Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia: disease symptoms, distribution and impact



Yüklə 2.99 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə2/3
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü2.99 Mb.
1   2   3

Month

Puccinia psidii 

 host species

Total hosts

RT hosts

MS hosts


HS/ES hosts

Figure 5 Cumulative number of host species since detection of Puccinia psidii in Queensland in December 2010.

Plant Pathology (2013)

6

G. S. Pegg et al.



Table 1 Current known host list of Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia and susceptibility level

Host name

New host

record


Tribe

a

Disease susceptibility



rating

b

Flower/fruit



infection

Rust spore type

c

Acmena hemilampra



Syzygieae

RT

II



Acmena ingens

9

Syzygieae



RT

II

Acmena smithii



Syzygieae

RT-MS


9

II

Acmenosperma claviflorum



Syzygieae

MS

II III



Agonis flexuosa

Leptospermeae

ES

II III


Anetholea (Backhousia) anisata

Backhousieae

RT-HS

II III


Asteromyrtus brassii

Leptospermeae

RT

II

Austromyrtus dulcis



Myrteae

RT-HS


9

II

Austromyrtus sp. (Lockerbie Scrub)



9

Myrteae


RT

II

Austromyrtus tenuifolia



Myrteae

RT

II



Backhousia angustifolia

Backhousieae

RT

II

Backhousia bancroftii



9

Backhousieae

RT

II

Backhousia citriodora



Backhousieae

MS-HS


9

II III


Backhousia gundara (Prince Regent)

9

Backhousieae



RT

II

Backhousia hughesii



9

Backhousieae

MS

II

Backhousia leptopetala



Backhousieae

HS

II III



Backhousia myrtifolia

Backhousieae

MS

II

Backhousia oligantha



9

Backhousieae

HS

II

Backhousia sciadophora



Backhousieae

RT

II



Backhousia subargentea

Backhousieae

RT

II

Chamelaucium uncinatum



Chamelaucieae

ES

9



II

Corymbia citriodora subsp. variegata

d

Eucalypteae



RT

II

Corymbia ficifolia



9 C. ptychocarpa

d

9



Eucalypteae

RT

II



Corymbia henryi

d

Eucalypteae



RT

II

Corymbia torelliana



d

Eucalypteae

RT

II

Darwinia citriodora



Chamelaucieae

MS

II III



Decaspermum humile

Myrteae


ES

II III


Decaspermum humile (North Qld form)

9

Myrteae



RT

II

Eucalyptus carnea



9

Eucalypteae

RT-HS

II

Eucalyptus cloeziana



d

Eucalypteae

RT

II

Eucalyptus curtisii



9

Eucalypteae

RT-HS

II

Eucalyptus grandis



Eucalypteae

RT-MS


II

Eucalyptus planchoniana

d

9

Eucalypteae



RT-MS

II

Eucalyptus tereticornis



d

Eucalypteae

RT

II

Eucalyptus tindaliae



d

Eucalypteae

MS

II

Eugenia natalitia



9

Myrteae


MS

II

Eugenia reinwardtiana



Myrteae

ES

9



II III

Eugenia uniflora

Myrteae

MS

9



II

Eugenia zeyheri

d

9

Myrteae



MS

II

Gossia acmenoides



Myrteae

HS

II III



Gossia bamagensis

9

Myrteae



RT

II

Gossia bidwillii



Myrteae

RT

II



Gossia floribunda

Myrteae


RT

II

Gossia fragrantissima



Myrteae

MS

II



Gossia gonoclada

Myrteae


HS

II

Gossia hillii



Myrteae

HS-ES


II III

Gossia inophloia

Myrteae

ES

II III



Gossia lewisensis

9

Myrteae



MS-HS

II

Gossia macilwraithensis



Myrteae

MS

II III



Gossia myrsinocarpa

9

Myrteae



MS-HS

9

II



Gossia punctata

Myrteae


MS

II III


Homoranthus melanostictus

9

Chamelaucieae



MS

II

Homoranthus papillatus



9

Chamelaucieae

MS

II

Homoranthus virgatus



9

Chamelaucieae

MS

9

II



Hypocalymma angustifolium

9

Chamelaucieae



RT

II

Lenwebbia lasioclada



Myrteae

RT

II



Lenwebbia prominens

Myrteae


HS

9

II III



Lenwebbia sp. Blackall Range

Myrteae


RT

II

(continued)



Plant Pathology (2013)

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

7


Table 1 (continued)

Host name

New host

record


Tribe

a

Disease susceptibility



rating

b

Flower/fruit



infection

Rust spore type

c

Leptospermum liversidgei



9

Leptospermeae

MS

II

Leptospermum luehmannii



Leptospermeae

RT

II



Leptospermum madidum

9

Leptospermeae



MS

II

Leptospermum petersonii



Leptospermeae

RT

II III



Leptospermum semibaccatum

d

9



Leptospermeae

RT

II



Leptospermum trinervium

Leptospermeae

MS

II

Lindsayomyrtus racemoides



Lindsayomyrteae

RT

II III



Lophostemon suaveolens

9

Lophostemoneae



RT

II

Melaleuca fluviatilis



Melaleucaeae

HS

II



Melaleuca formosa

9

Melaleucaeae



RT

II

Melaleuca leucadendra



Melaleucaeae

RT-HS


9

II

Melaleuca linariifolia



Melaleucaeae

RT

II



Melaleuca nervosa

9

Melaleucaeae



HS

II

Melaleuca nesophila



Melaleucaeae

RT

II



Melaleuca nodosa

Melaleucaeae

HS-ES

II

Melaleuca pachyphylla



Melaleucaeae

RT

II



Melaleuca paludicola

9

Melaleucaeae



HS

II

Melaleuca polandii



Melaleucaeae

HS

II



Melaleuca quinquenervia

Melaleucaeae

RT-ES

9

II III



Melaleuca salicina

9

Melaleucaeae



RT

II III


Melaleuca saligna

Melaleucaeae

MS

II

Melaleuca viminalis



Melaleucaeae

MS-HS


II III

Melaleuca viridiflora

9

Melaleucaeae



HS

II III


Metrosideros collina

Metrosidereae

RT

II III


Metrosideros collina

9 villosa

9

Metrosidereae



RT

II

Metrosideros kermadecensis



Metrosidereae

RT

II



Metrosideros thomasii

9

Metrosidereae



RT

II III


Mitrantia bilocularis

9

Kanieae



MS

II

Myrciaria cauliflora



Myrteae

RT

II



Myrtus communis

Myrteae


MS-HS

9

II III



Pilidiostigma glabrum

Myrteae


RT-MS

9

II III



Pilidiostigma tetramerum

9

Myrteae



MS

II III


Rhodamnia acuminata

9

Myrteae



RT

II

Rhodamnia angustifolia



Myrteae

ES

9



II

Rhodamnia arenaria

Myrteae

MS

9



II III

Rhodamnia argentea

Myrteae

MS-HS


II

Rhodamnia australis

9

Myrteae


HS

9

II



Rhodamnia blairiana

9

Myrteae



RT-MS

II

Rhodamnia costata



Myrteae

HS

II



Rhodamnia dumicola

Myrteae


HS

II

Rhodamnia glabrescens



Myrteae

MS

II



Rhodamnia maideniana

Myrteae


ES

9

II III



Rhodamnia pauciovulata

Myrteae


MS

II III


Rhodamnia rubescens

Myrteae


HS-ES

9

II III



Rhodamnia sessiliflora

Myrteae


MS-ES

9

II III



Rhodamnia spongiosa

Myrteae


HS

9

II III



Rhodomyrtus canescens

9

Myrteae



HS

9

II III



Rhodomyrtus effusa

9

Myrteae



MS

II

Rhodomyrtus macrocarpa



9

Myrteae


MS

II III


Rhodomyrtus pervagata

9

Myrteae



MS-HS

9

II III



Rhodomyrtus psidioides

Myrteae


ES

9

II III



Rhodomyrtus sericea

9

Myrteae



MS

II

Rhodomyrtus tomentosa



Myrteae

MS-HS


9

II

Rhodomyrtus trineura subsp. capensis



Myrteae

MS

II III



Ristantia waterhousei

Kanieae


RT

II

Sphaerantia discolor



9

Kanieae


MS

II

Stockwellia quadrifida



Eucalypteae

HS

II



(continued)

Plant Pathology (2013)

8

G. S. Pegg et al.



Table 1 (continued)

Host name

New host

record


Tribe

a

Disease susceptibility



rating

b

Flower/fruit



infection

Rust spore type

c

Syzygium angophoroides



9

Syzygieae

MS

II

Syzygium apodophyllum



9

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium aqueum



9

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium argyropedicum



Syzygieae

RT

II



Syzygium armstrongii

Syzygieae

RT

II III


Syzygium australe

Syzygieae

RT-MS

9

II III



Syzygium bamagense

Syzygieae

MS

II III


Syzygium banksii

9

Syzygieae



MS

II

Syzygium boonjee



9

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium canicortex



Syzygieae

RT

II III



Syzygium cormiflorum

Syzygieae

RT

II III


Syzygium corynanthum

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium cryptophlebium



9

Syzygieae

MS

II

Syzygium cumini



Syzygieae

MS

II



Syzygium dansiei

9

Syzygieae



RT

II

Syzygium endophloium



9

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium erythrocalyx



9

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium eucalyptoides



Syzygieae

HS

II



Syzygium eucalyptoides subsp. eucalyptoides

9

Syzygieae



MS

II III


Syzygium forte subsp. forte

9

Syzygieae



RT

II

Syzygium forte subsp. potamophilum



9

Syzygieae

RT

II III


Syzygium jambos

Syzygieae

ES

9

II III



Syzygium kuranda

9

Syzygieae



MS

II

Syzygium luehmannii



Syzygieae

MS

II III



Syzygium luehmannii

9 S. wilsonii

Syzygieae

RT

II III



Syzygium macilwraithianum

9

Syzygieae



RT

II

Syzygium minutiflorum



9

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium moorei



Syzygieae

RT

II



Syzygium nervosum

9

Syzygieae



HS

9

II



Syzygium oleosum

Syzygieae

HS

II

Syzygium paniculatum



Syzygieae

RT

II



Syzygium pseudofastigiatum

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium puberulum



Syzygieae

MS

II III



Syzygium rubrimolle

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium suborbiculare



9

Syzygieae

MS

II

Syzygium tierneyanum



Syzygieae

RT

II



Syzygium wilsonii

Syzygieae

RT

II

Syzygium xerampelinum



Syzygieae

MS

II



Thryptomene saxicola

9

Chamelaucieae



RT-MS

9

II III



Tristania neriifolia

Tristanieae

MS

II

Tristaniopsis exiliflora



Kanieae

HS

Tristaniopsis laurina



Kanieae

RT

II



Uromyrtus tenella

Myrteae


RT

II

Waterhousea floribunda



Syzygieae

RT

II



Waterhousea hedraiophylla

Syzygieae

RT

II

Waterhousea mulgraveana



Syzygieae

RT

II III



Waterhousea unipunctata

9

Syzygieae



MS

II

Xanthostemon chrysanthus



Xanthostemoneae

RT-MS


II

Xanthostemon oppositifolius

Xanthostemoneae

HS

II



Xanthostemon youngii

Xanthostemoneae

MS

9

II III



a

Tribes according to Wilson et al., 2005.

b

RT, relatively tolerant, restricted leaf spot or spots only; MS, moderate susceptibility, blight symptoms on new shoots and expanding foliage; HS,



high susceptibility, blight symptoms on new shoots and expanding foliage and juvenile stems; ES, extreme susceptibility, death of new shoots and

severe blighting on all foliage types, shoot and stem dieback. Susceptibility ratings are based on observations to date.

c

II, urediniospore; III, teliospore.



d

Puccinia psidii identified from seedlings only.

Plant Pathology (2013)

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

9


Taxonomy

Isolates of P. psidii collected in Qld were identical mor-

phologically and in DNA sequence data to those col-

lected from NSW. Urediniospores were found to be

morphologically plastic, ranging from globose to obpyri-

form in shape and with a broader size range than previ-

ously described (Table 3). The presence of a tonsure

(smooth patch) on urediniospores was often observed,

but its presence or absence was not consistent even in

the same sorus. Teliospores were produced on a sample

of Myrtus communis (BRIP 58517). A composite mor-

phological description of P. psidii based on host samples

from 11 genera collected in Qld follows:

Uredinia on chlorotic, red-purple or greyish leaf spots

with a darker margin up to 1 mm diameter, amphig-

enous,


mostly

abaxial,


subepidermal,

erumpent,

round, up to 500

lm, yellowish brown (Fig. 7).

Urediniospores globose, subglobose, ellipsoidal to

ovoid, obpyriform, yellowish brown, 14

–22 9 15–

26

lm; wall 1Á0–3Á0 lm thick, finely echinulate, germ



pore absent or inconspicuous (Fig. 7).

Telia on fruit, leaves or stems, up to 0

Á5 mm diame-

ter, abaxial, erumpent, pulvinate, yellow to yellowish

brown (Fig. 7).

Teliospores cylindrical to ellipsoidal, apex rounded,

pale yellowish brown, 23

–50 9 14–28 lm; wall 1Á0–

2

Á0 lm thick, smooth, 2-celled, remnant of pedicel



remains attached up to 15

lm long (Fig. 7).

Basidia cylindrical, up to 110

lm long 9 6–8 lm

wide, hyaline, 4-celled, produced from each cell of the

teliospores, apically in upper cell and laterally in

lower cell.

Basidiospores globose to pyriform, 8

–11 lm diameter,

hyaline, smooth, germinate in situ without dormancy

from an apical germ pore.

Teliospores were identified from 98 samples (20% of

total P. psidii samples), from 50 different host species

(Table 1). Teliospores were commonly found in the

autumn months of March, April and May in both 2011

and 2012 and June of 2012. In both years, this was fol-

lowed by a decline in detections in July and August (win-

ter months) with only urediniospores identified on

samples collected during these months in 2011 and

2012.


Symptoms and impact

Symptoms of infection by P. psidii ranged from minor

leaf spots to severe foliage and stem blight as well as

infection on flowers and fruit of some species. Based on

observations to date, 67 host species have been rated as

having low susceptibility to P. psidii, with only a small

percentage of leaves with 1

–2 sori per leaf recorded

(Table 1). A further 50 host species were considered

moderately susceptible with higher numbers of sori per

leaf and a greater percentage of expanding foliage and

shoots infected.

Forty-eight species were rated as highly or extremely

susceptible, with infection occurring on a high percent-

age of expanding leaves and shoots and evidence of

shoot and stem dieback (Table 1). Highly or extremely

susceptible species include the environmentally significant

Melaleuca quinquenervia, and the rare and endangered

species Backhousia oligantha, Gossia gonoclada and

Rhodamnia angustifolia.

To date in Qld P. psidii has been identified from 11

species of eucalypts (includes both Eucalyptus and

Corymbia), mostly on seedlings and at low incidence and

severity. On mature trees of Eucalyptus curtisii, which

generally do not exceed 7 m in height, significant infec-

tion has been observed causing shoot and stem dieback

and death of coppice growth from cut stems. Infection of

leaves and stems of coppice from the base of a mature

Eucalyptus carnea tree was recorded. Stem dieback, leaf

blight and shoot death was recorded on Eucalyptus

planchoniana seedlings, and leaf and shoot blight on

Eucalyptus grandis saplings.

Variability in disease severity was identified within 26

host species (Table 1), indicating potential variation in

susceptibility to infection by P. psidii infection. For Mel-

aleuca quinquenervia, ratings on individuals ranged from

resistant to low susceptibility, with no evidence of sori,

to severe stem and shoot dieback as a result of repeat

infection of growing tips. For some species, such as Rho-

domyrtus psidioides, Rhodamnia angustifolia and Rho-

damnia maideniana, all plants assessed across a range of

sites were rated as extremely susceptible, with severe die-

back on older trees as well as saplings and seedlings.

Changes in susceptibility on individual trees have also

been observed over time, with increased disease suscepti-

bility on Acmena smithii and Syzygium nervosum. Both

Table 2 Host species assessed and identified as free of disease at

sites where Puccinia psidii was detected

Acmena resa

Acmena Normanby River

Allosyncarpia ternata

Archirhodomyrtus beckleri

Eugenia aggregata

Eugenia luschnathiana

Lophostemon confertus

Lophostemon grandiflorus subsp. riparius

Melaleuca cheelii

Myrciaria edulis

Myrciaria glomerata

Psidium guajava

Psidium littorale Raddi var. littorale

Syncarpia glomulifera subsp. glomulifera

Syzygium alatoramulum

Syzygium alliiligneum

Syzygium branderhorstii

Syzygium johnsonii

Syzygium malaccense

Syzygium papyraceum

Syzygium sayeri

Syzygium velae

Syzygium wilsonii subsp. cryptophlebium

Thaleropia queenslandica

Plant Pathology (2013)

10

G. S. Pegg et al.



species were originally rated as being of low susceptibil-

ity when P. psidii was first detected, but were later

recorded as moderately or highly susceptible, respec-

tively. There has not been any evidence of individual

hosts showing lower disease susceptibility levels over

time apart from trees recovering during extended periods

of low or no rainfall, which do not favour disease

development.

The impact of infection by P. psidii on individual trees

and shrubs ranged from minor leaf spots through to

reduced fecundity from loss of flowers and fruit, and even

tree death. Foliage, stem and branch dieback has been

observed on a range of hosts including Chamelaucium un-

cinatum, Eugenia reinwardtiana, Gossia hillii, Melaleuca

quinquenervia, Rhodamnia dumicola, Rhodamnia maid-

eniana and Rhodomyrtus psidioides. Repeated infection

of new shoots and young foliage of Rhodamnia angustifo-

lia resulted in tree dieback and significant reduction in

canopy density over time (Fig. 8). Branch death and

dieback, as well as reduced shoot development on the

entire tree, became evident 15 months after P. psidii was

first detected. Tree death as a result of repeated infection

has been recorded for Rhodomyrtus psidioides, with

regenerating seedlings of the same species killed by P. psi-

dii at the cotyledon stage (Fig. 9).

Puccinia psidii was recorded on flower buds, flowers

and fruits of 28 host species (Table 1; Fig. 10). Sori of

P. psidii were observed on various parts of the flower

including the peduncle, receptacle, sepals (calyx) and pet-

als. On some species, e.g. Chamelaucium uncinatum, sori

formed on the inside of the flower bud, affecting the

anthers, filaments, styles, stigmas and ovaries (Fig. 10).

Infection of fruit was common on Austromyrtus dulcis,

Eugenia reinwardtiana, Rhodamnia rubescens and Rho-

damnia sessiliflora. Puccinia psidii was also recorded on

flowers and fruit of introduced species, e.g. Syzygium

jambos, some of which are significant weed species,

including Eugenia uniflora and Rhodomyrtus tomentosa.

Discussion

This study reports the dramatic increase in geographic

distribution and host range of P. psidii following its ini-

tial detection in Qld in December 2010. The disease now

extends from subtropical coastal and drier inland areas

east of the Great Dividing Range to tropical coastal and

Table 3 Hosts, GenBank accession numbers and spore measurements of isolates used in this study. GenBank accession numbers in bold were

obtained in this study

Isolate

Host


LSU

SSU


ITS

Urediniospore measurements

Agonis flexuosa

NA

NA



HM448900

BRIP 58332

Backhousia oligantha

KF318436


NA

KF318421


16

–21 9 18–25 lm, wall 1–2 lm,

globose to obpyriform

BRIP 58330

Chamelaucium uncinatum

KF318437


NA

KF318422


15

–20 9 19–25 lm, wall 1–2 lm,

globose to obpyriform

Eucalyptus

NA

NA

FJ710803–FJ710808



BRIP 57997

Eugenia reinwardtiana

KF318438

NA

NA



BRIP 58331

Eugenia reinwardtiana

KF318439

NA

KF318423



15

–18 9 19–24 lm, wall 1–2 lm,

globose to obpyriform

BRIP 58329

Gossia myrsinocarpa

KF318440


NA

KF318424


14

–18 9 15–19 lm, wall 1–3 lm,

globose to obpyriform

BRIP 58319

Lenwebbia lasioclada

KF318441


NA

KF318425


BRIP 58333

Lenwebbia prominens

KF318442

NA

KF318426



16

–20 9 17–22 lm, wall 1–2 lm,

globose to obpyriform

BRIP 57991

Melaleuca leucadendra

KF318443


KF318455

KF318427


BRIP 57922

Melaleuca quinquenervia

KF318444

KF318456


NA

Metrosideros

NA

NA

EU711421



BRIP 58164

Mitrantia bilocularis

KF318445

NA

KF318428



BRIP 58328

Mitrantia bilocularis

KF318446

NA

KF318429



19

–22 9 21–26 lm, wall 1–2 lm,

globose to obpyriform

Myrciaria cauliflora

NA

NA

KC543299–KC543317



BRIP 58517

Myrtus communis

KF318447

NA

KF318430



15

–21 9 16–23 lm, wall 1–2 lm,

globose to obpyriform, teliospores present

BRIP 58317

Pilidiostigma glabrum

KF318448


NA

KF318431


17

–19 9 19–25 lm, wall 1–2 lm

BRIP 57793

Rhodamnia angustifolia

KF318449

KF318457


NA

BRIP 58000

Rhodamnia rubescens

KF318450


NA

NA

BRIP 58334



Rhodomyrtus psidioides

KF318451


NA

KF318432


15

–20 9 17–21 lm, wall 1–2 lm

BRIP 58315

Sphaerantia discolor

KF318452

NA

KF318433



Syzygium jambos

NA

NA



KC543318–KC543330

BRIP 57985

Syzygium jambos

KF318453


KF318458

KF318434


BRIP 58335

Syzygium nervosum

KF318454

NA

KF318435



15

–20 9 18–23 lm, wall 1–2 lm,

globose to obpyriform

Plant Pathology (2013)

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

11


tableland vegetation. Despite an abundance of potential

host species west of the Great Dividing Range, P. psidii

has not so far established in that region, although it has

been reported from plant nurseries. Climate modelling

by Glen et al. (2007) and Booth & Jovanovic (2012)

predicted the likelihood of rust epidemics in these regions

as possible and dependent on short-term variations in

climatic conditions.

Van Der Merwe et al. (2008) first identified the ambig-

uous systematic position of P. psidii based on an analysis

of protein coding loci from 80 species in the Puccini-

aceae. The phylogenetic analysis in this study based on

combined LSU and SSU data has not resolved the

familial placement of P. psidii within the Pucciniales.

The systematics of several rust families, such as the

Uropyxidaceae, which often have puccinioid teliospores,

will need to be resolved before P. psidii can be confi-

dently placed at the family level.

Simpson et al. (2006) reviewed the rust taxa that

infected Myrtaceae. They introduced Uredo psidii, a

superfluous name for the uredinial stage of P. psidii,

which already had several validly published anamorphic

names, for example Uredo subneurophila and Uredo

neurophila. They also introduced the name Uredo rangel-

ii for two specimens on Myrtus communis and Syzygium

jambos. The basis for this new taxon was the presence of

a tonsure on the lower half of the urediniospores, the

shape and wall thickness of the urediniospores and

symptoms such as a lack of infection on stems or petioles

and the size of uredinia, all of which were considered by



Aecidium kalanchoe AY463163/DQ354524

Allodus podophylli DQ354543/DQ354544

Batistopsora crucis-filii DQ354539/DQ354538

Blastospora smilacis DQ354568/DQ354567

Caeoma torreyae AF522183/AY123284

Chrysomyxa arctostaphyli AF522163/AY123285

Coleosporium asterum DQ354559/DQ354558 

Cronartium ribicola DQ354560/M94338

Cumminsiella mirabilissima DQ354531/DQ354530

Dietelia portoricensis DQ354516/AY125414

Endocronartium harknessii AF522175/M94339

Endoraecium hawaiiense DQ323916/DQ323917

Endoraecium koae DQ323918/DQ323919

Eocronartium muscicola AY512844/DQ241438

Gymnoconia peckiana GU058010

Helicobasidium purpureum AY885168/D85648

Hemileia vastatrix DQ354566/DQ354565

Hyalopsora polypodii AF426229/AB011016

Kuehneola uredinis DQ354551/DQ092919

Melampsora euphorbiae DQ437504/DQ789986

Melampsoridium betulinum DQ354561/AY125391

Miyagia pseudosphaeria DQ354517/AY125411

Naohidemyces vaccinii DQ354563/DQ354562

Olivea scitula DQ354541/DQ354540

Phakopsora pachyrhizi DQ354537/DQ354536

Phakopsora tecta DQ354535

Phragmidium rubi-idaei AF426215/AY125405

Phragmidium tormentillae DQ354553/354552

Pileolaria toxicodendri DQ323924/AY123314

Puccinia caricis DQ354514/DQ354515

Puccinia convolvuli GU058018/DQ354511

Puccinia coronata DQ354526/DQ354525

Puccinia graminis AF522177

Puccinia hemerocallidis GU058020

Puccinia heucherae DQ359702

Puccinia hordei DQ354527/DQ831030

Puccinia menthae DQ354513/AY123315

Puccinia poarum DQ831028/DQ831029

Puccinia polysora GU058024

Puccinia smilacis DQ354533/DQ354532

Puccinia sp. MCA2969 GU058025

Puccinia sp. MCA3259 GU058026

Puccinia triticina DQ664194

Puccinia violae DQ354509/DQ354508

Puccinia windsoriae GU057995

Pucciniastrum epilobii AF522178/AY123303

Pucciniosira solani EU851137

Ravenelia havanensis DQ354557/DQ354556

Trachyspora intrusa DQ354550/DQ354549

Tranzschelia discolor DQ995341/AY125403

Triphragmium ulmariae AF426219/AY125402

Uredinopsis filicina AF426237

Uromyces acuminatus GU058004

Uromyces appendiculatus AY745704/DQ354510

Uromyces ari-triphylli DQ354529/DQ354528

Uromyces viciae-fabae AY745695

Uromycladium fusisporum DQ323921/DQ354548

Uromycladium tepperianum DQ323922/323923

Prospodium tuberculatum BRIP57630

Prospodium lippiae DQ354555/DQ831024

Puccinia psidii BRIP58000

Puccinia psidii BRIP57911

Puccinia psidii BRIP57985

Puccinia psidii BRIP57793

1

1



1

1

1



1

0·99


0·98

0·99


0·90

1

0·99



1

0·94


1

0·96


0·90

0·98


0·99

1

0·99



0·93

Pucciniaceae



sensu stricto

Figure 6 Phylogram obtained from

PHYML

in a maximum likelihood search on a combined dataset of the LSU and SSU regions. aRLT support values



(

>0Á90) above nodes.

Plant Pathology (2013)

12

G. S. Pegg et al.



the authors (Simpson et al., 2006) as different from

P. psidii. When this rust first appeared in Australia it

was referred to as Uredo rangelii (Carnegie et al., 2010).

Molecular sequence data from the ITS and LSU regions,

host studies and morphological data from two life cycle

stages support the premise that one taxon, P. psidii, is

responsible for widespread infection of Myrtaceae in

Australia.

Puccinia psidii is now identified from a range of native

forest ecosystems including coastal heath (Austromyrtus

dulcis, Homoranthus spp.), coastal and river wetlands

(Melaleuca quinquenervia, Melaleuca viridiflora), sand

island ecosystems of Moreton, Stradbroke and Fraser

Islands, and littoral, montane, subtropical and tropical

rainforests (Syzygium spp., Rhodamnia spp., Rhodo-

myrtus spp.). The disease is prevalent in urban and





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə