Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia: disease symptoms, distribution and impact



Yüklə 295.87 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü295.87 Kb.
  1   2   3

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia: disease symptoms,

distribution and impact

G. S. Pegg

ab

*, F. R. Giblin



b

, A. R. McTaggart

c

, G. P. Guymer



d

, H. Taylor

e

,

K. B. Ireland



e

, R. G. Shivas

f

and S. Perry



e

a

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Horticulture and Forestry Science, Agri-Science Queensland, GPO Box 267, Brisbane,



Qld 4001;

b

Forest Industries Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Locked Bag 4, Maroochydore DC, Qld 4558;



c

Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, Ecosciences Precinct, GPO Box 267, Brisbane,

Qld 4001;

d

Department of Science, Information Technology, Innovation and the Arts, Queensland Herbarium, Brisbane Botanic Gardens



Mt Coot-tha, Mt Coot-tha Road, Toowong, Qld 4066;

e

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Plant Biosecurity and Product



Integrity, Biosecurity Queensland, GPO Box 267, Brisbane, Qld 4001; and

f

Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry, Plant



Pathology Herbarium, Biosecurity Queensland, GPO Box 267, Brisbane, Qld 4001, Australia

Puccinia psidii has long been considered a significant threat to Australian plant industries and ecosystems. In April

2010, P. psidii was detected for the first time in Australia on the central coast of New South Wales (NSW). The

fungus spread rapidly along the east coast and in December 2010 was found in Queensland (Qld) followed by Victo-

ria a year later. Puccinia psidii was initially restricted to the southeastern part of Qld but spread as far north as

Mossman. In Qld, 48 species of Myrtaceae are considered highly or extremely susceptible to the disease. The impact

of P. psidii on individual trees and shrubs has ranged from minor leaf spots, foliage, stem and branch dieback to

reduced fecundity. Tree death, as a result of repeated infection, has been recorded for Rhodomyrtus psidioides. Rust

infection has also been recorded on flower buds, flowers and fruits of 28 host species. Morphological and molecular

characteristics were used to confirm the identification of P. psidii from a range of Myrtaceae in Qld and compared

with isolates from NSW and overseas. A reconstructed phylogeny based on the LSU and SSU regions of rDNA did

not resolve the familial placement of P. psidii, but indicated that it does not belong to the Pucciniaceae. Uredo

rangelii was found to be con-specific with all isolates of P. psidii in morphology, ITS and LSU sequence data, and

host range.

Keywords: eucalyptus rust, guava rust, Myrtaceae, myrtle rust, Puccinia psidii, systematics

Introduction

Puccinia psidii was first described from Psidium guajava

(guava) in Brazil in 1884 (Coutinho et al., 1998), from

which its common name guava rust was derived. The

disease has since been reported from a range of plant

species in the Myrtaceae in South and Central America

as well as the United States (Florida and California;

Coutinho et al., 1998). More recently, P. psidii has been

reported outside of the Americas, with detections in

Hawaii (Uchida et al., 2006), Japan (Kawanishi et al.,

2009), China (Zhuang & Wei, 2011) and South Africa

(Roux et al., 2013).

Historically, P. psidii has had a significant impact on

industries reliant on Myrtaceae, including the all-spice

(Pimenta dioica) industry in Jamaica (MacLachlan,

1938) and the eucalypt plantation industry in Brazil

(Ferreira, 1983; Glen et al., 2007). In the 1970s, the

disease earned a new common name of eucalyptus

rust, because of the severe damage caused to eucalypt

plantations grown for paper and pulp production in

Brazil (Coutinho et al., 1998).

For many years, P. psidii has been considered a signifi-

cant threat to Australian plant industries and ecosystems

(Grgurinovic et al., 2006; Glen et al., 2007), and strict

biosecurity measures were implemented to prevent its

introduction. In April 2010, P. psidii was identified for the

first time in Australia on the central coast of New South

Wales (NSW) (Carnegie et al., 2010). Originally detected

on Agonis flexuosa, Melaleuca viminalis (Callistemon vim-

inalis) and Syncarpia glomulifera (Carnegie et al., 2010),

the host range rapidly increased as the rust fungus spread

within Australia. Carnegie & Lidbetter (2012) reported

the host range of P. psidii, from natural infections in

Australia, as 107 species from 30 genera of Myrtaceae.

The geographic distribution of P. psidii has expanded

rapidly since it was first detected in December 2010 at a

retail nursery in Brisbane, Queensland (Qld). This paper

discusses the spread and the impact of P. psidii on host

species in Qld and implications for natural ecosystems and

commercial operations. In addition, new host records are

identified and the systematics of P. psidii is discussed in

the light of morphological and molecular data.

*E-mail: geoff.pegg@daff.qld.gov.au

ª 2013 Crown copyright.

Plant Pathology

ª 2013 British Society for Plant Pathology

1

Plant Pathology (2013)



Doi: 10.1111/ppa.12173

Materials and methods

Distribution and spread

To determine the distribution and spread of P. psidii following

its initial detection in Qld, surveillance was conducted in nurser-

ies (retail, production and wholesale), parks, gardens and natu-

ral bushland areas. Initial surveys focused in and around

infected premises but were extended as the number of detections

and host records increased. During the initial stages of the incur-

sion, samples were collected for all suspect reports for disease

confirmation in the laboratory. As the disease became more

widespread, samples were only collected from new host species

and/or new geographical locations.

To track disease spread and identify new hosts, a public

reporting system for P. psidii was implemented. Samples from

reports of new hosts or locations were collected for botanical

confirmation before infected specimens were deposited in the

Qld Plant Pathology Herbarium (BRIP). The location of infected

plants in native vegetation and home gardens was recorded using

a Global Positioning System (GPS; Garmen 76 Series). All data

were mapped by GIS mapping systems (

ARCGIS

v. 10.0; ESRI).



Maps were generated monthly to show changes in disease distri-

bution. The database system BioSIRT (Biosecurity Surveillance,

Incident Response and Tracing) was used as the primary reposi-

tory for data relating to P. psidii detections in Qld. Surveys and

public reports were recorded and located spatially in BioSIRT.

Host range and diagnostics

To determine the host range of P. psidii following the initial

detection of the disease in Qld, inspections of retail, wholesale

and production nurseries were conducted in addition to surveil-

lance in parks, gardens and natural bushland areas. Samples

were pressed and dried prior to examination by a botanist to

confirm the host species. Host range data were also captured

through the public reporting system, including information on

the host species, as well as severity of rust symptoms, assessed

from digital photographs. Samples were deposited in BRIP after

P. psidii was confirmed. Reports without photographs of disease

symptoms and host were recorded as suspect but were not

included as a confirmed report.

Identification of P. psidii was through a combined morphologi-

cal and molecular barcoding approach with the internal tran-

scribed spacer (ITS) region of ribosomal DNA (rDNA; Schoch

et al., 2012). Specimens of P. psidii in Qld were compared to

those collected in NSW and from overseas. All samples were

examined under the light microscope for sori and characteristic

spores. Slides of sori and spores were examined at

9400 for the

presence of urediniospores, teliospores and basidiospores. Uredin-

iospores were examined under oil immersion at

91000 and by

scanning electron microscopy as described by Pegg et al. (2008).

Uredinia and telia were selectively removed from fresh leaf

material with a vacuum pump and stored in DNA extraction

buffer. DNA was extracted according to the protocol outlined

by Aime (2006) using the UltraClean Plant DNA Isolation kit

(MoBio Laboratories). The ITS region was amplified with

ITS1F/ITS4B (Gardes & Bruns, 1993). The ITS2-large subunit

(LSU) region was amplified with Rust2inv (Aime, 2006)/LR7

(Vilgalys & Hester, 1990) and nested with LROR/LR6 (Vilgalys

& Hester, 1990) according to the protocol by Aime (2006). The

small subunit (SSU) region was amplified with NS1 (White

et al., 1990)/Rust 18S-R (Aime, 2006). Amplification of the LSU

by nested PCR required an initial denaturation of 3 min at

94

°C; 42 cycles of 30 s at 94°C, 1 min at 58°C and 1Á5 min at



72

°C; with a final extension for 7 min at 72°C. The nested SSU

protocol was identical, except for annealing at 63

°C for 1 min.

The LSU and SSU sequences for specimens of P. psidii were

added to the data set of Minnis et al. (2012). Prospodium tuber-

culatum was included in the data set to increase sampling of the

Uropyxidaceae. Maximum likelihood was implemented as a

search criterion in RA

X

ML (Stamatakis, 2006) and P



HY

ML v. 3.0

(Guindon et al., 2010). GTRGAMMA was specified as the model

of evolution in both programs. The RA

X

ML analyses were run



with a rapid bootstrap analysis (command -f a) using a random

starting tree and 1000 maximum likelihood bootstrap replicates.

The P

HY

ML analyses were implemented using the ATGC bioinfor-



matics platform (available at: http://www.atgcmontpellier.fr/

phyml/), with SPR tree improvement, and support obtained from

an approximate likelihood ratio test (Anisimova et al., 2011).

M

R



B

AYES


was used for a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC)

search in a Bayesian analysis (Ronquist & Huelsenbeck, 2003). A

user-defined tree obtained from the maximum likelihood analyses

was used as a starting point. Four runs, each consisting of four

chains, were implemented for 5 000 000 generations. The cold

chain was heated at a temperature of 0

Á25. Substitution model

parameters were sampled every 5000 generations and trees were

saved every 5000 generations. Convergence of the Bayesian analy-

sis was confirmed using AWTY (available at: ceb.csit.fsu.edu/

awty/; Nylander et al., 2008) and used to calculate a burn-in.

Symptoms and impact

Targeted surveys were conducted to determine susceptibility of

host species to P. psidii. These surveys were conducted in public

parks and surrounding bushland, private gardens and arboreta in

Tallebudgera Valley and Cooroy on the Sunshine Coast, natural

bushland in Brisbane, the Gold and Sunshine Coasts and sur-

rounding suburbs, and botanical gardens in Mackay, the Gold

and Sunshine Coasts and Brisbane (Mt Coot-tha). National parks

surveyed included Lamington (Green Mountain) and Spring-

brook in the Gold Coast hinterland, Kondalilla in the Sunshine

Coast hinterland and Kuranda, Herberton Range and Crater

Lakes (Lake Eacham) in the Wet Tropics of far north Qld.

A disease rating system was developed to record species sus-

ceptibility. Host plants, including seedlings, saplings and mature

trees, showing evidence of infection by P. psidii, were rated for

susceptibility with the following scale (Fig. 1):

Relatively tolerant: minor leaf spots with rust sori on <10%

of expanding leaves and shoots, limited sori per infected leaf;

Moderately susceptible: rust sori present on 10

–50% of

expanding leaves and shoots, limited



–multiple sori per

infected leaf;

Highly susceptible: rust sori present on 50

–80% of expand-

ing leaves and shoots, evidence of rust on juvenile stems and

older leaves, leaf and stem blighting and distortion, multiple

sori per leaf/stem;

Extremely susceptible: rust sori present on all expanding

leaves, shoots and juvenile stems; foliage dieback; evidence

of stem and shoot dieback.

Results

Distribution and spread



In December 2010, following the first detection of P. psi-

dii on Gossia inophloia in a retail nursery in southeast

Qld, three additional nurseries were found to have infected

Plant Pathology (2013)

2

G. S. Pegg et al.



plants. At that time there was no evidence of infection in

peri-urban landscapes or natural bushland. By the end of

January 2011, P. psidii had been found at a further 19

locations in southeast Qld, including urban landscapes

and natural bushland (Figs 2 & 3). The first detection of

P. psidii on the Gold Coast occurred in February 2011. By

June 2011, P. psidii had been found as far west as

Toowoomba (127 km west of Brisbane, 27

°58′S, 151°93′E)

and by September 2011, north to Maryborough (260 km

north of Brisbane, 25

°32′S, 152°42′E; Fig. 2). By January

2012, P. psidii was detected in Bundaberg and Rock-

hampton, 370 km (24

°51′S, 152°21′E) and 650 km

(23


°23′S, 150°30′E) north of Brisbane, respectively.

Surveys in far north Qld failed to detect the disease until

May 2012, when P. psidii was found in natural bushland

near Cairns. By August 2012, additional detections

extended from Townsville to Daintree National Park, c.

100 km north of Cairns (Fig. 3).

By the end of August 2012 there were more than 1000

public reports and detections of P. psidii in Qld. To

date, P. psidii has been detected in coastal areas as far

north as the Wet Tropics World Heritage Area (including

Daintree, Kuranda, Barron Gorge, Crater Lakes and

Hypipamee National Parks) as well as Herberton

Ranges. In far north Qld, P. psidii has also been detected

in the drier regions on the Atherton Tablelands (includ-

ing Tolga, Yungaburra and Mareeba). Apart from detec-

tions in plant nurseries, P. psidii has not been identified

in areas west of the Great Dividing Range.

Based on data collected from southeast Qld, the num-

ber of reports of P. psidii peaked during April, May and

June 2011 followed by a decline in July and August

2011. Reports began to increase again towards the end

of August, peaking in November 2011 (Fig. 4), followed

by another decline in December 2011. In January 2012,

a total of 157 reports of P. psidii were received followed

by a further 95 in February and a dramatic increase in

reports in March 2012 with 252 reports. Comparatively

fewer reports (43) were made in April 2012. Some of

these report peaks coincided with media releases (Dayton

& Higgins, 2011).

The number of host species reported each month

increased as the number of detections increased. The high-

est diversity of species reported occurred in April (35),

May (34) and November (32) of 2011 (Fig. 4). Syzygium

jambos was the most commonly reported species in all

months, with the highest number of reports for this species

(79) occurring in March 2012. There were 82 new hosts



(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

(g)

(h)

Figure 1 Puccinia psidii severity levels Relatively tolerant (a, b): sori present on



<10% of expanding leaves and shoots; limited number sori per

infected leaf; Moderate susceptibility (c, d): sori present on 10

–50% of expanding leaves and shoots; limited–multiple number sori per infected leaf;

High susceptibility (e, f): sori present on 50

–80% expanding leaves and shoots; some evidence of disease on juvenile stems; evidence of disease

on older leaves and stems; multiple sori per leaf/stem causing blight and leaf/stem distortion; Extreme susceptibility (g, h): sori present on all

expanding leaves and shoots and juvenile stems; shoot, stem and foliage dieback; evidence of older stem/shoot dieback.

Plant Pathology (2013)

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

3


Figure 2 Map of southeast Queensland plotting the number of detections and public reports of Puccinia psidii within the first 12 months of initial

detection.

Plant Pathology (2013)

4

G. S. Pegg et al.



recorded within the first 6 months following the initial

detection of P. psidii in December 2010 (Fig. 5). Only six

new hosts were identified in the following 4-month period

of July to October 2011. From November 2011 to Febru-

ary 2012 there was an increase in the number of species

identified, with 37 new hosts recorded and a further 13

new hosts between March 2012 and July 2012. The

majority (77%) of host species rated as highly or extre-

mely susceptible were identified within 6 months of P. psi-

dii being first detected. Since then, only a further eight

species have been added to this category.

Host range

Since P. psidii was first detected in Qld, 165 species

from 38 different genera have been identified as hosts

based on natural infections, the majority from the tribes

Myrteae (31%) and Syzygieae (28%) (Table 1; Wilson

et al., 2005). New host records of P. psidii were found

for 61 species in 22 genera from 11 tribes (Table 1),

including Acmena (1 species), Austromyrtus (1), Back-

housia (4), Corymbia (1), Decaspermum (1), Eucalyptus

(3), Eugenia (2), Gossia (3), Homoranthus (3), Hypoc-

alymma (1), Leptospermum (3), Lophostemon (1), Mel-

aleuca

(5),


Metrosideros

(2),


Pilidiostigma

(1),


Rhodamnia

(3),


Rhodomyrtus

(5),


Syzygium

(17),


Thryptomene (1) and Waterhousea (1). These records

also included two previously unreported host genera,

Mitrantia (Mitrantia bilocularis) and Sphaerantia (Spha-

erantia discolor). Puccinia psidii has not been recorded

from common guava (Psidium spp.) in Qld despite its

wide distribution and weed status. Puccinia psidii was



Locality diagram

Toowoomba

Rockhampton

Mackay


Cairns

Brisbane


Bundaberg

Townsville



August 2012

Toowoomba

Rockhampton

Mackay


Cairns

Brisbane


Bundaberg

Townsville



January 2011

Datum : GDA94   Projection : Geographic

0

200


400

600


800

km

Legend

Town

Myrtle rust detection                                 



Wet tropics boundary

NSW


QLD

SA

NT



WA

Figure 3 Changes in distribution of Puccinia psidii in Queensland from January 2011 to August 2012.

Plant Pathology (2013)

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

5


confirmed from a single sample of Psidium sp. collected

in northern NSW (P. Entwistle, NSW, Australia &

G. S. Pegg, unpublished). Several genera and species

were found free of disease symptoms at sites where

P. psidii was detected (Table 2).

Sequence data

The ITS region was identical for isolates collected on 12

host genera (Table 3). A high identity was returned in a

BLAST

search to other sequences of P. psidii on GenBank



from eight other genera within the Myrtaceae. Sequence

trace chromatograms had three sites with single nucleo-

tide polymorphisms.

These sites were variable in

sequences obtained from GenBank. The LSU and SSU

regions were identical for 16 and four isolates, respec-

tively. The specimen collected on Myrtus communis

(BRIP 58517), the type host of Uredo rangelii, was

molecularly identical to all other isolates of P. psidii in

the ITS and LSU regions.

Phylogenetic analysis

Puccinia psidii was recovered as a rogue taxon in three

separate phylogenetic analyses on the combined LSU-SSU

data set. It did not have a well-supported relationship

with any rust family. It was sister to the Pucciniaceae in

RA

X



ML and Bayesian inference, or in a clade with

members from the Pileolariaceae and Uropyxidaceae

reconstructed in P

HY

ML (Fig. 6).



0

50

100



150

200


250

Dec-10


Jan-11

Feb-11


Mar-11

Apr-11


May-11

Jun-11


Jul-11

Aug-11


Sep-11

Oct-11


Nov-11

Dec-11


Jan-12

Feb-12


Mar-12

Apr-12


May-12

Jun-12


Jul-12

Aug-12


Sep-12

Month

Puccinia psidii

 reports

Puccinia psidii reports

Syzygium jambos reports

Species reported

Figure 4 Number of new reports of Puccinia psidii in Queensland and the number of host species per month in comparison to the number of

reports of infected Syzygium jambos from first detection in December 2010 to September 2012 when public reporting ceased.

0

20

40



60

80

100



120

140


160

180


Dec-10

Jan-11


Feb-11

Mar-11


Apr-11

May-11


Jun-11

Jul-11


Aug-11

Sep-11


Oct-11

No

v-



11

Dec-11


Jan-12

Feb-12


Mar-12

Apr-12


May-12

Jun-12


Jul-12

Aug-12


Sep-12

Oct-12


No

v-

12



Dec-12

Jan-13


Feb-13

M

ar-1



3

Apr-13


May-13
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə