Rticle two-dimensional immune profiles improve antigen microarray-based characterization of humoral immunity



Yüklə 152.53 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix31.03.2017
ölçüsü152.53 Kb.

R

ESEARCH


A

RTICLE


Two-dimensional immune profiles improve antigen

microarray-based characterization of humoral immunity

Krisztián Papp

1

, Zsuzsanna Szekeres

2

, Anna Erdei

1, 2

and József Prechl

1

1

Immunology Research Group, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest, Hungary



2

Department of Immunology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary

Antigen arrays are becoming widely used tools for the characterization of the complexity of

humoral immune responses. Current antibody profiling techniques provide modest and indirect

information about the effector functions of the antibodies that bind to particular antigens. Here

we introduce an antigen array-based approach for obtaining immune profiles reflecting antibody

functionality. This technology relies on the parallel measurement of antibody binding and com-

plement activation by features of the array. By comparing sera from animals immunized against

the same antigen under different conditions, we show that identifying the position of an antigen

in a 2-D space, derived from antibody binding and complement deposition, permits distinction

between immune profiles characterized by diverse antibody isotype distributions. Additionally,

the technology provides a biologically interpretable graphical representation of the relationship

between antigen and host. Our data suggest that 2-D immune profiling could enrich the data

obtained from proteomic scale serum profiling studies.

Received: January 7, 2008

Revised: March 28, 2008

Accepted: March 31, 2008

Keywords:

Antibody profiling / Antigen microarray / Complement / Humoral immunity / Protein

array

2840


Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

1

Introduction

In depth analysis of humoral immunity requires detailed

characterization of the antibodies that are produced in re-

sponse to immunogens. This involves, and is often restricted

to, the determination of the amount and ratio of antibody

isotypes and depends on the measurement of several classes

and subclasses of antigen-specific antibodies. Characteriza-

tion of the contribution of antibodies with diverse isotypes to

an immune response helps determining the nature of the

response with respect to its duration, T-helper cell bias, pro-

tectiveness, or pathogenicity. Class switching is regulated by

the stimuli and costimuli delivered by the immunogen and

the cytokine milieu of the germinal center. Humans have five

antibody classes (IgD, IgM, IgG, IgA, IgE) with IgG further

subdivided into four subclasses (IgG1 to IgG4) as deter-

mined by the heavy chain gene usage. The same Ig classes

are observed in the mouse, whose IgG subclasses (IgG1,

IgG2a/c, IgG2b, and IgG3) also are diversified. Importantly,

IgG subclasses have different affinities for IgG Fc receptors

(receptor for the crystallizable fragment of IgG (FcgR) [1] and

dissimilar abilities to activate the complement system [2, 3],

necessitating the need to determine their relative contribu-

tion to an immune response. Effector functions are also

considerably influenced by the avidity [4, 5] and glycosylation

[6, 7] of antibodies, but as these properties are more cum-

bersome to measure they are tested less frequently.

Incubation of an array of indexed antigens with serum

allows the identification of a large number of specific anti-

bodies in the circulation, a method called antibody profiling

[8]. Though antigen arrays are becoming the tools of choice



Correspondence: Dr. József Prechl, MTA-TKI Immunology Re-

search Group, Budapest, Pázmány P.s. 1/C, H-1117, Hungary



E-mail: jprechl@gmail.com

Fax: 136-13812176

Abbreviations: anti-C3, goat anti-mouse C3; anti-IgG, goat anti-

mouse IgG; CFA, complete Freund’s adjuvant; IL-4, interleukin 4;



KLH, keyhole limpet hemocyanin; KO, knock out; pLA, protein LA;

RBC, red blood cell; TD, thymus dependent; TI, thymus inde-

pendent; TNP, 2,4,6-trinitrophenol

DOI 10.1002/pmic.200800014

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

Protein Arrays

2841


for serum antibody profiling, current microarray instru-

mentation generally does not allow more than three parallel

measurements in distinct fluorescence channels. This

excludes simultaneous detection of all IgG subclasses, not

speaking of other Ig classes. In an attempt to give a better

view of in vivo immune complex formation and to function-

ally characterize array-bound antibodies we have modified

experimental conditions so as to allow complement activa-

tion on the antigen arrays [9]. Complement is an innate sys-

tem of detector, regulator, and effector proteins, which is

activated either directly by antigens or indirectly via anti-

bodies bound to antigens, and has significant influence on

the development of adaptive immunity [10, 11]. Some anti-

bodies are particularly potent while others are ineffective at

activating complement, depending on their isotype, affinity,

and glycosylation [2, 3, 7]. Antigens that come into contact

with blood plasma are thus wrapped in varying mixtures of

recognition molecules including antibodies and comple-

ment activation products. The composition of these immune

complexes both reflects earlier immunological experience

and crucially influences all later steps of an immune re-

sponse. Gaining insight into the nature and function of

antibodies bound to a particular target on an antigen micro-

array would therefore extend the use of such arrays.

Using immunization protocols that induce characteristic

immunity with distinct antibody isotype dominance patterns,

we show that concurrent measurement of Ig binding and

complement deposition on antigen microarrays is suitable for

discriminating and identifying such immune responses.

2

Materials and methods

2.1 Materials

All materials were from Sigma–Aldrich (Hungary) unless

otherwise indicated. Conjugates of 2,4,6-trinitrophenol

(TNP) were generated by treating keyhole limpet hemocya-

nin (KLH) or BSA with trinitro-sulfobenzoic acid according

to standard protocol. BSA conjugates with varying degrees of

TNP content were produced by using 0.1, 0.01, and 0.001%

of trinitro-sulfobenzoic acid. TNP conjugation efficiency was

determined by spectrophotometry. TNP was conjugated to

sheep red blood cells (RBC) using 0.1% TNBA, cells were

washed afterwards and used fresh. Interleukin 4 (IL-4) con-

taining supernatant [12] was produced in our laboratory; IL-4

concentration was measured by ELISA. Printed capture

antibodies were heavy chain-specific (m and g) goat anti-

mouse F(ab

0

)



2

fragments from Southern Biotech. Alexa-647-

conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG (anti-IgG), g heavy chain-

and light chain-specific (g1L) (Southern Biotech, AL, USA)

and FITC-conjugated goat anti-mouse C3 (anti-C3) (MP Bio-

medicals, OH, USA) were used for fluorescent detection.

TNP-specific mAb H5, D10, 2.15, F4, GORK, Sp6, Hy1.2,

M12 were a kind gift of Birgitta Heyman, Uppsala Uni-

versity. A polyclonal conjugate reacting with both k and l

light-chains was created by mixing commercially available

light-chain antibodies (Southern Biotech) and conjugating

with Alexa-647 (Invitrogen, CA, USA).



2.2 Mouse protocol

Male C57/B6 mice (6–8 wk old), five per group, were used for

immunizations. All animal experiments were in accordance

with national regulations and were authorized by the ethical

committee of the institute. Serum from Ig knock out (IgKO)

[13] and C3 deficient (C3KO) [14] animals were a kind gift

from Matyas Sandor, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

TNP–Ficoll (Biosearch Technologies, CA, USA) was admi-

nistered intraperitoneally at a dose of 50 mg/mouse. Rigid,

highly repetitive structures, such as carbohydrate polymers

(Ficoll), induce thymus independent (TI) responses, char-

acterized by the dominance of IgM antibodies [15]. We used

TNP conjugated to a massive carrier protein, KLH, to evoke

thymus dependent (TD) immune response. TNP–KLH, at

100 mg/mouse dosage, was injected subcutaneously and

intraperitoneally alone or emulsified in complete Freund’s

adjuvant (CFA) or injected intravenously along with 2 mg

recombinant, intraperitoneally administered IL-4. CFA, con-

taining mycobacterial extract, induces strong inflammation.

In contrast, administration of the antigen via the intravenous

route and in the presence of an anti-inflammatory cytokine

(IL-4) is rather tolerogenic. TNP conjugated to sheep RBC

(TNP–RBC) represents particulate types of antigen, with

both TD and independent mechanisms involved in the

immune response. For the immunization 4610

7

cells/



mouse were injected intravenously.

For TD responses we gave booster immunizations

21 days after the primary injection, using the same formula-

tion, except for replacing complete Freund’s with incomplete

adjuvant. Sera were collected at the height of the immune

response, that is, 7 and 21 days following the last immuni-

zation for TI and TD responses, respectively. Isotype dis-

tribution of TNP-specific antibodies was determined by

ELISA and enzyme-linked immunospot assay (data not

shown), using isotype-specific HRP-conjugated goat anti-

bodies (Southern Biotech). For the radar chart representation

optical densities derived from 1:500 serum dilutions were

normalized for comparability by expressing optical densities

as the percentage of the highest readings.

One individual in the TNP–KLH 1 IL-4 group had sta-

tistically extreme ELISA values for TNP-specific IgG and

therefore did not meet our inclusion criteria. Microarray

results of two animals (one from the TNP–Ficoll group; one

from TNP–KLH 1 IL-4) were not reliable and were therefore

excluded from further analysis.



2.3 Antigen array data

Antigen arrays contained TNP conjugated to bovine albumin

at three different ratios, with an average of 12, 2, or 0.4 TNP

molecules per bovine albumin, providing various epitope

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

2842

K. Papp et al.



Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

densities. These conjugates were diluted in PBS containing

1 mg/mL BSA to the indicated concentrations of 1.3, 0.25,

and 0.05 mg/mL. Thus, all TNP carrying features contained

BSA and only the concentration of TNP was varied. Addi-

tionally, the following reference materials were printed on

the slide: anti-C3 (MP Biomedicals), anti-IgG, goat anti-

mouse IgM (anti-IgM) (Southern Biotech), KLH, lysozyme,

BSA, protein LA (pLA), mannan, and whole murine serum.

We printed these solutions in three different concentrations

(1, 0.2, 0.04 mg/mL) in triplicates, using Calligrapher mini-

arrayer (BioRad), onto home-made NC coated glass slides.

The generation of microarray data is described elsewhere in

detail [9].

Briefly, dried arrays were rinsed for 15 min in PBS just

before use, then incubated with undiluted sera in a humidi-

fied chamber at 377C degrees for 60 min. The reaction was

terminated by washing the array with PBS. The mixture of

the detecting antibodies diluted 1:5000 in 5% skimmed milk

powder in PBS were added to the arrays, which were then

incubated with gentle agitation for 30 min at room tempera-

ture in the dark. For the comparison of mAb, shown in Fig. 2,

the basic method was slightly modified. Antibody con-

centrations were adjusted based on pilot experiments, so as

to achieve antibody binding to TNP

12

–BSA in a similar



range, as assessed by pan-light chain detection. Assuming an

average antibody concentration of 10 mg/mL in the hybri-

doma supernatants and taking into account that two to ten-

fold dilutions were used, the estimated concentration of the

mAb was in the 1–5 mg/mL range. In this experiment we

wanted to compare complement activating abilities of differ-

ent classes and subclasses, therefore neither IgM nor IgG

detection was suitable. By measuring the antibody light

chains we can assume that identical fluorescence intensities

imply the presence of identical numbers of antibodies. Thus,

complement activation by similar numbers of antibodies

could be compared. Before treating with naive serum, arrays

were incubated in appropriately diluted supernatant con-

taining anti-TNP mAb for 30 min. The dilution was carried

out in 5% BSA, 0.05% Tween 20 containing PBS. As dis-

cussed above, instead of the anti-Ig antibody, a k 1 l-specific

fluorescent conjugate was used to eliminate isotype bias.

Slides were scanned on a Typhoon Trio 1 Imager

(Amersham Bioscience) following standard protocols. Laser

intensity was set to provide optimal signal intensity with

minimal background and without saturated pixels. Data

were analyzed with ImageQuantTL (Amersham Bioscience)

software. Signal intensities were calculated by subtracting

background from medians of signal intensity in a spread-

sheet program (Microsoft Excel).

Fluorescence intensity data were normalized, both for

IgG and C3, to yield identical pLA derived values, assuming

that antibody binding and consequent complement activa-

tion on this fusion protein of bacterial superantigens is not

influenced by the immunization schemes. Correcting inter-

assay fluorescence intensities using values obtained from

capture reagent readings (anti-IgG, anti-C3), instead of that

of pLA, did not essentially change the results (data not

shown). All results were within the dynamic range of the

measurement. We created overlays of false color microarray

images by ImageQuantTL (GE Healthcare). 2-D profiles

depict Ig and C3 signals from the three concentrations of the

indicated antigen.



2.4 Statistical analysis

Data are expressed as mean 6 SD. Correlations and princi-

pal components were calculated with Statistica AGA soft-

ware (StatSoft).



3

Results

3.1 Complement deposition on the array reflects

properties of antigen-specific antibodies

Taking advantage of two-channel fluorescent detection and

multiplexicity of microarray format we measured antigen-

bound C3 fragments and antibodies in parallel. To confirm

specificity of the technique we compared combined C3 and

Ig profiles of wild type, C3 deficient, Ig deficient naive mice

and mice immunized with a model antigen, TNP. An array

containing TNP–BSA conjugates with different densities of

TNP moieties per BSA molecule and different concentrations

of these conjugates, as well as various reference proteins, was

designed for addressing TNP-specific immunity (Fig. 1A,

panel layout). Sera from immunologically naive wild type

animals contain natural antibodies – mostly IgM – that can

bind to high density epitopes with adequate avidity to induce

moderate complement activation (Fig. 1A, panel naive).

Absence of complement C3 completely abolishes (Fig. 1A,

panel C3KO) while lack of antibodies diminishes this signal

(Fig. 1A, panel IgKO). Thus, high densities of this antigen

can initiate complement activation in an antibody independ-

ent manner. Immunization resulted in the appearance of

higher affinity antibodies against TNP, as reflected by the

appearance of IgG and C3 signals at lower conjugation ratios

of TNP per BSA, and dilutions of these conjugates.

Next, we compared a pair of TNP-specific mAb, one car-

rying a mutation that impairs C1q binding [16, 17], using our

assay (Fig. 1B). The mutant version was less efficient with

respect to complement activation, validating the assay for

semiquantitative measurements. We also tested comple-

ment-activating ability of several other TNP-specific mAb

(Fig. 2). By adjusting their concentrations to give similar Ig

binding signals on the array, we compared C3 deposition at

identical Ig values, the results being in agreement with the

isotype dependence of complement activation generally

[18,19]. Notably, natural antibodies present in the naive

serum that was used as a complement source, were avidly

binding and initiating complement activation at the highest

antigen concentration but disappeared at the lowest antigen

concentration (Fig. 2A). An mAb with IgG2a isotype (F4) was

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

Protein Arrays

2843


Figure 1. Parallel detection of antibody binding and complement C3 fragment deposition. (A) Representative false-color images of antigen

microarrays incubated in sera from naïve wild type (naive), C3-deficient (C3KO), Ig deficient (IgKO) animals and an immunized mouse (TNP

imm.) are shown, along with the layout of the subarray. We printed solutions of three different concentrations of every antigen and refer-

ence material. Additionally, three conjugates containing an average of 0.4, 2, or 12 TNP moieties per BSA were used. Polyclonal capture

antibodies for mouse C3, IgM and IgG and a fusion protein of bacterial superantigens, pLA, were used for reference (see Section 2). All

features are in triplicates. After incubating the arrays in sera, deposited C3 fragments and bound Ig were detected by fluorescently labeled

mouse C3 and Ig g heavy- and light chain-specific secondary reagents, respectively. (B) Comparison of wild type Hy1.2 and mutant C1q

binder mAb M12 with respect to antibody binding and complement activation. Three data points in each curve indicate fluorescence

intensities of C3 (anti-mouse C3) and Ig (anti-mouse Ig, g 1 L) at three different concentrations of TNP

2

–BSA.



the most potent complement activator, with IgG1 isotypes

showing intermediate to low activity. Ig binding to TNP

12



BSA is a function of avidity, because every BSA molecule



carries an average of 12 TNP labels. At a lower conjugation

ratio, such as TNP

2

–BSA, binding of both of the arms of Ig



molecules is not assured and affinity becomes a limiting

factor. This results in significant drops in Ig binding and also

in C3 deposition when the concentration of the conjugate is

lowered. It is important to note that monoclonal F4, unlike

all the others, bound to TNP

12

–BSA and TNP



2

–BSA equally

well (compare Figs. 2A and B), implying it had the highest

affinity for TNP. IgG1 antibodies can initiate the alternative

pathway of complement activation in addition to the classical

pathway [18]. The contribution of two pathways may account

for the nonlinear nature of the curve representing comple-

ment activation by monoclonal D10 (Fig. 2A). The fact that

the particular clone of IgM we tested was only moderately

effective is partly attributable to the detection of light chains

which therefore compares antibodies on a monomeric basis.

Taken together, these data suggested that our assay was suit-

able for the characterization of the biological activities of

mAb.


3.2 2-D antibody profiling

Next, we immunized mice using immunization schemes

(see Section 2) which result in characteristic distribution of

antibody isotypes against the model antigen TNP. This dis-

tribution was first characterized by measuring TNP-specific

IgM and various IgG isotypes by ELISA (Fig. 3A). The radar

chart readily reflects the diverse patterns of antigen-specific

antibodies achieved by the immunizations. These sera were

then applied to the above described antigen array. Different

patterns of Ig and C3 fragment binding were observed at

different TNP conjugates (see Fig. 1 of Supporting Informa-

tion), yet none of these measurements distinguished the

immunization groups reliably alone. Chip-based Ig meas-

urements showed positive correlations with all TNP-specific

IgG isotype levels, as determined by ELISA (Table 1). In a

similar way, C3 values, with the exception of those measured

at the lowest TNP densities, were positively correlated to

ELISA results for IgG levels. Significant positive correlation

between C3 deposition on the array and the relative amount

of ELISA derived antigen-specific IgM values was only

observed at the lowest concentration of TNP

0.4


–BSA. C1

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

2844

K. Papp et al.



Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

Figure 2. Comparison of the complement-activating abilities of

TNP-specific mAb. Six clones of mAb were applied to the TNP

arrays at dilutions that were previously determined to give com-

parable antibody binding, as determined by pan-light chain-spe-

cific detection (anti-mouse Ig, kl). Fresh serum of naive mice was

applied as a complement source. Results stand for (A) TNP

12



BSA and (B) TNP



2

–BSA binding data at three different con-

centrations and are representative of at least three independent

experiments.

activation requires at least two IgG molecules whereas one

IgM is still sufficient. Here, scarcely placed monomeric IgG

molecules are presumably no longer able to bind C1q and

cannot initiate complement activation, while C1q binding to

the pentameric IgM is still potent.

By displaying the immune responses in a 2-D space

generated from Ig and C3 fragment binding data, we

achieved to separate immunization groups in a biologically

meaningful fashion (Fig. 3B). This space reflects both innate

(complement C3) and adaptive (Ig) elements of a humoral

response against a given antigen. Using these coordinates an

antibody response that favors complement activation results

in an upward shift, nonactivating antibodies in the serum

shift signals downward (Fig. 3C). In the case of naive and

TNP–Ficoll injected mice, IgM dominated immunity

appears as potent complement activation with weak Ig bind-

ing. TNP was conjugated to KLH for the induction of T-cell

dependent responses and was used either alone or in com-



Table 1. Correlation matrix

a)

of array and ELISA measurements



Concen-

tration


b)

ELISA


IgM

IgG1


IgG2b

IgG2c


IgG3

Antigen array

Ig (

ª1L)

TNP

12

1.3



20.22

c)

0.38



0.23

0.33


0.55

**

0.26


20.24

0.44

*

0.29


0.40

0.60

**

0.05


20.26

0.48

*

0.33


0.44

*

0.61

**

TNP


2

1.3


20.27

0.59

**

0.45

*

0.51

*

0.67

**

0.26


20.29

0.73

***

0.62

**

0.67

***

0.75

***

0.05


20.28

0.77

***

0.69

***

0.70

***

0.76

***

TNP


0.4

1.3


20.25

0.84

***

0.80

***

0.78

***

0.68

***

0.26


20.16

0.78

***

0.79

***

0.70

***

0.51

*

0.05


20.07

0.51

***

0.51

***

0.41


0.20

Antigen array

C3

TNP


12

1.3


20.01

0.61

**

0.50

*

0.57

**

0.67

**

0.26


0.08

0.70

***

0.64

**

0.67

**

0.62

**

0.05


0.04

0.74

***

0.68

***

0.70

***

0.57

**

TNP


2

1.3


0.06

0.70

***

0.55

**

0.59

**

0.67

***

0.26


20.06

0.89

***

0.85

***

0.8

***

0.62

**

0.05


20.06

0.74

***

0.80

***

0.71

***

0.42

*

TNP


0.4

1.3


0.00

0.69

***

0.71

***

0.62

**

0.56

**

0.26


0.28

20.12


20.13

20.22


0.06

0.05


0.42

*

20.31


20.30

20.39


20.15

a) Pearson’s correlation coefficients are shown, unpaired meas-

urements were omitted (= 26).

b) Concentration of the conjugate solution printed on the slide.

c) Statistically significant r values are shown in bold font;

***


p,0.001,

**

p,0.01,

*

p,0.05.

bination with immunomodulatory agents. CFA is a highly

powerful

inflammation-inducing

agent,

which


skews

immunity toward cellular responses and promotes the

appearance antibody isotypes with strong complement acti-

vating potential. This is reflected by higher C3 values of this

group (TNP–KLH 1 CFA), as compared to those animals

immunized without adjuvant (Figs. 3B–D). To simulate tol-

erogenic antigen encounter we injected TNP–KLH intrave-

nously, in the presence of IL-4. This regimen indeed resulted

in a response lacking the inflammatory antibody isotype

IgG2c (Fig. 3A) and an overall IgG response with poor com-

plement activating properties (Figs. 3B–D). Intravenous

administration of TNP in particulate form, conjugated to

sheep RBC, also showed poorer complement activating

properties (Figs. 3B–D). Displaying our results as the loga-

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

Protein Arrays

2845


Figure 3. Isotype distribution profile of TNP-specific antibodies in the immunization groups. Six groups of mice were immunized using

schemes that are known to result in characteristic responses (see Section 2). TI responses were induced by TNP–Ficoll, while TD responses

were elicited by either soluble or particulate immunogens: TNP conjugated to a protein carrier, KLH (TNP–KLH) or to sheep RBC (TNP–RBC),

respectively. TD responses were further skewed toward inflammatory reactions by CFA or toward anti-inflammatory conditions by IL-4.

Control animals received PBS solution. (A) Levels of TNP-specific antibodies of the indicated isotypes were characterized by ELISA. Means

of optical densities, expressed as percentage of the highest obtained values, of the respective immunization groups are shown in a radar

chart. (B) Arrays, described in Fig. 1, were incubated with sera of animals of the above immunization groups. IgG and C3 binding data at

three different concentrations of TNP

12

-BSA conjugates from individual sera are shown in a 2-D representation. Using the coordinates



defined by Ig and C3 relative fluorescence intensity (RFI) values, we can simultaneously depict antibody binding and its effect on comple-

ment activation. (C) Immune responses biased toward inflammation are characterized by the appearance of antibody isotypes and glyco-

forms with good complement-activating properties, while tolerance and Th2 cytokines enhance the production of antibodies with poor

complement activating properties. Thus, innate or adaptive dominance in the recognition of an antigen theoretically appears as an upward

or downward shift, respectively, when bound C3 products and IgG define the coordinates. Enclosed areas correspond to experimental

data: TI = TNP–Ficoll, TD = TNP–KLH, TD1 = TNP–KLH 1 CFA, TD2 = TNP–KLH 1 IL-4. (D, E) Graphical representation of the logarithm of RFI

ratios versus average logarithmic intensities for individuals of the six immunization groups highlights the essentially different characters of

natural and adaptive humoral immunity. Convergence of the curves implies that large amounts of antibody will inevitably cause comple-

ment deposition when antigen is present at high concentration, yet segregation of different immunization schemes can still be observed.

Data points were derived from binding values shown in (B), from measurements of individual sera on TNP

12

–BSA conjugates.



©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

2846

K. Papp et al.



Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

rithmic ratio (= log

2

(C3/IgG)) against average logarithmic



intensity (=

1

/



2

log


2

(C36IgG)) of the measured parame-

ters, as used for representing two-channel microarray data,

further emphasizes the contrast between innate dominated

and adaptive, noninflammatory immune responses (Fig. 3E).

3.3 Discriminative properties of immune profiling

methods

Representation of characteristic immune responses in this 2-

D scale shows that simultaneous measurement of IgG and C3

is both suitable and sufficient for identifying these distinct

immune profiles. In order to confirm the discriminatory

potential of our assay and compare it with the ELISA results

we calculated principal components from the two sets of data.

Results of end-point measurements from a single, optimal

serum dilution were used for the comparison both for ELISA

and array measurements. This analysis revealed that deter-

mination of Ig binding and C3 fragment deposition at three

different concentrations of TNP

12

–BSA on the array yielded



factors which were as suitable for discriminating the immu-

nization groups in a 2-D scale as determination of the five

different isotypes by ELISA (Fig. 4). The first two principal

components deduced from the array data account for 96%

variance of the data, while 85% variance is covered by the first

two components of the ELISA measurements (Figs. 4A and

B). Using these components as coordinates individuals seg-

regated into groups according to the immunization schemes

in both cases (Figs. 4C and D).

4

Discussion

In this paper we introduce the representation of antigen–

serum interactions in the dimensions of bound Igs and

deposited complement C3 products, a simple and powerful

solution for detailed immune profile determination on anti-

gen arrays. Antigens attain a position in this 2-D space

depending on their ability to bind Ig and activate the com-

plement system. We validated this assay using an mAb,

Hy1.2, and its mutant form that is deficient in C1q binding

(Fig. 1B). We also compared a set of mAb with different iso-

types and confirmed that murine IgG2a antibodies are effi-

cient and generally better activators of complement than

IgG1 (Figs. 2A and B). It is important to stress, though, that

factors other than isotype, such as affinity and glycosylation,

are also known to influence complement activation. Antigen-

specific antibodies appear in the serum of immunologically

experienced individuals, as a result of germinal center reac-

tions that yield antibodies with increased affinity for the

antigen and switched isotypes for optimal effector functions.

ELISA measurements allow the precise quantitative deter-

mination of antigen-specific antibodies of various isotypes

but only indirectly predict functional effects. We measured

total Ig in combination with C3 products to generate a func-

tional view of the immune reactions against the antigen.

During an immune response, antibodies with different

immunological properties are produced against the antigen.

All these antibodies can bind to the antigen, forming

immune complexes with different compositions and effector



Figure 4. Principal component

analysis of isotype measure-

ments by ELISA and of 2-D pro-

filing by antigen array. Scree

plots represent Eigenvalues of

factors of (A) array-based deter-

minations of Ig binding and C3

deposition

at

three


different

dilutions of TNP

12

–BSA (six vari-



ables) and (B) ELISA determina-

tions of levels of five different

TNP-specific antibody isotypes.

Cumulative percentage of the

variance accounted for by the

factors is displayed at each

inflexion point. (C, D) Projec-

tions using the first two calcu-

lated factors as coordinates are

shown for each set of measure-

ments. Dots represent coordi-

nates of values rendered to indi-

vidual mice in the respective

factor-planes.

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

Protein Arrays

2847


functions. To model these differences, we used immuniza-

tion schemes that are known to result in characteristic,

immunologically distinct responses. The variable composi-

tion of the immune complexes is reflected by the isotype

patterns of our immunization schemes (Fig. 3A). Our

approach aims to grasp this complexity by measuring the

overall functional effect of antibodies on the complement

system instead of determining each component of an

immune complex separately. Murine IgG subclasses are

quite heterogeneous with respect to effector functions such

as complement activating properties [18, 20, 21] and FcgR

binding [22]. Accordingly, antibody protectivity against

infections can be determined by the dominant circulating

isotype [23–26]. Humans possess a similar set of IgG anti-

bodies with distinct effector potentials [6, 27].

For the 2-D characterization of sera we used a reagent

which preferentially binds the heavy chains of IgG (g-chains)

but also reacts with Ig light chains of all other isotypes.

Therefore IgM is poorly detected on the Ig scale but is effi-

ciently integrated into the detection of C3 products, which is

justified by its biological properties. This antibody class is

usually produced during the early phase of an immune re-

sponse by cells that do not go through affinity maturation

and do not participate in the generation of memory, similar

to innate responses. Additionally IgM can activate comple-

ment with the highest efficiency of all antibody classes, this

being the primary effector pathway initiated by IgM. In this

study, we have not considered antibodies of the IgA class,

which are abundant in serum and can initiate complement

activation [28]. However, these antibodies are primarily asso-

ciated with mucosal immune responses and are not expected

to influence our results. If required, detection of IgA should

preferably be incorporated into the Ig detection channel. The

same holds for IgE detection, the class associated with aller-

gies and known to be unable to initiate complement activa-

tion.


Although antigens, depending on their biophysical and

biochemical properties, may induce complement activation

in immunologically naive individuals by both antibody-de-

pendent and -independent ways, immunity profoundly

changes this efficiency (Figs. 1A and 3). Differences between

animals which were immunized in different ways can be

more subtle, underlining the importance of utilizing of anti-

gen features with different antigen densities. Dissimilarity in

complement activation for TI and TD Th2 biased immunity

groups was most pronounced at lower antigen densities

(Fig. 3D).

Our approach allows the direct assessment of functional

properties of antibody mixtures against antigens and could

therefore be used on arrays containing antigens derived from

microbes [29], especially because complement has an

important role in antimicrobial protection. Complement can

also mediate deleterious effects of autoantibodies [30] point-

ing to the potential utility of this assay in combination with

autoantigen arrays. Here we only followed the changes of

2-D immune profile against a particular model antigen under

experimental conditions. When panels of antigens are stud-

ied at a time, as in antibody profiling experiments, antigens

are expected to show different antibody binding and com-

plement activation even in immunologically naive individ-

uals, both because of the presence or absence of natural

antibodies and their distinct intrinsic complement activating

properties. In an immunologically experienced or a diseased

individual, different antigens are recognized by functionally

distinct antibodies of various isotypes [31] and are therefore

expected to take up distinct coordinates in this 2-D space.

Microarray-based determination of the pattern of positions of

relevant antigens and monitoring of their relative movement

in this space can indicate fine qualitative changes of the

immune response and help observe disease or effectiveness

of therapy.

This work was supported by the following grants: RET-06/

2006, NKFP 1A040_04, K72026, OTKA T047151. We thank

Árpád Mikesy for technical help, Birgitta Heyman for providing

TNP-specific mAband Matyas Sandor for serum samples and

suggestions.

The authors have declared the following conflict of interest.

Eotvos Lorand University (ELTE) and the Hungarian Academy

of Sciences (MTA) have applied for a patent on protein micro-

array-based complement activation detection.

5

References

[1] Nimmerjahn, F., Ravetch, J. V., Fcgamma receptors: Old

friends and new family members. Immunity 2006, 24, 19–28.

[2] Garred, P., Michaelsen, T. E., Aase, A., The IgG subclass pat-

tern of complement activation depends on epitope density

and antibody and complement concentration. Scand. J.



Immunol. 1989, 30, 379–382.

[3] Lucisano Valim, Y. M., Lachmann, P. J., The effect of antibody

isotype and antigenic epitope density on the complement-

fixing activity of immune complexes: A systematic study

using chimaeric anti-NIP antibodies with human Fc regions.

Clin. Exp. Immunol. 1991, 84, 1–8.

[4] Villalta, D., Romelli, P. B., Savina, C., Bizzaro, N. et al., Anti-

dsDNA antibody avidity determination by a simple reliable

ELISA method for SLE diagnosis and monitoring. Lupus 2003,



12, 31–36.

[5] Hangartner, L., Zinkernagel, R. M., Hengartner, H., Antiviral

antibody responses: The two extremes of a wide spectrum.

Nat. Rev. Immunol. 2006, 6, 231–243.

[6] Jefferis, R., Antibody therapeutics: Isotype and glycoform

selection. Expert Opin. Biol. Ther. 2007, 7, 1401–1413.

[7] Arnold, J. N., Dwek, R. A., Rudd, P. M., Sim, R. B., Mannan

binding lectin and its interaction with immunoglobulins in

health and in disease. Immunol. Lett. 2006, 106, 103–110.

[8] Robinson, W. H., Antigen arrays for antibody profiling. Curr.

Opin. Chem. Biol. 2006, 10, 67–72.

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com

2848

K. Papp et al.



Proteomics 2008, 8, 2840–2848

[9] Papp, K., Szekeres, Z., Terenyi, N., Isaak, A. et al., On-chip

complement activation adds an extra dimension to antigen

microarrays. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 2007, 6, 133–140.

[10] Morgan, B. P., Marchbank, K. J., Longhi, M. P., Harris, C. L.,

Gallimore, A. M., Complement: Central to innate immunity

and bridging to adaptive responses. Immunol. Lett. 2005, 97,

171–179.


[11] Carroll, M. C., The complement system in regulation of

adaptive immunity. Nat. Immunol. 2004, 5, 981–986.

[12] Karasuyama, H., Melchers, F., Establishment of mouse cell

lines which constitutively secrete large quantities of inter-

leukin 2, 3, 4 or 5, using modified cDNA expression vectors.

Eur. J. Immunol. 1988, 18, 97–104.

[13] Chen, J., Trounstine, M., Alt, F. W., Young, F. et al., Immu-

noglobulin gene rearrangement in B cell deficient mice

generated by targeted deletion of the JH locus. Int. Immu-



nol. 1993, 5, 647–656.

[14] Circolo, A., Garnier, G., Fukuda, W., Wang, X. et al., Genetic

disruption of the murine complement C3 promoter region

generates deficient mice with extrahepatic expression of C3

mRNA. Immunopharmacology 1999, 42, 135–149.

[15] Vos, Q., Lees, A., Wu, Z. Q., Snapper, C. M., Mond, J. J., B-

cell activation by T-cell-independent type 2 antigens as an

integral part of the humoral immune response to patho-

genic microorganisms. Immunol. Rev. 2000, 176, 154–170.

[16] Nose, M., Okuda, T., Gidlund, M., Ramstedt, U. et al., Mutant

monoclonal antibodies with select alteration in complement

activation ability. Impact on immune complex functions in

vivo. J. Immunol. 1988, 141, 2367–2373.

[17] Heyman, B., Wiersma, E., Nose, M., Complement activation

is not required for IgG-mediated suppression of the anti-

body response. Eur. J. Immunol. 1988, 18, 1739–1743.

[18] Seino, J., Eveleigh, P., Warnaar, S., van Haarlem, L. J. et al.,

Activation of human complement by mouse and mouse/hu-

man chimeric monoclonal antibodies. Clin. Exp. Immunol.

1993, 94, 291–296.

[19] Neuberger, M. S., Rajewsky, K., Activation of mouse com-

plement by monoclonal mouse antibodies. Eur. J. Immunol.

1981, 11, 1012–1016.

[20] Zeredo da, S. S., Kikuchi, S., Fossati-Jimack, L., Moll, T. et al.,

Complement activation selectively potentiates the patho-

genicity of the IgG2b and IgG3 isotypes of a high affinity

anti-erythrocyte autoantibody. J. Exp. Med. 2002, 195, 665–

672.


[21] Stewart, W. W., Johnson, A., Steward, M. W., Whaley, K.,

Kerr, M. A., The effect of antibody isotype on the activation

of C3 and C4 by immune complexes formed in the presence

of serum: Correlation with the prevention of immune pre-

cipitation. Mol. Immunol. 1990, 27, 423–428.

[22] Nimmerjahn, F., Ravetch, J. V., Divergent immunoglobulin g

subclass activity through selective Fc receptor binding. Sci-

ence 2005, 310, 1510–1512.

[23] Peterson, E. M., Cheng, X., Motin, V. L., de la Maza, L. M.,

Effect of immunoglobulin G isotype on the infectivity of

Chlamydia trachomatis in a mouse model of intravaginal

infection. Infect. Immun. 1997, 65, 2693–2699.

[24] Yuan, R. R., Spira, G., Oh, J., Paizi, M. et al., Isotype switch-

ing increases efficacy of antibody protection against Cryp-

tococcus neoformans infection in mice. Infect. Immun. 1998,



66, 1057–1062.

[25] Dorner, T., Radbruch, A., Antibodies and B cell memory in

viral immunity. Immunity 2007, 27, 384–392.

[26] Michaelsen, T. E., Ihle, O., Beckstrom, K. J., Herstad, T. K. et



al., Binding properties and anti-bacterial activities of V-

region identical, human IgG and IgM antibodies, against

group B Neisseria meningitidis. Biochem. Soc. Trans. 2003,

31, 1032–1035.

[27] Yone, C. L., Kremsner, P. G., Luty, A. J., Immunoglobulin G

isotype responses to erythrocyte surface-expressed variant

antigens of Plasmodium falciparum predict protection from

malaria in African children. Infect. Immun. 2005, 73, 2281–

2287.


[28] Roos, A., Bouwman, L. H., van Gijlswijk-Janssen, D. J.,

Faber-Krol, M. C. et al., Human IgA activates the comple-

ment system via the mannan-binding lectin pathway. J.

Immunol. 2001, 167, 2861–2868.

[29] Mezzasoma, L., Bacarese-Hamilton, T., Di, C. M., Rossi, R. et



al., Antigen microarrays for serodiagnosis of infectious dis-

eases. Clin. Chem. 2002, 48, 121–130.

[30] Girardi, G., Redecha, P., Salmon, J. E., Heparin prevents

antiphospholipid antibody-induced fetal loss by inhibiting

complement activation. Nat. Med. 2004, 10, 1222–1226.

[31] Graham, K. L., Vaysberg, M., Kuo, A., Utz, P. J., Autoantigen

arrays for multiplex analysis of antibody isotypes. Prote-

omics 2006, 6, 5720–5724.

©

2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim



www.proteomics-journal.com



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə