Publisher: Taylor & Francis



Yüklə 427.6 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix15.08.2017
ölçüsü427.6 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

This article was downloaded by: [University of Malaya]

On: 23 November 2013, At: 01:12

Publisher: Taylor & Francis

Informa Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registered

office: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

International Journal of Fruit Science

Publication details, including instructions for authors and

subscription information:

http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/wsfr20



Malaysian Species of Plants with Edible

Fruits or Seeds and Their Valuation

Pozi Milow 

a

 , Sorayya Bibi Malek 



a

 , Juli Edo 

b

 & Hean-Chooi Ong 



a

a

 Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science , University of



Malaya , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia

b

 Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Faculty of Arts and



Social Sciences , University of Malaya , Kuala Lumpur , Malaysia

Published online: 22 Nov 2013.



To cite this article: Pozi Milow , Sorayya Bibi Malek , Juli Edo & Hean-Chooi Ong (2014) Malaysian

Species of Plants with Edible Fruits or Seeds and Their Valuation, International Journal of Fruit

Science, 14:1, 1-27, DOI: 

10.1080/15538362.2013.801698



To link to this article:  

http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15538362.2013.801698

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE

Taylor & Francis makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of all the information (the

“Content”) contained in the publications on our platform. However, Taylor & Francis,

our agents, and our licensors make no representations or warranties whatsoever as to

the accuracy, completeness, or suitability for any purpose of the Content. Any opinions

and views expressed in this publication are the opinions and views of the authors,

and are not the views of or endorsed by Taylor & Francis. The accuracy of the Content

should not be relied upon and should be independently verified with primary sources

of information. Taylor and Francis shall not be liable for any losses, actions, claims,

proceedings, demands, costs, expenses, damages, and other liabilities whatsoever or

howsoever caused arising directly or indirectly in connection with, in relation to or arising

out of the use of the Content.

This article may be used for research, teaching, and private study purposes. Any

substantial or systematic reproduction, redistribution, reselling, loan, sub-licensing,

systematic supply, or distribution in any form to anyone is expressly forbidden. Terms &

Conditions of access and use can be found at 

http://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-

and-conditions



International Journal of Fruit Science, 14:1–27, 2014

Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

ISSN: 1553-8362 print/1553-8621 online

DOI: 10.1080/15538362.2013.801698



Malaysian Species of Plants with Edible Fruits

or Seeds and Their Valuation

POZI MILOW

1

, SORAYYA BIBI MALEK



1

, JULI EDO

2

,

and HEAN-CHOOI ONG



1

1

Institute of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya,



Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

2

Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences,



University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

This article compiles species of fruit plants in Malaysia that can

be used as a reference in environmental impact assessment and

conservation of fruit plants in Malaysia. A total of 520 species

of plants that produce edible fruits or seeds in Malaysia were

retrieved from the literature. These plants are broadly grouped

into trees (355 species) and non-trees (165 species). Their eco-

nomic and cultivation status along with the habit of fruit plant

species were determined through literature searches and verified

through semi-structured interviews with orchard and home gar-

den owners and fruit market inspection throughout the country.

In terms of economic status, the tree species were distributed into

three categories: major (70 species), medium (93 species), and

minor (192 species). Non-tree species of fruit plants in Malaysia

were grouped into herbs (43 species), shrubs (40 species), woody

climbers (40 species), herbaceous climbers (36 species), liana or

shrub (3 species), aquatic herbs (2 species), and bush or climber

(1 species). The overall total number of exclusively wild, wild or

planted, and exclusively planted species were 229 (44.0%), 129

(24.8%), and 162 (31.15%), respectively. This study provides a

framework for the valuation of species of plants that produce edible

fruits or seeds in Malaysia.

KEYWORDS

valuation, livelihood, compensation, economic sta-

tus, planting status, conservation

Address correspondence to Pozi Milow, Faculty of Science, Institute of Biological

Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. E-mail: pozimilow@um.edu.my

1

Downloaded by [University of Malaya] at 01:12 23 November 2013 



2

P. Milow et al.

INTRODUCTION

Fruit plants are important to the livelihood, culture, and religion of peo-

ple around the world. These plants are not only important as a source of

food and income, but they help to bind inter-family and family ties and

provide a sense of belonging when fruit trees are jointly owned through

inheritance. A study by Peluso (1996) on a Dayak community in Kalimantan,

Malaysia revealed that long-lived fruit trees, such as durian, were jointly

cultivated by several generations of the planters’ descendents. These trees

possess sentimental value to the owners because of emotional attachments

to them. Certain fruits are used as offerings in religious rituals (Cheu, 1996)

and funerals. Still, other fruits are used as gifts.

Fruit trees are among the items for which people are compensated when

they are affected by land acquisition and resettlement programs. However,

the basis for compensation for fruit plants is still unclear in Malaysia. Such

information is often not accessible to the public or academics. Some prin-

ciples on compensation for losses during acquisition and resettlement have

been discussed by international agencies. Asian Development Bank (1998)

emphasized replacement as the basis for compensation for all the losses dur-

ing the process of resettlement. This was criticized by the Rural Development

Institute (2007). One of the reasons is because the term replacement and its

derivatives are poorly defined. Another reason is the neglect for the cost of

an appropriate replacement for the expropriated asset where a functioning

market is lacking. Hence, the Rural Development Institute (2007) suggested

that compensation should be based on replacement cost, which consists

of market value (the prevailing standard in the world of state expropria-

tions or other forms of mandatory acquisitions), premium (reparation for the

involuntary nature of the taking), transaction costs (all reasonable administra-

tive charges, taxes, title or registration fees, and other legal costs associated

with replacing the lost assets), interest (only when substantial time passed

between the time of the determination of compensation and the time affected

people receive the compensation), and damages (caused by the physical

occupation of the land by a government through expropriation deserve

consideration and corresponding compensation). The formula is as follows.

Replacement cost

= Market value + Premium + Transaction cost

+ Interest + Damages.

For the compensation of trees, the Rural Development Institute

(2007) wrote “Where sufficiently developed markets exist, the market value

of trees of a similar age and use should be used in valuation. Where mar-

kets do not exist, surrogate values must be determined. For timber trees, the

compensation should equal the value of the lumber resulting from the tree.

For fruit trees, the compensation should equal the cumulative future value of

Downloaded by [University of Malaya] at 01:12 23 November 2013 



Malaysian Species of Plants

3

TABLE 1 Standard Rates of Compensation for Standing Crops and Structures (cited by Asian

Development Bank, 2007)

Annual


CNY400

/mu


regardless of

variety of the

crop

Crops


Perennial

Timber trees

Less than 3 cm in diameter

1.5


/tree

3–5 cm


3

/tree


6–10 cm

5

/tree



11–15 cm

8

/tree



16–20 cm

10

/tree



21 cm or above

15

/tree



Fruit trees

Mature tree with fruits

50

/tree


Trees that just bear fruits

30

/tree



Trees that do not bear

fruits


10

/tree


Young trees

1

/tree



Bamboo

0.6


/kg

Structures

Brick house

88

/m



2

Clay brick house

45

/m

2



Grain storage

0

/piece



Pigsty

40

/piece



Drying ground

40

/piece



the fruit crop for its productive life along with any timber value. If replace-

ment trees are provided, compensation should also include the value of

the harvests lost until the replacement trees come into full production.” The

compensation standard for trees (regardless of age) for most provinces in

China was discussed by the Rural Development Institute (2007) and is sum-

marized in Table 1. It is believed that a similar scheme has been practiced

in Malaysia. In Malaysia, however, compensation rates vary between species

and plant age groups. For example, the compensation rate estimates per

fruit tree (in Malaysian ringgit) of Durio zibethinus Murr. in the age groups

0 to 1 year, more than 1 to 6 years, more than 6 to 20 years, more than

20 to 50 years, and more than 50 years are 68, 143, 525, 300, and 143,

respectively.

There are several books that describe Malaysian fruits, but their content

is too exhaustive to accurately represent the diversity of fruit-producing plant

species in Malaysia. Examples are books by Chin and Yong (1980) and Aman

(1999). Chin and Yong documented 68 species of Malaysian fruits that they

grouped into those that produce common fruits, rare fruits, ornamental fruits,

wild fruits, nuts, and highland fruits. Aman (1999) documented 108 species of

Malaysian fruits that she grouped into those that produce common fruits, rare

fruits, and fruits from Sabah and Sarawak. Certain Malaysian fruits have also

been categorized as underutilized. Generally, these are fruits familiar to very

few people and grown on a small scale or found in the wild. Although eco-

nomically less important, they are thought to have potential for commercial

exploitation. There is still no definitive species list of underutilized Malaysian

Downloaded by [University of Malaya] at 01:12 23 November 2013 


4

P. Milow et al.

TABLE 2 Species of Plants That Produce Underutilized Fruits in Malaysia

No.


Species

1

Averrhoa bilimbi L.

2

Baccaurea macrocarpa (Miq.) Muell. Arg.

3

Baccaurea polyneura Hk. F

4

Bouea oppositifolia (Roxb.) Meis.

5

Cynometra cauliflora L.

6

Dimorcarpus longan ssp.malesianus Leenh. var. malesianus

7

Durio lowianus Scort. ex King

8

Durio kutejensis (Hassk). Becc.

9

Garcinia prainiana King

10

Garcinia costata Hemsl. ex King

11

Mangifera foetida Lour.

12

Mangifera odorata Griff.

13

Nephelium ramboutan-ake (Labill.) Leenh.

14

Phyllanthus emblica L.

15

Salacca conferta Griff.

16

Sandoricum koetjape (Burm f.) Merr.

17

Syzygium jambos (L.) Alst.

18

Syzygium malaccense (L.) Merr. & Perry

19

Zizyphus mauritiana Lamk

fruit plants. The following examples (Table 2) are gleaned from various

literature sources, such as Khoo et al. (2008) and Ikram et al. (2009).

More comprehensive information on the species of fruit plants of

Malaysia is needed to assess their importance, especially to native people.

A survey by Alias et al. (2010) indicated that the native people in Peninsular

Malaysia are generally unhappy with the compensation rates for losses of

their trees (including fruit trees) during land acquisition. These can be used

in environmental costs and benefits analysis, which is part of the environ-

mental impact assessment of developments in Malaysia. Such information

is also needed to devise a compensation approach that is comprehensive

and conforms to standards proposed by international development agencies.

The present article is a culmination of previous documentation on species of

plants that produce edible fruits or seeds in Malaysia and are supplemented

with surveys on fruit markets, orchards, and home gardens of native people

in the country. Implications and strategies for the conservation of species of

plants that produce edible fruits or seeds will also be discussed.

METHODOLOGY

A thorough literature search was carried out for species of plants that pro-

duce edible fruit or seeds in Malaysia. Exotic fruit species recently introduced

into the country, such as temperate fruits, were however excluded from this

study. The economic and cultivation status and the habit of each species was

obtained from the literature and verified through visits to local fruit markets,

and semi-structured interviews with more than 100 owners of home gardens

Downloaded by [University of Malaya] at 01:12 23 November 2013 



Malaysian Species of Plants

5

and orchards throughout the country. The primary literature referenced for



this study was Burkill (1935), Chin and Yong (1980), and Aman (1999).

RESULTS


Information for 520 species of plants that produce edible fruits or seeds in

Malaysia was obtained. These species are grouped into trees and non-trees

species. Tree species comprise 68.3% (355 species) of the total number of

species that produce edible fruits or seeds in Malaysia and are shown in

Table 3. Non-trees species comprise 31.7% (165 species) of the total num-

ber of species of plants that produce edible fruits or seeds in Malaysia and

are shown in Table 4. The tree species are distributed into three categories:

major (70 species), medium (93 species), and minor (192 species). In the first

category, the number of species that are exclusively wild, wild or planted,

and exclusively planted are 5 (7.1%), 24 (34.3%), and 41 (58.6%), respec-

tively. All these species produce fruits that, apart from self-consumption,

have economic demand and therefore are mostly sold for income by native

people in Malaysia. In the second category, the number of species that are

exclusively wild, wild or planted, and exclusively planted are 27 (29.0%),

37 (39.8%), and 29 (31.2%), respecively. All of the species of the second

category are produce fruits that are typically used for self-consumption, and

are usually traded, but on a small scale. In the third category, the number of

species that are exclusively wild, wild or planted, and exclusively planted are

124 (64.6%), 42 (21.9%), and 26 (13.3%), respectively. All the species in the

third category produce fruits that are not usually traded, but are harvested or

collected for self-consumption.

Based on their growth habit, the non-tree fruit producing plant species

were grouped into seven categories. These are herbs (43 species), shrubs

(40 species), woody climbers (40 species), herbaceous climbers (36 species),

liana or shrub (3 species), aquatic herbs (2 species), and bush or climber

(1 species). The number of herbs that are exclusively wild, wild or planted,

and exclusively planted are 14 (32.6%), 10 (23.6%), and 19 (44.2%), respec-

tively. The number of species of shrubs that are exclusively wild, wild or

planted, and exclusively planted are 19 (47.5%), 8 (20%), and 13 (32.5%),

respectively. The number of species of woody climbers that are exclusively

wild, wild or planted, and exclusively planted are 33 (82.5%), 3 (7.5%), and

4 (10%), respectively. The number of species of herbaceous climbers that

are exclusively wild, wild or planted, and exclusively planted are 3 (8.3%),

3 (8.3%), and 30 (83.3%), respectively. All three species of lianas

/shrubs

are wild. The two species of aquatic herbs are wild or planted. The only



species of liana is wild. The overall total number of exclusively wild, wild or

planted, and exclusively planted species are 229 (44.0%), 129 (24.8%), and

162 (31.15%), respectively.

Downloaded by [University of Malaya] at 01:12 23 November 2013 



6

P. Milow et al.

TABLE 3 Species List of Trees That Produce Edible Fruits or Seeds in Malaysia (in Alphabetical

Order)


Bil

Species


Common names

Economic


status

z

Cultivation



status

1

Adenanthera pavonina L.

Saga, saga hutan

Minor


Wild,

planted


2

Aegle marmelos (L.) Corr.

Bilak, bael, bel

Medium

Planted


3

Aglaia oligophylla Miq.

Belangkas hutan

Minor

Wild


4

Aglaia tomentosa Tesym. &

Binn.


Medang berbulu, redan

Minor


Wild

5

Alangium salviifolium Wange.

Ankota

Minor


Planted

6

Aleurites moluccana (L.) Willd.

Buah keras, candlenut

Major


Planted

7

Anacardium occidentale L.

Gajus, cashew

Major


Planted

8

Anacolosa frutescens (Bl.) Bl.

Belian landak, galo nut

Medium


Planted

9

Annona muricata L.

Durian belanda, soursop

Major


Planted

10

Annona reticulata L.

Nona kapri

Major


Planted

11

Annona squamosa L.

Nona serikaya, sweetsop

Major


Planted

12

Anthocephallus cadamba Miq.

Kelempayan

Minor


Wild,

planted


13

Antidesma bunias (L.) Spr.

Buni, Chinese laurel

Minor

Wild,


planted

14

Antidesma ghaesembilla Gaert.

Gunchiak

Minor


Wild,

planted


15

Antidesma montanum Bl.

Gunchiak gajah

Minor

Wild


16

Antidesma tomentosum Bl.

Mata pelandok

Minor

Wild


17

Aporosa prainiana King

Beberas hutan, rambai kera

Minor

Wild


18

Archidendron jiringa (Jack)

Niel.


Jering

Major


Wild,

planted


19

Archidendron microcarpum

(Benth.) Niel.

Kerdas

Major


Wild,

planted


20

Ardisia lurida Bl.

Mata ketam gajah

Minor

Wild


21

Arenga pinnata Merr.

Enau, kabong, sugar palm

Major

Wild,


planted

22

Artocarpus altilis (Parkin.)

Fosb. var. Silvestris

Kelor, seeded breadfruit

Medium

Wild,


planted

23

Artocarpus altilis (Parkin.)

Fosb.

Sukun, seedless breadfruit



Major

Planted


24

Artocarpus anisophyllus Miq.

Bintawa, entawa

Medium

Wild,


planted

25

Artocarpus elasticus Reinw. ex

Bl.

Terap, terkalong



Minor

Wild


26

Artocarpus fulvicortex Jarr.

Orange-barked tampang

Medium

Wild,


planted

27

Artocarpus gomezianus Wall.

ex Tre.

Tampang


Medium

Wild,


planted

28

Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam.

Nangka, jack

Major


Planted

29

Artocarpus integer (Thunb.)

Merr.

Cempedak


Major

Planted


30

Artocarpus integer var.

silvestris Cor.

Bangkong

Major


Wild

31

Artocarpus kemando Miq.

Cempedak air, pudau

Minor


Wild

32

Artocarpus lanceifolius Roxb.

Keledang, nangka pipit

Minor


Wild

(Continued)

Downloaded by [University of Malaya] at 01:12 23 November 2013 


Malaysian Species of Plants

7

TABLE 3 (Continued)

Bil

Species


Common names

Economic


status

z

Cultivation



status

33

Artocarpus lakoocha Roxb.

Tampang ambang,

keledang berok

Minor

Wild


34

Artocarpus nitidus

subsp.borneensis (Merr.) Jarr.

Shiny tampang

Medium


Wild

35

Artocarpus nitidus

subsp.griffithii (King) Jarr.

Tampang


Minor

Wild


36

Artocarpus nitidus subsp.

humilis (Becc.) Jarr.

Selangking

Medium

Wild,


planted

37

Artocarpus odoratissimus Blan.

Terap, pingan

Major


Wild,

planted


38

Artocarpus rigidus Bl.

Tempunik, pala munsuh

Medium

Wild,


planted

39

Artocarpus sarawakensis Jarr.

Pingan

Medium


Wild,

planted


40

Artocarpus sericicarpus Jarr.

Terap bulu

Medium

Wild,


planted

41

Arytera littoralis Bl.

Kelayu hitam, tampang

kecil


Minor

Wild


42

Averrhoa bilimbi L.

Belimbing asam, bilimbi

Major

Planted


43

Averrhoa carambola L.

Belimbing, starfruit

Major

Planted


44

Baccaurea angulata Merr.

Belimbing merah

Medium

Wild


45

Baccaurea bracteata Muell.

Arg.


Rambai hutan, tampoi

bunga, monkey’s tampoi

Medium

Wild


46

Baccaurea brevipes Hk.f.

Rambai ayam, setambun

lilin, blue rambai

Minor


Wild

47

Baccaurea dulcis Muell. Arg.

Cupa, tupa

Medium


Planted

48

Baccaurea griffithii Hk.f.

Rambai hutan, tampoi

butang


Minor

Wild


49

Baccaurea hookeri Gage

Jelintih, peris

Medium

Wild,


planted

50

Baccaurea kunstleri King ex

Gage.

Rambai hutan



Minor

Wild


51

Baccaurea lanceolata (Miq.)

Muell. Arg.

Rambai hutan, mempaung,

green rambai

Medium

Wild,


planted

52

Baccaurea macrocarpa (Miq.)

Muell. Arg.

Tampoi, greater tampoi

Major

Wild,


planted

53

Baccaurea macrophylla

(Muell. Arg.) Muell. Arg.

Tampoi bunga

Medium

Wild


54

Baccaurea motleyana

(Muell. Arg.) Muell. Arg.

Rambai

Major


Wild,

planted


55

Baccaurea parviflora

(Muell. Arg.) Muell. Arg

Setambun

Minor


Wild

56

Baccaurea polyneura Hk. f

Jentik-jentik

Minor


Wild

57

Baccauera pyriformis Gage.

Tampoi burung, fig tampoi

Minor


Wild

58

Baccaurea racemosa (Reinw.

ex Bl.) Muell. Arg.

Kapundung, jinteh merah

Minor

Wild


59

Baccaurea ramiflora Lour.

Pupor, tampoi, burmese

grape

Minor


Wild

60

Baccaurea reticulata Hk.f.

Tampoi bunga, lesser

tampoi


Minor

Wild


(Continued)

Downloaded by [University of Malaya] at 01:12 23 November 2013 



8

P. Milow et al.
  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə