Report to the ec clima East Pilot Project “Ecosystem based approaches to climate change”



Yüklə 142.17 Kb.

tarix01.06.2017
ölçüsü142.17 Kb.

Report to the  

 

EC Clima East Pilot Project “Ecosystem 

based approaches to climate change”

 

 

within the frame of a  



 

Complex inventory of pastureland in a selected pilot area 

of Ismayilli region of Azerbaijan, including further detail 

planning:  

 

Component Deliverable 3 Pasture restoration activities  

 

Partly based on a field stay between May 21

st

 and May 25



th

  

 



 

 

 

 

submitted by



 

Jonathan Etzold, 

Institut DUENE 

Greifswald, Germany 

 

Greifswald, June 2014 



 

Contents 



1

 

Description of Deliverable 3 Pasture restoration activities, as from DUENE offer 3

 

2

 

Itinerary of field days in May 2014 .......................................................................... 4

 

2.1


 

20.05. – 22.05.2014: Travel Baku – Qax – SARIBASH – Ilisu – Baku .................... 4

 

2.2


 

24.05.  -  25.05.2014:  Travel  Baku  –  Lahich  –  BUROVDAL  –  Lahich  –  Ismayilli 

(EN, EO, JE) ...................................................................................................................... 4

 

3

 

Project interventions to decrease erosion ................................................................. 4

 

3.1



 

General approach .................................................................................................... 4

 

3.2


 

Tree nursery site in Burovdal village ....................................................................... 5

 

3.3


 

Restoration of the 16 pilote summer pastures ........................................................ 10

 

4

 

Annex ....................................................................................................................... 11

 

4.1


 

Bio-engineering methods ...................................................................................... 11

 

 

  



 

 

1  Description of Deliverable 3 Pasture restoration activities, as from DUENE 



offer 

Restoration  activities  should  already  be  started  in  2014.  However,  full  knowledge  on  the 

extent of areas that need to be restored will be a result of the pasture inventory process and the 

full  catalogue  of  measures  to  be  applied  will  be  a  part  of  the  derived  management 

recommendations. Nonetheless, two activities for a successful implementation of restoration 

measures are necessarily to be started in 2014.  

Bio-engineering  encompasses  methods  to  halt  erosion  by  means  of  natural  materials, 

preferably living and dead plant material (Begemann & Schiechtl 1994, Hacker & Johannsen 

2011, Pflug 1988, Schiechtl 1973

1

). 



A project of DUENE e.V. and GABA in 2013 in a mountain village in the Greater Caucasus 

gathered 

experiences 

in 


this 

field 


(see 

http://www.duene-

greifswald.de/de/projekte.php_deicsa.php).  These  experiences  can  be  used  during  the  run  of 

our project here.  

For  producing  significant  amounts  of  autochthonic  woody  planting  material  (shrub  and  tree 

species  growing  in  the  project  region)  the  establishment  of  a  tree  nursery  is  advised, 

preferably in the close village Burovdal, where permanent caring would be feasible.  

Therefore,  a  tree  nursery  plot  has  to  be  fenced,  provided  with  water  supply,  and  a  drip 

irrigation system has to be installed. Planting of cuttings (living branch tips of native bush and 

tree species) can already start in June/July. Seeding of seeds from available species can start 

in late summer to autumn. With these measures and good care, already in 2015, small bushes 

and  trees  could  be  planted  at erosion/degradation  hotspots. With  good  care,  even  already in 

autumn 2014 plantable bushes or trees of some species might be available for planting. 

This  planting  material  can  be  as  well  used  for  planting  hedgerows,  preferably  of  thorny 

species, as in other bio-engineering measures like so called brush layering.  

Plantations  need  to  be  protected  by  fences  in  the  first  years.  Later,  if  densely  grown  and 

especially if thorny, fences can be removed again and used at other erosion sites. Therefore, 

already in 2014 some pilot erosion/degradation hotspots might be identified, visually and by 

means of remote sensing, and fenced in. For wider implementation in 2015 it will be useful to 

observe,  whether  snow  load/avalanches  as  well  as  theft  are  significant  threats  for  this 

measure. 

In general, fencing would also allow for natural regeneration of a closed vegetation cover on 

severely degraded sites. 

Time schedule:  

Methodology for restoration 

 

until end of May 2014 



Establishment of tree nursery 

 

until mid of June 2014 



First planting and fencing activities 

                                                 

1

 Begemann, W. & Schiechtl, H.M. (1994): Ingenieurbiologie. Handbuch zum ökologischen Wasser und Erdbau. 



2nd Edition. Bauverlag, Wiesbaden: 203pp. 

Hacker, E. & Johannsen, R. (2011): Ingenieurbiologie. Lehrbuch. 1st Edition. Ulmer UTB- Verlag, Ulm: 383pp. 

Pflug,  W.  (Ed.)  (1988):  Ingenieurbiologie:  Erosionsbekämpfung  im  Hochgebirge.  SEPiA-Verlag,  Aachen: 

251pp. 


Schiechtl,  H.M.  (1973):  Sicherungsarbeiten  im  Landschaftsbau:  Grundlagen,  lebende  Baustoffe,  Methoden. 

Callwey, München: 244pp. 

 


 

 



until end of October 2014 

Planning of further planting, fencing and other restoration activities 

 

end of November 2014 



 

2  Itinerary of field days in May 2014 

2.1 20.05. – 22.05.2014: Travel Baku – Qax – SARIBASH – Ilisu – Baku  

Aim:  


In  a  joint  delegation  of  ECO-GIZ-IEC-project  (P.  Sass  (PS),  E.  Namazov  (EN), 

Serdar  Hajiyev  (SH)),  UNDP-EU-Climate  East  (Silvija  Kalnins,  Eltekin  Omarov 

(EO)  and  Huseyn…)  visit  of  the  ICI  Project  DEICSA  (“Decreasing  erosion  by 

improving  carbon  stocks  in  the  strongly  degraded  surrounding  of  the  high-

mountain village Saribash in the Greater Caucasus of Azerbaijan”) in the village of 

Saribash,  presented  by  the  implementing  partners  GABA  (amongst  others  Vugar 

Babayev) and DUENE e.V. (Jonathan Etzold (JE)). Evaluation of measures from 

2013,  including  established  tree  nursery  (lessons  learnt  see  below  at  3.2),  fenced 

plantations on erosion hotspots and bio-engineering measures. 

 

2.2 24.05.  -  25.05.2014:  Travel  Baku  –  Lahich  –  BUROVDAL  –  Lahich  – 



Ismayilli (EN, EO, JE) 

Aim:  


Visit  of  target  area  of  the  project  UNDP-EU-Climate  East  around  Burovdal 

village. Discussion of steps for tree nursery establishment on already prepared plot, 

identification of woody species to be propagated here.  

Discussion  of  ways  of  joining  forces  between  both  projects,  e.g.  in  exchange  of 



knowledge, technologies and training of local population for these methodologies.  

 



3  Project interventions to decrease erosion  

3.1 General approach 

A high vegetation cover hinders erosion. Therefore, any measures to increase this cover are 

helping to diminish erosion. 

How?  



Grazing exclusion from parts that are particularly susceptible to or already heavily 



affected by erosion. 

By fencing which allows for undisturbed recovery of vegetation cover.  



By  planting  bushes  and  trees  at  “hotspots”  of  erosion.  For  their  successful 

establishmend fences protecting the plantations are necessary. 

By sowing autochthonous seeds e.g. from hay residues on eroded sites, best inside 



of fences. 

By other bio-engineering measures on eroded sites. 



By  creating  alternative  income  sources  to  reduce  dependence  of  local  population 

on  animal  husbandry  and  by  this  finally  decrease  animal  numbers  and  grazing 

pressure. 

By  better  management  of  grazing  regimes,  adapted  to  site  conditions  driving 



susceptibility to erosion. 

 


 

3.2 Tree nursery site in Burovdal village 



For producing sufficient numbers of autochthonous and therefore regionally adapted trees and 

bushes a tree nursery has to be established.  

Necessary  steps  are  based  on  the  experience  and  many  very  valuable  lessons  learnt  of  the 

establishment of a pilot tree nursery in 2013 in the village Saribash in Qax District. 

Among these lessons learnt are: 

a)  Ploughing/ digging of the tree nursery plot as soon as possible, to allow for better 

cleaning of plant parts and roots of the current meadow prior to planting of tree and 

bush cuttings. This eases later efforts for weed control. This has to be done regularly.  

b)  Thourough protection of the plot from intruding livestock by fencing 

c)   Installation of professional shading systems from commercial glass house gardening 

to protect sensitive tree and bush cuttings from too high sun radiation. 

d)  To create with drip irrigation permanently moist, however not wet conditions. 

e)  Arrange rows in a way that enough place remains for planting and cleaning without 

destroying other rows. A pattern could be two narrow rows, a wider gap and then 

again two narrow rows etc. 

f)  For seeding of especially large seeds/nuts to use containers of a depth of at least 

10 cm. For seeds grown in open soil to replant them to single pots as soon you can 

handle them. All pots should get casted into soil surface for better frost protection and 

maybe also irrigation.  

g)  Methods for frost protection are necessary, as well for tree nursery and trees/bushes 

planted to their permanent positions. Recommended is thick mulching with old 

hay/other plant residues. These would also help for the following year to reduce 

efforts of weed control. 

 

Criteria  for  selecting  a  tree  nursery  plot  were  discussed  in  email  and  skype  conversation 



between EO and JE.  

 

According to these criteria a plot for the nursery was identified in mid of April 2014 next to 



the  main access  road  to Burovdal  village  by  EO  and  villagers.  The  site, a  former  garden,  is 

close to the village, therefore allows for permanent care. It is close to a water source and now 

fully protected by a brush fence and bushes. The size is approx. 23 x 14 m. 

The villager Badal was selected to prepare the tree nursery plot. 

 

On the field visit on 24.05.2014 the plot was found to be completely cleaned from the grass 



cover. The soil is sandy-gravelly-humic which is promising for sowing seeds and planting tree 

and bush cuttings. 

With continued cleaning of plant parts and roots until first plantings in the beginning of July 

problems of weed control are regarded to be feasible. For later cleaning of weeds, additionally 

to the tree nursery keeper, one or two women could be contracted. 

 

Technical  specifications  for  the  installation  of  a  drip  irrigation  system  were  discussed 



beforehand via email and skype conversation between EO and JE and now approved by EN 

who is experienced with this issue e.g. from Saribash in 2013. The preconditions for irrigation 

with a slight sloping of the plot are perfect.  

The same applies to the installation of a professional shading system from commercial glass 

house gardening. To allow for experiments, this shading should only be installed over a part 

of  the  nursery.  It  will  be  interesting  to  learn  whether  all  species  to  be  propagated  here  in 

future are in need of this sophisticated protection. 

 

Both installations have to be functioning before planting starts. 



 

 



In  the  beginning  of  July  cuttings  of  at  least  13  tree  and  bush  species  (see  Table  1,  column 

“Propagation  from  cuttings  in  early  summer”)  could  be  planted  in  the  tree  nursery.  The 

cuttings  (i.e.  20-30 cm  branch  tips  of  bush  and  tree  species,  for  summer  planting  soft  fresh 

wood)  should  be  collected  in  the  nearer  surrounding  of  the  village  from  as  many  plant 

individuals  as  possible  (to  gain  genetic  diversity)  and  brought  carefully  and  immediately  to 

the moist soil of the nursery. Personel and interested villagers will need to be trained in these 

techniques. 

 

The preliminary list of the in total 26 species (Table 1) was developed on observations of the 



nearer surroundings of Burovdal during the field visit on 24. and 25.05.2014. Of importance 

will be their suitability for different site conditions, traits like thorns and non-palatibility for 

effective  planting  as  living  fences  and  also  the  potential  other  benefits  for  villagers  (fruit 

collection,  bee  pasture,  fire  wood  etc.).  Guidelines  for  propagation  worked  out  for  the 

Saribash tree nursery will be adapted to the Burovdal situation. A short version is given here. 

Some  of  the  species  are  said  to  be  planted  best  in  autumn  only  (see  Table  1,  column 

“Propagation  from  cuttings  in  autumn”).  However,  for  testing  reasons,  they  should  be 

collected now as well.  

 

For other bush and tree species seeding is the most perspective way of propagation (see Table 



1, column “Propagation from seeds”). This will take place during autumn after the particular 

seeds could be collected.  

For testing purposes experiments with planting/seeding into open soil and/or containers/pots 

will take place. The latter shall have a depth of at least 10 cm. 

 

During  the  field  visit  on 24. and  25.05.2014, we found  seedlings  of  Quercus,  Carpinus and 



other  species  on  the  margins  of  the  the  river  bed,  where  they  obviously  had  found  good 

conditions  for  germination.  The  next  bigger  flood  would  destroy  them.  In  the  beginning  of 

July  they  should  become  carefully  transplanted  to  deep  containers  and  kept  in  the  tree 

nursery. They might be planted out already in autumn 2014. 

 

All plant material planted in the tree nursery should be properly provided with water and with 



shadow  if  necessary.  Cleaning  of  weeds  is  necessary  to  reduce  root  concurrence.  Covering 

with  mulch  might  ease  this  work.  In  autumn  mulching  is  recommended  as  frost  protection 

(see above). 

 


 

Table 1: Preliminary list of woody species occurring in the surrounding of Burovdal village. Short information on names, propagation methods and 



time (long list in preparation). 

Nr.  Family 

Botanical name 

English name 

Azeri name 

thorny/

spikey? 

Poisonous? 

Propag

ation 

from 

seeds 

Propag

ation 

from 

cuttings 

in  early 

summer 

Propag

ation 

from 

cuttings 

in 

autumn 

Direct 

use  of 

cutting



without 

rooting 

in 

nursery 

for  bio-

enginee

ring 

Adoxaceae 



Viburnum lantana 

Wayfaring tree 

Lantana 

başınağacı 



(Large 



quantities  of  the 

fruit  can  cause 

vomiting 

and 


diarrhoea 

[PFAF]). 





 

Berberidacea





Berberis spp.  

Berberis 

Zirinc 





 



 

Betulaceae 



Betula 

pendula/litwinowii 

[further  descriptions  refer  to 

B. pendula only but might be 

applicable  to  other  Betula 

spp. as well] 

Silver 


birch/Caucasian 

Down Birch 

Sallaq 

tozağacı/...to



zağacı 



1  (seed 

ripening 

August-

Septem


ber) 

not 


mention

ed 


not 

mention


ed 

not 


mention

ed 


Betulaceae 



Carpinus  betulus  (syn.  C. 

caucasica) 

Hornbeam, European 

hornbeam 

Qafqaz vələsi   n 



not 



mention

ed 


not 

mention


ed 

not 


mention

ed 


Betulaceae 



Corylus maxima (C. avellana 

var.  purpurea,  C.  Avellana 

var. rubra) 

Filbert  (C.  maxima); 

Hazelnut 

(C. 


Avellana) 

Adi fındıq 



 



 

 

 



Caprifoliaceae  Lonicera 



xylosteum 

(foll. 

FlAZ  VIII  p.  62  also  L. 

caucasica and L. iberica) 

Fly honeysuckle 

Adi 

doqquzdon 



y  (berries  weakly 

poisonous) 



 

 



Cornaceae 

Cornus mas 

Cornel 


cherry, 

Cornelian cherry 

Zoğal 







 

 



Cornaceae 

Cornus  sanguinea  (s.l.)  In 

FlAZ  VI  S.  510  given  as 

Thelycrania australis 

Common dogwood 

Garamurdarc

ha 


Genus: 

zoğal 


(Might 



be 

problematic 

for 

sensitive  people: 



fruits  raw  rather 

unpalatable  (risk 

of gastroenteriris), 

leaves  can  cause 

skin 

irritations 



through 

their 


calcium 

carbonate 

incrusted 

trichomes [PFAF]) 





 

Elaeagnaceae  Hippophae rhamnoides 



Buckthorn 

Çaytikanı 





 



10 

Fagaceae 



Quercus 

macranthera, 

maybe partly still Qu. Iberica 

in this altitude 

Caucasian Oak 





 

 



 

11 


Juglandaceae  Juglans regia 

Walnut 


Qoz 



 

 



 

12 


Rosaceae 

Crataegus  spp.  [e.g.  C. 

pentagyna,  C.  microphylla, 

C.  pontica,  C.  szovitsii,  C. 

tournefortii,  C.  ulotricha,  C. 

zangezura; 

according 

to 

FlAZ: 

C. 

orientalis, 

C. 

meyeri,  C.  caucasica,  C. 

lagenaria,  C.  kyrtostyla  und 

C. pentagyna.] 

Hawthorn 

Yemişan 



 

 



 

13 


Rosaceae 

Malus 

orientalis 



M. 

domestica (?)  

Wild 


domestic 

apple 

and 


other 

species 


of 

the 


village's fruit orchard 

Alma 




 

 



14 

Rosaceae 



Mespilus germanica 

Common Medlar 

Alman  əzgili, 

adi 


ə

zgil, 


qafqaz əzgili 

y, young 

shoots 





 

 



15 

Rosaceae 



Prunus 

avium 

(Cerasus 

avium) 

Wild cherry 

Gilas 





 



 

 

16 



Rosaceae 

Prunus 

cerasifera 

(P. 

divaricata, P. cerasifera ssp. 

divaricata) 

Cherry 


plum, 

myrobalan plum  

Alça 



n  



 



 

17 


Rosaceae 

Pyrus 

domestica 

subsp. 

caucasica (P. caucasica) 

Pear 


Armud 



 



 

18 


Rosaceae 

Rosa 

spp. 

[e.g: 

R. 

doluchanovii,  R.  foetida,  R. 

gallica, 

R. 

jundzillii, 

R. 

majalis,  R.  spinosissima,  R. 

villosa, R. pulverulenta] 

different  wild  rose 

species,  e.g.  Dog 

rose 


Itburnu 

(Həmərsin) 

n  




 

19 


Rosaceae 

Sorbus caucasica 

 

Qafqaz 



quşarmudu 



 



 

20 


Salicaceae 

Populus alba 

White poplar 

Ağcaqovaq 

n  





21 


Salicaceae 

Populus tremula 

Aspen poplar 

Ə

sməqovaq, 



titrək qovaq 

n  





22 


Salicaceae 

Salix  broad-leaved  (different 

species, Salix cf. caprea) 

willow 


Söyüd 



(1) 


(1) 

23 



Salicaceae 

Salix 

narrow-leaved 

(different species) 

Willows 


Söyüd 



 



24 


Sapindaceae 

Acer campestre 

Field  maple,  Hedge 

maple  

çöl 


ağcaqayını 

n  





 

25 


Tamaricaceae  Myricaria germanica  

German tamarisk 

Tülküquyruq 

çayyovşanı 

n  




 

26 


Ulmaceae 

Ulmus 

sp. 

under 


http://www.botany.az/upload

s/haciyev_vahid/pdf_ler/Bota

nika_nstitutunu_srlri-

2012.pdf 

mentioned 

U. 

minor,  U.  glabra,  U.  scabra 

(= Syn. to glabra?!) for AZ. 

Elm 


Qarağac 

n  


n  

1  (seed 

ripening 

May-


June) 

 

 



 

 

 



10 

 

3.3 Restoration of the 16 pilote summer pastures 



Improved pasture management, an outcome of the Pasture Inventory with support of Remote 

Sensing, is the basic principle for pasture restoration.  

However, direct interventions on erosion/degradation hotspots might become necessary. Such 

severely  degraded  sites  of  all  16  summer  pastures  will  become  obvious  after  the  Pasture 

Inventory and a supervised classification have been conducted. .  

On  the  most  severely  degraded  sites,  fencing  would  become  necessary  to  allow  for 

undisturbed  natural  regeneration  of  a  closed  vegetation  cover.  In  case  of  strong  soil 

dislocation bio-engineering measures using rooted and unrooted woody material can be used. 

Already until July 2014 some pilot erosion/degradation hotspots might be identified, visually 

and by means of remote sensing, to test the above mentioned methods.  

Suitable plots which also do not interfere with the absolutely necessary cooperation of the 16 

livestock  farms  and  which  are  even  more  regarded  as  advantageous  for  their  own  purposes 

should be chosen. These could be eroding slopes along necessary access roads to the camps.  

Here,  already  in  summer  2014  fences  should  be  build  up.  This  will  stop  disturbance  of 

grazing and trampling livestock and might allow already for recovery of the vegetation cover, 

including the remaining strongly browsed bushes.  

 

Building  fences  already  in  2014  can  also  serve  for  testing  the  durability  of  these  measures. 



Site dependent, snow load or avalanches might destroy fences over winter. Raising awareness 

in  the  study  region  for  these  measures  should,  by  a  certain  social  control  within  the  land 

users’ community, prevent destruction or theft of the fences.  

 

The  pasture  recovery  could  be  supported  by  seeding  already  in  late  summer/early  autumn 



2014 herbs’ and grass’ seeds on bare soil sites. They can be collected by using hay residues 

from hay storage places in the village.  

 

With  good  care,  already  in  autumn  2014  the  tree  nursery  might  have  a  certain  output  of 



plantable bushes or trees of some species. However, main output is expected for the following 

years.  Those  small  bushes  and  trees  available  in  autumn  2014  could  be  planted  within  the 

fenced areas to ensure their undisturbed growth in the first years.  

This planting material can be planted in rows mostly parallel to the slope creating in the future 

a living fence or hedgerows, preferably of thorny or other not palatable species. Hence, after 

some years the fence can be deinstalled and build up again at other erosion hotspots. 

Depending on the site conditions, different ways of planting in rows parallel to slopes will be 

tested, including bio-engineering methods. This includes the so called “brush layering” using 

living  branches  of  narrow-leaved  willows  (Salix  spp.)  or  combined  with  already  rooted 

planting  material  from  the  tree  nursery  “bush  brush  layering”  following  Schiechtl  1973

2



Slightly inclined rows of woody species with a a water demand can also help draining moist 



slopes  which  are  threatened  by  land  slides.  Other  bio-engineering  measures  can  help  to 

diminish gully erosion, e.g. by using living branches of narrow-leaved willows (Salix spp.) in 

e.g. “gully brush filling”. These and other measures are described in more detail in Annex 4.1. 

 

 



                                                 

2

 Schiechtl  H. M. (1973):  Sicherungsarbeiten im  Landschaftsbau. Grundlagen - lebende Baustoffe - Methoden. 



244 pp., Callwey -Verlag. München 

11 

 

4  Annex 



4.1 Bio-engineering methods 

Cutting 

•  Most species root while rest in winter and therefore should not be cut too early 

•  Shrubs are cut directly above soil, trees are pollarded using saws or loppers, not axes 

•  Tree-forming willows can only be propagated vegetatively by basal cuttings, cuttings 

of shrub-forming willows can be taken of any plant part. Make sure to use only 

narrow-leafed species, as round-leafed ones do not propagate vegetatively. 

•  Transport cuttings in whole length, shorten at building site. 

•  Cuttings of pear, apple and similar poorly rooting species should be taken rather from 

near the trunk than from the tree tops; buckthorn cuttings are rooting regardless of 

their origin. 

 

Gully  brush  filling

  (for  gullies  up  to  3  m 

deep and 8 m wide) 

•  type 1: plug stakes in slope line into 

ground of the gully, fill it up to the 

surface with firmly packed branched 

and foliate cuttings (coniferous 

branches also suitable). Cut surfaces 

should be buried in soil for some 

decimetres to root. 

•  type 2: long branches are stacked in 

a fishbone pattern into the gully and 

secured by crossbars (Ø 10-16 cm, 

distance 1-2 m) punched into the side 

walls (see picture). Cut surfaces 

should be buried in soil for some 

decimetres to root. Max. thickness of 

branch layer: 0.5 m. 

 

 

 



 

 

Living palisade

 (gullies up to 6 m width and 2-4 m depth) 

•  Cut straight, living, little 

branched terminal shoots from 

tree-forming willows or poplar 

(1,5-2,5 m long, any diameter 

> 5 cm) straight at the top and 

sharpen them at the lower end. 

•  Punch them in for about 1/3 of 

their length side by side to 

form a line across the gully (5-

20 poles per lineal metre). 

•  Poles are connected to 

crossbars (build in gully side 

walls) with twine or willow 

stakes. 

Gully brush filling 

Living palisade 


12 

 

Wattle fence 

•  pickets (Ø 3-10 cm, 100 cm long, to 2/3 in 

ground) are placed in a horizontal line with a 

distance of 100 cm, inbetween shorter live 

stakes in a distance of ca. 30 cm  

•  stakes and pickets are braided with flexible  

strong branches of willow (unbranched or 

nearly so, at least 1,20 m long, one to three 

years old; 3-7 stacked and pressed down 

firmly) 

•   


•  pickets should overtop fence not more than 5 

cm  


•  to root successfully, the lowermost branches 

and at least the cut surface of every branch 

must be embedded in the soil; the deeper 

buried the fence the better 

 

Drain wattling 

•  Wattle/fascine: tube-shaped bundle of live 

brush (willow cuttings Ø 2-4 cm), each 4-6 

m long and Ø 20-40 cm in diameter, tied 

with twine- 

•  Place wattles in trench so that their surface 

draws level with the surrounding soil 

surface, ends overlapping. If necessary 

because of trench depth, wattles can be 

stacked (see picture below). Only upper 

wattles will root. 

•  Punch one live stake of 30-60 cm length 

and Ø 3-5 cm or steel bar Ø 10-20 mm per 

lineal metre through wattle. 

•  Cover lightly with soil. 

•  For steep slopes, additional twines tied 

around the wattles can serve to fix the 

construction when connected to massive 

stakes to the left and right of the trench. 

 

Drain wattling 



Types of drain wattling 

Wattle fence 

13 

 

Brush layering

 (best depth effect) 

•  Construction direction: bottom-up 

•  Cut 0.5-0.7 m wide triangular 

trenches with a 10° slope (depending 

on site conditions horizontally to 

vertically; the wetter, the steeper), 

with a 1.5-3 m distance of rows. 

•  Insert 10-20 willow stakes (2 cm Ø, 

1,5 m deep) per lineal metre 

crosswise (1-2 bare-root shrubs can 

be added if at hand). 

•  With the excavated material of the 

next overlying trench covere the 

stakes. They should stick out for 

only ¼ – 

 of their length. Tamp 



firmly. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Staking 

•  Place 5-10 unbranched willow cuttings per m

2

 (Ø 1-5 cm, 25-40(-60) cm long) for ¾ 



of their length in scattered holes prepared with a steel bar in a 45° angle. 

•  Tamp firmly. 

 

Cover 

•  Mulching with hay flowers: 0.5-2 kg/m

2

 hay flowers (late summer swath or hayloft 



remains), watered to reduce wind dispersal. Improves soil and micro-climate by 

forming a vegetation cover in the next growing season (but make sure that they do not 

outcompete the aspired bushes). 

•  Surface layering: live cuttings are densely layed out between other protective 

constructions, thick end covered with soil and secured against wind etc. by cross-bars, 

wettle fences or riprap. 

 

Plantation of rooted plants 

•  Autumn best season for planting 

•  Distance between individual plants 0,8-1,5 m 

•  When planted in groups of individuals of one species they will grow especially dense 

 

 

References: 



Begemann,  Schiechtl:  Ingenieurbiologie  :  Handbuch  zum  ökologischen  Wasser-  und  Erdbau.  2.  Aufl.  1994, 

Bauverl. 

Hacker/Johannsen: Ingenieurbiologie. UTB, 2011 

Pflug [Hrsg.]: Ingenieurbiologie : Erosionsbekämpfung im Hochgebirge. SEPiA-Verl., 1988 

Schiechtl: Sicherungsarbeiten im Landschaftsbau : Grundlagen, lebende Baustoffe, Methoden. Callwey, 1973. 

 

Brush layering 







Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə