Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia: disease symptoms, distribution and impact



Yüklə 295.87 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/3
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü295.87 Kb.
1   2   3

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

Figure 7 Puccinia psidii. (a) Uredinia on abaxial surface (scale bar

= 500 lm), (b) uredinia and telia (arrowed; scale bar = 500 lm), (c) erumpent

uredinium (scale bar

= 125 lm), (d) erumpent uredinium (scale bar = 20 lm), (e) single urediniospore with tonsure (scale bar = 5 lm), (f)

teliospores (scale bar

= 10 lm).

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

Figure 8 Photographic sequence showing the impact of Puccinia psidii over time on Rhodamnia angustifolia, a rare and endangered Queensland

species. (a) Initial detection of rust on new shoots and expanding foliage, March 2011; (b) high level of P. psidii infection on new shoots and

expanding leaves, December 2011; (c) severe defoliation following repeated infection by P. psidii, January 2012; (d) foliage and branch dieback

15 months after initial infection was detected, June 2012. Photographs are of cultivated plants, Brisbane.

Plant Pathology (2013)

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

13


peri-urban environments around major cities and towns,

commonly reported from botanic gardens and nature

reserves, with disease impacts ranging from minor leaf

spots to severe dieback and infection, and premature

senescence of flowers and fruits. In comparison, P. psidii

is rarely severe on native vegetation in Brazil, even

though it has been identified from a range of native

Myrtaceae and causes occasional epidemics in native

guava plantations (Ribeiro & Pommer, 2004).

The spread of P. psidii via movement of infected

nursery stock, and other human assisted mechanisms,

played a significant role in the initial distribution and

establishment of the disease in different regions of Qld.

Now that the disease is established and widespread in

Qld, further spread of P. psidii into new regions is

likely to result from wind and rain dispersal of spores.

Short distance dispersal is facilitated by animals and

insects (Coutinho et al., 1998). Dominant southeasterly

winds and the presence of susceptible species, e.g.

Melaleuca quinquenervia and Melaleuca leucadendra,

that provide a near-contiguous corridor along the east

coast of Australia (Carnegie & Lidbetter, 2012), are



(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

Figure 9 Branch dieback and infection of

shoots on a mature Rhodomyrtus psidioides

tree (a, b) and infection and dieback of

regenerating seedlings under adult trees (c,

d). Photographs are of cultivated plants in

the Brisbane Botanic Gardens, Mt Coot-tha.

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

(f)

Figure 10 Puccinia psidii infection on inflorescences of Melaleuca leucadendra (a, b), inflorescences and flowers of Chamelaucium uncinatum

(c, d), and immature fruit of Rhodamnia sessiliflora (e), and mature fruit of Rhodamnia rubescens (f).

Plant Pathology (2013)

14

G. S. Pegg et al.



significant factors for the dispersal of this rust in Aus-

tralia.


Following the initial increase in the number of

reported detections of P. psidii in Qld, report numbers

have fluctuated. Peaks in reporting were often followed

by declines, a pattern repeated several times over the

duration of this study. Factors influencing these patterns

have not yet been studied in detail in Australia. How-

ever, Tessmann et al. (2001) identified disease outbreaks

of P. psidii on Syzygium jambos in Brazil as being clo-

sely linked to duration of leaf wetness and relative

humidity (RH), combined with nocturnal temperatures

ranging from 18 to 22

°C. A high correlation between

progression of P. psidii on Eucalyptus grandis and days

with 90% RH or higher for 8 h, combined with temper-

atures between 18 and 25

°C has been demonstrated

(Glen et al., 2007). Data collected as part of the current

study indicate that temperature is not the main factor

influencing disease development, with reports of new

infections throughout the year. The influence of host

physiology and changes under different climatic condi-

tions is also likely to influence disease development. This

requires further study.

Climatic conditions since P. psidii was first detected in

Qld have favoured spread and disease development with

above average rainfall and associated periods of high rel-

ative humidity occurring across most of coastal Qld

(www.bom.gov.au). This has undoubtedly led to optimal

plant growth conditions, providing repeated growth

flushes and high numbers of new shoots and young

leaves, which are most susceptible to infection (Coutinho

et al., 1998). Interestingly, a decline in reporting of

P. psidii coincided with consecutive days of heavy rain-

fall. Previous studies (Lana et al., 2012) have also

observed lower levels of P. psidii with increased rainfall

levels in areas of Brazil. A reduction in spore levels due

to high rainfall over a short period of time is a possible

explanation. Reduced human activity outdoors during

rainfall periods may also have reduced rust observations

and reporting.

The host range of P. psidii in Qld has expanded rap-

idly from the five species initially detected in January

2011 to more than 160 species in July 2012. As reported

by Carnegie & Lidbetter (2012), the host range recorded

in Australia is significantly greater than the known host

range for this disease internationally. This study alone

has identified a further 56 host species and two genera

not previously reported in Australia or internationally

(Carnegie & Lidbetter, 2012). The first new genus and

species was Mitrantia bilocularis, a rare rainforest species

endemic to north Qld, which appears moderately suscep-

tible to P. psidii and is considered a vulnerable species

(Atlas of Living Australia; www.ala.org.au). The second

was Sphaerantia discolor, also endemic to north Qld

rainforest ecosystems and also listed as vulnerable (Atlas

of Living Australia; www.ala.org.au). The host range of

P. psidii is likely to continue expanding as the fungus

becomes established in new geographic regions and

where new host species exist.

Teliospores were identified from a range of host spe-

cies with different levels of susceptibility to P. psidii. The

detection of teliospores did not appear to be limited to

season, with detections made during warmer wetter

months of summer and the drier winter months. Ruiz

(1988) reported that teliospores occur under natural con-

ditions in Brazil on Eucalyptus cloeziana during the war-

mer months of the year (December to March). Other

studies indicate that temperature plays a role in spore

development, with the ideal temperature for germination

of urediniospores being 20

°C and subsequent mainte-

nance of infected plants at 25

°C or above likely to pro-

duce telia rather than uredinia (Coutinho et al., 1998).

Urediniospores have been detected on a range of host

plants in Qld at all times of the year.

Symptoms of infection by P. psidii range from minor

leaf spots to severe foliage and stem blight, as well as

infection of flowers and fruit of some species. Of the

highly or extremely susceptible species, several have

importance economically, e.g. Backhousia citriodora and

Chamelaucium uncinatum, and environmentally, e.g.

Melaleuca quinquenervia. The level of natural resistance

within species populations in Australia is unknown. Field

observations indicate variability in susceptibility to the

disease within some species. It is unclear at this point in

time if this is a true reflection of resistance or variation

in host phenology and/or localized microclimatic and

edaphic conditions. Variations in inoculum levels may

also be important.

The impacts that P. psidii will have on fragile and threa-

tened ecosystems in Australia, e.g. Melaleuca wetlands,

are unknown and difficult to predict. The disease has been

recorded on 15 species of Melaleuca with half considered

highly or extremely susceptible based on survey data from

this study, including Melaleuca viridiflora, which occurs

predominantly in higher rainfall areas of northern

Australia (Boland et al., 1992). This species is an integral

component of diverse tropical lowland environments in

northern Qld (Skull & Congdon, 2008) and is regarded as

an endangered ecological community (EPBC, 2012).

Melaleuca quinquenervia is considered highly suscepti-

ble to P. psidii, with infection causing seedling and tree

dieback, reduced flower production and flower death. Sim-

ilar observations were made in Florida (Rayamajhi et al.,

2006), where M. quinquenervia is a weed and P. psidii has

been used as a biocontrol agent. Melaleuca quinquenervia

habitats are threatened in Australia, with large areas

cleared for housing, road development and agriculture

(Catterall & Kingston, 1994). Impact on growth and

regeneration of M. quinquenervia by P. psidii may impact

on ecosystems crucial to maintaining biodiversity as well

as the quality of coastal waterways.

The known impact of P. psidii on eucalypts in Austra-

lia is limited and restricted to seedlings, apart from

Eucalyptus curtisii where infection has been identified on

new shoots of mature trees and coppice. In Brazil, heavy

infection of juvenile leaves and meristems of eucalypts

causes plants to become stunted and multibranched, with

highly susceptible individuals grossly malformed, and

Plant Pathology (2013)

Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

15


some dying as a result of infection by P. psidii. Infection

levels have been reported as 20

–30% of trees, impacting

significantly enough to affect growth rates and subse-

quent profitability (Booth et al., 2000). Many eucalypt

plantations in Qld are subcoastal and located in areas

where P. psidii has not been detected outside of nurser-

ies. The majority of plantations are also more than

2 years old and less likely to be affected by P. psidii

based on observations in Brazil (Glen et al., 2007).

Some plant species are at risk of disappearing alto-

gether from their natural ecosystems because of infection

by P. psidii, especially species that are already rare and

endangered, e.g. Rhodamnia angustifolia, Rhodamnia

maideniana, Gossia gonoclada and Backhousia oligan-

tha. Only 11 R. angustifolia trees remain in their natural

habitat in central Qld (Snow & Guymer, 1999). Given

this restricted gene pool, the likelihood of identifying any

resistance in this population is limited. Similarly, only

12 G. gonoclada trees exist naturally and indications are

that this species is highly susceptible to P. psidii.

Some host range studies had investigated the suscepti-

bility of Australian native Myrtaceae to P. psidii, before

it entered Australia. Zauza et al. (2010) identified 60

Á5%

of Rhodamnia rubescens seedlings as being resistant.



Similarly, they found 80% resistance in Eugenia rein-

wardtiana. Both species are considered extremely suscep-

tible in Australia with no evidence of resistance, and

often the first host to be recorded as the disease extended

its geographic range in Qld. This raises the important

issue of pathogen variability within P. psidii and the

need to maintain strict border controls, preventing addi-

tional strains entering Australia. In addition, the require-

ment for more investigation into potential resistance

within host populations should be considered.

Loss or significant impact on common, dominant and

keystone species such as Melaleuca quinquenervia,

M. viridiflora and M. leucadendra are likely to have far

more devastating effects on ecosystem health than the

loss of minor ecosystem species, even species that are

listed as threatened. Loss of biodiversity through impact

on a wide range of species will occur as P. psidii spreads.

This is particularly salient given that Qld’s terrestrial

ecosystems are dominated by native Myrtaceae (REDD,

2012). Booth et al. (2000) highlight the potential impact

the disease may have on ecosystems and tourism, focus-

ing on the environmental attractions of coastal Qld. The

full impact of this disease in Qld and Australia may not

be realized for some years.

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the facilities, and the scientific

and technical assistance, of the Australian Microscopy &

Microanalysis Research Facility at the Centre for Micros-

copy and Microanalysis, The University of Queensland.

Funding for the work provided by the Queensland govern-

ment and The CRC for Plant Biosecurity is greatly appre-

ciated. A. R. M. acknowledges the Australian Biological

Resources Study for funding (grant number RFL212-33).

The authors also wish to thank Tony Bean and Stephen

McKenna for assistance in the identification and collection

of plant species as well as staff from Botanical Gardens in

Queensland. They would also like to thank Charlie Booth

for allowing access to his collection of Myrtaceae.

References

Aime MC, 2006. Toward resolving family-level relationships in rust

fungi (Uredinales). Mycoscience 47, 112

–22.


Anisimova M, Gil M, Dufayard JF, Dessimoz C, Gascuel O, 2011.

Survey of branch support methods demonstrates accuracy, power, and

robustness of fast likelihood-based approximation schemes. Systematic

Biology 60, 685

–99.

Boland DJ, Brooker MIH, Chippendale GM et al., 1992. Forest Trees of



Australia. Victoria, Australia: CSIRO Publishing.

Booth TH, Jovanovic T, 2012. Assessing vulnerable areas for Puccinia

psidii (eucalyptus rust) in Australia. Australasian Plant Pathology 41,

425


–9.

Booth TH, Old KM, Jovanovic T, 2000. A preliminary assessment of

high risk areas for Puccinia psidii (Eucalyptus rust) in the Neotropics

and Australia. Agriculture Ecosystems & Environment 82, 295

–301.

Carnegie AJ, Lidbetter JR, 2012. Rapidly expanding host range of



Puccinia psidii sensu lato in Australia. Australasian Plant Pathology

41, 13


–29.

Carnegie AJ, Lidbetter JR, Walker J et al., 2010. Uredo rangelii, a taxon

in the guava rust complex, newly recorded on Myrtaceae in Australia.

Australasian Plant Pathology 39, 463

–6.

Catterall C, Kingston M, 1994. Remnant Bushland of South East



Queensland in the 1990’s: Its Distribution, Loss, Ecological

Consequences, and Future Prospects. Brisbane, Australia: Institute of

Applied Environmental Research, Griffith University.

Coutinho TA, Wingfield MJ, Alfenas AC, Crous PW, 1998. Eucalyptus

rust: a disease with the potential for serious international implications.

Plant Disease 82, 819

–25.

Dayton L, Higgins E, 2011. Myrtle rust “biggest threat to ecosystem”.



The Australian, 9 April 2011. [http://www.theaustralian.com.au/ news/

health-science/myrtle-rust-biggest-threat-to-ecosystem/story-e6frg8y6-

1226036247221]. Accessed 9 April 2011.

EPBC, 2012. Broad leaf tea-tree (Melaleuca viridiflora) woodlands in

high rainfall coastal north Queensland. [http://www.environment.gov.

au/cgi-bin/sprat/public/publicshowcommunity.pl?id=122]. Accessed

July 2013.

Ferreira FA, 1983. Eucalyptus rust. Revista Arvore 7, 91

–109.

Gardes M, Bruns TD, 1993. ITS primers with enhanced specificity for



basidiomycetes

– application to the identification of mycorrhizae and

rusts. Molecular Ecology 2, 113

–8.


Glen M, Alfenas AC, Zauza EAV, Wingfield MJ, Mohammed C, 2007.

Puccinia psidii: a threat to the Australian environment and economy

a review. Australasian Plant Pathology 36, 1



–16.

Grgurinovic CA, Walsh D, Macbeth F, 2006. Eucalyptus rust caused by

Puccinia psidii and the threat it poses to Australia. EPPO Bulletin 36,

486


–9.

Guindon S, Dufayard JF, Lefort V, Anisimova M, Hordijk W, Gascuel

O, 2010. New algorithms and methods to estimate maximum-

likelihood phylogenies: assessing the performance of PH

Y

ML 3.0.


Systematic Biology 59, 307

–21.


Kawanishi T, Uemastu S, Kakishima M et al., 2009. First report of rust

disease on ohia and the causal fungus, Puccinia psidii, in Japan.

Journal of General Plant Pathology 75, 428

–31.


Lana VM, Mafia RG, Ferreira MA et al., 2012. Survival and dispersal of

Puccinia psidii spores in eucalypt wood products. Australasian Plant

Pathology 41, 229

–38.


MacLachlan JD, 1938. A rust of the pimento tree in Jamaica, BWI.

Phytopathology 28, 157

–70.

Minnis D, McTaggart A, Rossman A, Aime MC, 2012. Taxonomy of



mayapple rust: the genus Allodus resurrected. Mycologia 104, 942

–50.


Plant Pathology (2013)

16

G. S. Pegg et al.



Nylander JAA, Olsson U, Alstr

€om P, Sanmartın I, 2008. Accounting for

phylogenetic uncertainty in biogeography: a Bayesian approach to

dispersal

–vicariance analysis of the thrushes (Aves: Turdus). Systematic

Biology 57, 257

–68.

Pegg GS, O’Dwyer C, Carnegie AJ, Burgess TI, Wingfield MJ, Drenth A,



2008. Quambalaria species associated with plantation and native

eucalypts in Australia. Plant Pathology 57, 702

–14.

Rayamajhi MB, Van TK, Pratt PD, Center TD, 2006. Interactive



association between Puccinia psidii and Oxyops vitiosa, two

introduced natural enemies of Melaleuca quinquenervia in Florida.

Biological Control 37, 56

–67.


REDD, 2012. Regional Ecosystem Description Database. [http://www.

ehp.qld.gov.au/ecosystems/biodiversity/regional-ecosystems/index.php].

Accessed July 2013.

Ribeiro IJA, Pommer CV, 2004. Breeding guava (Psidium guajava) for

resistance to rust caused by Puccinia psidii. Acta Horticulturae 632,

75

–8.



Ronquist F, Huelsenbeck JP, 2003. M

R

B



AYES

version 3.0: Bayesian

phylogenetic inference under mixed models. Bioinformatics 19, 1572

–4.


Roux J, Greyling I, Coutinho TA, Verleur M, Wingfield MJ, 2013. The

Myrtle rust pathogen, Puccinia psidii, discovered in Africa. IMA

Fungus 4, 155

–9.


Ruiz RAR, 1988. Epidemiologia e Controle Qu

ımico da Ferrugem

(Puccinia psidii Winter) do Eucalipto. Vic

ßosa, Brazil: Universidade

Federal de Vic

ßosa, MS thesis.

Schoch CL, Seifert KA, Huhndorf S et al., 2012. Nuclear ribosomal

internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region as a universal DNA barcode

marker for Fungi. Cunninghamia 109, 6241

–6.


Simpson JA, Thomas K, Grgurinovic CA, 2006. Uredinales species

pathogenic on species of Myrtaceae. Australasian Plant Pathology 35,

549

–62.


Skull SD, Congdon RA, 2008. Floristics, structure and site characteristics

of Melaleuca viridiflora (Myrtaceae) dominated open woodlands of the

wet tropics lowlands. Cunninghamia 10, 423

–38.


Snow N, Guymer GP, 1999. Rhodamnia angustifolia (Myrtaceae), a new

and endangered species from south-eastern Queensland. Austrobaileya

5, 421

–6.


Stamatakis A, 2006. RA

X

ML-VI-HPC: maximum likelihood-based



phylogenetic analyses with thousands of taxa and mixed models.

Bioinformatics 22, 2688

–90.

Tessmann DJ, Dianese JC, Miranda AC, Castro LHR, 2001.



Epidemiology of a neotropical rust (Puccinia psidii): periodical analysis

of the temporal progress in a perennial host (Syzygium jambos). Plant

Pathology 50, 725

–31.


Uchida J, Zhong S, Killgore E, 2006. First report of a rust disease on

ohia caused by Puccinia psidii in Hawaii. Plant Disease 90, 524.

Van Der Merwe MM, Walker J, Ericson L, Burdon JJ, 2008.

Coevolution with higher taxonomic host groups within the Puccinia/

Uromyces rust lineage obscured by host jumps. Mycological Research

112, 1387

–408.

Vilgalys R, Hester M, 1990. Rapid genetic identification and mapping of



enzymatically amplified ribosomal DNA from several Cryptococcus

species. Journal of Bacteriology 172, 4238

–46.

White TJ, Bruns T, Lee S, Taylor JW, 1990. Amplification and direct



sequencing of fungal ribosomal RNA genes for phylogenetics. In: Innis

MA, Gelfand DH, Sninsky JJ, White TJ, eds. PCR Protocols: a Guide

to Methods and Applications. San Diego, USA: Academic Press,

315


–22.

Wilson PG, O’Brien MM, Heselwood MM, Quinn CJ, 2005.

Relationships within Myrtaceae sensu lato based on matK phylogeny.

Plant Systematics and Evolution 251, 3

–19.

Zauza EAV, Alfenas AC, Old KM, Couto MMF, Grac



ßa RN, Maffia LA,

2010. Myrtaceae species resistance to rust caused by Puccinia psidii.

Australasian Plant Pathology 39, 405

–11.


Zhuang JY, Wei SX, 2011. Additional materials for the rust flora of

Hainan Province, China. Mycosystema 30, 853



–60.

Plant Pathology (2013)



Puccinia psidii in Queensland, Australia

17
1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə