Resumo: “Significância quimiotaxômica de flavonoides, cumarinas e triterpenos de Augusta longifolia



Yüklə 0,74 Mb.
Pdf görüntüsü
tarix13.08.2017
ölçüsü0,74 Mb.

295

RESUMO:  “Significância  quimiotaxômica  de  flavonoides,  cumarinas  e  triterpenos  de 

Augusta longifolia (Spreng.) Rehder, Rubiaceae- Ixoroideae, com novos entendimentos sobre 

a posição sistemática dentro da família”. Augusta tem sido tradicionalmente colocada na tribo 

Rondeletieae, Cinchonoideae subfamília. No entanto, recentes filogenias moleculares posicionou-a 

perto de Wendlandia, porém localizando A. longifolia perto do clado Ixoroidinae II. O estudo de A. 

longifolia resultou em duas cumarinas, cinco flavonoides, três triterpenoides e um derivado do ácido 

benzóico. Estes metabolitos reforçam a separação da Augusta como um gênero monoespecífico, e 



Lindenia como um gênero de três espécies, intimamente relacionada com Wendlandia.

Unitermos: Rubiaceae, Augusta, Wendlandia, Lindenia, quimiotaxonomia.

ABSTRACT:  Augusta  has  traditionally  been  placed  in  the  tribe  Rondeletieae,  subfamily 

Cinchonoideae.  However,  recent  molecular  phylogenies  positioned  it  near  to  Wendlandia 

(Ixoroideae), but locate A. longifolia near to the clade Ixoroidinae II. The study of A. longifolia 

afforded two coumarins, five flavonoids, three triterpenoids and one benzoic acid derivative. These 

metabolites reinforce the separation of Augusta as a monospecific genus, and Lindenia as a genus 

of three species, closely related to Wendlandia.



Keywords: Rubiaceae, Augusta, Wendlandia, Lindenia, Chemotaxonomy.

Revista Brasileira de Farmacognosia

Brazilian Journal of Pharmacognosy

20(3): 295-299, Jun./Jul. 2010



Artigo

Received 13 February 2009; Accepted 18 October 2009



Chemotaxonomic significance of flavonoids, coumarins and 

triterpenes of Augusta longifolia (Spreng.) Rehder,  

Rubiaceae-Ixoroideae, with new insights about its 

 systematic position within the family

Rafael Choze,



Piero G. Delprete,

2

 Luciano M. Lião

*,1

1

Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Campus Samambaia, 74001-970 Goiânia-GO, Brazil,

2

Institut de Recherche pour le Développement - AMAP, TA-A51/PS2, Blvd de la Lironde, 34398 Montpellier Cedex 5, 

France.

*E-mail: luciano@quimica.ufg.br, Tel. +55 62 3521 1059; Fax: +55 62 3521 1190.

ISSN 0102-695X



INTRODUCTION

 

The  family  Rubiaceae  is  composed  by  about 



650 genera and 13,000 species, and represented by herbs, 

shrubs, trees, and lianas, mostly of tropical and subtropical 

distribution  (Delprete,  2004).  The  family  is  currently 

divided into three subfamilies: Rubioideae, Cinchonoideae, 

and Rubioideae (Bremer et al., 1995; Rova et al., 2002; 

Delprete, 2004).

 

According  to  the  delimitations  by  Kirkbride 



(1997) and Delprete (1997), Augusta (including Lindenia

is a genus of four species of rheophytic shrubs of puzzling 

geographic  distribution:  1)  A.  longifolia  Pohl,  endemic 

to Brazil, 2) A. rivalis (Benth.) J.H. Kirkbr., endemic to 

Central America,  3)  A.  austrocaledonica  (Brongn.)  J.H. 

Kirkbr.,  endemic  to  New  Caledonia,  and  4)  A.  vitiensis 

(Seem.)  J.H.  Kirkbr.,  endemic  to  the  Fiji  Islands. Also, 

Kirkbride  divided  Augusta  into  two  subgenera:  Subgen. 



Augusta,  containing  only  A.  longifolia,  with  narrowly-

campanulate, red flowers, and subgen. Lindenia, containing 

the other three species, with long-tubular, white flowers.

 

Augusta  has  traditionally  been  placed  in  the 

tribe  Rondeletieae,  in  the  subfamily  Cinchonoideae 

(Robbrecht,  1988;  Delprete,  1997).  However  recent 

molecular  phylogenies  have  positioned  it  in  subfamily 

Ixoroideae. Aside from its systematic position within the 

family,  the  phylogenies  of  Rova  et  al.  (2002)  supported 

the  delimitation  of  Augusta  proposed  by  Kirkbride  and 

Delprete, even though only two species of Augusta and one 

of Wendlandia were included in the study (Delprete, 1997). 



Wendlandia is a genus of about 50-70 species occurring in 

the  Indo-Malaysian  Region,  that  has  never  been  subject 

of  a  taxonomic  revision,  and  its  monophyly  has  never 

been tested. Both have capsular fruits with minute, wind-

dispersed  seeds,  facilitating  dispersals  among  distant 

areas, and supporting the unusual geographic distribution 

of these genera.

 

Recently, Robbrecht & Manen (2006) presented 



molecular  phylogenies  using  DNA  sequences  of  four 

regions  of  the  plastid  genome,  rbcL,  rps16,  trnL-F  and 



296

atpB-rbcL,  with  the  intent  of  producing  a  new  family 

classification.  In  their  study,  the  general  tree  topology 

resembled that of the three-subfamily system (e.g., Bremer 

et al., 1995; Rova et al., 2002), but the authors preferred 

to divide the Rubiaceae into two subfamilies and several 

supertribes.  In  the  phylogenies  of  Robbrecht  &  Manen 

(2006), the position and delimitation of Augusta was not the 

same as those of Rova et al. (2002): “Lindenia was found 

as sister taxon to Wendlandia, based on the trnL-F source, 

while Augusta is sister taxon to the clade Ixoroidinae II 

in the atpB-rbcL spacer tree (Robbrecht & Manen, 2006). 

These results contrast with the reduction of Lindenia as a 

subgenus of Augusta proposed by Kirkbride (1997), and 

the authors placed the Wendlandia and Lindenia as part of 

the Wendlandia/Augusta informal group, while they kept 



Augusta as tentatively included in it. 

 

Saad et al.(1988) were able to isolate two iridoid 



alkaloids,  lindenialine  and  lindeniamine,  from  Lindenia 

austrocaledonica  Brongn.  (=Augusta  austrocaledonica), 

this  being  the  only  report  of  compounds  isolated  from 



Augusta  as  broadly  delimited.  Glycosidic  iridoids  were 

isolated from the leaves of Wendlandia formosana Cowan 

by Takeda et al. (1977) in the form of gardenoside, methyl 

deacetylasperulosidate, tarennoside and geniposidic acid, 

as well as 10-O-caffeoyl scandoside methyl, 10-O-caffeoyl 

daphylloside  and  6-methoxy  scandoside  methyl  ester 

isolated by Raju et al. (2004). Scandoside methyl ester was 

isolated from the wood of W. bicuspidata Wight & Arn. by 

De Silva et al. (1986), and geniposidic acid from the stem 

of W. tinctoria (Roxb.) DC. by Dinda et al. (2004). 

 

The  main  objective  of  the  present  study  was 



isolate  compounds  that  might  be  used  as  taxonomic 

markers  to  help  elucidate  the  systematic  position  and 

generic delimitation of the Augusta-Lindenia-Wendlandia 

complex. 



MATERIALS AND METHODS

General procedures

 

Chromatographic  separations  in  adsorption 



column were carried out using Merck silica gel (70-230 

and 230-400 mesh ASTM, Merck), and Sephadex LH-20 

(Aldrich). TLC were produced using Merck silica gel 60 

F

254



, and revealed by ultraviolet radiation at λ=254 nm and 

366 nm, followed by nebulization with H

2

SO

4



/anisaldehyde/

acetic acid (1:0.5:50) solution, and subsequently heated.

 

The


 1

H and 


13

C NMR spectra were recorded on a 

Bruker DRX 400 and on a Varian Unit Plus spectrometers 

at 400 and 100 MHz, respectively, using the appropriate 

deutered  solvent  and  TMS  as  internal  reference.  The 

GC/MS analysis was performed on Shimadzu QP5050A 

instrument  employing  the  following  conditions:  column 

DB-5 (Shimadzu), fused silica capillary column, 30 m x 

0.25 mm, 0.25 μm film thickness, temperature gradient of 

4 °C/min from 60 °C to 295 °C. The carrier gas was helium 

Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 

Braz. J. Pharmacogn. 

20(3): Jun./Jul.2010 

at  8  psi  pressure;  injector  port  and  detector  temperature 

were  250 

o

C  and  200 



o

C,  respectively.  Samples  were 

injected by splitting and the split ratio 1:50. The infrared 

spectroscopy were obtained with a Bomem FTIR, model 

MB-100, using KBr tablets.

Plant material

 

Delprete  (1997)  recognized  two  varieties  of 



Augusta longifolia: var. longifolia, occurring in the cerrado 

biome and var. parvifolia (Pohl.) Delprete, restricted to the 

Atlantic forest of the Rio de Janeiro State.

 

Plant  material  of  Augusta  longifolia  var. 



longifolia was collected by P.G. Delprete and R. Choze in 

Mossâmedes, Goiás State, Brazil (S 16°04´, W 50°11´, 500 

m), from natural populations growing at the margins and 

among rocks inside the Córrego Piçarrão, a small creek at 

the base of the Serra Dourada reserve, in December 2005. 

The  material  was  identified  by  Delprete,  and  voucher 

specimens  (collection  N.  9442-A)  were  deposited  at  the 

herbarium of the Universidade Federal de Goiás, Goiânia, 

Brazil.

EXTRACTION 

AND 

ISOLATION 

OF  

CONSTITUENTS

 

Dried and powdered stem barks of A. longifolia 



(400  g)  were  extracted  with  EtOH.  The  resulting  EtOH 

extract was filtered and concentrated in vacuo to afford a 

brown gum (20.1 g), which was submitted to liquid-liquid 

partitioning.  The  n-hexane,  ethyl  acetate  and  butanol 

soluble  parts  of  the  EtOH  extract  were  concentrated  in 

vacuo affording 4.8, 5.2 and 6.1 g, respectively. The ethyl 

acetate fraction was submitted to a silica gel column (70-

230  mesh)  eluted  with  a  CHCl

3

/EtOAc/MeOH  gradient, 



yielding  three  fractions.  The  chloroform  fraction  was 

submitted to a silica gel column (70-230 mesh) eluted with 

CHCl

3

/EtOAc  (65/35)  yielding  the  esterified  triterpenes 



lup-20(29)-en-3β-O-decanoate  and  lup-20(29)-en-3β-O-

dodecanoate (25 mg). The EtOAc fraction was submitted to 

a flash silica gel CC (230-400 mesh), eluted with a CHCl

3

/



MeOH. The  fraction  2  was  then  purified  by  preparative 

TLC (silica gel, CH

2

Cl

2



/MeOH, 70/30) yielding coumarin 

(6.5 mg). Fraction 3 was also purified by preparative TLC 

(silica  gel,  CH

2

Cl



2

/acetone/MeOH,  60/30/10),  affording 

the  coumarin  scopoletin  (4.0  mg)  and  2-methoxy-4-

hydroxy-benzoic acid (5.0 mg). The methanolic fraction 

was  silica  gel  chromatographed  (70-230  mesh)  using 

acetone/MeOH in gradient form resulting nine fractions. 

The fraction 5 afforded the flavonoid naringenin (2.5 mg). 

Fraction 7 was then chromatographed by a flash silica gel 

CC (230-400 mesh), eluted with acetone/MeOH (15/85), 

yielding the flavonoids kaempferol (6.0 mg) and quercetin 

(4.5 mg). The butanol fraction was first chromatographed 

by  sephadex  LH-20,  eluted  with  H

2

O/MeOH  (1/1)  and 



then submitted to silica gel CC (70-230 mesh), eluted with 

Rafael Choze, Piero G. Delprete, Luciano M. Lião



297

Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 

Braz. J. Pharmacogn. 

20(3): Jun./Jul. 2010 

Chemotaxonomic significance of flavonoids, coumarins and triterpenes of Augusta longifolia (Spreng.) Rehder

organic phase of CHCl

3

/MeOH/H


2

O (5/5/3) + 5% MeOH, 

affording the flavonol myricitrin (155.0 mg).

 

Dried and powdered leaves of A. longifolia (800 



g) were extracted with EtOH. The resulting EtOH extract 

was filtered and concentrated in vacuo to afford a 14.1 g of 

crude extract. This extract was silica gel chromatographed 

affording  the  hexane  (9.7  g),  ethyl  acetate  (2.1  g)  and 

methanol  (0.4  g)  fractions.  The  methanol  fraction  was 

submitted  to  a  silica  gel  (70-230  mesh),  using  CHCl

3

/

MeOH/H



2

O  (5/5/3)  +  10%  MeOH,  affording  seven 

fractions. The fraction 3 was then flash chromatographed 

on silica gel (230-400 mesh), eluting with organic phase 

of  CHCl

3

/MeOH/butanol/H



2

O  (6/5/1/3)  +  6%  MeOH, 

affording the flavonol rutin (7.0 mg). The hexanic fraction 

after  silica  gel  CC  (70-230  mesh),  eluted  with  CHCl

3

/

acetone afforded the trieterpene ursolic acid (20.0 mg).



 

Dried and powdered woods of A. longifolia (150 

g) were extracted with EtOH. The resulting EtOH extract 

was filtered and concentrated in vacuo to afford a 5.0 g of 

crude extract. This extract was silica gel chromatographed 

(70-230  mesh)  using  hexane,  acetone  and  methanol  in 

gradient form. The fraction acetone was submitted to a silica 

gel  CC  (70-230  mesh),  eluted  with  a  CH

2

Cl

2



/acetone  in 

gradient form, resulting eight fractions. The fraction 2 was 

then flash chromatographed on silica gel (230-400 mesh), 

eluted with CHCl

3

/MeOH (15/85), affording 2-methoxy-4-



hydroxy-benzoic acid (7 mg). The methanolic fraction was 

chromatographed on a silica gel column (230-400 mesh), 

eluted with organic phase of CHCl

3

/MeOH/H



2

O (2/5/1) + 

20% MeOH, obtaining large quantities of myricitrin.

RESULTS

 

In  this  paper  we  report  the  isolation  of  eleven 



known  compounds  from  Augusta  longifolia  (Spreng.) 

Rehder var. longifolia. The compounds were identified by 

IR, GC/MS, 

1

H and 



13

C NMR one and two-dimensional 

techniques,  and  their  structural  propose  were  confirmed 

by  literature  data.  From  stem  bark  were  isolated  two 

pentacyclic triterpenes acyl lupeols (1 and 2, 25 mg, Brum 

et al., 1998); two coumarins, coumarin (3, 6.5 mg, Tonin 

& Tavares, 2002) and scopoletin (4, 4.0 mg, Silva et al., 

2002);  four  flavonoids,  naringenin  (5,  2.5  mg, Almeida 

et al., 2005), kaempferol (6, 6 mg, Oliveira et al., 1999), 

quercetin (7, 4.5 mg, Barberá, 1986; Agrawal & Bansal, 

1989) and myricitrin (9, 155.0 mg, Timbola et al., 2002), 

besides  2-methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzoic  acid  (11,  12  mg, 

Scott, 1972). From the leaves were isolated the flavonoid 

rutin (8, 7 mg, Buszewski et al., 1993; Agrawal & Bansal, 

1989) and a pentacyclic triterpene ursolic acid (10, 20 mg, 

Tkachev et al., 2004). The compounds 9 and 11 were also 

isolated  from  the  woods.  No  iridoids  were  found  in  the 

leaves and steam barks of A. longifolia.



DISCUSSION

Terpenes

 

In  this  specie  were  isolated  the  pentacyclic 



triterpenes ursolic acid (10) from the leaves, and two acyl 

lupeols (1 and 2) from the stem bark. The abundance and 

 

O

O



CH

3

(CH



2

)n

1 n = 8



2 n = 10

O

R



1

R

2



O

3 R

1

 = R



2

 = H


4 R

1

 OMe; R



2

 = OH


O

HO

OH O



OH

5

O

HO



OH O

OH

6 R

1

 = OH; R


2

 = H; R


3

 = H


7 R

1

 = OH; R



2

 = H; R


3

 = OH


8 R

1

 = OGly-Ram; R



2

 = H; R


3

 = OH


9 R

1

 = ORam; R



2

 = OH; R


3

 = OH


R

1

R



3

R

2



HO

CO

2



H

10

OMe


CO

2

H



HO

11

298

Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 

Braz. J. Pharmacogn. 

20(3): Jun./Jul. 2010 

Rafael Choze, Piero G. Delprete, Luciano M. Lião

frequency  of  these  compounds  in  Rubiaceae  has  been 

reported  from  many  species  of  the  three  subfamilies 

(Delprete  et  al.,  2006).  The  ursolic  acid  triterpene  and 

the diterpene phytol were also isolated from Wendlandia 

formosana  Cowan  (Raju  et  al.,  2004);  however  the 

universal presence of this compound in the family shows 

no taxonomic significance.

Coumarins

 

The compound coumarin (3), a simple coumarin, 



was the first time reported in Rubiaceae. Its biosynthesis is 

simple and rather rare in the Angiosperms. This compound 

has been commonly isolated in species of Fabaceae and 

Asteraceae, as in Amburana cearensis (Allemão) A.C. Sm. 

(Fabaceae; Canuto & Silveira, 2006), and in Mikania Willd. 

(Asteraceae; Dos Santos, 2005). A study focusing on the 

evolutionary  trends  in  coumarin-producing  Angiosperm 

families,  reports  the  occurrence  of  91  simple  coumarins 

in  the  order  Gentianales,  of  which  59  in  the  Rubiaceae, 

21  in  the  Apocynaceae,  4  in  the  Menyanthaceae,  2  in 

the  Gentianaceae,  3  in  the Asclepiadaceae,  and  2  in  the 

Loganiaceae (Ribeiro & Kaplan, 2002). A. longifolia also 

afforded  scopoletin  (4),  which  belongs  to  the  subclass 

of  hydroxy-coumarins.  This  compound  was  isolated  in 

many  genera  of  the  Rubiaceae,  mainly  in  the  subfamily 

Ixoroideae, as this studied specie.



Flavonoids

 

In  A.  longifolia  were  isolated  the  flavonoids: 



naringenin  (5),  kaempferol  (6),  quercetin  (7)  from  stem 

bark,  myricitrin  from  steam  bark  and  woods  (9)  and 

rutin  (8)  from  the  leaves.  Myrictrin  was  also  isolated 

from the wood. These findings are in agreement with the 

biochemical survey conducted by Delprete et al. (2006), 

where the subfamily Ixoroideae was characterized by the 

moderate presence of flavonoids, where flavonols are in 

majority. Special attention should be given to the flavonol 

myricitrin (9), which is also reported the first time in the 

Rubiaceae. This  glycosilated  flavonol  was  also  found  in 

the fruits of Pouteria Aubl. (Sapotaceae; Ma et al., 2004) 

and  of  Manilkara  zapota  (L.)  P.  Royen  (Sapotaceae; 

Ma et al., 2003). In addition, it was also isolated in the 

leaves  Eugenia  L.  (Myrtaceae;  Schmeda-Hirschmannet 

et  al.,  1987)  and  in  the  latex  of  Croton  draco  Schltdl. 

(Euphorbiaceae; Tsacheva et al., 1987).



Benzoic acid derivates

 

2-Methoxy-4-hydroxy-benzoic  acid  (11)  was 



isolated,  and  it  is  present  in  many  taxa  of  the  three 

subfamilies of the Rubiaceae. This compound has a great 

structural  similarity  with  salicylic  acid,  a  benzoic  acid 

derivate with pharmacologic importance (Berretta, 2007). 

Therefore, for possessing a similar bioactive nucleus, this 

benzoic acid derivate might also have similar biological 

properties; however, this remains to be tested.

Iridoids

 

Despite  many  attempts,  no  iridoids  were  found 



in  A.  longifolia.  On  the  other  hand,  in  Wendlandia  and 

Lindenia were isolated glycosidic and alkaloidic iridoids, 

respectively.  From  the  leaves  of  Wendlandia  formosana 

were  isolated  gardenoside,  10-O-caffeoyl  scandoside 

methyl  ester,  10-O-caffeoyl  daphylloside,  6-methoxy 

scandoside  methyl  ester,  methyl  deacetylasperulosidate, 

tarennoside and geniposidic acid (all glycosidic iridoids; 

Takeda et al., 1977; Raju et al., 2004); while scandoside 

methyl  ester  was  found  in  the  wood  of  W.  bicuspidata 

Wight  &  Arn.  (De  Silva  et  al.,  1986),  and  geniposidic 

acid in the stem of W. tinctoria (Roxb.) DC. (Dinda et al., 

2004). In addition, two alkaloidic iridoids, lindenialine and 

lindeniamine, were isolated from the leaves of Lindenia 



austrocaledonica Brongn. (Saad et al., 1988).

Taxonomic significance

 

The  presence  or  absence  of  certain  compounds 



in Augusta longifolia supplied several taxonomic markers 

with  valuable  information  about  the  systematic  position 

of  this  species  within  the  Rubiaceae.  The  isolation  of 

flavonoids and coumarins in Augusta, not isolated at the 

moment in Lindenia or Wendlandia, suggests the chemical 

uniqueness of this species in the family and in the order 

Gentianales. On the other hand, glycosidic and alkaloidic 

iridoids were obtained in Wendlandia and Lindenia, and 

no  iridoids  were  yet  found  in  Augusta,  suggesting  that 

Augusta, could be treated as a monospecific genus, and is 

not closely related to Lindenia (as traditionally defined) and 



Wendlandia. Therefore, the results of this study reinforce 

the  systematic  position  and  the  generic  circumscriptions 

of the three genera as indicated in the atpB-rbcL spacer 

phylogeny of Robbrecht & Manen (2006, fig. 3). 



ACKNOWLEDGMENT

 

The authors are grateful to CAPES and FUNAPE 



for  scholarships  and  financial  support,  as  well  as  to  Dr. 

Antonio  Gilberto  Ferreira,  Departamento  de  Química-

UFSCar, for NMR spectra. 

REFERENCES

Agrawal PK, Bansal MC 1989. Carbon-13 NMR of flavonoids. 

Elsevier: New York.

Almeida  SCX,  Lemos  TLG,  Silveira  ER,  Pessoas  ODL  2005. 

Constituintes voláteis e não voláteis de Cochlospermum 

vitifolium. Quim Nova 28: 57-60.

Barberá O, Sanz JF, Sánchez-Parareda J, Marco JA 1986. Further 

flavonol  glycosides  from  Anthyllis  onobrychioides. 


299

Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 

Braz. J. Pharmacogn. 

20(3): Jun./Jul. 2010 

Chemotaxonomic significance of flavonoids, coumarins and triterpenes of Augusta longifolia (Spreng.) Rehder

Phytochemistry 25: 2361-2365.

Berretta  AA  2007.  Fitoterapia  como  prática  integrativa  e 

complementar no SUS. II Semana Farmacêutica do HC. 

Ribeirão Preto, Brasil.

Bremer B, Andreasen K, Olsson D 1995. Subfamilial and tribal 

relationships in the Rubiaceae based on rbcL sequence 

data. Ann Missouri Bot Gard 82: 383-397.

Brum RL, Honda NK, Cavalheiro AJ, Monache FD 1998. Acyl 

lupeols  from  Cnidoscolus  vitifolius.  Phytochemistry 

19:1127-1128.

Buszewski  B,  Kawka  S,  Suprynowicz  Z,  Wolski  TJ  1993. 

Simultaneous  isolation  of  rutin  and  esculin  from  plant 

material  and  drugs  using  solid-phase  extraction.  



Pharmaceut Biomed 11: 211-215.

Canuto KM, Silveira ER 2006. Constituintes químicos da casca 

do caule de Amburana cearensis A.C. Smith. Quim Nova 

29: 1-3. 

Delprete PG 1997. Revision and typification of Brazilian Augusta 

(Rubiaceae,  Rondeletieae),  with  ecological  observation 

on  riverine  vegetation  of  Cerrado  and Atlantic  Forest. 



Brittonia 49: 487-497.

Delprete  PG  2004.  Rubiaceae.  In:  Smith,  N.P.  et  al.  (Eds.). 

Flowering  Plant  Families  of  the  American  Tropics. 

Princeton University Press, New York, p. 328-333.

Delprete PG, Choze R, Silva RA, Dufrayer CR 2006. Abstracts 

of  the  3rd  International  Rubiaceae  Conference,  K.U. 

Leuven, Belgium.

De Silva LB, Herath WHMW, Malangani Navaratne K, Ahmad 

VU, Alvi KA 1986. An iridoid glycoside from Wendlandia 

bicuspidataJ Nat Prod 50: 1184-1184.

Dinda B, Debnath S, Arima S, Sato N, Harigaya Y 2004. Chemical 

constituents  of  Lasia  spinosa,  Mussaenda  incana  and 

Wendlandia tinctoriaJ Indian Chem Soc 81: 73-76. 

Dos Santos SC 2005. Caracterização cromatográfica de extratos 

medicinais de Guaco: Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex 

Baker e M. glomerata Sprengel e ação de M. laevigata na 

inflamação alérgica pulmonar. Itajaí, 120p. Dissertação 

de Mestrado – Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências 

Farmacêuticas,  Universidade  do  Vale  do  Itajaí,  SC, 

Brazil.


Kirkbride  JH  1997.  Manipulus  rubiacearum  VI.  Brittonia  49

354-379. 

Ma J, Luo XD, Protiva P, Yang H, Ma C, Basile MJ, Weinstein 

IB, Kennelly EJ 2003. Bioactive novel polyphenols from 

the fruit of Manilkara zapota (Sapodilla). J Nat Prod 66

983-986.


Ma  J,  Yang  H,  Basile  MJ,  Kennelly  EJ  2004.  Analysis  of 

polyphenolic  antioxidants  from  the  fruits  of  three 



Pouteria  species  by  selected  ion  monitoring  liquid 

chromatography-mass spectrometry. J Agric Food Chem 



52: 5873-5878. 

Oliveira MCC, Carvalho MG, Ferreira DT, Braz-Filho R 1999. 

Flavonóides  das  flores  de  Stiffitia  chrysantha  Mikan

Quim Nova 22: 182-185.

Raju BL, Lin S, Hou W, Lai Z, Liu P, Hsu F 2004. Antioxidant 

iridoid glucosides from Wendlandia formosana. Nat Prod 

Res 18: 357-364.

Ribeiro  CVC,  Kaplan  MAC  2002.  Tendências  evolutivas  de 

famílias  produtoras  de  cumarinas  em  angiospermas. 

Quim Nova 25: 533-538. 

Robbrecht  E  1988.  Tropical  woody  Rubiaceae.  Characteristic 

features  and  progressions.  Contributions  to  a  new 

subfamilial classification. Opera Bot Belg 1: 1-271. 

Robbrecht E, Manen JF 2006. The major evolutionary lineages of 

the coffee family (Rubiaceae, angiosperms). Combined 

analysis  (nDNA  and  cpDNA)  to  infer  the  position  of 

Coptospelta  and  Luculia,  and  supertree  construction 

based on rbcL, rps16, trnL-trnF and atpB-rbcL data. A 

new classification in two subfamilies, Cinchonoideae and 

Rubioideae. Syst Geogr Pl 76: 85-146.

Rova  JHE,  Delprete  PG,  Andersson  L,  Albert  VA  2002.  A 

trnL-F  cpDNA  sequence  study  of  the  Condamineae-

Rondeletieae-Sipaneeae  complex  with  implications  on 

the phylogeny of the Rubiaceae. Am J Bot 89: 145-159. 

Saad HEA, Aanton R, Quirion JC, Chauvière G, Pusset J 1988. 

New-caledonian  plants.  116  (1).  Lindenialine  and 

lindeniamine,  two  new  iridoids  from  Lindenia  austro-

caledonica Brongn. Tetrahedron Lett 29: 615-618. 

Schmeda-Hirschmann  G,  Theoduloz  C,  Franco  L,  Ferro  E, 

Arias  AR  1987.  Preliminary  pharmacological  studies 

on Eugenia uniflora leaves: xanthine oxidase inhibitory 

activity. J Ethnopharmacol 21: 183-186. 

Scott  KN  1972.  Carbon-13  Nuclear  Magnetic  Resonance  of 

Biologically important aromatic acids.I. Chemical shifts 

of benzoic acid and derivatives. J Am Chem 94: 8564-

8568.


Silva WPK, Deraniyagala SA, Wijesundera RLC, Karunanayake 

EH,  Priyanka  UMS  2002.  Isolation  of  scopoletin  from 

leaves of Hevea brasiliensis and the effect of scopoletin 

on  pathogens  of  H.  brasiliensis.  Mycopathologia  153

199-202.

Takeda Y, Nishimura H, Inouye H 1977. Iridoid glucosides of 



Wendlandia formosana. Phytochemistry 16: 1300-1301. 

Timbola AK, Szpoganicz B, Branco A, Monache FD, Pizzolatti 

MG  2002.  A  new  flavonol  from  leaves  of  Eugenia 

jambolana. Fitoterapia 73: 174-176.

Tkachev  AV,  Denisov  AY,  Gatiloov  YV,  Bagryanskaya  IY, 

Shevtsov  SA,  Rybalova  TV  2004.  Triterpenes  and 

triterpenoidal  glycosides  from  the  fruits  of  Ilex 



paraguariensis. J Braz Chem Soc 15: 205-211.

Tonin  FG,  Tavares  MFM  2002.  Otimização  de  extração  de 

cumarina  em  folhas  de  Mikania  laevigata  para  uso 

fitoterápico. Simpósio de Plantas Medicinais, Cuiabá.

Tsacheva  I,  Rostan  J,  Iossifova  T,  Vogler  B,  Odjakova  M, 

Navas  H,  Kostova  I,  Kojouharova  M,  Kraus  W  1987. 

Complement inhibiting properties of dragon's blood from 

Croton draco. Z Naturforsch 59: 528-532.




Yüklə 0,74 Mb.

Dostları ilə paylaş:




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2020
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə