School of graduate studies environmental science program



Yüklə 439.26 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/5
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü439.26 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5

 

1.2   Problem statement 

 

Decades  back,  Ethiopia  was  covered  with  dense  natural  forests.  Unfortunately  this  became  a 



history for the present generation. A long history of land clearing and sedentary agriculture has 

changed the vegetation cover of Ethiopia. The natural vegetation types have disappeared from 

most parts of the country except in few patches in holy places and inaccessible areas (Feoli et 

al

., 2002). Deforestation is followed by soil erosion and loss of soil fertility which affects the 

land productivity of the country.    

 

Studies  have  shown  that  some  species  of  plants  in  the  country  are  threatened  with  different 



factors which need different approaches of conservation actions. Indigenous tree/ shrub species 

are at high risk of genetic erosion due to the rapid decline of the natural forests. Reforestation 

of degraded lands through plantation of native species depends up on the possibility of raising 

seedlings either from seeds or vegetative propagules (Demel Teketay, 1993). Access to seeds 

and  seedling  and  storage  problems  limit  the  use  of  many  potentially  high  value  indigenous 

species in tree planting and conservation programs (Leggesse Negash, 1995).  

    

Loss  of  traditional  value  of  a  given  species  in  an  area  is  also  one  of  the  plant  conservation 



challenges.  Local  peoples  are  aware  of  many  uses  of  the  trees.  They  know  how  to  harvest  it 

and which part can be used. This invaluable knowledge is being lost by the destruction of the 

natural ecosystems.   

 

Indigenous  knowledge  of  people  about  individual  species  should  be  part  of  conservation 



researches. The knowledge gathered through scientific methodology has to be associated with 

indigenous knowledge practices to make sure that the plant resources are conserved and used 

in  sustainable  manner  (Zemede  Asfaw,  2006).  Therefore,  studies  about  seed  storage 

physiology of the indigenous trees of the country and documentation of traditional knowledge 

must be part of different conservation actions.  

 

This work therefore is an attempt to build up scientific knowledge about seed storage behavior 



of S. guineense which includes tree seed collection, drying and viability test.  The other aim of 

 

this  study  was  to  assess  and  document  the  local  people’s  knowledge  on  the  uses,  threats  and 



conservation status of the species in Bombaso Regi peasant association of Arsi Negle Woreda, 

West Arsi zone of of Oromia Region.  

 

Two main factors were mainly considered for selection of the species. It is one of the species in 



the priority list of the IBC (Taye Bekele et al., 2004) and the availability seeds during the time 

of the study. The results of this research can reinforce the experimental investigation, it helps 

to kindle the interests of local people and raise awareness on the seed storage behavior of the 

species. 

  

1.3 Objectives of the study  

 

The  main  objective  of  this  study  was  to  investigate  the  desiccation-sensitivity  of  seeds  and 



ethnobotany of S. guineense  

Specific objectives  

  To record and analyze the indigenous knowledge of the local people in the study area 

on the use, propagation  and conservation status of S. guineense  

  To investigate the impact of moisture content on the viability of seeds of S. guineense.   

  To study  and describe the desiccation sensitivity  of seeds of   S. guineense both from 

the experimental results and the ethnobotanical investigations. 

  

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 



2    Literature review  

 

2.1 Conservation measures of biodiversity  

 

The  two  basic  approaches  to  conservation  are  in-situ  and  ex-situ  methods.  In-situ  refers  to 



maintaining  plants  and  animals  in  their  original  habitat  while  ex-situ  conservation  is  the 

conservation of components of biological diversity outside their natural habitats in a controlled 

condition. The in-situ  approach of  conservation is at an ecosystem level  and natural habitats, 

and it includes the maintenance and recovery of viable populations of species in their natural 

surrounding.  The  preservation  of  species  in-situ  offers  all  the  advantages  of  allowing  natural 

selection to act which cannot be recreated in ex-situ conservation (Taye Bekele, 2004).   

  

In  ex-situ  conservation  the  genetic  resources  are  conserved  in  identified  genebanks.  These 



genebanks  can  be  storage  of  seed  (≈5  to  -20ºC),  in  vitro  storage  of  plantlets  (≈  4  to  25  ºC), 

Cryostorage  of  propagules  using  liquid  nitrogen  (≈-150  to  -196  ºC)  or  in  the  form  of  field 

genebank (Dhillon et al., 2004). 

  

Since  in-situ  conservation  is  the  conservation  of  ecosystems  and  natural  habitats,  priority 



should be given to this conservation measure whenever feasible for maintenance and recovery 

of  viable  populations  of  species  in  their  natural  surroundings.  However,  there  are  conditions 

where in-situ conservation is not feasible. Habitat destruction of endangered  and  rare species 

requires  ex-situ  conservation  efforts  to  prevent  extinction.  Ex-situ  conservation  is  means  of 

conservation  of  plant  genetic  resources  when  there  is  a  shortcoming  to  conserve  natural 

habitats which is really the fate of our earth.   

 

According  to  Phartyl  et  al.  (2002),  in-situ  conservation  in  tropical  ecosystem  is  difficult  not 



only due to environmental disasters, landslides, unpredictable rainfalls, and flood but also due 

to human made disasters and pressures like forest fire and over exploitation of wild resources 

for commercial purposes. Thus in tropics ex-situ conservation of forest genetic resources have 

become a common practice due to the alarming rate of deforestation and the loss of species and 

genetic  diversity.  In  situations  where  in-situ  conservation  programs  do  not  prove  to  be 


 

adequate,  appropriately  maintained samples of living collections reduce the risk of extinction 



(Gurrent and Raven, 2003).  Engels (2001) also suggested that   ex-situ conservation methods 

should be applied as a back up system to avoid possible loss of genetic diversity. 

 

Ex-situ 

conservation  can  serve  a  variety  of  different  roles  depending  on  the  sort  of  the  plant 

and the purpose for which they are being stored. The roles can be extended from collections of 

agriculturally  important  crop  plants  and  their  relatives  to  collections  of  threatened  native 

species (Guerrant and Raven, 2003). Ex-situ conservation can provide the opportunity to study 

the  biology  of,  and  understand  the  threats  to,  endangered  species  in  order  to  eventually 

consider  successful  species  recovery  programs  which  would  include  restoration  and 

reintroduction.  Ex-situ  facilities  can  be  used  for  germplasm  evaluation,  as  centers  of 

documentation and information systems and for providing information on genetic resources on 

a commercial basis (NBSAP, 2005).  

 

According to Frensco (1998) there are three major forms of ex-situ conservation    



• 

Seed  genebanks

  provide  a  controlled  environment  where  seeds  can  be  dried  to  low 

moisture  content  and  stored  at  low  temperature  without  losing  their  viability. 

Approximately 90% of all "ex-situ" accessions are stored as seeds.  

• 

Field  genebanks

  such  as  arboreta,  plantations  and  botanical  gardens  are  useful  for 

species  that  are  difficult  or  impossible  to  store  as  seed,  including  vegetatively 

propagated crops and tree species. Field genebanks account for approximately 8% of all 

accessions in "ex-situ" storage.  

• 

In vitro methods

 are techniques for conserving plant parts, tissue or cells in a nutrient 

medium. This method is used to conserve species that do not readily produce seeds, or 

where the seeds cannot be dried without damaging them. Only 1% of all accessions are 

held "in vitro".  

The  other  measure  to  conserve  biodiversity  is  to  study  indigenous  knowledge  of  local 

community. Ethnobotanists explore how plants are used by the people for such things as food, 

shelter  medicine  clothing,  hunting  and  religious  ceremonies.  This  information  is  critical  to 


 

study the interaction between people and plant in an area and to plan the conservation actions 



for specific species.  

Ethnobotanical  Studies  are  significant  in  revealing  locally  important  plants  species  and 

documentation of traditional knowledge. According to Tigist Wondimu et al. (2006), there is a 

wide  gap  between  the  perception  of  elder  people  and  their  descendents,  older  people  remain 

with more knowledge about the environmental components and their uses than younger ones.  

Therefore, indigenous knowledge should be protected as an important natural heritage.   



2.2 Roles of seed banking for biodiversity conservation

 

 

Among the various ex-situ conservation methods, seed storage is the most convenient for long-



term  conservation  of  plant  genetic  resources.  Seed  banking  is  one  form  of  garden-based 

conservation. Because such efforts occur away from the plants' natural habitats, they are called 

off-site  or  ex-situ  conservation  (Dhillon  et  al.,  2004;  Rao,  2004).  When  a  species  or  an 

ecologically  significant  or  taxonomically  distinct  section  of  a  species  is  either  needed  for 

research or endangered in its natural habitat, conservation of seeds, live plants, or both can be 

options.  

 

The  preservation  of  plant  germplasm  in  seedbanks  (or  genebanks)  is  one  of  the  more  useful 



techniques  of  ex-situ  conservation  of  wild  plant  species.  Through  seedbanks  researchers  can 

obtain  access  to  rare  and  endangered  species  without  disturbing  or  damaging  natural 

populations  (Phartyal  et  al.,  2002).  Unlike  most  agricultural  species  that  can  generate  crop 

varieties  with  multiple  breeding  cycles  over  a  few  years,  forest  tree  breeders  can  not  rapidly 

produce  new  varieties,  nor  can  they  quickly  breed  for  new  variations  among  populations 

(Girma  Balcha,  2004).  Conserving  the  existing  genetic  diversity  among  population  is  very 

critical and this can be archived by long–term storage of seeds in gene banks. 

 

As plant genetic resources programs have increased in number and expanded in scope so, the 



range  of  species  requiring  ex-situ  conservation  has  broadened  from  major  crops  to  include 

forestry species, and wild and underutilized species. Assembling ex-situ collections from wild 

populations is an important component of wider conservation goals (Schoen and Brown, 2001). 


 

 



Seed banking is relatively new and under-exploited tool in combating the loss of global plant 

diversity  and  has  the  unique  feature  as  conservation  techniques  of  making  rapidly  and  easily 

available. Conventional seed storage is believed to be safe, effective and inexpensive method 

of ex-situ conservation of plant genetic resources (Phartyl et al., 2002).    

 

Maintaining



 collections for conservation purposes is not a new concept and is extremely useful 

if based with a sense of purpose. Many people store native plant seeds quite effectively without 

a lot of money. Storing germplasm in seed banks is both inexpensive and space efficient as an 

ex-situ

  conservation  method.  It  successfully  allows  for  the  preservation  of  large  populations 

with minimal genetic erosion (Dhillon, et al., 2004).  

 

  



The  banks  provide  a  controlled  source  of  material  of  high  quality  and  genetic  diversity  for 

research and for the rehabilitation and restoration of degraded ecosystems and the recovery of 

threatened  species.  Genebank  collections  are  very  important  for  post–war  rehabilitation  of 

farming (

Richards and Ruivenkamp, 1997; 

Guerrant and Raven, 2003

). 

 

2.3 Establishing priorities for plant conservation program 



  

Conservationists  need  to  assess  the  conservation  needs  of  all  plant  species  and  establish 

detailed and appropriate management plans. But there is very little information about the plant 

species.  What  is  known  in  reality  is  many  plant  species  are  threatened  (Tenner,  2003).  The 

number of woody species that require attention for conservation could be very large; therefore, 

setting  priority  is  very  essential  for  efficient  allocation  of  scares  resources  and  time  (Girma 

Balcha,  2004).  When  choosing  species  for  ex-situ  conservation  priority  should  be  given  to 

endangered  species.  A  list  of  priority  species  and/  or  habitats  for  conservation  is  developed 

based on the institutional remit and expertise, political priorities and botanical information such 

as Red Data Lists (Tenner, 2003; Miranto, 2005). 

 


 

10 


The  basic  criteria  for  determining  the  necessity  of  gene  conservation  are  the  degree  of  threat 

and socioeconomic importance of the woody species. Ethnobotanical studies can also help to 

identify conservation issues such as cases where rates of harvest of plants exceed rates of re-

growth (Aumeeruddy-Thomas and Shengji, 2003).   

 

The Forest Genetic Resources Conservation Project which was organized and implemented by 



forest and aquatic plants resources conservation department of IBC has carried out woody plant 

diversity  and  structural  studies  including  socioeconomic  survey  in  several  forest  areas  of 

Ethiopia and prioritized 154 woody species of the country from nine moist montane forests of 

Ethiopia (Taye Bekele et al., 2004). The selection of species for the present study was based on 

the priority lists of IBC and the availability of seeds by the time of the study.    

 

2.4 Seed storage behavior and general storage principles  



 

Roberts  (1973)  classified  plant  seeds  as  orthodox  (desiccation-tolerant)  and  recalcitrant 

(desiccation-intolerant)  according  to  their  storage  properties.  A  large  proportion  of  plant 

species produce seeds that can be dried to a sufficiently low moisture content that permits them 

to  be  stored  at  low  temperatures.  These  seeds  are  termed  orthodox  seeds  (Roberts  1973). 

Orthodox  seeds  can  survive  complete  water  removal  and  can  be  stored  for  many  years  by 

drying and cooling.  

 

Orthodox seeds can be dried without loosing viability to low levels of moisture content. Mature 



seeds  survive  desiccation  to  low  moisture  content  at  least  2-6%  depending  on  the  species 

usually  much  lower  than  those  they  would  normally  achieve  in  nature.  These  seeds  are 

generally easy to store if basic processing and storage facilities are available. (Hong and Ellis, 

1996).    Drying  seed  and  placing  in  cold  storage  is  relatively  simple  way  of  conserving  large 

amounts of germplasm in a small space. This method of conserving a germplasm is achieved 

only  for  orthodox  seeds.  Orthodox  seeds  undergo  a  period  of  desiccation  before  being  shed 

from the tree (Corner and Sowa, 2002).  

  


 

11 


On the other hand, many species of tropical or subtropical origin have recalcitrant seeds which 

are sensitive to drying and chilling and cannot be stored in  conventional  genebanks  (Bonner, 

1996). A number of tropical fruit and timber species fall into this category including coconut, 

avocado,  mango  and  cacao  (Krishanapillay  and  Engelmann,  1996).  Recalcitrant  seeds  do  not 

survive drying to any large degree and are thus not amenable to long term storage.  Although 

the  critical  moisture  level  for  survival  varies  among  species,  there  is  a  threshold  of  minimal 

value of water content below which there is damage to germination of recalcitrant seeds. Thus 

the water content of recalcitrant seeds and storage temperature must be reduced until near the 

minimum  critical  water  content  (Hong  and  Ellis,  1996;  Barbedo  and  Bilia,  1998;  Pritchard, 

2004).  


 

 

A  further  characteristic  of  recalcitrant  is  that  the  seeds  are  actively



 

metabolic  when  they  are 

shed, in contrast to orthodox types

 

which are quiescent. This affects all aspects of the handling



 

and  storage  of  recalcitrant  seeds  (Schmidt,  2000).  However;  the

 

type  and  intensity  of 



metabolism  differ  among  recalcitrant  seeds

 

of  different  species,  depending  on  the 



developmental status

 

and water concentration at shedding. 



    

Recalcitrance  is  not  an  absolute  phenomenon  and  that  there  is  a  continuum  of  seed  behavior 

graduating  from  that  characterized  by  desiccation  tolerance,  through  a  decreasing  ability  to 

withstand  dehydration  stress,    to  that  of  extreme  sensitivity  to  even  the  slightest  water  loss 

(Berjak  and  Pammenter,  1994).  According  to  Tompsett  and  Pritchard  (1998),  tropical 

recalcitrant seeds which must, in most cases be held at non-chilling temperatures are limited to 

storage for a year. But desiccation- intolerant seeds can survive well for three years.  

 

Improved  methods  for  short-or  medium-term  storage  and  for  handling  are  required  to  enable 



the  uses  of  recalcitrant  species  in  reforestation  programs.  Optimum  seed  moisture  contents, 

temperatures  and  atmospheric  conditions  should  be  determined  for  important  species. 

Minimum storage temperatures that avoid chilling damage are the most important, since lower 

temperature should in general decrease seed metabolism and pathogen activity and extend the 

storage  life  of  seeds  (Bonner,  1996).  According  to  Engels  (1996),  ex-situ  conservation  of 


 

12 


recalcitrant seeds is very problematic and much more research is required to allow medium or 

long-term storage of such materials. 

 

There  is  also  an  intermediate  category  between  the  orthodox  and  recalcitrant  seed  groups    



Intermediate  storage  behavior  implies  that  the  seeds  are  shed

 

at  relatively  high  water 



concentrations,  but  will  withstand

 

considerable  dehydration,  although  not  to  the  extent 



tolerated

 

by orthodox seeds (Ellis et al., 1990; Girma Balcha et al., 2000). Intermediate seeds 



can

 

withstand  partial  dehydration,  but  they  cannot  be  stored  under



 

conventional  genebank 

conditions  because  they  are  cold-sensitive

 

and  desiccation  does  not  increase  their  longevity. 



The  intermediate  category  contains  numerous  important

 

tropical  cash  crops,  such  as  oil  palm 



(Elaeis  guinensis)  or

 

coffee  (Coffea  arabica)  and  neem  tree  (Azadirachta  indica)  (Hor  et  al., 



2005). 

2.5 Approaches to predict storage behavior of seed 

 

 



The  first  step  in  developing  an  ex-situ  conservation  strategy  for  a  particular  species  is  to 

determine  seed  storage  behavior.  In  order  to  obtain  the  preliminary  information  for  their 

storage  it  is  important  to  examine  the  desiccation  responses  of  seeds  of  unknown  storage 

behavior. Engels (1996) suggested that a simple protocol is needed to allow easy determination 

of unknown seed storage behavior (orthodox-recalcitrant-intermediate). 

 

 According  to  Hong  and  Ellis  (1996),  the  first  step  of  the  protocol  to  determine  seed  storage 



behavior  considers  desiccation  tolerance  to  low  moisture  content  and  the  second  step  of  the 

protocol  requires  investigation  of  the  survival  of  seeds  following  storage  in  different 

environments as shown in flow chart (Appendix, 1).  

 

In principle investigation of desiccation tolerances and temperature requires quite a lot seeds. 



In cases where there is a short supply of seeds it is difficult to apply such investigation. There 

are  certain  approaches  to  predict  seed  storage  behavior  in  species  for  which  experimental 

results  are  not  currently  available.  There  have  been  a  number  of  attempts  to  correlate  seed 

storage  behavior  with  seed  characteristics  such  as  shape,  size,  mass,  seed  coat  ratio  and 



 

13 


moisture content at shedding. Desiccation sensitive seeds have been reported to be, on average, 

larger than desiccation tolerant seeds which will reduce the rate of seed  drying  and  are more 

frequent in wet habitats (Tropical rainforests) or shed in wetter periods of drier habitats.      

 

 Pritchard  et  al.  (2004)  presented  data  for  10  African  dry  land  species  and  examined  the 



relationships between desiccation sensitivity and seed size, rainfall at the time of seed shed and    

germination  behaviors.  The  authors  found  that  desiccation  species  producing  desiccation-

sensitive  seeds  had  larger  (>  0.5  g)  seeds,  shed  in  months  of  comparatively  high  rainfall, 

germinated rapidly and had comparatively small investments in seed physical defenses. 

 

There  is  also  association  between  level  of  desiccation  tolerance  and  SCR  (i.e.  ratio



 

of  seed 

coverings: mass). Desiccation sensitivity was found to

 

be significantly related to relatively low 



SCRs, typified by

 

large  seed size coupled with thin covering (Daws et al., 2006).   Hong and 



Ellis  (1998)  also  investigated  patterns  of  response  to  seed  desiccation  in  40  species  of 

Meliaceae. According to their report, species with desiccation–sensitive seeds typically occur 

in moist areas, particularly rainforests, and produce large (>1g), round seeds which are shed at 

high moisture content. 

 

 Desiccation-sensitivity of seeds can also correlate with plant ecology. According to Pritchard 



et  al

.  (2004),  desiccation-  sensitive  seeds  are  largely  restricted  to  regions  with  comparatively 

high rainfall. Species producing recalcitrant seeds are common in humid tropical forests, where 

the  seeds  of  climax  species  germinate  immediately  after  shed  rather  than  contributing  to  the 

soil seed bank (Pammenter and Berjak, 2000).  

 

In  a  study  of  886  tree  and  shrub  species,  Tweddle  et  al.  (2003)  reported  that  desiccation  -



sensitive  seeds  are  most  common  in  tropical  rainforests,  where  they  contribute  about  47%  of 

species and are infrequent in drier environments such as savanna where about 12% species are 

found.  Species which show orthodox seed storage behavior occur in arid habitats, desert and 

savanna. And few species may show intermediate storage behaviors in theses habitats.  

 


 

14 


 Recalcitrant seeds which are shed in a highly hydrated state and endure a chilling spell during 

their maturation are adapted to low temperatures in storage in comparison to those which have 

no such opportunity as in warm tropical environments. These responses served as the basis for 

the  identification  of  recalcitrant  types  as  temperate  recalcitrant  and  tropical  recalcitrant  seeds 

(Phartyal et al., 2002).    

 

One  potential  advantage  of  seed  desiccation  sensitivity  may  be  rapid  germination.  Rapid 



germination may reduce the period during which seed desiccation can occur and also have the 

advantage of reducing seed predation levels. In contrast seed desiccation tolerance may form a 

soil  seed  bank  and  have  been  potentially  exposed  to  seed  predators  for  extended  periods  of 

time (Pritchard et al., 2004).   

 

1   2   3   4   5


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə