School of graduate studies environmental science program



Yüklə 439.26 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/5
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü439.26 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5

 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



ADDIS ABABA UNIVERSITY 

SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES  

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE PROGRAM 

 

 



Investigation of Desiccation Sensitivity of Seeds and Ethnobotany of 

Syzygium guineense (

Willd.) DC.

 

 



 

 

By  



Sinework Dagnachew 

 

  



 

 

February 2008 

 


  

 

 



 

 

Investigation of Desiccation Sensitivity of Seeds and Ethnobotany of 



Syzygium guineense 

(Willd.) DC.

 

 



 

By  


Sinework Dagnachew 

 

  

A thesis submitted to the School of Graduate Studies of the 

Addis Ababa University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the 

Degree of Master of Science in Environmental Science 

 

 



 

 

Addis Ababa University 



Faculty of Science, Environmental Science Program 

 

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

February 2008  



Addis-Ababa 

 

  



 

 



Acknowledgement  

 

First and for most I would like to express my deepest sense of gratitude and the heart 



felt  appreciation  to  my  advisors  Dr.  Girma  Balcha  and  Dr.  Zemede  Asfaw  for  their 

consistent  and  stimulating  advice,  valuable  suggestions,  providing  appropriate  books 

and critical reading of the manuscripts.  

 

I  am  also  very  grateful  to  the  Institute  of  Biodiversity  Conservation  (IBC)  for  the 



provision of vehicles and laboratory facilities.  I also wish to extend my sincere thanks 

to Forestry Department of IBC for field trip facilitation, staff assignment and office and 

its facilities provision during the write up of my thesis. I thank members of drying room 

and germination laboratory technicians of the Institute of Biodiversity Conservation for 

their  hospitality  and  for  so  generously  sharing  their  time  with  me  throughout  my 

laboratory work.    

 

I  also  wish  to  thank  tree  seeds  laboratory  technicians  of  Forestry  Research  Center 



(FRC) for their advice and encouragement during germination experiment of my study.  

 

Finally,  I would like to thank all my  families and friends who  gave me  unconditional 



help through out my educational life.   

 

  Thanks to God!  



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


 

ii

 



Table of Contents 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT......................................................................................................................... I

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS ........................................................................................................................ II

 

LIST OF TABLES .................................................................................................................................. III

 

LIST OF FIGURES ................................................................................................................................ IV

 

ABSTRACT...............................................................................................................................................V

 

1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................. 1

 

1.1


 

B

ACKGROUND AND JUSTIFICATION



................................................................................................... 1

 

1.2



   

P

ROBLEM STATEMENT



..................................................................................................................... 4

 

1.3



 

O

BJECTIVES OF THE STUDY



............................................................................................................... 5

 

2    LITERATURE REVIEW .................................................................................................................. 6

 

2.1


 

C

ONSERVATION MEASURES OF BIODIVERSITY



................................................................................... 6

 

2.2



 

R

OLES OF SEED BANKING FOR BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION



........................................................... 8

 

2.3



 

E

STABLISHING PRIORITIES FOR PLANT CONSERVATION PROGRAM



..................................................... 9

 

2.4



 

S

EED STORAGE BEHAVIOR AND GENERAL STORAGE PRINCIPLES



..................................................... 10

 

2.5



 

A

PPROACHES TO PREDICT STORAGE BEHAVIOR OF SEED



................................................................. 12

 

2.6



 

F

ACTORS AFFECTING SEED LONGEVITY



........................................................................................... 14

 

2.7



 

S

EED AGEING



.................................................................................................................................. 16

 

2.8



 

D

ESCRIPTION OF 



S

YZYGIUM GUINEENSE

......................................................................................... 18

 

3. MATERIALS AND METHODS ....................................................................................................... 19

 

3.1


 

S

TUDY SITE AND SPECIES IDENTIFICATION



...................................................................................... 19

 

3.1.1 Study site ................................................................................................................................ 19

 

3.1.2 Species identification.............................................................................................................. 19

 

3.2



 

F

IELD AND LABORATORY METHODS



................................................................................................ 20

 

3.2.1 Seed collection and processing .............................................................................................. 20

 

3.2.2 Seed desiccation and moisture content determination ........................................................... 21

 

3.3.



 

S

AMPLING



...................................................................................................................................... 22

 

3.4



 

G

ERMINATION EXPERIMENTS



.......................................................................................................... 22

 

3.5



 

E

THNOBOTANICAL DATA COLLECTION



............................................................................................ 24

 

3.6



 

D

ATA ANALYSIS



.............................................................................................................................. 24

 

4. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION ......................................................................................................... 25

 

4.1


 

I

MPACTS OF DESICCATION ON THE GERMINATION OF SEEDS OF 



S.

  GUINEENSE

................................ 25

 

4.2



 

E

THNOBOTANY OF 



S.

 GUINEENSE

.................................................................................................... 29

 

4.2.1 Local name and uses of S. guineense ..................................................................................... 29

 

4.2.2 Threats to S. guineense........................................................................................................... 31

 

4.2.3 Conservation status of S. guineense ....................................................................................... 32

 

5. CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS .............................................................................. 34

 

6. REFERENCES ................................................................................................................................... 36

 

7. APPENDICES..................................................................................................................................... 47

 

 



 

 

iii 


List of Tables  

 

Table 1.  Results of one way analysis of variance (ANOVA) for germination tests..... 26 

 

Table 2. Local peoples' perception of factors threatening S. guineense in Regi, West  



             Arsi Zone of Oromia Region ............................................................................ 31 

 

Table 3. Local people’s perception about conservation status of S. guineense in Regi,  



              West Arsi zone of  Oromia Region.................................................................. 33 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



 

 


 

iv 


List of Figures

 

  

Figure 1. Processing of S. guineense seeds at IBC ........................................................ 21 

 

Figure 2.  An illustration of the set up used for the germination experiment................ 23 



 

Figure 4. Germination percentage of the seeds of S. guineense after desiccation to  

              different levels of moisture .............................................................................. 27 

 

Figure 5. Germination percentages of seeds of S. guineense after storage at different  



               moisture content for different weeks .............................................................. 28 

 

Figure 6. Local uses of S. guineense in Regi, West Arsi Zone of Oromia Region........ 30 



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 



 



Abstract 

 

Desiccation  sensitivity  of  seeds  and  ethnobotany  of  S.  guineense  (Willd.)  DC.  ssp. 



afromontanum  (Myrtaceae)  were  investigated  based  on  both  field  and  laboratory 

experiments.  The  field  study  component  includes  ethnobotanical  data  and  seed 

collection.  The  laboratory  work  includes  moisture  content  determination  and  viability 

test.  Desiccation  sensitivity  of  seeds  were  assessed  based  on  germination  tests 

following  desiccation and indigenous knowledge of the local communities using semi 

structured interview in the locality of Bombaso Regi peasant association of Arsi Negele 

Woreda, West Arsi Zone of Oromia Region where the seeds were collected. Seeds with 

initial  moisture  content  of  51%  had  99%  germination  percentage.  The  germination 

percentage  declined  significantly  following  desiccation  until  none  of  the  seeds 

germinated at 24% moisture content. The germination percentage declined slowly from 

99% (initial) to 78% at 37% moisture content. There was an abrupt loss of germination 

percentage  from  78%  to  16%  below  37%  moisture  content  which  indicates  that  the 

critical  moisture  content  was  around  37%.  The  result  has  shown  that  seeds  are  very 

sensitive  to  desiccation  which  exhibited  that  the  species  could  be  classified  as   

recalcitrant seed storage behaviors. It was also investigated that the local people have 

considerable indigenous knowledge about this tree and its use as construction material, 

timber,  fuel  wood,  charcoal  making,  and  local  medicine  and  as  wild  edible  fruit  have 

been  recorded.  In  addition  to  having  desiccation-sensitive  seeds,  the  plant  has  been 

locally  threatened  with  high  degree  of  exploitation  with  no  actions  of  conservation. 

Therefore, there should  be urgent implementation of conservation options suitable for 

the species. In addition to in-situ conservation options further research should be done 

to find suitable alternatives for long term conservation option as cryopreservation.       

  

  


 



1 Introduction 

 

     1.1 Background and justification 

 

 

Plants  are  vital  part  of  world’s  biological  diversity  and  essential  resources  for  human  well-

being. Forests play particularly important roles in peoples’ livelihoods by providing goods and 

services. Besides crop plants that provide the basic food, many thousands of wild plants have 

great economic and cultural importance and potential to provide food, medicine, fuel, clothing 

and shelter  for vast number of people throughout the world.  Forests provide services such  as 

waste absorption, regulating soil erosion, maintenance of the natural balances of water bodies, 

reduction of greenhouse gases and provision of aesthetic values. Trees are the basic constitute 

of  forests  and  have  essential  roles  in  protecting  the  soil  from  erosion  by  wind  and  water, 

providing fuel wood, fodder for livestock and habitats for wildlife. 

 

Different factors have contributed to the very high rate of deforestation. Increasing demand for 



agricultural land as a result of the growth of population, settlements and increasing investment 

needs  are  subjecting  the  natural  forest  resources  to  decline.  Due  to  agricultural  expansion 

naturally  occurring  plant  species  are  replaced  by  the  small  number  of  introduced  species.    In 

tropical  areas,  forests  are  cleared  and  converted  into  permanent  arable  land  under  permanent 

cultivation.  Seeds  of  climax  tree  species  become  scarce  for  regeneration  and  woody  growths 

are eliminated by continuous burning and weeding (Demel Teketay, 1996). 

 

 

The  rate  of  deforestation  is  becoming  faster  in  Ethiopia  and  the  efforts  made  to  halt  this 



condition  are  little  or  none  which  makes  the  situation  both  worst  and  alarming  (Elias  Taye, 

2004). Forests are being destructed even before they have been surveyed, described and studied 

thoroughly (Demel Teketay, 1993). Legesse Negash (1995) pointed out that some decades ago 

Ethiopia  was  covered  by  various  indigenous  tree  species  including  Podocarpus,  Acacia,  wild 

olive  and  others.    About  35%  (42  million  hectare)  of  the  land  cover  of  Ethiopia  was  once 

covered  with  high  forests  (EFAP,  1994).  It  was  also  reported  that  the  high  forest  cover  was 

3.6% by the early 1980s, 2.7% by 1989 and less than 2.3% in 1994; IBCR, 2001 According to 

Girma  Balcha  (1996),  Seed  storage  for  genetic  conservation  in  Ethiopia  concentrated  mainly 



 

on agricultural species. But now, research towards the preservation of plant material should be 



crucial before it is too late to save forest seed particularly of rare species.   

  

According  to  Taye  Bekele  (2004),  knowledge  of  the  genetic  structure,  mating  system  and 



storage  behavior  of  the  tree/shrub  species  is  necessary  for  the  selection  of  appropriate 

conservation  measures  to  achieve  specific  conservation  objectives. 

One  of  the  methods  to 

preserve tree species is storage of their seeds in genebanks.

 Unfortunately, not all seeds can be 

stored  without  loss  of  viability.

 

To  survive  long-term



 

storage  in  the  dehydrated  state,  seeds 

have  to  be  able  to  withstand

 

desiccation  to  low  water  contents.  A  large  group  of  so-called



 

orthodox  seeds  have  this  ability,  whereas  another  group  of  mainly

 

tropical  seeds,  designated 



recalcitrant, are damaged during

 

drying.



 The ability of seeds to tolerate desiccation could play a 

role in determining conservation strategies.

 

 

Seeds are mainly of three types based on their ability to resist desiccation. These are orthodox 



seeds  which  can  be  desiccated  to  2-6%  moisture  level  (Hong  and  Ellis,  1996).  Recalcitrant 

seeds  killed  by  desiccation  at  high  moisture  level  as  high  as  20-30%  and  are  difficult  to 

manage; hence they  cannot withstand moisture loss without loss of viability  (Pritchard  et al., 

2004).  The  third  category  which  is  intermediate  between  orthodox  and  recalcitrant  seeds  can

 

withstand  partial  dehydration,  but  they  cannot  be  stored  under



 

conventional  genebank 

conditions  because  they  are  cold-sensitive

 

and  desiccation  does  not  increase  their  longevity 



(Ellis et al., 1990; Girma Balcha et al., 2000).  

 

As  many  tree  species  or  their  habitats  are  being  threatened,  it  is  important  to  learn  about  the 



seed  biology  of  these  species  (Demel  Teketay,  1993).  Knowledge  of  the  storage  behavior  of 

tree  species  is  necessary  for  the  selection  of  appropriate  conservation  measures  to  achieve 

specific conservation objectives. In order to obtain preliminary information for their storage it 

is important to examine the desiccation responses of seeds of unknown storage behavior.  

 

 A successful reforestation program depends on a continuous supply of healthy seedlings. This 



process  begins  with  successful  seed  collection,  storage,  processing  and  sowing  practices 

(Leaden,  1996).  Inadequate  work  has  been  done  on  establishing  the  seed  storage  behavior  of 

native  species  resulting  in  only  limited  availability  of  ex-situ  conservation  seed  collection 


 

especially with respect to native forest species (Girma Balcha et al., 2003). Studies undertaken 



on  Coffee  arabica  (Ellis  et  al.,  1990)  and  Podocarpus  falcatus  (Girma  Balcha,  1996;  Girma 

Balcha, 2000) classified these species as having intermediate storage behavior.  

 

Endemic  and  threatened  plants  can  be  protected  directly  through  establishment  of  seedbanks 



and  indirectly  through  the  documentation  of  information  concerning  the  geographic 

distribution  and  population  size  of  target  plants  and  threats  to  them.  Indigenous  people  in  an 

area  can  be  sources  of  information  about  individual  species  using  ethnobotanical  studies.  

Ethnobotany is quantitative evaluation of the use and management of plant resources (Martin, 

1995).  Ethnobotanical  studies  also  used  raise  awareness  in  local  communities  as  discussions 

are set in motion during data collection. 

 

  

This  research  was  targeted  to  Syzygium  guineense,  an  important  indigenous  tree  species  in 



Ethiopia.  S. guineense has become one of the species which needs urgent need of conservation 

actions  (Elias  Taye,  2004).  Girma  Balcha  (1996)  also  claimed  that  the  species  is  one  of 

Ethiopia’s  indigenous  tree  species  with  no  published  reports  on  the  storage  behavior  of  the 

species.    The  species  is  in  the  list  of  priority  species  for  conservation  by  IBC  along  with 



Hagenia  abyssinica

,  Cordia  africana,  Podocurpus  falcatus,  Prunus  africana,  Accacia 



abyssinica

 and many other indigenous tree species (Taye Bekele et al., 2004). 

 

The main purpose of this research was to investigate the desiccation sensitivity and to asses the 



available  ethnobotanical  information  on  S.  guineense.  This  species  has  three  subspecies  in 

Ethiopia  and  the  present  study  is  based  on  S.  guineense  (Wild.)  DC.  ssp.  afromontanum.  F. 

White (Friis, 1995).  

 

 



 

 

 



 

 


 


  1   2   3   4   5


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə