Rediscovery of Melicope quadrangularis (Rutaceae) and other notable plant records for the island of Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i



Yüklə 41.95 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü41.95 Kb.

Rediscovery of Melicope quadrangularis (Rutaceae) and other notable

plant records for the island of Kaua‘iHawai‘i

1

K



eNNetH

R. W


ood

2

& M



egAN

K

iRKPAtRiCK



National Tropical Botanical Garden, 3530 Papalina Road, Kalaheo,

Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i 96741, USA; email: kwood@ntbg.org

Although  several  previously  funded  surveys  by  the  U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service

(USFWS) and the National tropical Botanical garden (NtBg) between 1993 and pres-

ent had failed to relocate any living individuals of the Kaua‘i endemic Melicope quad-



rangularis (Rutaceae), a recent USFWS-funded survey has brought about its rediscovery

and is reported here. in addition, Bidens hillebrandiana subsp. polycephala (Asteraceae)

has been documented on Kaua‘i for the first time, possibly indicating a recent inter-island

introduction; and a single individual of Lysimachia filifolia (Primulaceae) was discovered

within the remote upper headwater drainages of Wainiha, representing the only known liv-

ing individual on Kaua‘i. 



Asteraceae

Bidens hillebrandiana (drake) o. deg. ex Sherff 

subsp. polycephala Nagata & ganders 



New island record

Previously recorded from the islands of Moloka‘i and Maui, Bidens hillebrandiana subsp.



polycephala has  now  been  documented  along  the  coastal  strand  of  Kalalau,  Kaua‘i.

Although  all  Hawaiian  Bidens have  evolved  with  reduced  dispersal  ability  (Carlquist

1974) and are predominantly single-island endemics (Wagner et al. 1990; Knope et al.

2012), B. hillebrandiana subsp. polycephala has retained some ancestral mechanisms for

dispersal by birds (i.e., setose achenes with spreading awns) and is usually associated with

near-shore bluffs and cliffs that are frequented by sea birds. in 2013, ca. 50 plants of this



Bidens species were discovered around a Kalalau coastal bluff site that had been botani-

cally surveyed by the senior author numerous times in the past without being previously

detected. the presence of B. hillebrandiana subsp. polycephala on Kaua‘i may possibly

be an example of a recent natural inter-island introduction by sea birds, which are often

seen in the general region. Plants are being cultivated by the NtBg.

Material examined. KAUA‘I: Hanalei distr., Kalalau, coastline around river mouth, Scaevola

taccada  coastal  shrubland, with  Chenopodium  oahuense,  Artemisia  australis,  Vigna  marina,

Capparis  sandwichiana,  Panicum  fauriei  var.  latius,  Lysimachia  mauritiana,  Adiantum  capillus-

veneris, threatened by goats, landslides, Digitaria ciliaris, 3 m elev., herb, decumbent, 25–35 cm tall,

several older plants dried up, a few with flowering left, some achenes, ca. 50 plants, observed most-

ly on north side of Kalalau Stream, a few on south side of stream near heiau, 26 Jul 2013, Wood,

Kirkpatrick & Clark 15589 (PtBg).

Records  of  the  Hawaii  Biological  Survey  for  2013.  Edited  by

Neal L. Evenhuis Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 115: 29–32

(2014)

29

1. Contribution No. 2014-006 the Hawaii Biological Survey.



2. Research Associate, Hawaii Biological Survey, Bishop Museum, 1525 Bernice Street, Honolulu, Hawai‘i 96817-

2704, USA.

Published online: 27 March 2014


Primulaceae

Lysimachia filifolia C.N. Forbes & Lydgate

Range rediscovery

the extremely rare Hawaiian primrose Lysimachia filifolia has been recorded on Kaua‘i

and o‘ahu. in 1912 John Lydgate made the holotype collection in upper olokele, Kaua‘i

below the Kawaikini summit (Wagner et al. 1990; Marr & Bohm 1997; Wood 2012), and

subsequently, up till now, the only other reported collection from Kaua‘i was made in

2008 in the Waikoko headwater region, below Kamanu Ridge (Wood 2012). Plants of L.



filifolia on Kaua‘i can be erect shrubs up to 1.5 m tall as compared to the o‘ahu plants,

which are smaller, more delicate, and only known to be pendulous (Wood 2012). Within

the Ko‘olau Mountain Range of o‘ahu several colonies still remain around waterfall sites

of Uwao, Waianu, and Waiāhole Streams. Recent research around the only known Kaua‘i

colony  of  L.  filifolia (i.e., Waikoko)  revealed  that  a  large  landslide  had  destroyed  the

plants, causing a regional extinction from a singular stochastic event (Wood, pers. obs.).

Fortunately, in october 2013 a single plant was documented on the northwestern side of

Kaua‘i,  within  the  upper  headwaters  of  Wainiha  Valley.  the  Kaua‘i  Plant  extinction

Prevention (PeP) Program and NtBg are planning for additional surveys to attempt con-

servation collections and to search for additional plants around this last known individual

on Kaua‘i. there is also potential for additional colonies around the holotype locality of

olokele, Kaua‘i, which is privately owned and historically off-limits for biotic surveys.



Material examined. KAUA‘I: Līhu‘e distr., upper olokele Valley, Jan. 1912, Lydgate 2 (holo-

type, BiSH); Līhu‘e distr., Waikoko headwaters, below Kamanu Ridge, S of Wailua River and above

Wailua ditch, associated with Cheirodendron, Pipturus spp., Dubautia, Cyrtandra, Kadua centran-

thoides, K. elatior, K. foggiana, Psychotria, Melicope, Machaerina, Isachne, with ferns of Micro -

lepia,  Asplenium,  Cyclosorus,  Deparia,  terrestrial  in  Diplazium with  Boehmeria  grandis,  threats

include pigs, landslides, Buddleia asiatica, and Erigeron karvinskianus, 732 m elev., 1.5 m tall with

erect stems brown-red, pendent corolla light purple, terrestrial near land slide and on wet cliff, ca 30

plants, 12 Jan 2008, Wood 12774 (BiSH, PtBg); Hanalei distr., Wainiha, upper northeastern fork,

closed  Metrosideros lowland  wet  forest,  8–12  m  canopy,  surrounded  by  steep  valley  walls  with

Dicranopteris and mixed shrubs, understory dominated by Antidesma with Syzygium, Broussaisia,

Perrottetia,  Cyrtandra spp.,  Psychotria  spp.,  Dubautia  spp.,  Labordia spp.,  Coprosma  waimeae,

Cheirodendron spp.,  Polyscias  kavaiensis,  and  P.  oahuensis,  rich  fern  and  bryophyte  understory,

threatened by pigs, rats, slugs, Sphaeropteris cooperi, Buddleia asiatica, Clidemia hirta, Hedychium



gardnerianum, Juncus planifolius, Erigeron karvinskianus, Psidium guajava, Cyperus meyenianus,

and Rubus rosifolius, 845 m elev., herb, 30 cm tall, unbranched young plant, vegetative, single plant

seen, 10 oct 2013, Wood & Kishida 15697 (PtBg).

Rutaceae

Melicope quadrangularis (H. St. John & 

e.P. Hume) t.g. Hartley & B.C. Stone



Rediscovery

Melicope quadrangularis is a Kaua‘i endemic tree known from the holotype collection

made by Charles Forbes in 1909, and rediscovered in the same general region of Wahiawa

in May 1991 (Lorence et al. 1995; Lorence & Flynn 1997). the rediscovered population,

consisting of 13 trees in close proximity, was subsequently destroyed by Hurricane ‘iniki

in September 1992 (Wood 2000, 2009, 2011) and reported as possibly extinct, as no liv-

ing individuals were known (Wood 2012). Recent field research funded by the USFWS

has rediscovered four individuals of this taxon in the headwater region of Wai‘ahi Stream,

ca. 2 km to the north of the holotype locality. Fruit capsules were present and seeds are

actively being monitored for collection by PeP and NtBg. Melicope quadrangularis can

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 115, 2014

30


be easily distinguished from other Melicope species on Kaua‘i by its large, 12–14 mm

long × 19–22 mm wide, cube-shaped capsules that have an unusual central depression at

their apex, yet can be very difficult to recognize when not in fruit (Wood 2012). the

extreme vulnerability of these last known individuals of M. quadrangularis cannot be

overstated,  especially  being  a  wet  forest  understory  species  susceptible  to  the  severe

storms that frequent Kaua‘i. Continued botanical surveys are encouraged in order to dis-

cover more individuals and prevent the extinction of this taxon. Recommended regions

for survey include the prime Metrosideros wet forests of Wahiawa and adjacent drainages

to its north, including Kamo‘oloa, Wai‘ahi, ‘iole, and ‘ili‘ili‘ula.

Material  examined. KAUA‘I:  Līhu‘e  distr.,  vicinity  of Wahiawa  Swamp, Aug  1909,  C.  N.

Forbes 273.K (holotype, BiSH); Līhu‘e distr., Wahiawa, drainage between Hulua and Kapalaoa,

Metrosideros-Dicranopteris lowland wet forest with Syzygium, Polyscias oahuensis P. waialealae,

Labordia, Perrottetia, area rich with bryophytes, threats include severe storms, pigs, rats, Psidium

cattleianum P. rosifolius, Melastoma candidum, 820 m, 2 m tall, branches ascending, 13 trees in

general area, 20 May 1991, Wood, Flynn & Lorence 0859 (PtBg); loc. cit., with Broussaisia, Eurya,



Cyanea coriacea, Labordia hirtella, Syzygium, 850 m, 4 m tall tree, 13 trees in general area, single

tree in fruit, 13 cm diameter at base, vigorous, east aspect, 20 May 1991, Wood, Flynn & Lorence



0858 (PtBg);  Līhu‘e  distr.,  Wai‘ahi,  upper  southern  headwaters,  Metrosideros-Cheirodendron

mixed wet forest with dissecting drainages and matting ferns of Diplopterygium Dicranopteris,

with Broussaisia arguta, Perrottetia sandwicensis, Touchardia latifolia, Pipturus albidus, P. ruber,

Psychotria mariniana, P. hexandra, Antidesma platyphylla var. hillebrandii, Polyscias oahuensis,

Kadua affinis, Melicope wawraeana, Vaccinium calycinum, Coprosma kauaense, Dubautia laxa, D.

paleata, D. imbricata subsp. acronaea, Sadleria spp., Cyanea hirtella, C. recta, C. kahiliensis, C.

fissa, Machaerina angustifolia, M. mariscoides, Cyrtandra pickeringii, C. paludosa, C. heinrichii, C.

longifolia, and C. kealiae, immediate threats include rats, goats, pigs, slugs, Clidemia hirta, Rubus

rosifolius,  Axonopus  fissifolius,  Juncus  planifolius,  Cyperus  meyenianus,  Paspalum  conjugatum,

Psidium  cattleianum.  Melastoma  candidum,  Rhodomyrtus  tomentosa,  Sphaeropteris  cooperi,

Sacciolepis indica, 830 m elev, tree, 3 m tall, moderately branched, stems covered in moss, imma-

ture fruit cauliflorous, tree 10 m above small side gulch, west aspect, single individual, 19 Nov 2013,



Wood, Kirkpatrick & Perlman 15728 (PtBg); Līhu‘e distr., Wai‘ahi, upper central headwaters, 820

m elev, tree 2.5 m tall, few-branched, trunk 7 cm diameter near base, stems gray-brown, with fruit,

5–7 m above gulch bottom, 30 dec 2013, Wood, Kirkpatrick & Perlman 15773 (PtBg); loc. cit., 823

m elev, tree, 3 m tall, moderately branched, gray-brown, base of trunk 10 cm diameter, female, imma-

ture  fruit,  on  slope  just  above  south  side  of  stream  lowermost  of  2  trees,  30  dec  2013,  Wood,

Kirkpatrick & Perlman 15780 (PtBg); loc. cit., 823 m elev, tree, 3 m tall, moderately branched,

gray-brown, base of trunk 8 cm diameter, cf male, on slope just above south side of stream upper-

most  of  2  trees,  female  immediately  below,  30  dec  2013,  Wood,  Kirkpatrick  &  Perlman  15781

(PtBg).


Acknowledgments

For  continued  support  we  acknowledge  the  dedicated  staff  of  the  National  tropical

Botanical  garden,  the  Bernice  Pauahi  Bishop  Museum,  the  U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife

Service,  the  Hawai‘i  State  department  of  Land  and  Natural  Resources,  the  Plant

extinction  Prevention  Program  of  Hawai‘i,  the  Nature  Conservancy  of  Hawai‘i,  and

Airborne Aviation. Funding for this research was partially granted through the U.S. Fish

and Wildlife Service. We thank Arryl Kaneshiro and grove Farm Company, inc., and its

subsidiaries,  for  right  of  entry  to  their  properties.  Special  gratitude  to  Steve  Perlman,

Wendy Kishida, and Michelle Clark for field assistance, and Nicolai Barca for his obser-

vations of Bidens hillebrandiana subsp. polycephala.

HBS Records for 2013

31


Literature Cited

CarlquistS. 1974. Island biology. Columbia University Press, New York. 660 pp.

KnopeM.L., MordenC.W., FunkV.A& FukamiT. 2012. Area and the rapid radi-

ation of Hawaiian Bidens (Asteraceae). Journal of Biogeography39: 1206–1216.



LorenceD.H& Flynn T. 1997. Botanical survey of the Wahiawa drainage, Kaua‘i.

Final report prepared for and available from State of Hawai‘i, department of Land

and Natural Resources, division of Forestry and Wildlife.

———., FlynnT& WagnerW.L. 1995. Contributions to the flora of Hawai‘i. iii.

New  additions,  range  extensions,  and  rediscoveries  of  flowering  plants.  Bishop

Museum Occasional Papers 41: 19–58.

Marr K.L.  & Bohm,  B.A.  1997.  A  taxonomic  revision  of  the  endemic  Hawaiian

Lysimachia (Primulaceae) including three new species. Pacific Science 51: 254–287.

WagnerW.L., HerbstD.R& SohmerS.H. 1990. Manual of the flowering plants of

Hawaii. 2 vols. University of Hawai‘i Press & Bishop Museum Press, Honolulu.

1853 pp.


WoodK.R. 2000. Biogeographical research and conservation. three Melicope survey:

Melicope  degeneri,  M.  knudsenii,  &  M.  quadrangularis.  USFWS  grant  No.

1448–12200–99–M090. Final report prepared for and available from the US Fish and

Wildlife Service. 41 pp.

———. 2009. Further notes on Melicope quadrangularis (Rutaceae) Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i.

Biological report prepared for and available from the National tropical Botanical

garden (NtBg), Kalaheo, Hawai‘i. 6 pp.

———. 2011. Rediscovery, conservation status and taxonomic assessment of Melicope

degeneri (Rutaceae), Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i. Endangered Species Research 14: 61–68.

———.  2012.  Possible  extinctions,  rediscoveries  and  new  plant  records  within  the

Hawaiian islands. Bishop Museum Occasional Papers 113: 91–102.

BISHOP MUSEUM OCCASIONAL PAPERS: No. 111, 2012



32


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə