Preliminary studies on antioxidant and anti-cataract activities of Cheilanthes glauca



Yüklə 157.99 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix08.08.2017
ölçüsü157.99 Kb.

Preliminary  studies  on  antioxidant 

and  anti-cataract  activities  of 

Cheilanthes  glauca  (Cav.)  Mett. 

through various in vitro models

Edgar Pastene✉

1

, Marcia Avello



1

, María Eugenia Letelier

2



Elizabeth Sanzana



1

, Mario Vega

3

 and Margarita González



4

Keywords:



Cheilanthes  glauca

Diabetes,  cataracts, 

fl a v o n o i d s ,  r u t i n , 

k a e m p f e r i t r i n , 

antioxidants,  ORAC, 

ABTS, FRAP, DPPH.



Received: May 18, 2006

Revised: June 04, 2006

Accepted: June 08, 2006

Final  version:  May  20, 

2007

1 ,  L a b o r a t o r y  o f 

P h a r m a c o g n o s y , 

D e p a r t m e n t 

o f 

Pharmacy,  Faculty  of 

Pharmacy,  University  of 

Concepcion, Chile

2 ,  L a b o r a t o r y  o f 

P h a r m a c o l o g y  a n d 

Toxicology,  Faculty  of 

P h a r m a c e u t i c a l 

Sciences,  University  of 

Chile, Chile

3,  Department  of  Food 

Science,  Nutrition  and 

Dietetic,  Faculty  of 

Pharmacy,  University  of 

Concepcion

4,  Laboratories  of 

Clinical  Biochemistry 

and Immunology, Faculty 

of  Pharmacy,  University 

of Concepcion, Chile



Corresponding author: 



email epastene@udec.cl 

Tel: +56 41 2204359 

Fax: +56 41 2207086

Aqueous extracts of Cheilanthes glauca (Cav.) Mett., (Adiantaceae), commonly named 

Doradilla,  are  often  used  in  folk  medicine  as  anti-inflammatory  and  for  diabetes 

treatment. In the present study the antioxidant capacity of freeze-dried extract of Ch. 



glauca  was  investigated through different  tests,  i.e. i) 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl 

(DPPH),  ii)  2,2’-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic  acid  (ABTS)  radical 

scavenging activities iii) ferric reducing  antioxidant power (FRAP) iv) Oxygen Radical 

Absorbance  Capacity  (ORAC)  v)  lipid  peroxidation  in rat  liver  microsomes  and vi) 

anti-cataract  effect on cultured bovine lens. The total phenolic  content of  the plant 

was  also  determined  to  estimate  the  antioxidant  activity  as  gallic  acid  equivalent 

(GAE).  Doradilla  extracts  exhibited  a  strong  antioxidant  capacity,  which  was 

concentration-dependent  in all assays. To ascertain the possible  explanation for  this 

potent activity, the percentages of rutin and total flavonoids were estimated by planar 

chromatography, found values of 3.50%  ± 0.05%  and 11.70% ± 0.08% respectively. 

Only rutin was able to partially inhibit cataract formation in high glucose conditions. 

The results suggest that rutin could be related to some of pharmacological effects of 



Ch. glauca. In vitro models clearly established the antioxidant properties of this plant 

and its use in pathological conditions where oxidative stress was involved.

Introduction

Diabetes  mellitus  represents  the  final  consequence  of  a  chronic  and  progressive 

syndrome. The costs of diabetes treatment and its associated complications have great 

implications, and therefore prevention measures are very important. A recent study of 

the World Health Organization estimated that the worldwide prevalence of diabetes 

in  2002  was  170  million,  which  has  a  predicted  growth  to  366  million  by 

2030 [1, 2]. Type 1 and 2 diabetes,  exhibit hyperglycemia  as their hallmark. Type 1 

diabetes, accounting for  5-10%  of diabetes diagnoses, is  caused by  a  failure of the 

pancreatic β-islet cells producing an insulin deficiency. Type 2 diabetes encompasses 

90% of  diabetes and it is characterized by insulin resistance  often accompanied by 

obesity  and  dyslipidemia. The  vascular  complications  of  diabetes  are  divided  into 

macrovascular  and  microvascular  categories.  Microvascular  complications  such  as 

retinopathy,  neuropathy,  and  nephropathy  are  important  causes  of  morbidity  and 

mortality  in  diabetic  patients  and have been  involved in oxidative stress. There are 

several  studies  demonstrating  that  patients  with  diabetes  not  only  have  increased 

levels  of circulating  markers of free radical-induced damage, but also have  reduced 

antioxidant  defenses [3].  Hyperglycemia  can  induce  oxidative  stress  via  several 

mechanisms. These  include  glucose  autoxidation,  formation  of  advanced glycation 

end-products  (AGE),  and  activation  of  the  polyol  pathway.  The  latter  induce 

intracellular  overload of sorbitol and have been proposed as  initial event of various 

types  of  ocular  lesions.  Additionally,  this  polyol  was  involved  in  generation  of 

peripheral  neuropathy [4].  The  biochemical  reactions  known  as  “polyol  pathway” 

represent only a 3% of glucose metabolism. During hyperglycemia or osmotic stress

Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry 2 (1) 2007 1-8

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



1

Original 

Article

the  pathway  activity  increases  several  times. 

Association  of  this  condition  with  chronic 

complications  in  diabetes  has  been  observed  in 

experimental  models  of  hyperglycemia,  where 

significant  alterations  affected  the  lens.  These 

changes  are  characterized  by  high  sorbitol  levels, 

alterations  on  the  membrane  permeability,  lost  of 

glutathione  (GSH)  and  a  diminution of  the  protein 

synthesis [5].  Additionally,  diabetic  individuals 

present  a  polymorphism in the  promoter  region  of 

ARL2  gene,  generating   major  susceptibility  to 

develop  cataracts,  neuropathy  and  retinopathy [6]. 

By the  other  side, oxidative stress is associated with 

cataracts  formation  by  production  of  hydrogen 

peroxide  through  glucose  auto-oxidation [7].  Levels 

of  hydrogen  peroxide  in  normal  lens  and  aqueous 

humor are between 20 and 30 mol L

-1

. This value is 



10  or  20  times  higher  in  lens  with  cataracts.  This 

finding strongly  suggests  that  hydroxide peroxide  is 

the  most  important  reactive  oxygen  intermediary 

with  deleterious  effect  upon  lens [8].  Moreover,  as 

diabetic  lens  has  lower  GSH  levels  than  normal 

ones,  the  probability  of  protein  damage  is 

increased [9].  Therefore,  now  is  established  that  in 

diabetes, oxidation events (lipids and proteins), AGE, 

sorbitol accumulation and other events contribute to 

cataracts formation and retinopathy [10, 11]. 

From  biological  point  of  view  an  antioxidant  is 

defined  as  any  molecule  that  in  relatively  low 

concentrations  prevents  free  radical  generation and 

neutralizes  oxidation  of  biological  substrates [12]. 

Antioxidant substances could act as reducing  agents, 

free radical scavengers, singlet oxygen quenchers or 

by  complex  formation  with  metallic  ions  like  Fe

2+

 



and Cu

2+



There  is  a  plethora  of  information  about  foodstuff 

and  medicinal  plants  with  antioxidant  capacity 

evaluated by  different methods. Vaccinium myrtillus 

(billberry),  Ginkgo  biloba,  Vitis  vinifera  and 



Rosmarinus  officinalis  among  others,  have  been 

investigated for  some  complications associated with 

diabetes  like  retinopathy  and  atherosclerosis.  The 

contribution  of  these  plants  in  lowering  glucose 

levels  was  also  investigated  elsewhere [13,  14].  In 

our  previous  work  rutin  and  kaempferitrin  were 

isolated  as  predominating  flavonoids  from 

Cheilanthes glauca (Cav.)  Mett. Only rutin displayed 

notorious scavenging activity on DPPH assay [15]. In 

the  same  study  the  contents  of  rutin  and  total 

flavonoids were not determined, hence is not clear if 

these  compounds  could  be  responsible  of  relevant 

biological effects. Therefore, presence of high levels 

of  kaempferitrin  could  be  important  due  to  its 

significant  hypoglycemic  effect  proved  in  animal 

models. Hypoglycemic activity  of kaempferitrin and 

other  flavonoids  has  been  demonstrated  for  some 



Bauhinia  species.  Recently,  a  quercetin  glycoside 

isolated  from  B.  megalandra  caused  inhibition  of 

hepatic  neoglucogenesis  and  glucose-6-

phosphatase [16].  Also,  it  has  been  reported  that 



Bauhinia  candicans  shown  hypoglycaemic  effect 

stimulating glucose uptake  in isolated gastric  glands 

of normal and diabetic rabbits [17, 18]. Additionally, 

administration of pure  flavonoids  such as quercetin, 

rutin  and kaempferitrin induced antihyperglycaemic 

and  antioxidant  effects  in  streptozotocin-induced 

diabetic  rats [19,  20].  Consumption  of polyphenols 

containing  foods and herbal teas has been proposed 

as a useful practice to decrease the oxidative damage 

in  the  body.  Because  of  this,  the  objectives  of  the 

study  were  to  assess  the  antioxidant  activity  of 

Cheilanthes  glauca  extracts  using  some  general 

assays,  i.e.  DPPH,  ABTS,  ORAC  and  FRAP  and  to 

evaluate  its  anti-cataracts  effect  through  an  in  vitro 

model  with  bovine  lens.  Furthermore  the  effect  of 

the  extracts  on the  consumed  oxygen  and on  lipid 

peroxidation  in  the  hepatic  microsomes,  was 

measured.  For  quantitative  evaluation  of  rutin  and 

total  flavonoids  levels  an  HPTLC  method  was 

developed. 

Materials and Methods



Chemicals and reagents

2,4,6-tripyridyl-s-triazine  (TPTZ),  1,1-diphenyl-2-

picrylhydrazyl  (DPPH),  2,2’-azinobis  (3-

ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic  acid  (ABTS),  2,2’ 

azobis(2-amidinopropane)  dihydrochloride  (AAPH), 

β-phycoerythrin  (β-PE),  6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-

tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic  acid  (Trolox), 

Triton X-100, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and Folin-

Ciocalteau  reagents  were  purchased  from  Sigma 

(St. Louis,  MO,  USA).  Thiobarbituric  acid  (TBA), 

trichloroacetic  acid  (TCA)  and  all  the  others 

chemical  and  solvents  were  obtained  from  Merck 

(Darmstadt, Germany). 

Plants material

Cheilanthes  glauca  (Cav.)  Mett.  (CONC  148497) 

samples were  collected in  January  of  2005 in  Peña 

Negra, located 80 Km from Chillan, 600 m s.m. (36º 

58’ S – 71º 48’ W) in the VIII Region, Chile.



Extraction

100 g  of dried Ch. glauca stems were extracted twice 

with 1 L of methanol-water (8:2 v/v). Pooled extracts 

were  rotary  evaporated  under  vacuum  (40°  C)  and 

the aqueous extract was freeze-dried to yield 9.24 g 

of  material  (EChg).  Polyphenols-free  extract  of  Ch. 



glauca  was  prepared  dispersing  100  mg  of  freeze-

dried  EChg  in  5  mL  of  ethanol.  This  solution  was 

centrifuged  (2500  g,  15  min)  and  the  supernatant 

was  loaded  onto  a  column  packaged  with  5  g  of 

Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry ISSN 0718-3550

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



2

diethylaminoethyl  cellulose  (DEAE  cellulose). 

Column was  eluted  with 50 mL  of ethanol  and the 

resulting   extract  was  dried  under  nitrogen  current 

stream(EChg-DEAE yield 2.5 mg). 



Total polyphenol analysis (TP) 

Total  phenolic  content  in Ch.  glauca  extracts  were 

determined  with  Folin-Ciocalteu  reagent  according 

to  the  method  of  Singleton  and  Rossi  [21],  using 

gallic acid as standard. Briefly, 100 µL of 1 mg mL

-1

 



extract  was  mixed  with 0.2  mL  of  Folin-Ciocalteau 

reagent,  2  mL  of  distilled  water,  and  1  mL  of 

200 g L

-1

  Na



2

CO

3



, and the mixture was measured at 

765  nm  after  1  hour  at  room  temperature  using a 

V-500  Jasco  spectrophotometer  (Easton,  USA).  A 

Gallic acid calibration plot was established from 5 to 

20 mg  L

-1

 (final concentration in cuvette). The results 



were  expressed  as  mg   g

-1

  gallic  acid  equivalents 



(GAE).  All  measurements  were  performed  in 

triplicate



Rutin content by planar chromatography (HPTLC):

For  quantitative  evaluation  of  rutin,  we  adapted  a 

p r e v i o u s l y  p u b l i s h e d  p r e p a ra t ive  T L C 

separation [15]. The  solvent  system  used  was  ethyl 

acetate, formic acid and water with a volume ratio of 

9:1:1  v/v/v  for  flavonoids  analysis.  The 

chromatography was performed on silica gel 60 F

254


10 cm x 10 cm HPTLC plates from Merck. The plates 

were  previously  washed  with  methanol  by  pre-

chromatography  for  30 minutes  and  dried  at  room 

temperature in a fume  hood. Before analyses, plates 

were  activated  at  120  ºC  for  30  min.  Sample  and 

standard zones were applied to the layer as bands by 

means  of  the  Automatic  TLC  Sampler  (ATS)  3  and 

Linomat III  automated spray-on applicator  equipped 

with a 100 µL syringe, both from CAMAG (Muttenz, 

Switzerland),  operated  with  the  following  settings 

band  length  6  mm,  application  rate  4  s  µL

–1

,  table 



speed  10  mm  s

–1

,  distance  between  bands  4  mm, 



distance  from  the  plate  side  edge  6.5  mm,  and 

distance from the bottom of the plate 10 mm. Plates 

were developed up to a migration distance of 50 mm 

in  a  CAMAG  HPTLC  twin-trough  chamber 

equilibrated  with  the  mobile  phase  for  15  min. 

Approximately 15 mL of mobile phase were used for 

each  development,  which  required  approximately 

18 min. For multiple  developments,  the plates were 

run  three  times  as  maximum.  Freeze-dried  extract 

(100 mg) was dissolved in methanol, filtered through 

cotton  and  diluted  to  50  mL  with  methanol,  no 

further  clean up  was  necessary. This  operation  was 

performed  in triplicate, and  developed  three  times. 

For  rutin analysis, different volumes were applied in 

the plate (2–8  µL). For total flavonoids analysis, 1 µL 

of  samples  was  applied  on  the  plate  and  the 

detection  for  both was performed in UV  absorption 

mode  using  the  TLC  Scanner  3  from  CAMAG  at 

λ= 355 nm.

DPPH assay

For  radical  scavenging  capacity  DPPH  assay  was 

carried  out  according  to  Bonoli  et  al.  with  slight 

modifications  [22].  Briefly,  100  µL  sample  of  each 

extract were added to 2.9 mL  of 0.1 mol  L

-1

  DPPH 



solution in methanol-water  (8:2  v/v).  A  decrease  in 

absorbance  was  determined  at  517  nm  every 

0.5 seconds  intervals in a  0-30 min range at  25°C. 

The  blank  reference  cuvette  contained  only 

methanol-water  (8:2  v/v).  Delta  absorbancies  were 

evaluated  according  to  the  Trolox  calibration  plot 

established from 20 to 200 µmol L

-1

, the results were 



expressed as µmol L

-1

  of Trolox equivalent per  gram 



of  extract.  All  measurements  were  performed  in 

triplicate.



ABTS assay

Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC) assay 

using  ABTS

•+

 radical cation, was done according  to 



Pellegrini et al. [23]. ABTS

•+

 (7 mmol L



-1

) was mixed 

with  potassium  persulfate  (final  concentration: 

2.42 mmol  L

-1

)  and  kept  for  12–16  h  at  room 



temperature  in  the  dark.  For  the  assay,  this  stock 

solution was  diluted with  ethanol to an absorbance 

of 0.70  at  734  nm. After  the  addition  of 1.0 mL  of 

ABTS


•+

 solution to 10 µL of each extract (1 mg mL

-1

), 


the  mixture  was  stirred  for  10  s  and  the  readings 

were  taken every 0.5 seconds until  15 min (25 °C). 

Delta  absorbencies  were  evaluated  regarding  the 

Trolox  calibration  plot  established  from 

20-100 µmol L

-1

  and  the  results  were  expressed  as 



µmol L

-1

  of Trolox equivalent per gram of extract. All 



measurements were performed in triplicate.

Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity Assay (ORAC)

This  procedure  was  based on a  previously  reported 

method [24]. The  assay was  done in a final volume 

of  500  µL  solution  constituted  by:  β-PE 

(16.7 nmol L

-1

),  AAPH  2.2  mg  mL



-1

  and 


2.5-10.0 µg mL

-1

  of Ch. glauca extract. After addition 



of the AAPH, fluorescence was recorded every 1 min 

for 70 min with emission and excitation wavelengths 

of λ = 535 and 485 nm,  respectively, using a blank 

composed  by  phosphate  buffer  (pH  7.4),  β-PE  and 

AAPH. All readings were carried out at 37°C using  a 

RF  5301-PC  fluorescence  spectrophotometer  from 

Shimadzu (Kyoto, Japan) and the ORAC values were 

calculated  as  area  under  the  curve  (AUC)  and 

expressed as µmol Trolox equivalent (TE)  per  gram. 

All measurements were performed in triplicate.

Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry ISSN 0718-3550

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



3

1

2

3



(a)

(b)

(c)

sample


rutin

94.92 % : 355nm



Figure 1.

 Chromatographic profile of EChg. Samples were applied on HPTLC silica gel 60 plates and developed as indicated 

in material and methods section. (a) HPTLC separation of EChg: rutin (1), unknown (2), kaempferitrin (3). (b) Comparison of 

UV spectra of sample and  rutin  standard. Additionally, peaks assignation was assessed  by comparison with  spectroscopic 

data  from  previous  work[15].  (c)  Amounts  of  flavonoids  were  calculated  from  calibration  curve  (area  versus  rutin 

concentration).



FRAP assay

For FRAP assay [25], a mixture of 0.1 mol L

-1

  acetate 



buffer (pH 3.6), 0.01 mol L

-1

 TPTZ, and 0.02 mol L



-1

 

ferric  chloride  (10:1:1  v/v/v)  was  prepared  (FRAP 



reagent). To 900 µL of FRAP reagent, 90 µL of water 

and 30  µL  of  sample  were  added.  The  absorbance 

readings  started  immediately  after  the  addition  of 

sample,  and  they  were  performed  at  593  nm with 

readings  every  0.5  seconds  for  10  min.  The  blank 

consisted in 120 µL of water and 900 µL of reagent. 

The final absorbance of  each sample was evaluated 

regarding  the Trolox calibration plot established from 

10 to 100  µmol  L

-1

. The  results  were  expressed as 



µmol L

-1

 of Trolox equivalent per gram of extract. All 



measurements were performed in triplicate. 

Animals

Adult male Sprague Dawley rats (200–250 g) from a 

stock  maintained  at  the  University  of  Chile,  were 

used.  Animals  had  free  access  to  pelleted  food, 

maintained with controlled temperature  (22 ºC) and 

photo-period  (lights  on  from  07:00  a.m.  to 

7 p.m. hr).  All  animal  procedures  were  performed 

using  protocols  approved  by  the  Ethical  Committee 

of  the  Faculty  of  Chemical  and  Pharmaceutical 

Sciences, University of Chile. 



Liver microsomal preparations

Animals were fasted for  15 hr with water ad libitum 

and sacrificed by decapitation. Livers were  perfused 

in  situ  4  times  with  25  mL  of  9  mg  mL

-1

  NaCl, 



excised, and placed on ice. All homogenization and 

fractionation procedures were performed at 4 °C (ice 

bath). The centrifugation were performed using either 

a  Suprafuge  22  Heraeus  centrifuge  (Osterode, 

Germany) or an XL-90 Beckman ultracentrifuge (Palo 

Alto,  CA,  USA).  Liver  tissue  (9–11  g  wet  weight), 

devoid  of  connective  and  vascular  tissue,  was 

homogenized with five volumes of 0.154 mol L

-1

 KCl 


and  eight  strokes  in  a  Dounce  Wheaton  B 

homogenizer  (Millville,  NJ,  USA).  Homogenates 

were centrifuged at 9.000 × g for 15 min at 4 ºC, and 

sediments  were  discarded.  Supernatants  were  then 

centrifuged  at  105.000  ×  g  for  60  min  at  4  ºC. 

Sediments  (microsomes,  enriched  in  endoplasmic 

reticulum)  were  stored  at  -80 °C  until  use.  Protein 

determinations  were  performed according to  Lowry 



et al. [26].

Microsomal lipid peroxidation

Lipid  peroxidation  was  estimated  measuring  the 

thiobarbituric  acid  reactive  substances  (TBARS) 

according to Buege and Aust [27] protocol.

Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry ISSN 0718-3550

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



4

Table 1.

 In vitro antioxidant activity of Ch. glauca extracts determined by ORAC, FRAP, ABTS and DPPH assays

Antioxidant 

activity

EChg-DEAE

(µmol Trolox /g)

EChg

(µmol Trolox /g)

equation

y = ax + b

ORAC


3

1245 ± 11 (115.0)



y = 2043x + 124 (r

2

 = 0.9840)



FRAP

n.d


486 ± 30 (44.9)

y = 0.0449x + 0.07 (r

2

 = 0.9983)



ABTS

n.d


852 ± 130 (78.7)

y = 0.0334x + 0.0148 (r

2

 = 0.9902)



DPPH

n.d


855 ± 41 (79.0)

y = 0.022x + 0.0301 (r

2

 = 0.9958)



n.d. : non-detectable. Values are expressed as mean ±  standard deviation (n =  3). Values in parentheses indicate µmol Trolox equivalents per 

gram of dried plant.

Oxidative  damage  was  induced  by  ascorbate-Fe

2+

 



system.  Incubations  were  carried  out  at  37°C  for 

30 min in a  shaker-water  bath. After the incubation, 

the  samples  were  boiled  with  TBA  reagent  for 

30 min.  The  pink  color  of  TBARS  formed  was 

measured at 532 nm as malondialdehyde equivalents 

(MDA)  after  accounting  for  appropriated  blanks.  A 

MDA  standard  was  prepared  by  acid  hydrolysis  of 

tetraethoxypropane.  The  extinction  coefficient  used 

was  0.156  mol

-1

  x  cm



-1

.  All  measurements  were 

performed in triplicate.

Oxygen Consumption

Measures of  oxygen consumption were investigated 

polarographically using a 2 mL chamber and a Clark 

electrode Nº 5331 (Yellow Springs, instrument model 

5300  Biological  Oxygen  Monitor,  Ohio,  USA). 

Reaction  mix  contained:  plant  extracts  [IC

50

  from 


lipoperoxidation  assay],  10  µmol  L

-1

  CuSO



4

  and 


1 mmol  L

-1

  sodium  ascorbate.  All  measurements 



were performed in triplicate.

Bovine Lens assay

Extract  anti-cataract  effect  was  evaluated  using  a  a 

previously  published  in vitro protocol  [28].  Bovine 

lens were obtained from young  and healthy animals, 

slaughtered  in  the  same  day  of  the  sampling 

(Chiguayante  abattoir  in  Chile).  Lens  were  quickly 

removed  and  stored  at  -20°C.  Krebs  Ringer 

carbonate  buffer  (132 mmol L

-1 

NaCl, 4.8  mmol L



-1 

KCl,  1.2 mmol L

-1

  Na


2

HPO


4

12H



2

O  and 


1.2 mmol L

-1 


MgSO

4



7H

2

O, pH  7.5) was  used,  plus 



1.3  mmol  L

-1 


CaCl

2



2H

2

O,  25  mmol  L



-1

  NaHCO


3

 

and glucose. Buffer was  sparged with a low flow of 



CO

2

  at  37°C.  Extracts  were  dissolved  in  25  mL  of 



buffer  and  filtered  thought  0.22  µm  membrane. 

Lenses  were  incubated in this medium for 24 hours 

at  37  °C  with  5%  CO

2

  and  95%  air.  Positive  and 



negative  controls  were  prepared  with  and  without 

glucose (0.03 mol L

-1

), respectively. Hyperoside was 



used as aldose reductase inhibitor. Image of the lens 

were  digitally  acquired  by Reprostar  3 system from  

CAMAG.

Results and Discussion



Total polyphenols (TP) and rutin content:

Using the  equation  of  gallic  acid  calibration  curve 

was  = 0.091x + 0.0229  (r

2

 = 0.9951)  the  TP 



calculated for EChg was 148 ± 3 mg GAE per  gram 

of dried extract. The rutin and total flavonoid content 

in dried  plant  (expressed as rutin  equivalents) were 

3.50%  ±  0.05% and  11.70% ± 0.08%  respectively. 

As  expected,  TP  in  EChg-DEAE  was  <  1  mg  GAE. 

From  HPTLC  profiles  (figure  1),  it  is  possible  to 

calculate  a  kaempferitrin  (peak  3)  content  of 

3.80% ± 0.06% in the plant,  which is exceptionally 

higher  than  contents  reported  for  some  Bauhinia 

species. However, due to obvious differences  in the 

response  factors  for  rutin  and  kaempferitrin,  in  the 

future  this  content  must  be  corrected  using  an 

adequate calibration curve with an authentic sample. 

Antioxidant Capacity (DPPH, ABTS, ORAC, FRAP)

Table 1 depicts results of antioxidant capacity of Ch. 



glauca  extracts  addressed  by  different  methods. 

Antioxidant  capacity  assayed with DPPH and ABTS 

radicals  showed  similar  results.  Both  radicals  are 

stable  in  absence  of  antioxidant  substance  and 

became  to  decolorize  mainly  through  a  single 

electron transfer  mechanism [29]. In spite of widely 

use  of  FRAP  to  estimate  antioxidants  in  different 

products, results only reflex the presence of reducing 

substances,  which  not  necessarily  involve 

polyphenol compounds. It should be noted however, 

that  the  reaction  of  Ch.  glauca  polyphenols  with 

FRAP  reagent  has  not  been  finished  within  the 

10 min  period.  Some  polyphenols  causes  a 

continuous  increasing   of  the  FRAP  reagent 

absorbance  sometimes  for  hours. Therefore, if short 

recording  times  are  used,  antioxidant  potential  of 

these  compounds  cannot be  determined accurately. 

Also,  presence  of  non-phenolic  substances 

(vitamin C and Cu (I)) must be considered in order to 

a  correct interpretation of  total polyphenol analysis 

by  means  of  Folin-Ciocalteu  reagent.  Nevertheless, 

correlate  total  polyphenol  content  with  antioxidant 

capacity is a routine  practice  in food and medicinal 

plants investigation [30]. 

Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry ISSN 0718-3550

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



5

Figure 2.

 In vitro anti-cataract effect of EChg. Bovine lenses were incubated as described in material and method section:   

(a) without glucose; (b) with 0.030 mol L

-1

  glucose (c) 50 mg  L



-1

 hyperoside; (d), (e) and  (f) Ch. glauca extract (1, 100 and 

1000 mg L

-1

, respectively). 



a

b

c



d

e

f



ORAC  assay  was  chosen  because  it  is  becoming a 

very popular method, which is considered one of the 

most  sensitive  and  reliable  assays  for  antioxidant 

capacity  evaluation  in  foodstuff  and  medicinal 

plants [31-33].  In  the  present  work  the  original 

method published by Cao et  al. [24]  was  used.  For 

this  reason,  R-Phycoeritrin  was  employed  as 

fluorescence  probe  instead  of  sodium  fluorescein, 

which  is  considered  more  stable  and  inexpensive. 

The  ORACPE  value  of  1245 Trolox  equivalents  per 

gram  of  extract,  ranks  Ch.  glauca  in  the  same 

category  of  some  fruits  extracts  like  bilberry, 

elderberry  which  published  ORACPE  values  are 

1283 and 1174, respectively [34]. 

In agreement with the chemical analysis, presence of 

rutin and kaempferitrin could explain the antioxidant 

capacity of Ch. glauca. However, in a previous study 

we  found  that kaempferitrin  only  produced a  slight 

DPPH bleaching rate in comparison with rutin [15]. 

To  our  knowledge,  there  is  not  evidence  of  other 

antioxidant  substances  in  this  plant.  In  order  to 

confirm  if  the  antioxidant  capacity  of  Ch.  glauca 

extract is related to the presence of polyphenols  we 

prepared  a  polyphenols-free  extract  using  DEAE-

cellulose  which  efficiently  removed  polyphenolic 

material.  As  expected,  DEAE-EChg  showed  weaker 

antioxidant capacity  than EChg in the entire  battery 

of tests, suggesting that polyphenolic substances may 

be  related  to  this  property.   In  other  approach,  we 

used  dot-blot  over  TLC  with  DPPH  as  visualizing 

reagent. Only one spot with antioxidant activity was 

observed  5 minute  after  spraying the  layers  with  a 

DPPH solution. After  scrapped and eluted the zone 

from preparative TLC plates, rutin  was identified by 

spectra comparison UV, 

1

H-NMR and 



13

C-NMR (data 

not  show)  [15]  and  by  co-chromatography  with  a 

certified  standard.  Nevertheless,  it  is  important  to 

complete  the  phytochemical  profile  of  Ch.  glauca 

searching new substances with biological activity.



Table 2.

  Inhibition of microsomal  lipid peroxidation 

induced  by  Fe

2+

/ascorbate   ([FeCl



3

]:  600  µmol  L

-1



[ascorbate]: 1 mmol L



-1

). IC


50

  values were calculated 

from dose-response curves obtained for each extract.

Extract

IC

50

 

(µg/mL)

EChg


50,8

EChg-DEAE

>1000

Table 3.

  Effect  of the Ch. glauca  extracts on oxygen 

consumption.  Concentrations  used  were  the  IC

50

 

determined in the lipid peroxidation assay (Table 2).



Extract

Concentration

(µg/mL)

% Inhibition

EChg


51

24.6 %


EChg-DEAE

1000


21.3%

Microsomal  Lipid  peroxidation  and  oxygen 

consumption

From  the  dose-response  curves  obtained  with  the 

extracts, IC

50

  values were calculated as is showed in 



Table  3.  These  values  represent  the  extract 

concentration  capable  to  inhibit  in  a  50%  the 

microsome  lipid  peroxidation induced  by  the  Fe

2+

/



ascorbate  pro-oxidant  system.  Because  EChg-DEAE 

extract  shown  a  very  low  anti-lipoperoxidative 

activity,  IC

50

  value  was  not  determined.  



Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry ISSN 0718-3550

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



6

Nevertheless, EChg and EChg-DEAE extracts display 

only a low antioxidant activity (IC

50

) upon consumed 



oxygen assays (Tables 2 and 3)

Bovine lens assay

As is shown in figure 2, in vitro anti-cataract effect of 



Ch.  glauca  on  bovine  lenses  incubated  in  a  high 

glucose  medium  was  dose-dependent.   This  effect 

was  manifested  as  amelioration of  glucose-induced 

bovine  lens  opacity.  However,  hyperoside  was  still 

more  effective.  As  reported  by  other  researchers 

there  are  some  structural  requirements  that 

determine  aldose  reductase (AR)  inhibitory effect of 

flavonoids  [35-38].  For  instance,  the  ortho 

orientation of the hydroxyl groups in positions 3′ and 

4′  of  ring  B,  number  of  hydroxyl  groups  and 

glycosylation  pattern  appears  as  structure-activity 

relevant  requisites.  In  a  recent  report,  using  a 

Genetic Algorithm (GA) analysis and Artificial Neural 

Network  (ANN)  approach,  the  importance  of  the 

carbonyl group on the aromatic rings was remarked. 

Such  groups  can  form hydrogen  bonds  with Tyr48, 

and  His110  residues  in  the  active  site  of  AR.  The 

same  authors  observed  that  the  absence  of  the 

hydroxyl  substituent  at  position  4′  drastically 

decreases the AR  inhibitory activity [41].  In spite  of 

its  powerful  free  radical  scavenging properties,  the 

potential  mechanism  of  Ch.  glauca  anti-cataract 

effect  also  could  be  associated  to  a  flavonoids 

inhibitory activity over the bovine AR. This could be 

proved  in an in vivo model like  the  streptozotocin-

induced  diabetic  rat  [39].  This  model  allows 

investigate if Ch. glauca could inhibit cataract rating 

and lipid peroxidation  or  gliycation  of  plasma  and 

lens  proteins  [40].  Nevertheless,  it  must  be  kept  in 

mind the potential anti-diabetic effects associated to 

the  presence  of  kaempferitrin.  This  polyphenol, 

lowering   the  glucose  levels  of  plasma  and  lens, 

could  produce  more  relevant  outcomes  than  those 

related  to  the  antioxidant  and  AR  inhibitory 

properties. 

Concluding remarks

This  work  supports  the  possibility  that  Ch.  glauca 

polyphenols  reduce  the  oxidative  stress  and  could 

protect  diabetes  mellitus  patients  against 

hyperglycemia-mediated  lens  damage.  Further 

research is necessary to determine if the ingestion or 

administration  of  this  plant  extracts  could  partially 

abrogate diabetes mellitus chronic complications via 

anti-diabetic and/or antioxidant effects

Acknowledgements

Authors thank the “Dirección de Investigación de  la 

Universidad  de  Concepción”  for  financial  support 

through Grant: “Plantas  Medicinales Chilenas  en  la 

Prevención  de  Complicaciones  Crónicas  de  la 

Diabetes”.  Edgar  Pastene  thanks  to  Rodrigo 

Troncoso,  veterinarian  responsible  for  bovine  lens 

provision. 

References

1. Wild  S., Roglic  G., Green A., Sicree R. and King  H., 

Diabetes Care 27 (2004): 1047-1053

2. Hudson B., Wendt T., Bucciarelli L., Rong  L.L., Naka 

Y.,  Fang  Yang  S.  and  Schmidt  A.M.,  Forum  Review: 

Antioxid.  Redox.  Sign.  7  (2005):  11  and   12, 

1588-1600

3. Ceriello A. and  Motz  E., Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. 

Biol. 24 (2004): 816-823

4. Kador PF., Med. Res. Rev. 8 (1988): 325

5. Kinoshita  J.H.,  Am.  J.  Ophthalmol.  102  (1986): 

685-692


6. Demaine  A.,  Cross  D.  and  Millward  A.,  Invest. 

Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci. 41 (2000): 4064-4068

7. Ohguro  N., Fukuda  M., Sasabe T.  and  Tano Y.,  Brit. 

J. Ophthalmol. 83 (1999): 1064-1068

8. Spector A., FASEB J. 9 (1995): 1172-1182 

9. Mitton  K.P.,  Dzialoszynski  T.,  Sanford  S.E.  and 

Trevithick J.R., Curr. Eye Res. 16 (1997): 564-567

10. Saxena  P.,  Saxena  A.K.,  Cui  X.L.,  Obrenovich  M., 

Gudipaty K. and Monnier V.M., Invest. Ophth. Vis Sci. 

41 (2000): 1473-1481 

11. Obrosova IG., Antioxid. Redox. Sign. 7 (2005): 11-12, 

1543-1552

12. Speisky H. and Jimenez I., Rev. Chil. Nutr. 27 (2000):

1, 48-55


13. Morazzoni  P.  and  Bombardelli  E.,  Fitoterapia  67 

(1996): 3–29

14. Bombardelli  E.  and  Morazzoni  P.,  Fitoterapia  66 

(1995) 4, 291-317 

15. Pastene E., Wilkomirsky T., Bocaz G., Havel J., Peric I. 

and Vega M., Bol. Soc. Chil. Quím. (2001): 449-457

16. Gonzalez-Mujica  F.,  Motta  N.  and   Becerra  A., 

Phytother. Res. 4 (1998): 1-293

17. Fuentes  O.,  Arancibia-Avila  P.  and  Alarcón  J., 

Fitoterapia 75 (2004):527-532

18. Fuentes  O.  and   Alarcón  J.,  Fitoterapia  77  (2006): 

271-275.


19. De  Souza  E.,  Zanatta  L.,  Seifriz  I.,  Creczynski-Pasa 

T.B., Pizzolatti M.G., Szpoganicz B. and Barreto Silva 

F.M., J. Nat. Prod. 67 (2004): 829-832 

20. Anjaneyulu M. and Chopra K., Clin. Exp. Pharmacol. 

Physiol. 31 (2004): 244–248.

21. Singleton V.L. and Rossi J.A., Am. J. Enol. Viticult. 16 

(1956): 144-158 

22. Bonoli  M., Verardo V.,  Marcioni  E.  and  Carboni  F., 

J. Agric. Food Chem. 52 (2004): 5195-5200

23. Pellegrini  N.,  Serafini  M.,  Colombi  B.,  Del  Rio  D., 

Salvatore S., Bianchi M. and  Brighenti F., J. Nutr. 133 

(2003): 2812-2819 

24. Cao  G., Alessio  H.M. and  Cutler  R.G., Free  Radical 

Biol. Med. 14 (1993): 303-311

25. Cao  G.,  and   Prior  R.,  Clin.  Chem.  44  (1998): 

1309-1315 

26. Lowry O.H., Rosebrough M.J., Farr  A.L., and  Randall 

RJ., J. Biol. Chem. 193 (1951): 265-275

Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry ISSN 0718-3550

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



7

27. Buege  J.A.  and  Aust  S.D.,  Microsomal  Lipid 

Peroxidation. 52 (1978), Fleisher S. and Parker I. eds., 

Academic Press, New York, 302-310 

28. Qin  S.C.,  Kamiya  T.,  Krishna  M.C.,  Cheng  Q.,  

Tumminia S. and Russell  P.,  Free  Radical  Biol.  Med. 

35 (2003): 1194-202

29. Huang  D., Ou B. and Prior  R., J. Agric. Food  Chem. 

53 (2005): 1841-1856

30. Alonso A.M., Guillén D., Barroso C.G., Puertas B. and 

García A., J. Agric. Food Chem. 50 (2002): 5832-5836

31. Miller K.B., Stuart D.A., Smith N.L., Lee C.Y., McHale 

N.L., Flanagan  J.A.,  Ou  B.  and  Hurst W.J.,  J.  Agric. 

Food Chem. 54 (2006): 4062-4068 

32. Teow  C.C.,  Truong  V.D.,  McFeeters  R.F.,  Thompson 

R.L., Pecota  K.V.  and Yencho G.C.,  Food  Chem.  103 

(2007): 829-838 

33. Ou B., Huang  D., Hampsch-Woodill M., Flanagan J.A. 

and  Deemer  E.K.,  J.  Agric.  Food  Chem.  50  (2002): 

3122-3128 

34. Ou  B., Hampsch-Woodill M. and Prior R.L., J. Agric. 

Food Chem. 49 (2001): 4619-4656

35. Stefanic-Petek A., Krbavcic A.  and Solmajer T., Croat 

Chem Acta. 75 (2002): 517-529 

36. Matsuda H., Morikawa T., Toguchida I. and Yoshikawa 

M., Chem. Pharm. Bull. 50 (2002): 788-795 

37. De La Fuente J.A. and Manzanaro S., Nat. Prod. Rep. 

20 (2003): 243-251 

38. Park Y.H. and Chiou  G.C.Y.,  J. Ocul. Pharmacol. Th.  

20 (2004): 34-41 

39. Guzmán  A.  and  Guerrero  R.O.,  Rev  Cubana  Plant. 

Med. 10 (2005): 3-4

40. Vertommen  J.,  van  den  Enden  M.,  Simoens  L.,  De 

Leeuw I., Phytother. Res. 8 (1994): 430-432

41. Fernández  M.,  Caballero  J.,  Morales  Helguera  A., 

Castro E.A.  and González Pérez  M., Bioorgan.  Med. 

Chem. 13 (2005): 3269-3277 

Electronic Journal of Food and Plants Chemistry ISSN 0718-3550

 

www.ejfoodplants.cl



 

               



8


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə