy, with Pouteria, Xylosma hawaiiensis, Claoxylon, Wikstroemia furcata,

Dodonaea, Kadua affinis, Melicope ovata, Pleomele, Polyscias kavaiensis, Psychotria greenwelliae P.

mariniana, Zanthoxylum dipetalum, Nestegis, Diplazium, immediate area has 20% Myrsine lanaiensis,

5% Pittosporum kauaiensis, some Alphitonia ponderosaCarex meyenii, Dianella sandwicensis, threat-

ened  by  deer,  rats,  10%  cover  of  Lantana  camara,  with  Rubus  argutus,  Hedychium  gardnerianum,

Kalanchoë pinnata, Sphaeropteris cooperiAdiantum hispidulum, Psidium cattleianum, rhizome terrestri-

al sub-erect with abundant stamineous scales which continue up stipe and rachis, 5 fronds, protected on

steep slope with boulder outcrops, adjacent Dryopteris sandwicensis, Doodia, Microlepia strigosa, single

plant, 1006 m (3300 ft),19 Feb 2011, Wood & Query 14524 (BISH, PtBG); Awa‘awapuhi, north facing

slopes,  Metrosideros-Acacia montane  mesic  forest,  with  Pouteria,  Xylosma  hawaiiensis,  Antidesma,

Diospyros sandwicensis, Wikstroemia furcata, Leptecophylla tameiameiae, Kadua affinis, Melicope ovata,

M.  barbigera,  Euphorbia  atrococca,  Pleomele,  Polyscias  kavaiensis,  Psychotria  greenwelliae,

Zanthoxylum dipetalum, Nestegis, rhizome terrestrial, 4 cm wide × 7 cm long, 7 healthy fronds with skirt

of old fronds, under 90% forest cover, with Microlepia strigosa, Hillebrandia sandwicensis, Lepidium



serra, Melicope pallida, Remya kauaiensis, Pritchardia minor, 1 plant on steep rock outcrop with soil

pockets, large 12 m tall Alphitonia ponderosa near-by, with adjacent Psychotria mariniana, Dodonaea vis-



cosa, Myrsine lanaiensis, single plant, threatened by pig, deer, rats, Erigeron karvinskianus, Psidium cat-

tleianum, Lantana camara, Rubus argutus, R. rosifolius, Adiantum hispidulum, Blechnum appendicula-

tum,  Hedychium gardnerianum, Kalanchoë pinnata, Sphaeropteris cooperi, 951 m (3120 ft), 5 May 2011,

Wood & Query 14639 (PtBG).

Euphorbiaceae

Euphorbia prostrata Aiton

New island record

Previously recorded on Midway, Kaua‘i, o‘ahu, Moloka‘i, Lāna‘i, Maui, Kaho‘olawe,

and the Big Island of Hawai‘i (Wagner, Herbst et al. 1999; Hughes 1995), the prostrate

spurge is now documented on Ni‘ihau’s offshore islet of Lehua.



Material examined. NIIHAU: Lehua Islet, West Horn, Sida fallax shrubland with Tribulus cis-

toides, Waltheria indica, Jacquemontia ovalifolia subsp. sandwicensis, several native grasses such as

Panicum torridum, Panicum fauriei var. latius, and Panicum pellitum, relatively bare with ca 75% of

the  ground  being  exposed  barren  tuff  along  with  many  hundreds  of  naturally  hallowed  burrows,

decumbent stems pink or green-purple, leaves green or green-red, cyathial gland white, uncommon,

island record, 30 m elev., 2 May 2009, Wood 13714 (BISH, PtBG, US).

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 113, 2012

94


Lamiaceae

Phyllostegia knudsenii Hillebr.

Possibly extinct

Previously known only from the type collection made in the woods of Waimea (Knudsen



190, B) and listed as extinct by Wagner et al. (1990: 819), Phyllostegia knudsenii was

rediscovered May 1993 (Lorence et al. 1995) in Koai‘e Canyon and subsequently found

in upper Kawai Iki Valley on 25 Sep 2001. Unfortunately, both wild populations have

since died, and there are no cultivated plants of this Kaua‘i endemic mint.



Material examined. KAUA‘I: Waimea Distr, Koai‘e Canyon, upper canyon, in forest 21 m (70

ft) above stream, north-facing slope, 692 m (2270 ft) elev., 24 May 1993, Wood & Perlman 2583

(PtBG); loc. cit., 31 Aug 1994, Perlman & Wood 14365 (PtBG); Kawai Iki, upper drainage above

twin falls of Koai‘e Canyon, Metrosideros polymorpha mixed mesic forest with Gahnia beecheyi,



Dianella  sandwicensis,  Dubautia  laevigata,  Kadua  affinis,  Cheirodendron  trigynum,  Psychotria

mariniana, Poa sandwicensis, Bidens cosmoides, Peperomia membranacea, Peperomia latifolia, and

Peperomia kokeana, threats include goats, pigs, rats, Rubus argutus, Kalanchoë pinnatum, Psidium

cattleianum, Grevillea robusta, Myrica faya, Cyperus meyenianus, Passiflora mollissima, Lantana

camara, and Setaria parviflora, shrub 1 m tall, young plant with old inflorescence, 4 immature plants

observed in general area, 330 deg aspect, 20 deg slope, in side-gulch bottom near main drainage,

1015 m elev. (3330 ft), 25 Sep 2001, Wood 9115 (PtBG).

Lycopodiaceae

Huperzia filiformis (Sw.) Holub

New island record

this delicately pendulous fern is considered indigenous to Hawai‘i and Central and South

America to Bolivia (Mickel & Smith 2004). In Hawai‘i Huperzia filiformis was previ-

ously thought to be restricted to o‘ahu, Moloka‘i, Lāna‘i, Maui, and Hawai‘i (Palmer

2003). Further field research now indicates that H. filiformis is also present on Kaua‘i, yet

quite rare, within the headwater drainages of Wainiha and Wailua.



Material examined. KAUA‘I: Hanalei Distr, headwaters of Wainiha River, northeast fork, just

southwest of Mahinakehau Ridge, lowland wet forest with Metrosideros polymorpha dominant, also



Antidesma,  Syzygium,  Broussaisia,  Boehmeria,  &  Perrottetia,  with  understory  of  pteridophytes,

Cyrtandra, & Cyanea, epiphyte on Perrottetia tree 1.5 m above ground in moderate shade, stems

pendulous, light green, very rare, a single plant seen at 825 m elev., 30 Jan 1993, Lorence et al. 7346

(PtBG); Blue Hole, headwaters of Wailua River, below Wai‘ale‘ale and Kawaikini, near south fac-

ing cliffs below Blue Hole proper, ridge running 300 degrees down to stream, Metrosideros lowland

wet  forest  with  Psychotria  mariniana,  Antidesma  platyphyllum  var. hillebrandii,  Dianella  sand-

wicensis, Polyscias oahuensis, Freycinetia arborea, Diplazium sandwichianum, Microlepia strigosa,

and Sadleria pallida, threatened by pigs, Rubus rosifolius, Psidium guajava, Paspalum urvillei, and



Mariscus meyenianus, epiphytic rhizome on Melicope paniculata, stems pendulous, leaves medium

green, sporangia yellow-white, rare, 610 m elev., 10 Dec 1998, Wood 7631 (PtBG).



Malvaceae

Hibiscadelphus woodii Lorence & 

W.L. Wagner (Fig. 1)



Possibly extinct

Four shrubs of Hibiscadelphus woodii were discovered in March 1991 clustered on a ver-

tical cliff in Kalalau Valley, Kaua‘i, increasing the total number of species for the endem-

ic Hibiscadelphus to seven (Wood 1992; Lorence & Wagner 1995). Subsequent efforts to

propagate H. woodii by air layering, cuttings, and grafting trials onto con-generic culti-

vated individuals had failed. tests for H. woodii pollen viability proved negative, and

cross pollination trials from H. distans showed no success. Micropropagation attempts at

in vitro protocol development for apical and lateral meristem culture, callus culture uti-

HBS Records for 2011 — Part II: Plants

95


lizing  leaf  and  internode  explants,  and  propagation  by  tip  and  stem  cuttings  had  also

failed. Although no fruit set was ever observed, flowering was documented during the

months  of  March, April,  July,  and  September.  Flower  visitations  by  birds  include  the

native ‘amakihi (Hemignathus virens). Introduced Japanese white eye (Zosterops japoni-



cus) regularly pierced the corollas of H. woodii above the calyx, presumably robbing nec-

tar. three individuals of H. woodii were apparently crushed by a large fallen boulder and

died  between  1995  and  1998.  on  17 August  2011,  the  last  remaining  H.  woodii  was

observed dead. Previously, the final wild H. hualalaiensis died on the Big Island in 1992

(Wood & Perlman, pers. observ.). A total of six species of Hibiscadelphus are now extinct

in the wild, two of which are maintained through cultivation (i.e., H. giffardianus and H.



hualalaiensis). only one species of Hibiscadelphus still survives in the wild, being H. dis-

tans from the dry to mesic canyon cliffs of Koai‘e, Kaua‘i. 

Material examined. KAUA‘I: Hanalei Distr, Kalalau Rim, north of Kahuama‘a Flat, lowland

mesic  cliffs,  990–1020  m,  3  March  1991,  Wood,  Query  &  Montgomery  629  (holotype,  PtBG,  a

flower also in spirit collection; isotypes, BISH, K, Mo, NY, US).

Piperaceae

Peperomia subpetiolata Yunck. 

Possibly extinct

Peperomia subpetiolata is an east Maui narrow endemic species known only from around

the Kula Pipeline of lower Waikamoi (Yuncker 1933; Wagner et al. 1990). In the early

1990s it was estimated that around 40 individuals occurred in that region, both above and

below the road. A putative hybrid between P. subpetiolata and P. cookiana was also doc-

umented in that area. the dense invasion of Hedychium gardnerianum below a nonnative

forest canopy of Eucalyptus has left little open soil for herbaceous terrestrial species such

as P. subpetiolata to survive. Recent field research has failed to locate any individuals of

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 113, 2012

96

Figure 1Hibiscedelphus woodii. Kalalau cliffs, Kaua‘i. Photo: K.R. Wood.


P.  subpetiolata and  only  hybrid  individuals  were  observed  (Wood  2001,  2009a;

oppenheimer & Perlman pers. observ.). 



Material examined. MAUI: east Maui, Kula pipeline, Waikamoi, 5–6 Sep 1919, Forbes 1283-

(holotype, BISH); Kula pipeline, woods, 4500 ft elev., 11 Feb 1930, St. John 10299 (BISH).

Poaceae

Dichanthelium cynodon (Reichardt) C.A. 

Clark & Gould



New island record

Gon (1994) describes a true bog on o‘ahu where several island plant records were ob served

(Kennedy et al. 2010: 21), including two endemic species of Dichanthelium, both of which

were documented during the discovery of the bog in February 1993. Dichanthelium cynodon

was previously recorded from Kaua‘i, Moloka‘i, and Maui (Wagner et al. 1990), and now

reported on o‘ahu in association with D. hillebrandianum



Material  examined. O‘AHU:  Ko‘olau  Mountains,  just  below  summit  ridge,  north  of

Pe‘ahināi‘a and south of Castle trail, Metrosideros-Rhynchospora lowland bog with Lobelia gau-



dichaudii subsp.  koolauensis,  Viola  oahuensis,  Dichanthelium  hillebrandianum,  D.  koolauense,

Vaccinium  dentatum  &  V.  reticulatum,  Metrosideros  rugosa,  threatened  by  pigs,  Clidemia  hirta,

Axonopus fissifolius, Pterolepis glomerata, Juncus planifolius, growing in tussocks within bog with

D. hillebrandianum, common in bog, 25 Feb 1993, Wood & Lau 2428 (PtBG, Mo). 

Dichanthelium hillebrandianum (Hitchc.) 

C.A. Clark & Gould



New island record

Dichanthelium hillebrandianum was previously recorded from Kaua‘i, Moloka‘i, Maui,

and Hawai‘i (Wagner et al. 1990) and is now documented on o‘ahu.



Material examined. O‘AHU: Ko‘olau Mountains, just below summit ridge, north of Pe‘ahināi‘a

and south of Castle trail, Metrosideros-Rhynchospora lowland bog with Dichanthelium hillebrandi-



anum, growing in tussocks within bog, east aspect, common only in bog, 25 Feb 1993, Wood & Lau

2421 (PtBG, US). 

Primulaceae

Lysimachia filifolia C.N. Forbes & Lydgate

Range rediscovery

Previously  recorded  on  o‘ahu  and  Kaua‘i,  yet  not  seen  on  Kaua‘i  since  1912  when

Lydgate  made  the  holotype  collection  in  upper  olokele  below  the  Kawaikini  summit

(Wagner et al. 1990; Marr & Bohm 1997), Lysimachia filifolia was recently rediscovered

below Kamanu ridge, eastern Kaua‘i, in the headwater region of Waikoko. Plants of this

federally listed endangered species are being cultivated by the National tropical Botanical

Garden (NtBG). Wagner et al. (1990) report collections of L. filifolia from the Blue Hole

region of Wailua, Kaua‘i, but these plants were subsequently described as a new species

(i.e., L. pendens Marr). Lysimachia filifolia can be distinguished from L. pendens by its

narrower leaves and non-tomentose stems, pedicels, and leaves (Marr & Bohm 1997). It

is worth noting that plants of L. filifolia on Kaua‘i can be erect up to 1.5 m tall as com-

pared to the o‘ahu plants which are smaller, more delicate, and only known to be pendu-

lous. Further studies are needed to better understand their relationship.

Material examined. KAUA‘I: upper olokele Valley, Jan 1912, Lydgate 2 (holotype, BISH);

Waikoko headwaters, below Kamanu ridge, S of Wailua River and above Wailua ditch, associated

with Cheirodendron, Pipturus spp., Dubautia, Cyrtandra, Kadua centranthoides, K. elatior, K. fog-

giana, Psychotria, Melicope, Machaerina, Isachne, with ferns of Microlepia, Asplenium, Cyclosorus,

Deparia, terrestrial in Diplazium with Boehmeria grandis, 1.5 m tall with erect stems brown-red,

pendent corolla light purple, terrestrial near land slide and on wet cliff, ca 30 plants, threats include

pigs, landslides, Buddleia asiatica, Erigeron karvinskianus, 732 m elev., 12 Jan 2008, Wood 12774

(BISH, PtBG).

HBS Records for 2011 — Part II: Plants

97


Lysimachia venosa (Wawra) H. St. John

Possibly extinct

Lysimachia venosa was originally discovered by Heinrich W. Wawra in 1870 on the sum-

mit of Mt Wai‘ale‘ale. this species was not observed again until 1911 when Joseph Rock

also made a collection around Mt. Wai‘ale‘ale summit. In 1991 a small branch represent-

ing this taxon was found after a storm at the bottom of a 1000 m tall cliff (i.e., Blue Hole,

below Wai‘ale‘ale, at the headwaters of Wailua River), with no indication of where the liv-

ing plant might be located. Lysimachia venosa is presently considered possibly extinct

since no living individuals are known.

Material examined. KAUA‘I: Summit of Mt Wai‘ale‘ale, 1600 m elev., Mar 1870, Wawra 2165

(holotype, W; isotypes, W, BISH); Summit of Mt Wai‘ale‘ale, 1911, Rock 8881 (BISH, GH); Wailua

headwaters, north fork, Blue Hole, small branch found after storm at bottom of 1000 m tall cliff, 600

m elev., 7 May 1991, Wood 784 (PtBG). 



Rosaceae

Acaena exigua A. Gray

Possibly extinct

After not being observed since 1957 a single plant of Acaena exigua was rediscovered in

a West Maui bog in 1997 (Meidell et al. 1998; oppenheimer et al. 2002; Wood 2005).

During the period of 1997 to 2000, attempts at propagation failed and in early 2000 the

only known plant died. Historically, A. exigua occurred in bogs on West Maui where its

Hawaiian name is liliwai, and also on the island of Kaua‘i where it was known as nani

Wai‘ale‘ale. Numerous surveys have since been conducted around the West Maui bogs

and throughout most of the summit bogs of Alaka‘i and Nāmolokama, Kaua‘i, yet no

other individuals of A. exigua have been documented (Wood 2006). Heinrich Wawra was

the last one to observe it on Kaua‘i in 1870. the extremely small size of A. exigua, with

stems 1–4 cm long (Wagner et al. 1990) make it extremely difficult to locate. Although

there is excellent bog habitat being protected on the summits of Kaua‘i and West Maui

indicating that there could be more individuals waiting to be discovered, A. exigua is now

considered possibly extinct with no known living plants extant. 



Material examined. MAUI: Lahaina Distr, Honokōhau, 1719 m elev., among bryophytes in

mixed ‘ōhi‘a montane bog, 19 Mar 1997, Meidell & Oppenheimer 194 (BISH).



Rubiaceae

Kadua haupuensis Lorence & W.L. Wagner

Possibly extinct

Recently described and known only from a single location on the north side of Mt Ha‘upu,

Kaua‘i,  Kadua  haupuensis was  last  observed  in  the  wild  when  discovered  in  1998

(Lorence et al. 2010). Plants from the holotype region of the mountain were evidently

destroyed by a small rock slide and numerous attempts to locate additional plants of this

species have failed. With no known wild individuals remaining, K. haupuensis is now

considered possibly extinct. the quality of its habitat is rapidly declining due to animal

disturbance such as rats, pigs, and goats, and invasive alien plant species including Cae -



salpinia decapetalaRhodomyrtus tomentosa, and Passiflora laurifolia. At the time of dis-

covery, seeds were collected and plants are being cultivated at the NtBG. 



Material examined. KAUA‘I: Kōloa Distr, Ha‘upu Range, north facing mesic forest, just below

and along cliffs w of summit, 366 m, 23 Sep 1998, Wood 7492 (BISH, Mo, NY, PtBG, US). 



Rutaceae

Melicope macropus (Hillebr.) t.G. Hartley 

& B.C. Stone 



Possibly extinct

A  Kaua‘i  endemic,  Melicope  macropus was  historically  known  from  the  Kahōluamano

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 113, 2012

98


region of Waimea where Heller made a collection in 1885 and Faurie in 1910 (Stone 1969).

Most recently it was observed in Kalalau in 1987, Honopū in 1991, and the upper Nu‘ololo

stream region in 1995. this taxon is poorly understood (Wagner et al. 1990) and the type

designated by Hillebrand (i.e., Knudsen 189) was destroyed in Berlin (Stone 1969). Wagner



et al. (1990) considered M. macropus to be rare and related to M. kavaiensis from which it

differs in its puberulent exocarp, less overall pubescence and predominantly smaller leaves

(Stone 1969). No living individuals of this species are known at this time.

Material  examined. KAUA‘I:  Hanalei  Distr,  Nā  Pali-Kōna  Forest  Reserve,  Kalalau  Valley,

steep, southwest slope between Kalalau and Pu‘u o Kila lookouts, diverse forest of Metrosideros,



Xylosma, Nestegis and Cryptocarya, elev. 3900–4100 ft, sprawling shrub of 4 ft, with Cibotium,

Dubautia, and Rubus, 20 Mar 1987, Flynn et al. 2116 (PtBG); Hanalei District, Honopū, south of

Kalalau lookout, by stream on west side of road, Metrosideros diverse montane mesic forest with



Labordia, Dubautia, Kadua, Nothocestrum peltatum, and Myrsine, scandent shrub, in fruit, attractive

and vigorous, threatened by pigs, Rubus rosifolius, Hedychium gardnerianum, 1200 m elev., 29 Aug

1991, Wood & Perlman 1182 (PtBG, US); Waimea Distr, upper Nu‘ololo Stream, north branch,

Acacia-Metrosideros  montane  mesic  forest  with  Psychotria  grandiflora,  Xylosma  crenatum,  Poa

siphonoglossa  P.  sandvicensis,  Myrsine  knudsenii,  Nothocestrum  peltatum,  Dubautia  latifolia,

Bobea brevipes, Melicope macropus, Lobelia yuccoides, Alyxia stellata, threats include pigs, deer,

Rubus  argutus,  Hedychium  gardnerianum,  Kalanchoë  pinnata,  3700–3800  ft,  1  m  tall,  diffusely

branched shrub, sprawling stems 1 m long, stems dark-brown, petiole brown, leaves shiny, dark-

green above, paler below, peduncle yellow-green, immature flower brown-red, branches with tan or

white pubescence at apical tips, det. W.L. Wagner, 23 Nov 1995, Wood & Davis 4806 (PtBG).



Melicope nealae (B.C. Stone) t.G. Hartley 

& B.C. Stone 



Possibly extinct

Considered  rare  by  Wagner  et  al. (1990),  Melicope  nealae  was  known  from  the

Kahōluamano  and  Kumuwela  regions  of  Kaua‘i.  Last  observed  in  1960  around

Kumuwela, no living individuals are known of this taxon. Melicope nealae differs from



M. puberula in its shrubby stature, glabrous endocarp, larger capsules, and predominant-

ly obovate leaves (Stone 1969). Wagner et al. (1990) relate it to the M. kavaiensis com-

plex, differing by its combination of puberulent exocarp, glabrous endocarp, and carpels

connate ca. ½ their length.



Material examined. KAUA‘I: Kahōluamano, behind Waimea, Sep 1909, Forbes 341 (BISH);

Kōke‘e Plateau, level forested area north of Kumuwela Lookout, under Psychotria, Zanthoxylum,

and Platydesma, a subscandent low shrub with green pubescent capsules and pubescent leaves, elev.

3500 ft, 12 Apr 1960, B. C. Stone et al. 3359 (BISH, L, US).



Melicope quadrangularis (H. St. John & 

e.P. Hume) t.G. Hartley & B.C. Stone



Possibly extinct

Melicope quadrangularis is a Kaua‘i endemic known from the holotype collection made

in 1909, and rediscovered in the same general region of Wahiawa in May 1991 (Lorence



et al. 1995). the rediscovered population was subsequently destroyed by Hurricane Iniki

in September 1992 (Wood 2009b, 2011). Melicope quadrangularis is easily distinguished

on Kaua‘i by its large 12–14 mm long × 19–22 mm wide, cube-shaped capsules with cen-

tral depression at apex. Numerous surveys in the Wahiawa region have failed to relocate

any living individuals of this species.

Material examined. KAUA‘I: Vicinity of Wahiawa Swamp, Aug 1909, C. N. Forbes 273.K

(holotype,  BISH);  Līhu‘e  Distr,  Wahiawa,  drainage  between  Hulua  and  Kapalaoa,  Metrosideros-



Dicranopteris lowland wet forest with Syzygium, Polyscias oahuensis & P. waialealae, Labordia,

Perrottetia, area rich with bryophytes, threats include severe storms, pigs, rats, Psidium cattleianum

HBS Records for 2011 — Part II: Plants

99


& P. rosifolius, Melastoma candidum, 820 m, 2 m tall, branches ascending, collected below M. quad-

rangularis population of 9 trees, 4 trees in immediate area, 20 May 1991, Wood et al. 0859 (PtBG);

loc. cit., with Broussaisia, Eurya, Cyanea coriacea, Labordia hirtella, Syzygium, 850 m, 4 m tall tree,

single tree in fruit, 13 cm diameter at base, vigorous, east aspect, 20 May 1991, Wood et al. 0858

(PtBG).

Thelypteridaceae

Cyclosorus pendens (D.D. Palmer) N. Snow

[Syn. Pneumatopteris pendens D.D. Palmer] 



Range rediscovery

Recently described by Palmer (2005), yet historically known from the islands of Kaua‘i,

o‘ahu, Moloka‘i, Maui, and Hawai‘i, Cyclosorus pendens has been taxonomically con-

fused  with  C.  sandwicensis  by  numerous  collectors  and  botanists.  the  genus  Pneu -



matopteris was recently merged into Cyclosorus (Snow et al. 2011). Collections date back

to 1909 when it was first documented by C. N. Forbes in olokele Valley, Kaua‘i. Palmer

considered C. pendens to be extinct on Kaua‘i and only cited recent collections on o‘ahu,

Moloka‘i, Maui, and Hawai‘i (Palmer 2005). the following collection made around the

falls of Hanakāpī‘ai indicates that it is still extant on Kaua‘i.  

Material examined. KAUA‘I: Na Pali coast, Hanakāpī‘ai falls, base of wet cliff, to left of falls

along narrow ledge, growing with Selaginella arbusculaDeparia peterseniiBlechnum appendicu-



latum, very small plants of Tectaria gaudichaudii, also Christella cyatheoides and a native Deparia

sp. in the area, det. A. Smith, 6 Apr 2007, A. R. Smith 2918 (PtBG, UC).



Zingiberaceae

Curcuma longa L.

New island record

An Indian perennial herb, semi-wild populations of turmeric (‘ōlena) have been previ-

ously recorded from Moloka‘i, Maui, and Hawai‘i (Wagner et al. 1990). Recent research

around the remote headwater region of Wainiha has documented Curcuma longa growing

adjacent to ancient rock walls. Rhizomes have been collected and are being cultivated at

the NtBG. 



Material examined. KAUA‘I: Wainiha Valley, around confluence of upper east and west fork,

Metrosideros 40-60% closed forest with 12–15 m tall canopy, understory of PerrottetiaPsychotria

spp, Dubautia spp, Labordia spp, Polyscias kavaiensisP. oahuensis, rich fern and bryophyte under-

story, 472 m elev., 18 Jun 2008, Wood et al. 13135 (BISH, PtBG).

Acknowledgments

For their continued support I thank the staff at the National tropical Botanical Garden; the

Bishop Museum; the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; the Hawai‘i State Department of

Land  and  Natural  Resources;  the  Nature  Conservancy  of  Hawai‘i;  the  Smithsonian

Institution;  the  Plant  extinction  Prevention  Program  of  Hawai‘i  (PePP);  and  the

University Herbarium, UC Berkeley. My respect and gratitude to those who have assist-

ed  in  field  research.  Much  appreciation  is  extended  to  Clyde  Imada  who  helped  to

improve this manuscript and to Danielle Frohlich and Alex Lau for sharing their knowl-

edge of Merremia peltata.

Literature Cited

Fosberg,  F.R.  & Sachet,  M.-H.  1977.  Flora  of  Micronesia.  Part  3.  Convolvulaceae.

Smithsonian Contrib. Bot. 36: 1–34.

GonS.M. 1994. A Hawaiian bog in the Ko‘olau Mountains of o‘ahu? evidence from

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 113, 2012

100


community structure and diagnostic species. Newsletter of the Hawaiian Botanical

Society 33(4): 89–96. 

HBMP. 2011. Hawaii Biodiversity and Mapping Program, Natural Diversity Database,

677 Ala Moana Blvd. Suite 705, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96813.



HellerA.A. 1897. observations on the ferns and flowering plants of the Hawaiian Is -

lands. Minnesota Botanical Studies 1: 760–922.



HughesG.D. 1995. New Hawaiian plant records. II. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers

42: 1–10.

ImadaD.T., StaplesG.W., & HerbstD.R. 2000. New Hawaiian Plant Records for

1999. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 63: 9–16.



KearnsC.A., InouyeD.W& WaserN. 1998. endangered mutualisms: the conserva-

tion of plant-pollinator interactions. Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics 29:

83–112.

KennedyB.H., JamesS.A., & ImadaC.T. 2010. New Hawaiian plant records from

Herbarium Pacificum for 2008. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 107: 19–26.

KingsfordRT., WatsonJ.E.M., LundquistC.J., VenterO., HughesL., Johnson,

E.L.,  Atherton,  J.,  Gawel,  M.,  Keith,  D.A.,  Mackey,  B.G.,  Morley,  C.,

Possingham,  H.P.,  Raynor,  B.,  Recher,  H.F.,  and Wilson,  K.A2009.  Major

Conservation Policy Issues for Biodiversity in oceania. Conservation Biology23:

834–840.

Lammers,  T.G.  1991.  Systematics  of  Clermontia (Campanulaceae-Lobelioideae)

Systematic Botany Monographs 32: 1–97.

———. 1992. two new combinations in the endemic Hawaiian genus Cyanea (Cam -

panulaceae: Lobelioideae). Novon 2: 129–131.

Lorence,  D.H.,  Flynn,  T.W.  & Wagner,  W.L.  1995.  Contributions  to  the  flora  of

Hawai‘i. III. New additions, range extensions, and rediscoveries of flowering plants.



Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 41: 19–58.

———. & WagnerW.L. 1995. Another new, nearly extinct species of Hibiscadelphus

(Malvaceae) from the Hawaiian Islands. Novon 5: 183–187.

———.,  Wagner,  W.L.,  & Laidlaw,  W.G.  2010.  Kadua  haupuensis (Rubiaceae:

Spermacoceae), a new endemic species from Kaua‘i, Hawaiian Islands. Brittonia 62:

137–144.


Marr K.L.  & Bohm,  B.A.  1997.  A  taxonomic  revision  of  the  endemic  Hawaiian

Lysimachia (Primulaceae) including three new species. Pacific Science 51: 254–287.

MeidellJ.S., OppenheimerH.L& BartlettR.T. 1998. New plant records from West

Maui. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 56: 6–8.



MickelJ.T& SmithA.R. 2004. the Pteridophytes of Mexico. Mem. New York Bot.

Gard. 88: 1–1054. 

MilbergP& TTyrberg. 1993. Naïve birds and noble savages – a review of man-

caused prehistoric extinctions of island birds. Ecography16: 229–250.



OppenheimerH., PerlmanS& RomanchakE. 2002, Acaena exigua Survey Report,

USFWS Agreement No. 122001G017.



Palmer,  D.D.  2003.  Hawai‘i’s  ferns  and  fern  allies.  University  of  Hawai‘i  Press,

Honolulu. 324 pp.

———.  2005.  Pneumatopteris  pendens (thelypteridaceae),  a  new  Hawaii  endemic

species of Pneumatopteris from Hawaii. American Fern Journal 95: 80–83.

HBS Records for 2011 — Part II: Plants

101


SakaiA.K., WagnerW.L& MehrhoffL.A. 2002. Patterns of endangerment in the

Hawaiian flora. Syst. Biol. 51: 276–302.



SolowA.R& RobertsD.L. 2003. A nonparametric test for extinction based on a sight-

ing record. Ecology 84: 1329–1332.



SnowN., RankerT& LorenceD.H. 2011. taxonomic changes in Hawaiian ferns and

lycophytes. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 110: 11–16.



StoneB.C. 1969. The genus Pelea A. Gray (Rutaceae: Evodineae). A taxonomic mono-

graph.  (Studies  in  the  Hawaiian  Rutaceae,  10).  Phanerogamarum  Monographiae

tomus III. J. Cramer, Lehre, West Germany. 180 pp.



StJohnH. 1987. Diagnoses of Delissea species (Lobeliaceae) from Kaua‘i: Hawaiian

plant studies 145. Phytologia 63: 339–349.



[USFWS] U.SFish and Wildlife Service. 2010. endangered and threatened Wildlife

and  Plants;  Determination  of  endangered  Status  for  48  Species  on  Kaua‘i  and

Designation of Critical Habitat; Final Rule. Federal Register 75: 18960-19165.

WagnerW.L., BruegmannM., HerbstD.R& LauQ.C.  1999. Hawaiian Vascular

Plants at Risk: 1999. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 60: 1–64.

———., HerbstD.R& SohmerS.H. 1990. Manual of the flowering plants of Hawaii.

2 vols. University of Hawai‘i Press & Bishop Museum Press, Honolulu. 1853 pp.

———., HerbstD.R& SohmerS.H. 1999. Manual of the flowering plants of Hawaii.

Revised  edition.  2  vols.  University  of  Hawai‘i  Press  &  Bishop  Museum  Press,

Honolulu. 1,919 pp.

WoodK.R. 1992. New Hibiscadelphus found on Kaua‘i. Hawai‘i’s Forests and Wildlife

7: 115–117

———. 2001. Summary Report of Research Conducted in the Waikamoi Region of the

east  Maui Watershed.  Prepared  for the  Nature  Conservancy  of  Hawaii  (tNCH).

Biological Report, National tropical Botanical Garden (NtBG), Kalaheo, Hawai‘i.

21 pp. Available from tNCH.

———.  2005.  Summary  Report  of  Research:  Acaena  exigua  Botanical  Survey,  Pu‘u

Kukui Summit, West Maui, Hawai‘i. 14 pp. Available from the National tropical

Botanical Garden (NtBG).

———. 2006. Summary of Vascular Plant Research, Wai‘ale‘ale Summit Bog Region,

Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i, Botanical Report Prepared for the Department of Land and Natural

Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife; the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service;

the Nature Conservancy of Hawai‘i (tNCH); and the Kaua‘i Watershed Alliance. 41

pp. Available from tNCH.

———. 2007. New plant records, rediscoveries, range extensions, and possible extinc-

tions within the Hawaiian Islands. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 96: 13–17.

———. 2009a. Notes on Peperomia subpetiolata. Biological Report, National tropical

Botanical Garden (NtBG), Kalaheo, HI. 6 pp. Available from NtBG.

———. 2009b. Further Notes on Melicope quadrangularis (Rutaceae) Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i.

Biological Report, National tropical Botanical Garden (NtBG), Kalaheo, HI. 6 pp.

Available from NtBG.

———. 2011. Rediscovery, conservation status and taxonomic assessment of Melicope

degeneri (Rutaceae), Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i. Endangered Species Research 14: 61–68.

YunckerTG. 1933. Revision of the Hawaiian species of PeperomiaBernice Pauahi

Bishop Museum Bulletin 112: 1–131.

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 113, 2012



102


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə