Prostatectomy or transurethral resection of the prostate (turp) an information leaflet written by: Department of Urology September 2013



Yüklə 42.17 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix25.05.2017
ölçüsü42.17 Kb.

 

TURP 


1 of 6 

PROSTATECTOMY 

OR TRANSURETHRAL RESECTION 

OF THE PROSTATE 

(TURP) 

AN INFORMATION LEAFLET 

Written by: Department of Urology 

September 2013 

Stockport: 0161 419 5698 



Website: 

www.stockport.nhs.uk

 

Tameside: 0161 922 6696/6698 



Website: 

www.tameside.nhs.uk

 

Macclesfield: 01625 661517

 

 

 



 

TURP 


2 of 6 

The Prostate Gland 

The prostate gland is situated just below the bladder and surrounds the urethra (tube that drains 

urine from the bladder to the outside of the body). If the prostate becomes bigger, it may press on 

the urethra and cause the following symptoms; 

  difficulty starting to pass urine 

  the flow is slow or keeps stopping and starting 

  dribbling towards the end of the stream when passing urine 

  passing urine more often than usual during the day and night 

  the bladder does not completely empty to start with. 

What Is A Prostatectomy / TURP? 

A prostatectomy or TURP is carried out, either under a general anaesthetic (when you are asleep) 

or a spinal anaesthetic (when the bottom half of the body is numbed). A small telescope is inserted 

into the penis and the inside of the prostate gland is removed. This is sometimes described as being 

similar to the coring an apple. The pieces of prostate removed are sent to the pathology laboratory 

for analysis.  

Removing the inside of the prostate gland relieves the pressure on the urethra (the tube you pass 

urine through) and allows the urine to flow more easily. 



What are the Benefits? 

The aim of the operation is to improve the flow of urine from the bladder and relieve the symptoms 

listed above. 

Are There Any Risks Involved? 

General anaesthetic; you may feel normal soon after you wake, but you will be drowsy and your reactions 

sluggish for twenty four to forty eight hours. 

 

Absorption  of  irrigating  fluids  used  during  the  surgery  which  can  cause  confusion  and/or  heart 



failure (known as TUR syndrome) 

 

Blood in the urine. There may be a small amount of blood in the urine which normally settles down within 



one to two weeks after the procedure. A very tiny amount of blood in the urine is enough for it to 

look blood stained. There is a small  chance of requiring a blood transfusion if there is moderate 

blood loss during the operation. 

 

Discomfort passing urine for the first few weeks after the operation. Most patients experience  some  mild 



discomfort in the tip of the penis when passing urine for a week or so after the operation. For men 

who had larger prostates, this can last slightly longer. 

 

Urine  infection.  If  you  have  continued  pain  passing  urine,  your  urine  smells  offensive  or  you  have  a  high 



temperature, please contact your own GP as you may have a urine infection that needs treating 

with antibiotics. 

 

Scarring  of  the  urethra  leading  to  a  narrowing  of  the  passageway  caused  by  injury  during  the 



 

TURP 


3 of 6 

operation. 

 

Impotence. About five percent of patients may find it difficult to get an erection after a prostatectomy. 



If you experience erection problems, please inform you doctor, as there may be treatment available. 

Incontinence.  Some  urgency  (rushing  to  the  toilet  to  pass  urine)  may  be  experienced  after  the 

procedure. This normally settles a few months after the operation, and you may be taught how to 

perform pelvic floor exercises to help with your urgency symptoms. Less then 4% of patients will 

have long term problems with incontinence (leaking urine) although this is more likely if you have 

similar symptoms before surgery. 

Prolonged catheterisation. Some patients who experience difficulty emptying their bladder or have a 

permanent  catheter  inserted  before  the  operation  due  to  difficulty  passing  urine,  may  continue  to 

have problems with bladder emptying after this procedure and may have to have a catheter in for a 

longer  period  of  time. Very  occasionally,  the catheter  may  be  required  permanently  or  it  may  be 

possible to learn how to insert a catheter intermittently yourself to drain the bladder. 

Retrograde ejaculation. This means that when you ejaculate, you will have a normal sensation but 

semen does not come out. Instead the semen goes back into the bladder and will be passed next 

time  you  pass  urine,  turning  it  a  milky  colour.  Retrograde  ejaculation  is  completely  harmless  but 

decreases your chances of fathering children naturally. If this would be a problem for you, please 

discuss it with your doctor or nurse. Approximately 75% of patients experience this after TURP. 

Regrowth of the prostate. Although we remove a lot of the prostate, the prostate gland can grow 

back again, causing the original problem to return (usually after five to ten years). If this happens, you 

may need to have another operation. 

Analysis of the prostate. In most cases enlargement of the prostate is harmless but in some patients 

the enlargement may be due to cancer. The part of the prostate that has been removed will be sent 

to  the  laboratory  for  analysis  under  a  microscope  and  you  and  your  GP  will  be  informed  of  the 

results. This can take up to four weeks. 

•  Hospital-acquired infection 

•  Colonisation with MRSA (0.9% - 1 in 110) 

•  Clostridium difficile bowel infection (0.01% - 1 in 10,000) 

•  MRSA bloodstream infection (0.02% - 1 in 5000) 

 

The rates for hospital-acquired infection may be greater in high-risk patients e.g. with long-term 



drainage tubes, after removal of the bladder for cancer, after previous infections, after prolonged 

hospitalisation or after multiple admissions.



 

 

What Are The Alternatives to this Operation? 

You  may  already  have  tried  medications  to  either  reduce  the  size  of  your  prostate  or  to  relax  the 

muscle within the urethra, or both. If these are not effective, TURP surgery may be advised. 

A permanent catheter to continually drain your bladder. 



 

TURP 


4 of 6 

Observe / do nothing, although if your bladder is unable to empty effectively, your kidney function 

may be affected. 

 

How Long Will I Be In Hospital For? 

 

Patients usually stay in hospital for approximately 2 to 3 days but no two patients are the same. 

 

What Happens To Me When I Arrive At The Ward? 

Your operation will be performed at Stepping Hill Hospital, Stockport. 

You will not have had anything to eat or drink for at least six hours before your operation. If you 

would  normally  take  tablets  during  this  time,  please  ask  at  the  pre-operative  assessment  clinic 

which you should continue to take. 

 

You may undergo some routine blood or clinical tests, such as blood pressure, pulse or temperature. 



An anaesthetist will visit you on the ward, to discuss the anaesthetic and any risks involved.  

What Happens After The Procedure? 

After the operation you will have an intravenous drip (tube that drains fluid into a vein in your arm) to 

make sure you do not get dehydrated. You can usually eat and drink within a few hours of the 

operation. 

You will have a catheter in your penis to drain the urine out of your bladder. An irrigation drip will be 

attached to the catheter for approximately 24 hours to wash any blood or tissue out of the bladder. 

The  urine  will  contain  blood  at  first  but  this  will  clear  as  time  goes  on. When  there  is  no  fresh 

bleeding, usually 36 to 48 hours after the operation, the catheter will be removed. You may find that 

it stings a little when you pass urine and you may have to hurry to get to the toilet, when the catheter 

is first removed. This normally settles down after a couple of days and the nurses on the ward can 

teach you pelvic floor exercises to help with the urgency to pass urine. 

Early mobilisation is encouraged to avoid problems, such as DVT or chest infection. 



Discharge Arrangements 

You will be able to leave hospital when you can pass urine naturally and are able to completely 

empty your bladder. If you go home with a catheter, you will be referred to the district nurses to 

help you care for this at home.    

It is necessary to arrange for a responsible adult to collect you from hospital and take you home. 

We will send your doctor a letter with details of your progress, treatment and any follow-up required. 

Any necessary follow-up outpatient appointments will be sent to your home address via a letter and 

will be at your local urology department. 

The ward staff can give you a sick note to cover you while you while you are in hospital and your 

GP can provide one for while you are recovering. 



 

TURP 


5 of 6 

Day To Day Living 

Even though you cannot see a wound, there is a wound inside where the prostate used to be. This 

must heal, before you will feel entirely well and feel the full benefit of the operation and may take 

between 4 to 6 weeks. 

 

•  Weeks one and two 



 

There may be some blood in your urine for up to two weeks, especially at the beginning and 

end of your stream, when passing urine.

 

 



Around 10 to 14 days after the operation, you may have some unexpected extra bleeding. This is 

normal and is due to the scab coming away from the healing tissue inside the urethra. Drink 

plenty of fluids, as this will help to avoid blood clots. If the bleeding is heavy or you cannot pass 

urine, then call your GP immediately or attend A and E. 

 

You will probably feel tired due to the effect of the operation and the anaesthetic. This is quite 



normal and you should take things easy, resting when necessary. 

 

Do not drive long distances, check with your car insurance company to ensure you are covered. 



 

Take gentle exercise. 

 

After 5pm just drink what you feel like, so you are not up all night going to the toilet. 



 

Continue with 

your pelvic floor exercises. 

 

Eat lots of fruit and fibre, to avoid constipation. 



 

•  Week three 



 

Gradually go back to your normal activities. 



If there is a Problem? 

Contact your GP if you have any problems. 



Other Useful Contacts or Information 

If you have any questions you want to ask, you can use this space below to make notes to remind 

you. 

 


 

TURP 


6 of 6 

Source 

 

In  compiling  this  information  leaflet,  a  number  of  recognised  professional  bodies  have  been  used, 



including  the  British  Association  of  Urological  Surgeons.  Accredited  good  practice  guidelines  have 

been used. 

If you have a visual impairment this leaflet can be made available in bigger print 

or on audiotape. If you require either of these options please contact the Health 

Information Centre on 0161 922 5332 

 

If you would like any further information please telephone the Urology Nurse Specialists at your 



local Urology Department on: 

 

Stepping Hill 



0161 419  5695 

Tameside 

0161 922 6696/6698 

Macclesfield 

01625 661517 

 

 



 

 

Author: 



Division/Department: 

Date Created: 

Reference Number: 

Version: 

Urology Department 

Elective Services 

1998 


Version 1.4 

Каталог: documents
documents -> Исследование диагностических моделей по Пону и Коркхаузу
documents -> 3 пародонтологическая хирургия
documents -> Hemoglobinin yenidoğanda yapim azliğina bağli anemiler
documents -> Q ə r a r Azərbaycan Respublikası adından
documents -> Ubutumire uniib iratumiye abantu, imigwi y'abantu canke amashirahamwe bose bipfuza gushikiriza inkuru hamwe/canke ivyandiko bijanye n'ihonyangwa ry'agateka ka zina muntu hamwe n'ayandi mabi yose vyakozwe I Burundi guhera mu kwezi kwa Ndamukiza
documents -> Videotherapy Video: Cool Runnings Sixth Grade
documents -> Guidelines on methods for calculating contributions to dgs
documents -> Document Outline form monthly ret cont
documents -> Şİrvan şƏHƏr məRKƏZLƏŞDİRİLMİŞ Kİtabxana sistemi
documents -> İnsan hüquq müdafiəçilərinin vəziyyəti üzrə Xüsusi Məruzəçi


Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə