Sacred groves: potential microhabitats for conserving rare endemic and threatened plants



Yüklə 68.06 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü68.06 Kb.

Binu Thomas et al. / Journal of Science / Vol 4 / Issue 4 / 2014 / 223-226.

 

 

223 



 

 

e ISSN 2277 - 3290 

Print ISSN 2277 - 3282

 

Journal of Science

                                     Botany 

 

www.journalofscience.net

 

 

SACRED GROVES: POTENTIAL MICROHABITATS FOR 

CONSERVING RARE ENDEMIC AND THREATENED PLANTS 

 

1

Anish Babu VB, 

1

Antony VT

2

Binu Thomas

*

, 

3

Prabhu Kumar KM 

 

1

Department of Botany, St. Berchmans (SB) College, Changanacherry, Kottayam-686101, Kerala, India. 



2

PG Department of Botany, Deva Matha College, Kuravilangad, Kottayam-686633, Kerala, India. 

3

Plant Systematics & Genetic Resources Division, Centre for Medicinal Plants Research (CMPR), AVS, Kottakkal, 



Malappuram-676503, Kerala, India.

 

 



ABSTRACT 

The present investigation on the floristic diversity of sacred groves of Moonamkadavu, Kasaragod district of Kerala 

resulted in the documentation of 6 Rare, Endemic and Threatened (RET) plants. All the important details of these plants such 

as correct nomenclature, synonyms, family, habit, description and their specific notes were also discussed in this paper. The 

conservation of such precious sacred groves is an urgent need for future generation. 

 

Keywords: Sacred groves, Microhabitats, Rare, Endemic, Threatened plants. 



 

INTRODUCTION  

 

Sacred  groves  are  very  ancient  and  widespread 



phenomenon in the old world cultures. They are kept in a 

comparatively  undisturbed  condition,  due  to  faith  and 

other  religious  believes.  In  other  views,  these  are  forest 

patches  conserved  by  the  local  people  intertwined  with 

their  socio-cultural  and  religious  practices.  These  groves 

play  a  significant  role  in  the  conservation  of  biodiversity 

[1]. Such groves are the microhabitat with habitat specific 

flora  and  fauna.  The  vegetation  composing  the  sacred 

groves is very different from that of the surrounding areas 

of  the  region  [2].  Plant  worshiping  is  one  of  the  earliest 

religious  trends  since  the  time  ancient. Numerous 

references  are  available  in  literature  where  plants  are 

treated  as  to  the  abode  of  the  gods  [3].  In  the  scriptures, 

these  plants  are  mention  of  the Kalpavrisksha and 



Chaityavrisksha indicating that worshiping of the trees is 

an  Indian  tradition.  These  plants  are  often  grown  along 

and within the temples and can be considered as “sacred 

plants” [4]. 

 

 

Most of the studies on sacred groves in India are 



generally  focused  on  the  diversity  of  plants.  More  over 

such  groves  provide  excellent  micro-climatic  conditions 

for  the  luxuriant  growth  of  those  plants  which  are  not 

present  in  the  surrounding  areas  at  the  same  altitude. 

Because  of  this  several  taxa  exhibit  remarkable 

microhabitat-specific nature which can be attributed to the 

local  environmental  conditions  [5].  Some  species  are 

highly  sensitive  even  to  the  smallest  changes  in  the 

environmental  conditions  of  these  microhabitats.    Such 

groves  are  distributed  over  a  wide  ecosystem  and  also 

help in conservation of rare and endemic species [6]. 

 

STUDY AREA 

MoonamkadavuKasaragod district, Kerala 

 

Moonamkadavu,  Kasaragod  district,  Kerala  is 



lies between latitudes 12°25 '08.7'' N and 75°95 '12.2'' E.’ 

The  area  has  a  tropical  humid  climate.  The  hot  season 

extends  from  March  to  the  end  of  May.  This  is  followed 

by  the  Southwest  monsoon,  which  continues  up  to 

August.  The  Northeast  monsoon,  which  extends  from 

October  up  to  December.  During  hotseason,  the  mean 

daily  maximum  temperature  is  about  35

0

  C.  The  average 



minimum temperature is around 20

0

 C during December-



January.  The  annual  rainfall  is  35.38  mm.  More  than  80 

percent  of  it  occurs  during  the  period  of  Southwest 

monsoon [7]. 

 

METHODOLOGY 

 

The  present  investigation  was  undertaken  from 



the sacred grove at Moonamkadavu, kasaragod District,  

 

Corresponding Author:- Binu Thomas Email:-binuthomasct@gmail.com 



Binu Thomas et al. / Journal of Science / Vol 4 / Issue 4 / 2014 / 223-226.

 

 

224 



 

Kerala.  The  plant  specimens  along  with  photographs  are 

collected  from  the  study  area.  All  the  important  details 

including  correct  nomenclature,  synonyms,  family,  habit, 

description  and  their  specific  notes  were  given  with  the 

help  of  available  Floras  and  literature  [8,  9,  10,  11]. The 

voucher  specimens  were  prepared  as  per  standard 

procedure  [12]  and  deposited  at  Herbaria  of  Department 

of Botany, SB College, Changanacherry, Kerala for future 

studies and reference. 



 

ENUMERATION 

1.

 

Boesenbergia 

pulcherrima 

(Wall.) 


O. 

Ktze. 


(Zingiberaceae) (Fig. 1).  

Synonyms:  Gastrochilus pulcherima Wall. 

 

Herb, to 15-25 cm long. Leaves few, scattered, to 



13  x  6  cm,  broadly  elliptic,  acute  at  both  ends,  thinly 

tomentose  beneath;  petiole  to  2  cm  long;  sheath  saccate. 

Spike  to  5  cm  long,  terminal,  one  sided;  bracts  20  x  8 

mm,  obovate,  obtuse;  bracteoles  tubular,  deeply  cleft  to 

the base. Flowers solitary in each bracts; calyx tube short, 

truncate;  corolla  tube  15  mm  long;  lobes  equal,  10  x  4 

mm, oblong; lip 20  x 15  mm, obovate, acute,  white  with 

brown  spots;  lateral  staminodes  10  x  5  mm  obovate; 

filaments  2  mm  long;  anthers  parallel,  not  crested;  ovary 

3-celled,  oblong;  ovules  few;  style  filiform.  Fruit  an 

oblong capsule. 

Notes:  Endemic  to  Southern  Western  Ghats  [9,  10]; 

According  to  Nayar[13],  its  status  is  considered  as 

Threatened (TR). 

 

2.



 

Hopea  ponga  (Dennst.)  Mabb.  (Dipterocarpaceae

(Fig. 1).  



SynonymsArtocarpus ponga Dennst. 

Hopea wightiana Wall.ex Wight & Arn. 

 

Trees  up  to  18  m  tall,  bark  thin  smooth,  flaky, 



branchlets  usually  drooping,  terete,  tomentose.  Leaves 

simple,  alternate,  spiral;  stipules  caducous;  petiole  stout, 

terete,  whitish  tomentose,  1.3  cm  long;  lamina  11-31  x 

2.5-7.5  cm,  narrow  oblong  to  oblong,  apex  bluntly  acute 

or acuminate, often rounded, base rounded or subcordate, 

chartaceous  or  subcoriaceous;  secondary  nerves  7-12 

pairs,  gradually  curved;  tertiary  nerves  reticulo-

percurrent.  Inflorescence  panicled  racemes,  glabrous; 

flowers  white.Nut  with 3 shorter and 2 longer  accrescent 

calyx lobes; seeds 1. 



Notes:  Endemic  to  Southern  Western  Ghats  [9]; 

According  to  IUCN  [14],  its  status  is  considered  as 

Endangered (EN).  

 

3.



 

Syzygium travancoricum Gamble (Myrtaceae) (Fig. 1).  

 

Medium  sized tree, Leaves are simple, opposite, 



ovate  and  bluntly  acute  towards  the  tip.  The  leaf  base  is 

shortly decurrent on the 2 cm long petiole. Leaf measures 

9-18  cm  in  length  and  6-9  cm  in  breadth.  It  has  12-  15 

pairs of lateral nerves. Flowers occur in the axils of leaves 

in corymbose cymes of 5-8 cm long. They are very small, 

only 3 mm across. The white petals form a calyptra (cap) 

in the bud enclosing the stamens. Fruits 0.7-1 cm across, 

purplish to maroon-red. 



Notes:  Endemic  to  Southern  Western  Ghats  [9,  15]; 

According  to  IUCN  [14],  its  status  is  considered  as 

Critically Endangered (CR). 

 

4.



 

Vepris  bilocularis  (Wight  &Arn.)  Engl.  (Rutaceae

(Fig 1). 



Synonyms:    Toddalia bilocularis Wight & Arn. 

Dipetalum biloculare (Wight  & Arn.) Dalz. 

 

Large  trees  up  to  16  m  tall,  bark  large  corky 



lenticellate; 

blaze 


cream 

with 


orange 

speckels, 

branchletsterete,  glabrous.  Leaves  compound,  trifoliate, 

alternate,  spiral;  rachis  canaliculate  in  cross  section, 

pulvinate, 

glabrous; 

petiolule 

0.3-1.5 


cm 

long, 


planoconvex in cross section; leaflets 7.6-25.4 x 3.8-10.2 

cm,  narrow  elliptic,  apex  long  acuminate  with  blunt  tip, 

base  slightly  attenuate,  margin  entire,  coriaceous;  midrib 

nearly flat above; intramarginal nerves present; secondary 

nerves  nearly  straight  parallel;  tertiary  nerves  usually 

admedialyramified.Inflorescence  panicles,  terminal  or 

axillary;  flowers  unisexual,  dioecious,  sessile.Berry, 

fleshy, globose, 2 celled, gland dotted; seeds 1-2 per cell. 



Notes:  Endemic  to  Southern  Western  Ghats  [9]; 

According  to  Ahemdullah  &    Nayar  [16]    its  status  is 

considered as rare. 

 

5.



 

Cycas circinalis L. (Cycadaceae) (Fig. 1). 

SynonymsCycas squamosa Lodd.ex Dyer 

Cycas undulata Desf.ex Gaudich.

 

Cycas wallichii Miq. 

 

Small  palm  with  arborescent  stems,  to  5  m  tall. 



Leaves bright  green,  semiglossy,  150-250  cm  long,  flat 

with  170  leaflets,  tomentum  shedding  as  leaf  expands. 

Male  cones narrowly  ovoid,  orange,  45  cm  long,  10  cm 

diam.;  microsporophyll  lamina  firm,  not  dorsiventrally 

thickened,  38-50  mm  long,  12-19  mm  wide,  apical  spine 

prominent, 

gradually 

raised, 


25 

mm 


long. 

Megasporophylls  with  female  cones  about   30  cm  long, 

brown-tomentose; 

ovules 


4-10, 

glabrous; 

lamina 

lanceolate,  74-100  mm  long,  25-38  mm  wide,  regularly 



dentate,  with  24  pungent  lateral  spines,  apical  spine 

distinct from lateral spines.  Seeds subglobose, 25-38  mm 

long. 

Notes: Endemic to Peninsular India [17]. 

 

6.



 

Gnetum ula Brongn. (Gnetaceae) (Fig. 1). 

SynonymsGnetum edule (Willd.) Blume. 

Gnetum pyrifolium Miq.ex Parl.

 

Thoa edulis Willd. 

 

Woody  climber,  Leaves  elliptic,  with  netted 



veins and drip tips at their ends. Flowers  monosexual, in 

catkin-like  formations;  male  flower  consists  of  a  stamen 

and  perianth,  and  female  flower  of  an  ovule  with  2 

integuments and perianth (2, 9). 



Notes: Endemic to Peninsular India [10]. 

Binu Thomas et al. / Journal of Science / Vol 4 / Issue 4 / 2014 / 223-226.

 

 

225 



 

Fig.  1:  A.  Boesenbergia  pulcherrima  (Wall.)  O.  Ktze.;  B.  Syzygium  travancoricum  Gamble;  C.  Cycas  circinalis  L.;  D. 

Gnetum  ula  Brongn.;  E.  &  F.  Hopea  ponga(Dennst.)  Mabb.  E.  Flowering  twig;  F.  Bark;  G.  H.  &  I.  Vepris  bilocularis 

(Wight &Arn.) Engl. G. Habit; H. Bark; I. Twig. 



 

DISCUSSION  

 

The  present  study  resulted  in  the  collection  of  6 

Rare, Endemic, Threatened plants species from the sacred 

grove  at  Moonamkadavu,  kasaragod  District,  Kerala. 

They  are  Boesenbergia  pulcherrima  (Wall.)  O.  Ktze. 

(Zingiberaceae), 



Hopea 

ponga 

(Dennst.) 

Mabb. 

(Dipterocarpaceae),  Syzygium  travancoricum  Gamble 



(Myrtaceae),  Vepris  bilocularis  (Wight  &Arn.)  Engl. 

(Rutaceae), Cycas circinalis L. (Cycadaceae) and Gnetum 



ula Brongn. (Gnetaceae) (Fig. 1). 

 

Among  these,  B.  pulcherrima,  H.  ponga,  S. 



travancoricum and V. bilocularis are endemic to Southern 

Western  Ghats  [10].  The  status  of  B.  pulcherrima  is 

considered  as  threatened  by  Nayar  [13].    According  to 

IUCN  [14],  the  status  of  H.  ponga  is  treated  as  as 

endangered and S. travancoricum is critically endangered. 

According  to  Ahemdullah  &  Nayar  [16],  the  status  of  V. 



bilocularisis  considered  as  rare.  The  other  two  species 

viz.  G.  ula  and  C.  circinalis  are  gymnosperms  and  they 

are endemic to Peninsular India [10, 17]  

 

CONCLUSION 

 

Sacred  groves  have  become  fragmented  habitats 



housing  gene  pools  and  became  the  last  refuge  for  many 

rare,  threatened,  endangered  and  endemic  plant  and 

animal  species.  The  major  threats  to  these  existing 

ecosystems  are  habitat  destruction,  habitat  alternation, 

over  increasing  population  and  over  exploitation, 

introduction of exotic species and pollution has resulted in 

the  decline  of  sacred  groves.  The  conservation  of  such 

precious  sacred  groves  is  an  urgent  need  for  future 

generation. 

 


Binu Thomas et al. / Journal of Science / Vol 4 / Issue 4 / 2014 / 223-226.

 

 

226 



 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS        

 

The  authors  are  indebted  to  Dr.  N.  Sasidharan, 



Emeritus  Scientist,  Kerala  Forest  Research  Institute 

(KFRI),  Thrissur  District,  Kerala  for  giving  the  image  of 



Syzygium travancoricum Gamble. 

 

REFERENCES

 

1.

 



Anthwal  A,  Ramesh  CS  and  Sharma  A.  Sacred  Groves:  Traditional  Way  of  Conserving  Plant  Diversity  in  Garhwal 

Himalaya, Uttaranchal. J Amer Sci, 2(2), 2006, 35-43. 

2.

 

Chandrashekara, UM and Sankar S. Structure and functions of sacred groves: Case studies in Kerala. In: Ramakrishnan 



PS,  Saxena  KG  and  Chandrashekara  UM  (Editors),  Conserving  the  Sacred  groves  for  Biodiversity  Management. 

UNESCO and Oxford- IBH Publishing, New Delhi, 1998, 323 -335. 

3.

 

Deshmukh  S,  Gogate  MG  and  Gupta  AK.  Sacred  groves  and  biological  diversity:  providing  new  dimensions  to 



conservation  issue.    In:    Ramakrishnan  PS,  Saxena  KG  and  Chandrashekara  UM  (Eds)  Conserving  the  Sacred  for 

Biodiversity Management. UNESCO and Oxford-IBH Publishing, New Delhi. 1998, 397 - 414. 

4.

 

Agnihotri P, Singh H and Tariq H. Sacred Groves: A Religious platform for Biodiversity Conservation. Enviro News, 18, 



2012, 34 - 42.  

5.

 



Balasubramanyan K and Induchoodan NC. Plant diversity in sacred groves of Kerala. Evergr, 36, 1996, 3-4. 

6.

 



Bhakat RK and Pandit PK. Role of sacred grove in conservation of medicinal plants. Ind For, 129(2), 2003, 224- 232. 

7.

 



Anish Babu VB, Antony VT, Binu Thomas and Prabhu Kumar KM.  Ficus spp. a valuable tree species in sacred groves. 

J Sci Bot, 4, 2004, 74-76. 

8.

 



Gamble JS and Fischer CEC. The Flora of Presidency of Madras. 3 Vol, Adlard and Sons Ltd, London. 1915 - 1936. 

9.

 



Sasidharan N. Biodiversity documentation for Kerala, Part-6: Flowering plants, Kerala Forest Research Institute (KFRI), 

Peechi. 2004, 438-441. 

10.

 

Sasidharan N. Flowering plants of Kerala: CD-ROM ver 2.0. Kerala Forest Research Institute, Peechi. 2013. 



11.

 

Sasidharan N and Sivarajan VV. Flowering Plants of Thrissur Forests. Scientific Publishers, Jodphur. 1996. 



12.

 

Jain SK and  Rao  RR.  A Handbook of Field and Herbarium Methods, Today and  Tomorrow’s  Printers and Publishers, 



New Delhi. 1997. 

13.


 

Nayar  MP.  Biodiversity  challenges  in  Kerala  and  Science  of  conservation  biology.  In:  P.Pushpangadan  &  K.S.S.  Nair 

(Eds.) Biodiversity of Tropical Forests the Kerala scenario. TEC, Kerala, Trivandrum. 1997. 

14.


 

IUCN, IUCN Red list of Threatened species, IUCN, Gland. 2000. 

15.

 

Roby  TJ, Joyce  J,  Vijayakumaran  P  and  Nair.  Syzygium  travancoricum  Gamble-  A  critically  endangered  and  endemic 



tree  from  kerala,  india-  threats,  conservation  and  prediction  of  potential  areas;  with  special  emphasis  on  Myristica 

swamps as a prime habitat. Int J Sci Environ Techn, 2, 2013, 1335 – 1352. 

16.

 

Ahmedullah M and Nayar MP. Endemic plants of the Indian region. Botanical Survey of India, Calcutta. 1987. 



17.

 

Saneesh CS and Varghese A. Mutualistic Relationships Involving the Endemic Cycas circinalis L.: Field Notes from the 



Appankappu Forests, Nilambur, Kerala, India. Cycad Newslett, 30(4), 2007, 28-29. 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə