Qualitative and quantitative analysis of medicinal



Yüklə 148.39 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü148.39 Kb.

International Journal of 

Advances in Science Engineering and Technology

, ISSN: 2321-9009 

Volume- 3, Issue-4, Oct.-2015 

Qualitative And Quantitative Analysis Of Medicinal Tree’s Belonging To Myrtaceae Family 

 

130 



QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF   MEDICINAL 

TREE’S   BELONGING TO MYRTACEAE FAMILY 

 

1



S.B.NASRIN FATHIMA, 

2

R.PANDIAN 

 

1

S.B.NasrinFathima, Department of plant biology and biotechnology, 



Presidency College, Chennai, Tamil nadu, India. 

2

The Principal, GovernmentAarts and Science College, Kovilpatti,  



Tuticorin district, Tamil nadu, India. 

E-mail: 


1

nasrinfathima.sb@gmail.com, 

2

drpandian50@gmail.com 



 

 

Abstract-The study is aimed to investigate the phytochemical constituents present in the three medicinal tree 

species of Myrtaceae family such as Syzygium densiflorum, Syzygium tamilnadensis and Euginea candolleana,



 in 

which Syzygium densiflorum is categorized as a vulnerable species in the IUCN red list of threatened species.

 

Preliminary phytochemical analysis revealed the presences of tannins, alkaloids, and phenols, whereas saponins, 



terpenoids, steroids, phytosteroids, phlobatannins and anthraquinones are absent for tested extracts. The amount 

of total phenol, total flavonoids and Tannin content in n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Syzygium 



densiflorum,  Syzygium  tamilnadensis  and  Euginea  candolleana  are  determined  spectrometrically.  The 

methanolic extract shows high phenolic, flavonoid and tannins content for Euginea candolleana. The Syzygium 



densiflorum shows the presence of tannin content in methanolic extract. The presence of alkaloids is found to be 

high in Syzygium tamilnadensis of n- hexane and ethyl acetate extract. This report shows the complete study on 

qualitative and quantitative analysis of the tree leaves extracts.  

 

Keywords— Syzygium Tamilnadensis, Syzygium Densiflorum, Euginea Candolleana. 

 

I. INTRODUCTION 

 

Syzygium  densiflorum  ,Syzygium  tamilnadensis  and 

Euginea candolleana belong to the family Myrtaceae

The Myrtaceae is the myrtle family, of dicotyledonous 

plants placed within the order myetales. Myrtle, clove, 

guava and eucalyptus belong to this family.

 All species 

are  woody,  with 

essential  oils

.  Recent  estimates 

suggest  that 

Myrtaceae

  includes  over  5650  species 

occurring in some 130-150 genera, [11]. 

Plants of the 

Family  Myrtaceae  are  predominantly  from  the 

Southern  Hemisphere  and  are  found  in  tropical, 

sub-tropical 

and  temperate  Australia.

 

Syzygium 

densiflorum  has  been  categorized  as  a  vulnerable 

under  IUCN  red  list  of  threatened  species  and  is 

endemic  to  India  (IUCN  1998).    There  are  over  150 

Genera in the family and approximately 50 per cent of 

these are Australian.  Plants from  the  Myrtle  Family 

share  common  characteristics;  including  aromatic 

leaves  with  oil  glands  and  may  be  either  shrubs  or 

trees. Syzygium tamilnadensis is a tree up to 15m tall 

and is endemic to Western Ghats. Its leaves are simple, 

opposite  and  decussate.  Its  flowers  are  small  in 

terminal corymbose cyme [24]. 

 

Eugenia 



candolleana

 

is 



otherwise 

known 


as 

Rainforest

 Plum.

 

It is a tree, native from Atlantic rain 



forest 

of 


Brazil

 

,known 



locally 

by 


the

 

Portuguese 



 

names cambuí roxo

 

("purple cambuí") 



or

 

murtinha

 

("little


 

mytle").


 

It is quite rare in the wild, 

and has seen limited use in landscaping for its bright  

 

 



green  foliage  and  purple-black  fruits.

 

The  fruits  are 



consumed fresh or made into jams. The leaves of the 

tree have been used for the treatment of pain and fever 

[1].  They  have  oil  bearing  leaves  which  contain 

isomers  of  guaiol  and  cadinol,  δ-elemene  and 

viridiflorene [20]. 

 

Medicinal  plants  contain  some  organic  compounds 



which  provide  definite  physiological  action  on  the 

human  body  and  these  bioactive  substances  include 

tannins, alkaloids, carbohydrates, terpenoids, steroids 

and flavonoids [9]. These compounds are synthesized 

by  primary  or  rather  secondary  metabolism  of  living 

organisms. Secondary metabolites are chemically and 

taxonomically  extremely  diverse  compounds  with 

obscure  function.  They  are  widely  used  in  therapy, 

veterinary,  agriculture,  scientific  research  and  other 

countless areas [39]. 

 

Phytochemical  is  biologically  active,  naturally 



occurring chemical compounds found in any parts of 

plants such as barks, leaves, flowers, roots, fruits, and 

seeds  [7].  In  the  present  work,  qualitative  and 

quantitative  analysis  was  carried  out  in  three 

medicinal 

leaves  of  tree  species,  (Syzygium 



densiflorum,  Syzygium  tamilnadensis  and  Euginea 

candolleana) with three different solvents (n-hexane, 

ethyl  acetate  and  methanol)  for  the  better  yield  of 

biologically active compounds. 

 


International Journal of 

Advances in Science Engineering and Technology

, ISSN: 2321-9009 

Volume- 3, Issue-4, Oct.-2015 

Qualitative And Quantitative Analysis Of Medicinal Tree’s Belonging To Myrtaceae Family 

 

131 



II. MATERIALS AND METHODS 

 

Collection of plant materials: 

Fresh  leaves  of  Syzygium  tamilnadensis,  Syzygium 



densiflorum,  and  Euginea  candolleana  belong  to 

Myrtaceae  family.  These  leaves  were  collected  from 

Wayanad  district,  Kerala.  They  were  identified  and 

authenticated  at  “Gandhigram  Rural  Institute, 

Dindigul, Tamilnadu, by Dr. Ramasubbu, Department 

Of Plant Biology and Plant Biotechnology”. The plant 

materials were shade dried for the water molecules to 

get  evaporated.  Once  dried,  they  were  coarsely 

powdered  and  transferred  to  air  tight  container  for 

future work. 

 

Solvent Extraction: 

The  Crude  leaf  extract  was  prepared  by  percolation 

extraction method. About 100 gms of powered extracts 

were extracted three times by cold percolation method 

with 300 ml of n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol at 

room  temperature  for  72  hours.  The  filters  were 

concentrated  under  reduced  pressure  at  40°C  and 

stored  in  refrigerator  at  2-8°C  for  use  in  subsequent 

experiments.  

 

Qualitative test: 

The  extracts  were  screened  for  the  presence  of 

Carbohydrates,  Tannins,  Saponins,  Flavonoids, 

Alkaloids, 

Quinines, 

Glycosides, 

Terpenoids, 

Triterpenoids,  Phenols,  Coumarins  ,  Phytosteroids, 

Phlobatannis,  and  Anthraquinones  for  all  the  three 

leaves  samples  of    (Syzygium  densiflorum,  Syzygium 



tamilnadensis,  and  Euginea  candolleana)  with  three 

solvents (n-hexane, ethyl acetate and methanol) 



 

Quantitative  phytochemical  analysisTotal  phenol 

content 

Total  phenol  content  in  n-hexane,  ethyl  acetate  and 

methanol extracts of all the three leaves samples was 

determined  by  Folin-Ciocalteau  method  [33]  with 

some modifications. Briefly, 0.1ml of extract (200, 600 

and  1000  µg/ml),  1.9ml  distilled  water  and  1  ml  of 

Folin-Ciocalteau’s reagent were seeded in a tube. Then 

1  ml  of  100g/l  Na

2

CO



was  added.  The  reaction 

mixture  was  incubated  at  25°  C  for  2  hours  and  the 

absorbance  of  the  mixture  was  read  at  765  nm.  The 

sample was tested in triplicate and a calibration curve 

with  six  data  points  for  Catechol  was  obtained.  The 

results were compared to a Catechol calibration curve 

and the phenolic content of all the three leaves samples 

was expressed as mg of Catechol equivalents per gram 

of extract.  

 

Total Flavonoid content: 

Total flavonoid content in n-hexane, ethyl acetate and 

methanol  extracts  of  all  the  three  leaf  samples  was 

determined by calorimetric method as described in the 

literature. 0.5ml of this sample was mixed with 2 ml of 

distilled  water  and  subsequently  with  0.15ml  of 

NaNO



solution (15%). After 6 min, 0.15 ml of AlCl



solution (10%) was added to the mixture. Immediately, 

water was added to bring the final volume to 5 ml and 

the  mixture  was  thoroughly  mixed  and  allowed  to 

stand for another 15 min. Absorbance of the mixture 

was then determined at 510 nm versus prepared water 

blank. Results were expressed as quercetin equivalents 

(mg quercetin/g dried extract) [38]. 



 

Total condensed tannins assay: 

Total  Tannin  content  in  n-hexane,  ethyl  acetate  and 

methanol  extracts  of  all  the  three  leaf  samples  was 

determined  by  Sun  et  al.,  1998.  To  50µl  of  properly 

diluted sample, 3 ml of 4% methanol vanillin solution 

and 1.5 ml of concentrated hydrochloric acid were  

added. The mixture was allowed to stand for 15  min 

and  the  absorption  was  measured  at  500  nm  against 

methanol as a blank. The  amount  of  total  condensed 

tannins  is  expressed  as  mg  (+)  -  catechin  g

-1

.  The 


calibration  curve  range  was  0-400  µg  ml

-1

.  All  the 



samples were analyzed in three replicates. 

 

Alkaloids  determination  using  Harborne  (1973) 

method: 

5gms of the sample were weighed into a 250 ml beaker 

and 200 ml of 10% acetic acid in ethanol was added 

and covered and allowed to stand for 4 hours. This was 

filtered  and  the  extract  was  concentrated  on  a  water 

bath  to  one  quarter  of  the  original  volume. 

Concentrated  ammonium  hydroxide  was  added  drop 

wise  to  the  extract  until  the  precipitation  was 

completed.  The  whole  precipitated  solution  was 

collected  and  washed  with  dilute  ammonium 

hydroxide  and  then  filtered.  The  residues  in  the 

alkaloids were dried and weighed [12]. 

All the experiments were carried out in triplicate and 

the  results  were  represented  in  mean  ±  standard 

deviation (SD). 

 

III. RESULTS 

 

The  preliminary  phytochemical  characteristics  of 

leaves  of  three  medicinal  tree  species  (Syzygium 

densiflorum,  Syzygium  tamilnadensis,  and  Euginea 

candolleana)  were  tested  against  three  solvents 

(n-hexane,  ethyl  acetate,  and  methanol)  and  were 

summarized in the [Table-1]. The results revealed the 

presence and absence of medicinally active compounds 

in  the  three  leaves  samples.  Tannins,  alkaloids  and 

phenols were present in all the tested extracts of all the 

three leaves samples. Saponnins, terpenoids, steroids, 

pytosteriods, phlobatannina and anthraquinonol were 

absent for the tested extracts.  

 

The presence of such compounds in huge varieties of 



medicinal plants have been reported to have curative 

International Journal of 

Advances in Science Engineering and Technology

, ISSN: 2321-9009 

Volume- 3, Issue-4, Oct.-2015 

Qualitative And Quantitative Analysis Of Medicinal Tree’s Belonging To Myrtaceae Family 

 

132 



properties against several pathogens and therefore can 

be used in the treatment of various diseases [14].  

 

Table-1.  Phytochemical  analysis  of  plant  leaves 

extracts.  

 

Where-


1

:Syzygium 



tamilnadensis

2

: 



Syzygium 

densiflorum, 

3

:  Euginea  candolleana;  (++:  Strongly 

present, +: Weakly - : Absent). 

 

The amount of total phenols, flavonoids, and tannins 



in  n-hexane,  ethyl  acetate  and  methanol  extracts  of 

Syzygium  densiflorum,  Syzygium  tamilnadensis,  and 

Euginea 

candolleana 

was 


determined 

spectrometrically and was summarized in [Table-2, 3 

and  4].  The  maximum  phenol  content  in  the 

methanolic extracts of E. candolleana was 463.9mg/g 

and  of  S.tamilnadensis  was  335.9mg/g,  and  of 

S.densiflorum was found to be 389.0mg/g. In n-hexane 

and  ethyl  acetate,  the  maximum  phenol  content 

present  in  S.tamilnadensis  and  E.  Candolleana  was 

117.5mg/g  and  259.4mg/g  respectively.  The  total 

flavonoid  content  for  the  methanol  extract  of 

S.densiflorum was 152.8mg/g, and of E. candolleana 

was  215.8mg/g  but  it  was  absent  in  S.tamilnadensis

Ethyl  acetate  and  n-hexane  didn’t  show  flavonoid 

content  for  the  leaves  samples.The  concentration  of 

flavonoids in leaves extracts depends on the polarity of 

solvents  used  in  the  extract  preparation  [21].The 

amount  of  total  condensed  tannins  in  the  methanol 

extract  of  S.densiflorum  was    589.3mg/g  and  in  E. 



candolleana it was from 193.6mg/g and was absent in 

S.tamilnadensis.  Total  condensed  tannin  in  ethyl 

acetate extracts of S. tamilnadensis, was 162.1mg/gm, 



S  densiflorum  was  248.8mg/gm  and  Euginea 

candolleana  was  262.5mg/gm.  The  three  leaves 

samples showed the presence of condensed tannins in 

ethyl acetate extract, whereas n-hexane does not show 

tannin content for  S.densiflorum  and  E.  candolleana 

and  were  present  in  S.tamilnadensis  (72.6mg/gm). 

Natural antioxidants such as phenols, flavonoids and 

tannins  are  natural  disease  preventing,  health 

promoting and anti-ageing substances [27].  

 

Table-2. Total phenolic content of leaves extracts in 

different solvents. 

 

The results represented as mean ± SD of three 



independent experiments. 

    


Table-3: Total flavonoid content of leaves extracts in 

different solvents. 

 

 

The  results  represented  as  mean  ±  SD  of  three 



independent experiments. 

 

Table-4: Total condensed tannins of leaves extracts in 

different solvents. 

 

 



The  results  represented  as  mean  ±  SD  of  three 

independent experiments. 

It is well-known that phenolic compounds  contribute 

to quality and nutritional value in terms of modifying 

color,  taste,  aroma,  and  flavor  and  also  in  providing 

health  beneficial  effects.  They  also  serve  in  plant 

defense  mechanisms  to  counteract  reactive  oxygen 

species  (ROS)  in  order  to  survive  and  prevent 

molecular  damage  by  micro  organisms,  insects  and 

herbivores.  Condensed  tannins  can  be  found 

commonly  in  used  foods.  They  are  polyphenolic 

compound with bitter taste. Tannins are  used  in  folk 

medicine  to  combat  diarrhoea,  hemorrhoids  and  to 

heal  wounds  as  bactericides  and  other  poison  and 

antidotes [36]. 

 

IV. DISCUSSION: 

 

Chloroform,  benzene  and  methanol  were  used  as  a 



solvent source [24] but in our study we used n-hexane, 

ethyl  acetate  and  methanol  as  solvent  source  for  the 

extraction  of  metabolites.  Since  the  polarity  of 

methanol is higher, most of the secondary metabolites 

of S.tamildanensisS. densiflorum and E. candolleana 


International Journal of 

Advances in Science Engineering and Technology

, ISSN: 2321-9009 

Volume- 3, Issue-4, Oct.-2015 

Qualitative And Quantitative Analysis Of Medicinal Tree’s Belonging To Myrtaceae Family 

 

133 



leaves  were  dissolved  easily.  Out  of  fourteen 

qualitative tests screened for the presence of secondary 

metabolites,  four  showed  positive  results  for  all  the 

three  solvents  used.  Carbohydrates  were  present  in 



n-hexane and methanol extraction and were absent for 

S.tamilnadensis of ethyl acetate extraction. Flavonoid 

showed  positive  results  for  S.  densiflorum  and 



E.Candolleana of ethyl acetate extract and methanolic 

extract  of  E.candolleana.  Cardiac  glycosides  were 

present  in  all  the  extracts  and  were  absent  for  S. 

densiflorum  and  E.Candolleana  of  methanolic 

extracts.  Quinines  and  Coumarins  tests  showed 

positive results for methanol extracts.  

Preliminary qualitative tests for two algae  Gracilaria 



edulis and Gelidium acerosa [8], were tested  against 

four solvents (n-hexane, petroleum ether, ethyl acetate 

and  ethanol).Sixteen  phytochemical  tests  were  done, 

in  which  carbohydrates,  quinines,  and  glycosides 

showed positive results for all the solvent extracts and 

were  absent  for  triterpenoids,  coumarines,  proteins, 

steroids 

phyto-steroids, 

phlobatannins, 

and 


anthroquinonol. Rest was partially present and absent 

for all the four solvent extracts. The Eugenia uniflora 

was  tested  against  ethanol,  methanol,  chloroform, 

petroleum ether,  ethyl  acetate,  acetone,  aqueous  cold 

and  hot.  Aqueous  hot,  ethanol  and  methanol  extract 

showed best results for the entire test done [10]. These 

compounds present in the variety of medicinal plants 

have significant application against human pathogens, 

including  those  that  cause  enteric  infections  and  are 

reported  to  have  curative  properties  against  several 

pathogens and therefore could suggest their use in the 

treatment of various diseases [14].    

In  our  study  where  we  used  n-hexane,  ethyl  acetate 

and,  methanol  as  solvent  extractions,  methanol 

showed  maximum    phenol  content  for  all  the  three 

leaves samples of S.tamilnadensis, S. densiflorum and 



E.candolleana.  Whereas  n-hexane  and  ethyl  acetate 

showed  total  phenol  content  for  S.tamilnadensis  and 



E.candolleana. Methanol extract of S. densiflorum and 

E.candolleana  showed  maximum  flavonoid  content 

but absent for n-hexane and ethyl acetate extract. Ethyl 

acetate showed total condensed tannins for all the three 

leaves samples. Methanol extraction showed the total 

condensed 

tannin 


for 

S.densiflorum 

and 


E.candolleana.  The  total  condensed  tannin  for 

n-hexane 

extracts 

were 

present 


only 

for 


S.tamilnadensis.  Among  all  the  solvents  used, 

methanol  extraction  showed  best  results  and  this  is 

because methanol is a polar solvent and it can be easily 

dissolved. 

The  total  phenol  contents  in  the  examined  extracts 

ranged from 463.9 to 10.3mg of Catechol equivalents 

per  gram  of  extract.  The  highest  concentration  of 

phenols was measured in methanol  and  ethyl  acetate 

extracts,  whereas  n-hexane  extracts  contained 

considerably  smaller  concentration  of  phenol.  In  the 

previous  study,  the  total  phenolic  content  was 

examined  with  methanol,  acetone,  ethyl  acetate  and 

petroleum ether in Marrubium peregrinum. [23]. The 

total  phenolic  content  ranged  from  27.26  to  89.78 

mg/g of dry weight of extract, expressed as gallic acid 

equivalents. The total flavonoid concentrations varied 

from  18.72  to  54.77  mg/g,  expressed  as  rutin 

equivalents.  Methanolic  extracts  of  M.  peregrinum 

showed 

the 


highest 

phenolic  and  flavonoid 

concentration.The total phenolic content in  Paederia 

foetida ranges from 35.5mg/g and Syzygium  aqueum 

ranges  from  20.77mg/gm.  The  maximum  phenolic 

content was shown in methanol leaves extracts of both 

the plant materials. [15]. 

The  solvents used for the phenol and flavonoid content 

in  seven  medicinal  plants  such  as  Bryophyllum 



pinnatum, Ipomea aquatica, Oldenlandia corymbosa, 

Ricinus  communis,  Terminalia  bellerica,  Tinospora 

cordifolia,  and  Xanthium  strumarium,  were  water, 

methanol,  ethanol,  and  acetone  [41].  Among  all  the 

seven plants, the total phenol content was found to be 

in    Tinospora  cordifolia  (leaves)  and  the  flavonoids 

were found to be in Terminalia bellerica (leaves) for 

all  the  solvents  used.  The  total  phenol  content  was 

identified,  for  few  Australian  herbs  such  as  

Tasmannia  pepper  berry  leaf,  Anise  myrtle,  Lemon 

myrtle, Bush tomato, and Wattle seed and methanolic 

extract  of  Tasmania  pepper  leaf  showed  maximum 

phenolic content [16]. 

Phenol and flavonoid content in three plants Primula 



auriculata,  Fumaria  vaillantii  and  Falcaria  vulgaris 

were  extracted  with  methanol,  distilled  water,  and 

methanol  and  water  mixture.  The  total  phenol  and 

flavonoid  for  methanolic  extracts  of  Primula 



auriculata,  were  8.36  and  1.16mg/g,  Fumaria 

vaillantii  were  12.82  and  3.23mg/g  and  Falcaria 

vulgaris were 4.27 and 3.11mg/g respectively [13], in 

which it was found that  methanol  showed  maximum 

phenol and  flavonoid  content  for  all  the  three  leaves 

samples.  Whereas  in  Indigofera  aspalathoides,  the 

highest  concentration  of  phenol  content  and  tannins 

were  obtained  in  methanol  extracts,  in  which  the 

phenolic  content  was  47.38mg/g  and  the  tannin 

content was 34.59mg/g [36]. 

The quantitative phytochemical analysis of roots of S. 

caryophyllatum and S. densiflorum were treated with 

three different solvents such as acetone, methanol, and 

aqueous.  A  higher  concentration  of  total  phenol 

content was noted in the acetone root extract followed 

by aqueous and methanol extract of S. caryophyllatum 

and  very  low  total  phenol  content  was  seen  in  the 

aqueous  extract  of  S.  densiflorum.  Very  low 

concentrations  of  flavonoids  were  noted  in  aqueous 

root  extracts  of  both  the  plants  and  higher 

concentration  of  total  flavonoid  was  noted  in  the 

acetone root extract of S. caryophyllatum. The tannin 

content was found to be equal in the acetone, aqueous 

and  methanol  extracts  of  root.  Whereas,  the  lowest 

amount of tannin was noted in S. densiflorum extracts 



International Journal of 

Advances in Science Engineering and Technology

, ISSN: 2321-9009 

Volume- 3, Issue-4, Oct.-2015 

Qualitative And Quantitative Analysis Of Medicinal Tree’s Belonging To Myrtaceae Family 

 

134 



[33].  All  reviews  of  total  phenol  content  showed 

variation  depending  upon  the  extraction  and  solvent 

system used.  

Tannins  are  known  to  possess  general  antimicrobial 

and  antioxidant  activities  [32].  Recent  reports  show 

that tannins may have potential value as cytotoxic and 

antineoplastic  agents  [2].  Phytochemical  such  as 

saponins, terpenoids, flavonoids, tannins, steroids and 

alkaloids  are  reported  to  have  anti-inflammatory 

effects  [3]-[28].  Phenolic    phytochemicals  have 

antioxidative, 

antidiabetic, 

anticarcinogenic, 

antimicrobial, 

antiallergic, 

antimutagenic 

and 

anti-inflammtory  [4].  Tannins,  that  contain  tannic 



acid  as  a  building  block,  have  relatively  high 

molecular  weight  and  are  usually  divided  into  two 

groups: 

hydrolysable 

and 

condensed 



tannins. 

Condensed 

tannins 

are 


also 

known 


as 

proanthocyanidins  they  are  found  in  abundance  in 

fruits and fruit products. This unique group of phenol 

is  associated  with  the  astringency  and  color  of  fruits 

[18].  Moreover,  proanthocyanidins  are  known  to 

possess  some  biological  properties  that  are  of  vital 

importance  for  human  health.  In  the  previous  study, 

fruits  from  the  Ida  mountains  were  collected  and 

determined  for  the  total  condensed  tannins,  for  Sour 

cherry  the  tannin  content  was  163.4mg/g,  for  cherry 

was  113.1mg/g  for  apricot  was  38.8mg/g  and  for 

greengage  plum  was  20.42mg/g.  The  maximum 

condensed  tannins  were  found  to  be  in  sour  cherry 

[26].  


These  tannins  in  plants  are  generally  located  at  the 

epidermis  of  the  leaf  tissues,  most  common  in  the 

upper  epidermis.  However,  in  evergreen  plants, 

tannins are evenly distributed in all leaf tissues. They 

serve to reduce palatability and, thus, protect  against 

predators.  Condensed  tannins,  also  known  as 

proanthocyanidins, are polymers of 2 to 50 (or more) 

flavonoid units that are joined by carbon-carbon bonds, 

which  are  not  susceptible  to  being  cleaved  by 

hydrolysis.  Although  hydrolyzable  tannins  and  most 

condensed  tannins  are  water  soluble,  few  very  large 

condensed types of tannin are insoluble [42].Tannins 

play a major role as antihaemorrhagic agent and show 

to have immense significance as antihypercholesterol, 

hypotensive and cardiac depressant properties [30]. 

Previously, researchers took many of these compounds 

to be simply waste products of metabolism, but they are 

now known to possess important functions. One major 

category  of  such  compounds  is  alkaloids.  Although 

they vary greatly in their chemical structures, alkaloids 

have  several  common  characteristics:  they  possess 

nitrogen  and  alkaline  (basic),  but  none  have  basic 

forms such as quaternary compounds and N-oxides.  

Alkaloids  are  formed  as  metabolic  by-products  and 

have  been  reported  to  be  responsible  for  the 

antibacterial  activity  in  most  of  the  medicinal  plants 

[19].  The  alkaloid  extracts  obtained  from  medicinal 

plant  species  have  multiplicity  of  host-mediated 

biological 

activities, 

including 

antimalarial, 

antimicrobial,  antihyperglycemic,  anti-inflammatory 

and pharmacological effects [6]-[38]. The quantitative 

phytochemical  analysis  of  methanolic  extract  of 

Dendrobium  ovatum  (L.)  for  treating  liver  disorders 

could  be  due  to  generation  of  free  radicals.  The 

constituents  in  selected  plant  extract  alone  or  in 

combinations  might  be  responsible  for  the  observed 

hepatoprotective  activity.  The  total  phenolic  content 

was 4.51 mg/g,  flavonoid content was 5.34mg/g and 

alkaloids  content  was  48.16  mg/g  respectively.  The 

maximum yield was found to be  in  alkaloids  than  in 

phenolic and flavonoid contents. 

 

CONCLUSION 

 

The  present  study  of  the  phytochemical  screening, 



total  phenolics,  total  flavonoids,  total  tannins  and 

determination  of  alkaloids  in  different  extracts  of 



Syzygium  tamilnadensis,  Syzygium  densiflorum  and 

Euginea  candolleana  showed  that,  these  tree  species 

could be a potential source for natural antioxidants. If 

these  leaves’  samples  are  examined  for  further 

biological  studies,  it  would  be  a  promising  agent  in 

scavenging free radicals and treating diseases related 

to free radical reactions. Therefore, extracts from these 

leaves could be seen as a good source for useful drugs. 

The  traditional  medicine  practice  is  recommended 

strongly for these plants as well as it is suggested that 

further  work  should  be  carried  out  to  isolate,  purify, 

and characterize the active constituents responsible for 

the activity of these species. 



 

REFERENCES 

 

[1]



 

Adriana  G,  Guimaraes,  Monica  S,  Melo,  Rangel  R,  

Bonfim, Luiz O,  Passos, Samisia MF Machado, Adauto de 

S, Ribeiro, Marcos Sobral, Sara  M  Thomazzi,  Lucindo  J 

Quintans-Junior  ‘Antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory 

effects  of  the  essential  oil  of Eugenia  candolleana DC., 

Myrtaceae, 

on 

mice’. Revista 

Brasileira 

de 

Farmacognosia,  vol.4,  no.  19,  pp.



  883-887,  Dec, 

2009.sssssss

 

[2]


 

Aguinaldo  AM,  El  Espeso,  Guovara  BQ,  Nanoto  M, 

Phytochemistry.  In:  Guevara  BQ.  (ed.)  A  guide  book  to 

Plant  Screening  Phytochemical  and  Biological.  Manila: 

University of Santo Tomas, 2005. 

[3]


 

Akhindele  AJ  and  Adeyemi  OO,  ‘Antiinflammatory 

Activity  of  the  Aqueous  Leaf  Extract  of  Byrsocarpus 

coccineus’, Fitoterapia, Vol. 3(1), pp. 28-36, March-April 

2010. 


[4]

 

Arts  IC,  Hollman  PC,  ’Polyhenols  are  disease  risk  in 



epidemiological  studies’,  American  Journel  of  Clinical 

Nutrition, no. 81, pp.317-325, jan 2005.  

[5]

 

Baoshan  Sun,  Jorge  M,  Ricardo-da-Silva,  and  Isabel 



Spranger, ‘critical factors of vanillin assay for catechins and 

proanthocyanidins’.  Journel  Of  Agriculture  and  Food 

Chemistry, 46 (10), pp 4267–4274, Sep.1998. 

[6]


 

Boakye  Yiadom  K,  1979,  ‘Antimicrbial  Properties  of 

Cryptolepis’, Journel of Pharmceutical Science, 68,435 – 

447. 


[7]

 

Cragg GM, David, and JN 2001,  ‘Natural  Product  Drug 



Discovery  In  The  Next  Millennium’,  Journel  Of    Pharm 

Biology, 39, pp.8-17, Jan 2001. 



International Journal of 

Advances in Science Engineering and Technology

, ISSN: 2321-9009 

Volume- 3, Issue-4, Oct.-2015 

Qualitative And Quantitative Analysis Of Medicinal Tree’s Belonging To Myrtaceae Family 

 

135 



[8]

 

Divya SR, Padmaja M, Dhanarajan MS, Chandra Mohan 



A, ‘Preliminary Phytochemical Screening, Total Phenolics, 

Flavonoid  and  Tannin  contents  of  gracilaria  edulis  and 



gelidium  acerosa’,  International  journal  of  bioscience 

researchesVol. 2, May 2013. 

[9]

 

Edeoga HO, Okwu DE and Mbaebie BO, ‘Phytochemical 



constituents  of  some  Nigerian  medicinal  plants’,  African 

Journal  of  Biotechnology,  Vol.  4  (7),  pp.  685-688,  July 

2005. 

[10]


 

Geedhu  Daniel  and  Krishnakumari  S,  ‘Screening  of 



Eugenia uniflora leaves in various solvents for qualitative 

phytochemical  constituents’,  International  Journal  of 

Pharma and Bio Sciences, vol.6(1),pp. 1008 – 1015,  Jan 

2015. 


[11]

 

Govaerts, R et al. (12 additional authors) ‘World Checklist 



of Myrtaceae’. Royal Botanic Gardens,  Kew.  Xv  +  455, 

2008. 


[12]

 

Harborn JB, ‘Pytochemical methods’,



 A Guide to Modern 

Techniques of Plant Analysis’

 London. Chapman and Hall, 

Ltd. Pp.49-188, 1984. 

[13]

 

Hamideh  Jaberian  ,  Khosro  Piri  ,  Javad  Nazari, 



‘Phytochemical  Composition  and  In  Vitro  Antimicrobial 

and  Antioxidant  Activities  Of  Some  Medicinal  Plants’ 

,Food Chemistry, vol.136(1), pp.237-244, Jan 2013.

  

 



[14]

 

Hassan  MM,  Oyenwale  AO,  Abduallahi,  MS  and 



Okonkwo 

EM, 


‘Preliminary 

Phytochemical 

and 

Antibacterial investigation of crude extract of the root bark 



of Datarium microcarpum’, Journal of Chemical Society 

Nigeria,vol 29, pp.26-29, 2004. 

[15]

 

Hasnah Osman , Afidah A Rahim, Norhafizah M Isa and 



Nornaemah M Bakhir, ‘Antioxidant Activity and Phenolic 

Content  of  Paederia  foetida  and  Syzygium  aqueum’

Molecules, vol.14, pp.970-978, 2009. 

[16]


 

Izabela  Konczak  ,  Dimitrios  Zabaras,  Matthew  Dunstan, 

Patricia  Aguas,  ‘Antioxidant  Capacity  and  Phenolic 

Compounds  In  Commercially  Grown  Native  Australian 

Herbs And Spices’, Food Chemistry, vol.122, pp.260–266, 

2010. 


[17]

 

Landete  JM,  ‘Updated  Knowledge  About  Polyphenols: 



Functions,  Bioavailability,  Metabolism,  And  Health’, 

Critical  Reviews  In  Food  Science  and  Nutrition,  vol.52, 

pp.936-948, Jul 2012. 

[18]


 

Mantle  D,  Eddeb  F  and  Pickering  AT,  ‘Comparison  Of 

Relative Antioxidant Activities Of British Medicinal Plant 

Species  In  vitro’,  Journal  Of  Ethnopharmacology, 

vol.72(1-2), pp.47-51, Sep 2000.  

[19]


 

Marcos  J,  Nakamura,  Sergio  S  Monteiro,  Carlos  HB 

Bizarri,  Antonio  C  Siani,  Monica  FS,  Ramos

 ‘

Essential 



Oils  Of  Four  Myrtaceae  Species  From  The  Brazilian 

southeast’,  Biochemical  Systematic  And  Ecology, 

Vol.38,(6),pp.1170–1175

,  Mar 2010. 

[20]

 

Milan  S  Stankovic,  ’Total  Phenolic  Content,  Flavonoid 



Concentration  And  Antioxidant  Activity  Of  Marrubium 

peregrinum  L.  Extracts’,  Kragujevac  Journal  of 

science,Vol.33,pp. 63-72, Jan 2011. 

[21]

 

Min G, Chun-Zhao l,‘Comparison Of Techniques For The 



Extraction  Of  Flavonoids  From  Cultured  Cells  Of 

Saussurea medusa Maxim’, World journal Microbiology 

And Biotechnology, Vol.21,pp.1461-1463, Dec 2005. 

[22]

 

Mohsen MS, Ammar SMA,  ‘Total  phenolic  contents  and 



antioxidant activity of corn tassel extracts’, Food chemistry, 

Vol.112(3), pp.595-598, Feb 2009.



 

 

[23]



 

Mohan 


VR, 

Chenthurpandy 

P, 

Kalidass 



C,‘Pharmacognostic  and  phytochemical  investigation  of 

Elephantopus  scaber  L.  (Asteraceae)’,  Journel  of  Pharm 

Science and Technology, Vol-2 (3),pp.191-197, Jan 2010. 

[24]


 

Nair  and  Henry  F,  Tamil  Nadu  India  1:  158.  1983; 

Gamble,  Fl.  Madras  1:  479.1997  (re.ed);  Sasidharan, 

Biodiversity documentation for Kerala- Flowering  Plants, 

part 6: 179. 2004. 

[25]


 

Nazan  Cevik,  Bayram  Kizilkaya,  Gulen  Turker,  ‘The 

condensed tannin content of fresh fruits  Cultivated  in  Ida 

Mountains, Canakkale, Turkey, New knowledge Journal of 

Science. Oct.2012. 

[26]


 

Orhan I, Kupeli E, Sener B and Yesilada E, ‘Appraisal of 

anti-inflammatory potential of the clubmoss, Lycopodium 

cuvatum  L’,  Journal  of  Ethnopharmacology,  Vol.109, 

pp.146-150, Jul. 2006. 

[27]

 

Ozyurt  D,  Ozturk  BD,  Apak  R,  ‘Determination  of  total 



flavonoid  content  of  Urtica  dioica  L.  by  a  new  method’, 

Adnan  Menderes  University,  4  th  AACD  Congress, 

Turkey, Proceedings book. Oct.2004. 

[28]


 

Price KR, Johnson TI and Fenwick GR, ‘The chemistry and 

biological  significance  of  saponins  in  food  and  feeding 

stuffs’,  Critical  Reviews  in  Food  Science  and  Nutrition, 

Vol. 26, pp.22-48,1987. 

[29]


 

Praveen Kumar Ashok, Kumud Upadhyaya, ‘Tannins are 

Astringent, 

‘Journal 

of 

Pharmacognosy 



and 

Phytochemistry’, vol.1 (3), pp.45, 2012. 

[30]

 

Rievere  C,  Van  Nguyen  JH,  Pieters  L,  Dejaegher  B, 



HeydenYV,  Minh  CV,  ‘Polyphenols  isolated  from 

antiradical 

extracts 

of 


Mallotus 

metcalfianus’, 

Phytochemistry, Vol.70, pp.86-94, Jan 2009. 

[31]


 

Savitha  Rabeque  C  and  Padmavathy  S,  ‘comparative 

phytochemical 

analysis 

of 

root 


extracts 

of 


S. 

caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston  and  S.  densiflorum  wall, 

International  Journal  of  Comprehensive  Pharmacy,  Vol. 

06(05),pp.1,June 2013. 

[32]


 

Scalbert A, Manach C, Morand C, Remesy C, Jimenez L, 

‘Dietary  polyphenols  and  the  prevention  of  diseases’, 

Critical  Review  in  Food  Science  and  Nutrition’,Vol. 

45,pp.287-306, Jan 2007. 

[33]


 

Slinkard  K  and  Singleton  VL,  ‘Total  phenol  analysis: 

automation  and  comparison  with  manual  methods’, 

American  journal  of  Enology  and  Viticulture,  Vol.28, 

pp.49-55, 1977. 

[34]


 

Tackie  AN,  and  Schiff  PL,  ’Jnr.  Cryptospirolepine  A 

Unique 

Spiro-Noncyclic 



Alkaloid 

Isolated 

from 

Cryptolepis 



Sanguinolenta’, 

Journels 

of 

Natural 


Products,Vol. 56,pp. 653-655, 1993. 

[35]


 

Vasu  K,  Goud  JV,  Suryam  A,  Singara,  Chary,  MA 

‘Biomolecular and phytochemical analyses of three aquatic 

angiosperms’, African Journel of Microbiology, Vol.3(8), 

pp.418-421, Aug 2009. 

[36]


 

Vaya J, Belinky PA and Aviram M, Free Radical Biology 



Medicin, Vol. 23(2), pp.302-313, 1997 

[37]


 

Yadav  RNS  and  Munin  Agarwala,    ‘Phytochemical 

analysis of some medicinal  plants,’  journal  of  Phytology, 

Vol.3(12), pp.10-14, 2011. 

[38]

 

Wheeler SR, ‘Tea and Tannins’, Science, Vol.204, pp.6



‐8, 

1979. 


[39]

 

Zhishen  J,  Mengcheng  T,  and  Jianming  W,  ‘The 



determination of flavonoids contents in mulberry and their 

scavenging  effects  on  superoxide  radicals’,  Food 

Chemistry, Vol.64, pp.555-559, Mar 1999.

 

 



 

 





 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə