Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium (Myrtaceae), an endemic and endangered tropical tree species in the southern Eastern Ghats of India



Yüklə 297.56 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/4
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü297.56 Kb.
  1   2   3   4

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

(Myrtaceae), an endemic and endangered tropical tree 

species in the southern Eastern Ghats of India

A.J. Solomon Raju

 1

, J. Radha Krishna

 2 

& P. Hareesh Chandra

 3

 

 

1,2,3 


Department of Environmental Sciences, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh 530003, India

1

ajsraju@yahoo.com (corresponding author), 



2

jrkrishna30@gmail.com,

 3

hareeshchandu@gmail.com



6153

ISSN


Online 0974–7907 

Print 0974–7893



OPEN ACCESS

Ar

ticle

Journal of Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o3768.6153-71 

Editor: Raju Sekar, Xi’an Jiaotong-Liverpool University, Suzhou, China. 

Date of publication: 26 August 2014 (online & print)

Manuscript details: Ms # o3768 | Received 15 September 2013 | Final received 28 July 2014 | Finally accepted 04 August 2014

Citation: Raju, A.J.S., J.R. Krishna & P.H. Chandra (2014). Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium (Myrtaceae), an endemic and endangered tropical tree 

species in the southern Eastern Ghats of India. Journal of Threatened Taxa 6(9): 6153–6171; http://dx.doi.org/10.11609/JoTT.o3768.6153-71



Copyright: © Raju et al. 2014. Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. JoTT allows unrestricted use of this article in any medium, reproduction 

and distribution by providing adequate credit to the authors and the source of publication.



Funding: Ministry of Environment & Forests, Government of India, New Delhi.

Competing Interest: The authors declare no competing interests.

Author Contribution: AJSR has conceived the concept, ideas, plan of work and did part of field work and prepared the paper. JRK and PHC did field work and 

tabulated the observational and experimental work of the paper.



Author Details: Prof. A.J. Solomon Raju is Head of the Department of Environmental Sciences, Andhra University, Visakhapatnam. He is presently working on 

endemic and endangered plant species in southern Eastern Ghats forests with financial support from MoEF and CSIR. J. Radha Krishna is working as a Junior 

Research Fellow in the MoEF&CC research project registered for a PhD degree under Prof. A.J. Solomon Raju. P. Hareesh Chandra is working as a senior research 

fellow in the MoEF&CC research project registered for a PhD degree under Prof. A.J. Solomon Raju.  



Acknowledgements: This study is a part of the research work carried out under an All India Coordinated Research Project on Reproductive Biology of RET Tree 

species (MoEF No. 22/6/2010-RE) funded by the Ministry of Environment, Forests & Climate Change, New Delhi sanctioned to AJSR.  The second author is JRF 

and third author is SRF working in this project.  We thank Mr. K. Venkanna, Technical Officer, Central Research Institute for Dry land Agriculture, Hyderabad, for 

doing soil NPK analysis.



Abstract: Syzygium alternifolium is a semi-evergreen mass-flowering tree species of dry deciduous forest in the southern Eastern Ghats of 

India.  It is a mass bloomer with flowering during dry season.  The floral traits suggest a mixed pollination syndrome involving entomophily 

and  anemophily  together  called  as  ambophily.    Further,  the  floral  traits  suggest  generalist  pollination  system  adapted  for  a  guild  of 

pollinating insects. The plant is self-incompatible and obligate out-crosser.  The flowers are many-ovuled but only a single ovule forms 

seed and hence, fruit and seed set rates are the same.  Natural fruit set stands at 11%.  Bud infestation by a moth, flower predation by 

the beetle, Popillia impressipyga and bud and flower mounds significantly limit fruit set rate.  The ability of the plant to repopulate itself is 

limited by the collection of fruits by locals due to their edible nature, short viability of seeds, high seedling mortality due to water stress, 

nutrient deficiency and erratic rainfall or interval of drought within the rainy season.  Therefore, S. alternifolium is struggling to populate 

itself under various intrinsic and extrinsic factors.  Further studies should focus on how to assist the plant to increase its population size in 

its natural area taking into account the information provided in this paper.



Keywords: Ambophily, bud infestation, flower predation, generalist pollination system, self-incompatibility, seedling mortality, Syzygium 

alternifolium.

 

 



Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6154

insects  (Crome  &  Irvine  1986)  while  S. paniculatum is 

pollinated  by  honeybees,  hawk  moths,  honeyeaters 

and  butterflies  (Payne  1991,  1997).    S.  floribundum is 

pollinated  by  a  guild  of  short-tongued  unspecialized 

insects (Williams & Adam 2010).  In American Samoa, 



S. inophylloides and S. samarangense are regularly 

foraged by birds (Cox et al. 1992).  S. dealatum is both 

entomophilous and anemophilous (Webb & Solek 1996).  

Empirical studies on the pollination of other Syzygium 

species  in  Samao  are  absent  but  observers  have 

suggested that bats are important pollinators of these 

species (Wiles & Fujita 1992; Trail 1994; Banack 1996).  In 

Sulawesi, S. syzygiodes is pollinated by a variety of short-

tongued unspecialized insects (Williams & Adam 2010).  

In East Java, S. pycnanthum attracts a variety of insects 

but their pollination role has not been studied (Mudiana 

& Ariyanti 2010).  In Africa, S. guineense is reported to 

be a honeybee plant but details of pollination are lacking 

(Verdcourt 2001).  In Mauritius, S. mamillatum is a rare 

and endemic cauliflorus species and it is pollinated by 

a variety of birds (Kaiser et al. 2008).  In India, only S. 



mundagum and S. cuminii have been studied for their 

pollination biology.  S. mundagum in the Western Ghats 

is  pollinated  exclusively  by  bats  while  seed  dispersal 

takes  place  largely  by  bats  (Ganesh  1996).    S. cuminii 

is  pollinated  by  wind,  insects  and  gravity  (Misra  & 

Bajpai 1984; Bajpai et al. 2012).  Despite the richness of 



Syzygium species in India, the pollination biology of all 

other species has not been studied so far.



S. alternifolium occurs in the tropical dry deciduous 

forests  of  Kurnool,  Cuddapah  and  Chittoor  districts  of 

Andhra Pradesh, Chengalpattu and North Arcot districts 

of  Tamil  Nadu  and  Bangalore  District  in  Karnataka  in 

India (Gamble 1957; Chitra 1983; Saldanha 1996; Reddy 

et al. 2006).  Mohan & Lakshmi (2000) reported that S. 



alternifolium occurs in the upper plateau, slopes and 

valley  tops  with  dry,  slaty  and  rocky  conditions  at  an 

elevation ranging from 600–1000 m in Sri Venkateswara 

Wildlife  Sanctuary  of  Chittoor  and  Cuddapah  districts.  

They stated that the distribution of this species appears 

to  be  related  to  the  geology  and  rock  structure  along 

with elevation and aspect. 

S. alternifolium  is  a  fruit  tree  of  great  timber, 

medicinal  and  economic  importance.    Timber  is  used 

for making furniture and agricultural implements. 

 

The plant tops are used to cure skin diseases as it has 



excellent  anti-fungal  properties  (Reddy  et  al.  1989).  

The leaves are used in the treatment of liver cirrhosis, 

hepatitis, infective hepatitis, liver enlargement, jaundice 

and other ailments of liver and gall bladder.  Leaves fried 

in cow ghee are used as a curry to treat dry cough.  A 

INTRODUCTION

Syzygium  (Myrtaceae)  is  native  to  the  tropics, 

particularly  to  tropical  America  and  Australia.    It  has 

a  worldwide,  although  highly  uneven,  distribution  in 

tropical and subtropical regions.  It is known from many 

countries including South Africa, South America, South 

East Asia and Australia.    The  genus  comprises  about 

1,100  species,  and  has  a  native  range  that  extends 

from Africa and Madagascar through southern Asia 

east through the Pacific.  Its highest levels of diversity 

occur  from  Malaysia  to  northeastern  Australia,  where 

many  species  are  very  poorly  known  and  many  more 

have not been described taxonomically (Wrigley & Fagg, 

2003).  In India, Syzygium  has  75  species.    This  genus 

is of commercial importance with timber yielding plants 

such as S. aqueum  and  S.  bracteatum  and  with  fruit 

trees such as S. cuminii and S.  aromaticum  which  are 

highly adapted to adverse conditions.  The fruits of many 

plants are edible and found to be used in local medicine 

(Anonymous  1956).    A  list  of  18  Syzygium  species is 

included in the International Union for the Conservation 

of Nature (IUCN) Red List Plants of India (Reddy & Reddy 

2008).    They  are  S. andamanicum, S. courtallense, 



S. manii, S. palghatense,  S. travancoricum  (Critically 

Endangered), S. beddomeiS. bourdillonii, S. chavaran, 



S. microphyllum, S. myhendrae, S. parameswaranii, S. 

stocksii (Endangered), S. benthamianum, S. densiflorum, 

S. occidentale, S. ramavarma (Vulnerable), S. utilis (Data 

Deficient) and S. gambleanum (Extinct).  Reddy & Reddy 

(2008) documented that S. alternifolium is an endemic 

and  globally  endangered  species  as  per  the  criteria  of 

IUCN but not yet included in the IUCN Red List.

Sanewski (2010) stated that the studied species of 



Syzygium  for  their  reproductive  ecology  indicate  that 

both  self-compatible  and  self-incompatible  species 

exist  in  this  genus  but  the self-compatible  species  are 

most  common.    The  author  documented  some  self-

compatible species which include S. tierneyanum and S. 

nervosum from north Australia (Hopper 1980; Shapcott 

1998), S. cuminii from India (Reddi & Rangaiah (1999–

2000),  S.  rubicundum  from  Sri  Lanka  (Stacey  2001), 

S. lineatum  from  Indonesia  (Lack  &  Kevan  1984),  and 

S.  samarangense,  S.  jambos,  S.  megacarpum, and S. 

formosum  from  Thailand  (Chantaranothai  &  Parnell 

1994).  In Australia, a variety of nectar feeding animals 

visit and pollinate S. tierneyanum while blossom bats and 

honeyeaters are primary pollinators of S. sayeri, although 

butterflies, flies, thrips and wasps also playing a role in 

pollination  (Williams  &  Adam  2010).    S.  cormiflorum 

is mainly pollinated by bats and followed by birds and 


Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6155

mixture  of  leaves  and  mineral  oil  is  used  to  maintain 

dark hair and also to promote hair growth by external 

application to the scalp.  Tender shoots, fruits and leaf 

juice  are  used  to  treat  dysentery,  seeds  for  diabetes 

and stem bark for gastric ulcers.  Flowers yield honey 

and  possess  antibiotic  properties.    The  ripe  fruits  are 

used in making squashes and jellies.  Fruit juice is used 

to  cure  stomach-ache  and  ulcers  while  the  external 

application of fruit pulp reduces rheumatic pains (Reddy 

et  al.  1989;  Nagaraju  &  Rao  1990;  Rao  &  Rao  2001; 

Bakshu 2002; Mohan et al. 2010).  Despite its multiple 

medicinal  and  economic  uses,  the  plant  has  not  been 

studied for any aspect of pollination ecology.  In recent 

years, its population size is declining due to cut down 

of  trees  and  collection  of  fruits  leaving  less  possibility 

for the plant to repopulate itself in its natural area.  

Keeping this in view, the present study is contemplated 

to  describe  the  chronological  events  of  pollination 

biology  of  S. alternifolium  (Wight)  Walp.  (Myrtaceae).  

The  observational  and  experimental  data  collected  on 

the studied aspects are discussed in the light of relevant 

existing information on other Syzygium species.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

Study area

A population of about 80 individuals of S. alternifolium 

located  in  the  hill  and  slopes  of  Tirumala  (13

0

42”N  & 



79

0

20”E,  858m)  was  used  for  the  study  during  2011–



2013.  This area is a part of Seshachalam Hills and this 

region  is  declared  in  2011  as  Seshachalam  Biosphere 

Reserve  by  the  Ministry  of  Environment  and  Forests, 

Government of India.  The reserve lies between 13

0

38”–


13

0

55”N & 79



0

07”–79


0

24”E.  It is spread over 4756km

in 


both Kadapa and Chittoor districts of southern Andhra 

Pradesh.    The  vegetation  is  a  unique  mix  of  the  dry 

deciduous  and  moist  deciduous  types.    The  elevation 

ranges  from  150–1,130  m  and  the  terrain  undulating 

with deep forest-covered valleys and characterized by 

steep slopes, rocky terrain, dry and poor stony soils.  

The  area  receives  most  of  the  rainfall  from  northeast 

monsoon  and  little  from  southwest  monsoon  (Guptha 

et al. 2012). 

Floral biology

Field  observations  on  flowering  intensity  were 

made during 2011–2013.  Twenty-five trees (Diameter, 

Breast and Height 15±4) were tagged for recording the 

phenological  events  for  two  consecutive  years  2011 

and 2012.  Fifty tagged mature buds from 10 trees were 

followed for recording the time of anthesis and anther 

dehiscence;  the  mode  of  anther  dehiscence  was  also 

noted by using a 10x hand lens.  Five flowers each from 

ten trees selected at random were used to describe the 

flower details.  Twenty mature but undehisced anthers 

from the flowers of 10 different plants were collected 

and placed in a petri  dish.  Later,  each  time  a  single 

anther was taken out and placed on a clean microscope 

slide (75x25 mm) and dabbed with a needle in a drop 

of lactophenol-aniline-blue.  The anther tissue was then 

observed under the microscope for pollen, if any, and 

if pollen grains were not there, the tissue was removed 

from the slide.  The pollen mass was drawn into a band, 

and  the  total  number  of  pollen  grains  was  counted 

under  a  compound  microscope  (40x  objective,  10x 

eye piece).  This procedure was followed for counting 

the  number  of  pollen  grains  in  each  anther  collected. 

Based  on  these  counts,  the  mean  number  of  pollen 

produced per anther was determined.  The pollen grain 

characteristics  were  recorded  by  consulting  the  book 

of  Bhattacharya  et  al.  (2006).    Pollen  dispersal  rate 

as  single  grains  or  in  aggregates  was  ascertained  by 

gently touching the dehisced anthers and collecting the 

liberated pollen on microscope slides placed close to the 

anthers. The hourly pollen concentrations in the plant 

canopy were determined by operating rot rod samplers.  

Pollen  spread  downwind  of  the  source,  during  the 

period of anther dehiscence was measured at a distance 

of 0, 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 meters using rotor samplers 

(Perkins 1957).  Five flowers each from ten trees were 

used for testing stigma receptivity, nectar volume, sugar 

concentration, sugar types, protein content and amino 

acids.    These  aspects  were  examined  following  the 

protocols given in Dafni et al. (2005).  Nectar was also 

analyzed  for  amino  acid  types  by  following  the  Paper 

Chromatography method of Baker & Baker (1973). 



Foraging activity

The foraging activity of insects was observed during 

day and night for 15 days in each year.  In the 3-year 

period, the same insects were recorded.  The census of 

foraging  visits  of  each  insect  species  was  recorded  on 

three different occasions in each year and the data thus 

collected was compiled to arrive at the average foraging 

visits made by each species at each hour and for the day.  

They were observed with reference to the type of forage 

they collected, contact with essential organs to result in 

pollination and inter-plant foraging activity in terms of 

cross-pollination.



Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6156

Predation and breeding systems

Bud  and  flower  infestations  were  also  observed 

in each study year and recorded their intensity to the 

extent  possible.    Fifty  mature  buds,  five  each  from 

10  inflorescences  on  five  trees  were  bagged  prior 

to  anthesis  around  noon  time  without  manual  self-

pollination to know whether the fruit set occurs through 

autogamy.  Another set of 50 mature un-dehisced buds 

was selected in the same way and bagged.  On the next 

day,  the  bags  were  removed,  manually  self-pollinated 

and  bagged  again  to  know  whether  fruit  set  occurs 

through  manual  self-pollination.    Another  set  of  50 

mature buds was selected again, then emasculated and 

bagged.  The next day, the bags were removed and the 

stigmas were brushed with the freshly dehisced anthers 

from  the  flowers  of  the  same  tree  and  re-bagged  to 

know  whether  fruit  set  occurs  through  geitonogamy.  

Another set of 50 mature buds was selected in the same 

way, then emasculated and bagged.  The next day, the 

bags were removed and the stigmas were brushed with 

freshly dehisced anthers from the flowers of other trees 

and re-bagged to know whether fruit set occurs through 

xenogamy.  Ten inflorescences on each tree were tagged 

for fruit set in open-pollination.  The bagged flowers and 

tagged inflorescences were followed for eight weeks to 

record the results. 



Fruiting and seedling ecology

Fruits and seed characteristics were also recorded.  

Field observations on the fruit maturation duration and 

dispersal mode were recorded.  In vitro experiments for 

seed germination rate were conducted in the local forest 

nursery.  A total of 195 seeds were sown in experimental 

bags  and  followed  for  result  for  two  months.    A  total 

of  144  seeds  germinated  within  two  weeks.    Further, 

observations  were  made  on  seed  germination  and 

seedling establishment rates in natural habitat. 



Soil analysis

The  soil  analysis  for  NPK  was  done  by  the  Central 

Research Institute for Dry land Agriculture, Hyderabad.  

Field observations on soil status in natural habitat were 

also noted. 

Photography

The  plant  habit,  flowers,  fruits,  seeds,  seedlings, 

flower  foragers  and  bud  and  flower  infestations  were 

photographed  with  a  Nikon  D40X  Digital  SLR  camera 

(10.1 pixel).

GPS coordinates 

Magellan  Explorist  210  Model  Digital  Global 

Positioning System was used to record the coordinates - 

latitude, longitude and altitude. 



RESULTS

Phenology

S. alternifolium is a semi-evergreen mass-flowering 

tree  species  of  dry  deciduous  forest  (Image  1a).    Leaf 

shedding is partial during January–March.  Flower bud 

initiation  occurs  in  late  March  while  flowering  occurs 

during mid-April to mid-May at population level (Image 

1c,d).  All the trees flowered massively in 2011; moderate 

flowering  or  flowering  in  a  few  branches  occurred  in 

only four trees in 2012 and 2013 and in five others only 

in 2012.  Five others showed scattered flowering on a 

few branches only in 2013.  Flowering was totally absent 

in  11  trees  in  2012  and  2013.    The  flowering  lasts  21 

days  (Range  16–26)  in  individual  trees  (Table  1).    The 

flowering is almost synchronous within the population.  

The  number  of  flowers  opening  each  day  is  initially 

small, but increases rapidly, with a peak mass flowering 

for a fortnight and then declining rapidly.  Leaf flushing 

begins at the end of flowering and continues into rainy 

season from June–August (Image 1b).  The shedding of 

still intact old leaves takes place simultaneously.

Flower morphology

The flowers are borne in 8.62±1.26 cm long, terminal 

and  axillary  cymes  with  divaricating  branches.  Each 

inflorescence  consists  of  22–53  flowers.    They  are 

pedicellate, creamy-white, 16mm long and 2mm wide, 

cup-shaped (4mm), actinomorphic, bisexual and sweet 

scented.    The  calyx  and  corolla  are  joined  to  form  a 

cap  over  the  bud,  which  falls  off  as  a  calyptra  due  to 

the pressure of the growing stamens.  The stamens are 

epigynous, white, free, polystemonous (127±3), shaving-

brush type and arranged on the rim of the receptacle 

in two whorls; the outer whorl stamens are 9mm long 

while inner whorl stamens 6mm long.  The filaments are 

bent inwards in the bud condition but straighten at the 

time of anthesis.  The anthers are 1mm long, versatile, 

dithecous  and  introrse.    The  ovary  is  bicarpellary  and 

bilocular syncarpous; it is 4mm long and contains 21–38 

ovules on axile placentation (Image 1n).  The style tipped 

with  semi-wet  simple  stigma  is  8mm  long  when  fully 

grown, arises from the center of the cup and stretches 

out of the stamen ring by 2–3 mm (Image 1lm).

  1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə