Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium (Myrtaceae), an endemic and endangered tropical tree species in the southern Eastern Ghats of India



Yüklə 297.56 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/4
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü297.56 Kb.
1   2   3   4

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6157

Floral biology

The  flowers  open  during  16:00–18:00  hr  with 

maximum  flower  production  at  17:00hr  (Image  1 

e–k).    Anther  dehiscence  occurs  following  anthesis 

by  longitudinal  slits.    Each  anther  produces  4136±192 

pollen grains and the total pollen output per flower is 

5,25,272±12,408.  The  pollen-ovule  ratio  varies  from 

13,833 to 25,013.  The pollen grains are creamy-white, 

triangular,  tricolporate,  triangular,  16.6µm  in  size, 

powdery and fertile (Image 1o).  The apertures appear 

as  short  furrows  in  a  thickened  portion  of  the  wall.  

The distinctive pattern seen in polar view is formed by 

thinning of the exine.  Most of the pollen is dislodged as 

single grains and it enters the ambient environment by 

wind.  Two peak pollen concentrations were recorded, 

one  with  17,832  pollen  grains  per  m

3

 of air sampled 



in the evening hours between 17:00 and 20:00 hr and 

another with 5,721 pollen grains per m

3

 of air sampled 



in the morning hours between 07:00 and 10:00 hr. In the 

circadian  cycle,  the  pollen  grain  concentrations  varied 

between 17,832 and 843 for cubic meter of air sampled.  

The  pollen  concentration  at  peak  pollen  release  hour 

(19:00hr) at a distance of 0m was 17,832, at 5m 15,821, 

at 10m 12,981, at 15m 7,432, at 20m 1500, and at 25m 



Image 1. Syzygium alternifolium: Habitat; b - Leaf flushing; c -Flowering phase; d -A cluster of inflorescences with buds and flowers; 

e - Mature buds; f-k - Different stages of anthesis; l. & m - Calyx cup with centrally located ovary terminated with simple stigma; n - Ovules; 

o - Pollen grains. © Prof. A.J. Solomon Raju.

a

c



e

k

g



m

b

d



f

l

h



n

i

o



j

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6158

659.    The  pollen  concentration  at  second  peak  hour 

(09:00hr) was 5,721 at 0m, 4057 at 5m, 3947 at 10m, 

3254 at 15m, 2874 at 20m and 1647 at 25m.  The stigma 

receptivity begins at 20:00hr and remains until the end 

of 2


nd

 day.  The stamens fall at the 2

nd

 day of flower life 



while  the  remaining  parts  of  the  flower  remain  intact 

for  five  days  if  not  pollinated.    In  pollinated  flowers, 

the  calyx  cup  is  persistent  and  the  fruit  emerges  out 

when fully grown.  The nectar is secreted in the orange 

coloured  part  of  the  cup  continuously  for  a  period  of 

four days from the time of anthesis.  A total of 12.7±4.32 

µl  of  nectar  is  produced  in  the  total  life  span  of  the 

flower.  The nectar sugar concentration is 16.44±3.1 %; 

the  sugars  include  sucrose  (2.55µg),  fructose  (2.37µg) 

and glucose (0.13µg).  The nectar includes six essential 

and  nine  non-essential  amino  acids.    The  essential 

amino  acids  are  arginine,  histidine,  lysine,  threonine, 

tryptophan and valine.  The non-essential amino acids 

are  alanine,  aspartic  acid,  cysteine,  cystine,  glutamic 

acid, glysine, hydroxyproline, serine and tyrosine.  The 

total protein content in the nectar is 2.55µg. 



Flower visitors and pollination

The flowers completely expose the anthers as well 

as  the  stigma.    The  flower  visitors  accessed  the  floral 

rewards with great ease.  A total of 33 species consisting 

of  bees,  wasps,  flies,  beetles,  butterflies  (diurnal 

foragers),  the  hawk  moth  (crepuscular  forager),  and 

the  reptilian  (nocturnal  forager)  was  recorded  (Table 

2).  The bees included Apis dorsata (Image 2c), A. cerana 

(Image 2d),  A.  florea,  Trigona  iridipennis (Image 2e)

Amegilla  sp. (Image 2f) and Stizus sp. (Image 2g).  Of 

these, Trigona bees foraged for nectar and also pollen, 

while all others for nectar only. The wasps were nectar 

Tree No.

Flowering season 2012

Flowering season 2013

First flowers

Last flowers

Total flowering days

First flowers

Last flowers

Total flowering days

1.

--



--

--

--



--

--

2.



--

--

--



--

--

--



3.

19 April


7 May

20

19 April



10 May

22

4.



--

--

--



--

--

--



5.

--

--



--

--

--



--

6.

18 April



6 May

19

--



--

--

7.



--

--

--



18 April

8 May


21

8.

26 April



14 May

19

--



--

--

9.



--

--

--



--

--

--



10.

--

--



--

--

--



--

11.


--

--

--



14 April

6 May


22

12.


--

--

--



--

--

--



13.

--

--



--

--

--



--

14.


26 April

14 May


19

19 April


14 May

26

15.



--

--

--



13 April

7 May


25

16.


--

--

--



--

--

--



17.

26 April


11 May

16

--



--

--

18.



--

--

--



14 April

7 May


23

19.


19 April

11 May


23

--

--



--

20.


21 April

6 May


16

--

--



--

21.


--

--

--



--

--

--



22.

--

--



--

--

--



--

23.


19 April

11 May


23

20 April


10 May

21

24.



17 April

7 May


21

18 April


6 May

19

25.



--

--

--



17 April

5 May


19

Table 1. Flowering phenology of Syzygium alternifolium

17 April - 14 May 13 April - 14 May.  Flowering days: 16–23 (Mean 19 days) 19–26 (22 days)



Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6159

foragers and they were Eumenes sp. (Image 2h), Vespa 



cincta (Image 2i) and V. orientalis  (Image  2j).    Both 

the  bees  and  wasps  were  regular  foragers.  Flies  were 

occasional  nectar  foragers  and  they  were  Chrysomya 

megacephala (Image 2k) and Helophilus sp. (Image 2l).  

Beetles  were  Popillia impressipyga (Image 2m) and 

one unidentified species (Image 2n); the former was a 

resident forager feeding on flower parts and contributed 

to 26% of flower damage in 2011, 20% in 2012 and 6% 

depending on flowering intensity while the latter was an 

occasional nectar forager. The butterflies were regular 

foragers  and  they  were  Papilio polytes (Image 3a)



Graphium nomius, Catopsilia pyranthe  (Image  3b), C. 

pomona (Image c,d), Euploea core (Image 3e), Tirumala 

limniace (Image 3f), Precis iphita (Image 3g), Junonia 

lemonias (Image 3h), Melanitis leda (Image 3i), Danaus 

genutia (Image 3j),  Neptis  hylas (Image 3k), Mycalesis 

perseus (Image 3l), Moduza procris, Arhopala amantes 

(Image 3m), Pseudocoladenia indrani (Image 4a), Borbo 



cinnara  (Image  4b), Hasora chromus (Image 4c) and 

Celaenorrhinus  ambareesa  (Image  4d).    The  sphingid, 

Cephonodes hylas (Image 4e) was the only diurnal moth 

visiting  the  flowers  regularly.    The  African  fat-tailed 

gecko, Hemitheconyx caudicinctus was a resident nectar 

Image 2. Syzygium alternifolium: a - Bud infestation; b – Larva; c - Apis dorsata; d - Apis cerana; e - Trigona iridipennis; f - Amegilla sp.; 

g - Stizus sp.; h - Eumenes sp.; i - Vespa cincta; j - Vespa orientalis; k - Chrysomya megacephala; l - Helophilus sp.; m - Popillia impressipyga

n - Beetle (unidentified); o - Hemitheconyx caudicinctus. © Prof. A.J. Solomon Raju.

a

d



h

l

b



e

i

m



f

j

n



c

g

k



o

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6160

forager  during  night  time  from  0600–1000  hr  (Image 

2o).

The first visitor to just open flowers in the evening 



was  the  diurnal  hawk  moth,  Cephonodes hylas; it 

continued its foraging from 16:00–19:00 hr.  The same 

moth was the first visitor to the flowers in the morning 

and it foraged from 06:00–09:00 hr (Fig. 7).  All other 

insects  visited  the  flowers  from  07:00–12:00/13:00  hr 

(Fig. 1–6); the flies made a few visits during 15:00–16:00 

hr (Fig. 3).  The intense foraging activity was recorded 

during 09:00–11:00 for most of the insects.  Of the total 

foraging visits made by insects except beetles during the 

3-year  period,  bees  constituted  25%,  wasps  15%,  flies 

3%,  butterflies  50%  and  hawk  moth  7%  (Fig.  8).    The 

honey bee, A. dorsata, wasps, butterflies and the hawk 

moth foraged for nectar very frequently between closely 

and distantly spaced conspecific trees while other bees, 

the  unidentified  beetle  and  the  gecko  tended  to  stay 

mostly on the same tree for forage collection. 

 

Figure 1. Hourly foraging activity of bees on Syzygium alternifolium

Figure 2. Hourly foraging activity of wasps on Syzygium alternifolium

 

Time (hr)



Time (hr)

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6161

Flower bud as oviposition site for an unidentified moth 

A moth species (unidentified) used the flower buds 

as oviposition site.  It deposited its eggs in young flower 

buds and the emerged larvae consumed the entire bud 

over a period of approximately 3–4 days (Image 2a,b).  

The percentage of infested flower buds is 21% in 2011, 

17%  in  2012  and  4%  in  2013.    Consolidated  mounds 

formed by buds and flowers were also found and such 

flowers subsequently fell off (Image 4f).  These infested 

flowers were found on all flowering branches in 2011, 

randomly  in  2012  and  rarely  in  2013.    These  bud  and 

flower infestations were found be to be related to the 

intensity of flowering in each study year.

Image 3. Syzygium alternifolium: a - Papilio polytes; b - Catopsilia pyranthe; c. & d - Catopsilia pomona; e - Euploea core; f -Tirumala 

limniace; g - Precis iphita; h - Junonia lemonias; i - Melanitis leda; j - Danaus genutia; k - Neptis hylas; l - Mycalesis perseus; m - Arhopala 

amantes. © Prof. A.J. Solomon Raju.

Pollination mode

No. of flowers 

bagged/tagged/

pollinated

No. of fruits 

produced

Fruit set 

(%)

Autogamy (bagged)



366

0

0



Autogamy (manual 

pollination, bagged)

75

0

0



Geitonogamy (manual 

pollination, bagged)

80

0

0



Xenogamy (manual 

pollination, bagged)

60

34

57



Open-pollination 

(Flowers tagged prior 

to anthesis)

1030


116

11

Table 2. Results of breeding systems in Syzygium alternifolium

a

d

g



j

b

e



h

k

l



c

f

i



m

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6162

Breeding and fruiting behavior

Hand-pollination  experiments  indicated  that 

autogamy  and  geitonogamy  are  non-functional  while 

xenogamy is the only mode of pollination for fruit set. 

In  this  mode,  fruit  set  stands  at  56%  while  in  open-

pollination mode, it is 11% only (Table 3).  The fertilized 

flowers  grow,  mature  and  ripen  within  two  months 

(Image  4g-k).  Fruit  exhibits  different  colours  -  green, 

light purple, dark purple and violet during growing and 

maturing phase (Image 4l).  It is a globose berry, luscious, 

fleshy,  25–30  mm  in  diameter  and  edible.    It  has  a 

combination of sweet, mildly sour and astringent flavor 

and colours the tongue purple when eaten.  The green 

and light purple fruits are very tasty and sweet while the 

dark purple and violet ones are sweet and bitter.  Each 

fruit produces a single large seed only.  The fruits fall off 

during late July–August.  The locals were found to collect 

ripe fruits from trees and fallen fruits from the ground 

since they are edible and have commercial value. 

Seedling ecology

The  habitat  of  the  plant  is  rocky  with  steep  slope 

covered  with  little  litter  and  moisture.    The  seedlings 

recorded in the area were 58 in 2011, 32 in 2012 and 

17  in  2013.    These  were  subjected  to  drought  stress 

due  to  erratic  rainfall.    Further,  extensive  and  robust 

grass cover during that period was found to be having 

impact on the surviving seedlings of the plant.  Finally, 



Image 4. Syzygium alternifolium: a - Pseudocoladenia indrani; b - Borbo cinnara; c - Hasora chromus; d - Celaenorrhinus ambareesa; e - 

Cephonodes hylas; f - Infestation of buds and flowers; g - Fruiting phase; h-k - Stages of fruit maturation; l - Ripen fruits; m-p - Stages of seed 

germination and seedling formation. © Prof. A.J. Solomon Raju.

a

e



b

f

c



d

g

h



m

i

n



j

o

l



k

p


Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6163

27 seedlings in 2011, 16 in 2012 and seven in 2013 have 

established  and  are  growing  continually  at  slow  pace.  

The soil analysis for available nitrogen (N), phosphorous 

(P) and potassium (K) indicated that N is 270 kg/ha, P 

13.57 kg/ha and K 282 kg/ha.  These values show that 

these  nutrients  are  not  present  in  optimal  levels  and 

hence there is a deficiency in essential nutrients in the 

soil.  The seeds sown in experimental bags showed that 

seeds germinate within two weeks and form seedlings 

subsequently (Image 4m-p). The seed germination rate 

is 74%.


DISCUSSION

S. alternifolium is a semi-evergreen mass-flowering 

tree species in the study area. It is not only endemic but 

also  endangered  due  to  its  declining  population.    The 

plant is not found in some sites where it was reported 

by  previous  workers  as  cited  above.    It  is  exploited 

for  various  local  uses  and  hence  it  has  now  attained 

“Endangered”  status.    It  qualifies  for  inclusion  in  the 

IUCN Red List.

In Syzygium genus, the flowering pattern is of two 

types,  mass  flowering  and  short-period  steady  state 

flowering but most species exhibit mass flowering such 

 

Figure 3. Hourly foraging activity of flies on Syzygium alternifolium



Figure 4. Hourly foraging activity of Papilionid and Pierid butterflies on Syzygium alternifolium

 

Time (hr)



Time (hr)

Journal 

of

 Threatened Taxa | www.threatenedtaxa.org | 26 August 2014 | 6(9): 6153–6171

Reproductive ecology of Syzygium alternifolium 

Raju et al.

6164

as S. tierneyanum (Lack & Kevan 1984), S. cuminii (Reddi 

& Rangaiah 1999–2000), S. luehmannii (Sanewski 2010), 

S. sayeri (Williams & Adam 2010) and S. aqeum (Tarai 

& Kundu 2008).  S. alternifolium is also a mass bloomer 

and it flowers during dry season.  The flowering occurs 

after partial leaf shedding and leaf flushing occurs after 

the  completion  of  flowering.    This  finding  does  not 

agree with the observation made by Mohan & Lakshmi 



Order/Family

Scientific Name

Common Name

Forage 

collected

Visiting status

Hymenoptera

Apidae


Apis dorsata F.

Rock bee


Regular


A. cerana F.

Indian honey bee

Regular


A. florea F.

Dwarf honey bee

Regular


Trigona iridipennis Smith

Stingless bee

N + P

Regular


Amegilla sp.

Digger bee

Regular


Crabronidae

Stizus sp.

Sand wasp

N

Regular


Vespidae

Eumenes sp.

Potter wasp

N

Regular


Vespa cincta F.

Yellow-banded wasp

N

Regular


V. orientalis L.

Oriental Hornet

N

Regular


Diptera

Calliphoridae



Chrysomya megacephala F.

Oriental latrine fly

Occasional



Syrphidae

Helophilus sp.

Hoverfly


Occasional



Coleoptera

Scarabaeidae



Popillia impressipyga Ohaus

--

Flower parts



Resident

Unidentified sp.

--



Occasional



Lepidoptera

Papilionidae



Papilio polytes L.

Common Mormon

N

Regular


Graphium nomius Esper

Spot Swordtail

N

Regular


Pieridae

Catopsilia pyranthe L.

Mottled Emigrant

N

Regular


Catopsilia pomona F.

Common Emigrant

N

Regular


Nymphalidae

Euploea core Cramer

Common Indian Crow 

N

Regular


Tirumala limniace Cramer

Blue Tiger

N

Regular


Precis iphita Cramer

Chocolate Pansy

N

Regular


Junonia lemonias L.

Lemon Pansy

N

Regular


Melanitis leda L.

Common Evening Brown

N

Regular


Danaus genutia Cramer

Common Tiger

N

Regular


Neptis hylas L.

Common Sailer 

N

Regular


Mycalesis perseus F.

Common Bushbrown

N

Regular


Moduza procris Cramer

The Commander

N

Regular


Lycaenidae

Arhopala amantes Hewitson

Large Oakblue

N

Regular


Hesperiidae

Pseudocoladenia indrani F.

Tricolour Pied Flat

N

Regular


Borbo cinnara Wallace

Rice Swift

N

Regular


Hasora chromus Cramer

Common Banded Awl

N

Regular


Celaenorrhinus ambareesa Moore

Common Spotted Flat

N

Regular


Sphingidae

Cephonodes hylas L.

Pellucid Hawk Moth

N

Regular

1   2   3   4


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə