School of graduate studies environmental science program



Yüklə 439.26 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə3/5
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü439.26 Kb.
1   2   3   4   5

2.6 Factors affecting seed longevity 

 

Seed  longevity  refers  to  the  period  seeds  will  remain  viable  in  store  and  determined  by  the 



genetic  and  physiological  storage  potential  of  seeds.  Any  deteriorating  events  or  damage 

during  storage  affects  storability  of  a  given  seed.  The  most  important  trait  for  seed 

conservation  is  the  time  that  seeds  will  remain  alive  under  a  given  storage  condition  (seed 

longevity) (Probert et al., 2007). Seeds should be stored under optimum conditions in order to 

maximize  their  longevity.  Longevities

 

in  the  desiccated  state  vary  from  a  few  days  in  some 



pollen

 

and spore types to many decades in some seeds  and moss spores  and



 

green vegetative 

tissues (Hoakstra, 2005).  

  

Seed  longevity  is  mainly  influenced  by  the  environmental  conditions  such  as  storage 



temperature  and  moisture  content  (Spara  et  al.,  2003)  within  broad  limits,  reducing  moisture 

content  and  temperature

 

during  storage  increases  the  longevity  of  desiccation-tolerant



 

(orthodox) seeds (Girma Balcha et al., 2000). To survive long storage in the dehydration state, 

seed  have  to  be  able  to  withstand  desiccation  to  low  water  contents  (Scande  et  al.,  2000).  

However,  there  is  low  moisture  content  limit  below  which  further  desiccation  had  no  further 

effect  on  longevity.  This  is  because  of  the  type  of  water  present  in  seeds.    Thus,  removal  of 

weakly  bound  water  improves  longevity

 

but,  once  this  is  all  removed,  the  withdrawal  of 



 

15 


strongly  bound

 

water  by  further  desiccation



 

has  no  additional  effect  because  strongly  bound 

water has negligible

 

chemical potential (Ellis and  Hong, 2006). 



 

Seedbanks have a long term conservation objective. Because they need to maintain high levels 

of  seed  viability  in  their  collections,  effective

 

tools  to  predict  longevity  under  given  storage 



conditions  and

 

to  minimize  damage  to  the  germplasm  are  required.  Buitikin  et  al.  (2000) 



suggested that the limiting

 

factor of the longevity of dry germplasm is the availability of water



 

for  chemical  reactions,  and  that  therefore  the  water  potential

 

would  be  a  better  way  of 



predicting optimal storage conditions.   

 

Longevity  of  seeds  varies  from  species  to  species  even  if  they  are  provided  with  identical 



storage  conditions.  Species  and  sometimes  genera  show  an  inherited  storage  behavior  which 

may be either orthodox or recalcitrant. Each species is likely to respond identically to a given 

set of storage condition (Phartyal et al., 2002). 

 

Immature  seeds  generally  have  shorter  storability  than  fully  matured  seeds  unless  early 



collected  seeds  attain  full  maturity  including  normal  storability.  Neya  et  al.,  (2003) 

investigated  that  the  preservation  of  viability  of  stored  Neem  seeds  improved  with  maturity. 

Thus development of seeds and possible ripening of fruits can determine storability of seeds. 

Neya  et  al.  (2003)  concluded  that  the  effects  of  storage  moisture  content  and  temperature  on 

Neem seed longevity are highly dependent on the maturity of seeds, with the most mature seed 

exhibiting orthodox-type responses. According to Probert et al. (2007), slow or delayed drying 

of immature seeds has shown to increase both desiccation tolerance and  storability in several 

wild plant species.  

 

Development  stage  is  especially  evident  and  important  in  recalcitrant  seeds.  Because  the 



process  of  maturation  and  germination  are  more  or  less  continuous,  deteriorations  proceed 

rapidly  if  germination  does  not  occur.  Dehydration  is  an  essential  part  of  the  maturation 

process.  As  water  lost  from  the  seed  cell  membranes,  physiological  processes  such  as 

respiration  diminish  to  very  low  levels.  Simple  compounds  are  changed  to  starches,  fats  and 



 

16 


proteins.  These  complex  compounds  can  remain  stable  over  many  years  for  long  periods 

(Leaden, 1996). 

 

Seed deterioration may start already in the field and be influenced by handling from collection 



and  transport  through  processing.  Generally,  seeds  with  high  initial  viability  have  a  higher 

longevity. Loss of viability is initially slow, followed by a period of rapid decline. The higher 

the viability when the seed lot enters into storage the longer the seed will keep viable under a 

given  storage  environment  (Schmidt,  2000).  As  orthodox  seeds,  recalcitrant  seeds  of  poor 

quality will have reduced storage life spans (Berjak and Pammenter, 2003). 

 

 



2.7 Seed ageing 

 

 



Ageing  is  a  process  of  deteriorating  events  that  take  place  within  the  seed  which  lead  to  the 

death of the seed. Orthodox seeds are characterized by their ability to tolerate

 

desiccation and 



to retain their viability for a long time in

 

the dry state. However, these seeds age during storage 



and eventually

 

lose their ability to germinate (Murthy et al., 2003). 



 

Causes of physiological ageing may be grouped into extrinsic factors which are external factors 

influencing viability and intrinsic factors, where the ageing is a result of events within the seed 

only (Hoakstra, 2005).  In relation to the intrinsic longevity properties of  anhydrobiotes,

 

there 


may be several ways by which aging can be held up. One

 

such way is curtailing the production 



of  free  radicals.  This

 

may  be  achieved  by  down  regulation  of  the  metabolism  before



 

desiccation,  because  the  mitochondrial  system  is  a  major  source

 

of  free  radicals,  even  at  low 



water contents (Leprince et al.,

 

2000). Another way to control free radical production may be 



through

 

slowing  down  chemical  reaction  rates  and  molecular  diffusion



 

in  the  cytoplasm  by  a 

glassy state (Hoakstra, 2005).     

  

Under the long-term storage conditions, seeds are likely to



 

be in the glassy state because of the 

cool  storage  environment

 

and  low  seed  water  content.  The  high  intracellular  viscosity  of  the 



glassy  state

 

could  retard  molecular  mobility  and  thus  slow  down  seed  deterioration



 

during 


 

17 


storage.  With  increasing  temperature  or  seed  water  content,

 

the  solid-like  glassy  state  may 



soften  into  the  rubbery  state

 

or  even  ‘melt’  into  the  liquid.  The  low  viscosity  and  enhanced 



molecular mobility in the rubbery

 

or liquid state would permit certain deteriorative reactions



 

to 


proceed  rapidly,  which  are  otherwise  retarded  in  the  glassy

 

state.  This  implies  that  the  major 



primary process that initiates seed ageing

 

could be different under different storage conditions 



(Murthy et al., 2002; Pritchard and Dicke, 2003). 

 

Temperature  and  moisture  content  are  the  two  major  factors  determining  the  rate  of  ageing.  



Biochemical deterioration during seed ageing has been studied

 

mostly under accelerated ageing 



conditions using high temperature

 

and high seed water content (McDonald, 1999). Under such 



storage

 

conditions,  seeds  typically  lose  their  viability  within  a  few



 

days  or  weeks.  Loss  of 

viability  is  also  associated  with  an  increase  in  the  accumulation  of  chromosomal  aberrations. 

Sivritepe and Dourado (1998) reported that both in improved and landrace pea seeds, loss of 

viability and the induction of chromosomal aberrations occurred more rapidly in seeds of high 

moisture content than low moisture content. 

 

 In  desiccation  sensitive  recalcitrant  seeds  moisture  content  is  always  high,  hence  seeds  are 



currently metabolically active. Metabolically  active seeds continue to accumulate dry weight. 

If  germination  does  not  occur,  deterioration  proceeds  rapidly.  Molecular  mobility  is 

increasingly  considered  a  key  factor  influencing  storage  stability  of  bimolecular  substances 

(Buitink et al., 2000).   

 

Metabolism  is  strongly  related  to  temperature.  At  low  temperature  and  moisture  content   



biochemical  and  cytological  deterioration  can  be  slowed  down.  At  low  moisture  contents, 

enzymatic  reactions  are  expected  to

 

play  little  role  in  seed  ageing.  Within  broad  limits, 



reducing  moisture  content  and  temperature

 

during  storage  increases  the  longevity  of 



desiccation-tolerant

 

(orthodox) seeds (Schmidt, 2000; Murthy et al., 2003).  



 

 

 

 


 

18 


2.8 Description of Syzygium guineense   

  

Syzygium  guineense 

(Willd.)  DC.  ssp.  Afromontanum  F.  White  is  a  member  of  the  family 

Myrtaceae. The species is a large forest tree up to 35 m high. Young branches are cylindrical or 

triangular  (Friis,  1995).  Flowers  are  white  in  dense  heads  and  the  sweet  smell  attracts  many 

insects and frits are edible.  The species grows at altitudes of 1500- 2600m, found in montane 

forest and also secondary forest growth occasionally seen as an isolated tree left in farmlands 

(Fichl and Admasu Adi, 1994).  

 

According  to  Azene  Bekele  (1993),  the  species  is  widely  distributed  in  Africa,  prefers  moist 



soils  with  high  water  table  and  grows  well  in  moist  and  wet  kolla  and  woyena  dega 

agroclimatic  zones.Geographically,  this  species  is  distributed  in  Gahana,  Ethiopia,  Somalia, 

Afghanistan,  Zaire,  Rwanda,  Burundi,  Sudan,  Uganda,  Kenya,  Tanzania,  Angola,  Zambia, 

Malawi  and  Zimbabwe  (Demel  Teketay  and  Assefa  Tigineh,  1991;  Fichtl  and  Admasu  Adi, 

1994). 

 

S.  guineense



  is  one  of  multipurpose  tree  species  found  in  different  forest  areas  of  Ethiopia. 

Zerihun Woldu (1999) reported the presence of S. guineense in dry evergreen montane forests, 

in moist evergreen forests and also in the forests in transition between dry evergreen and moist 

evergreen  montane  forests,  while  Kumelachew  Yeshitela  and  Simon  Shibru  (2004)  reported 

the distribution of S. guineense in eight moist montane forests of southwest Ethiopia. 

 

S. guineense

 is known for its uses like hardwood, timber, construction material, shade tree and 

the  like  in  different  parts  of  Ethiopia.  In  a  study  of  coffee  shade  tree  in  Harargie,  Demel 

Teketay  and  Assefa  Tegineh  (1991)  pointed  out  that  S.  guineense  used  as  shade,  house 

building, various utensils, and fuel wood. It is also mentioned that the tree is important honey 

bee forage. The plant is  an edible fruit bearing species which adds more  importance for it as 

wild  edible  plants  are  important  for  family  diet  and  household  food  security  (Azene  Bekele, 

1993; Kebu Balemie and Fassil Kebebew, 2006). 


 

19 


 

As most authors reported, S. guineense is a plant with several uses in most areas of Africa. In a 

study undertaken on desiccation sensitivity of economically important trees in Kenya, Omondi 

(2004)  reported  that  the  species  has  several  uses  such  as  timber,  charcoal,  tool  handles, 

construction  and  food  /fruit.  According  to  Maunda  et  al.  (1999),  S.  guineense  is  a  tree  with 

sweet edible fruits which is made into drinks in some areas of Kenya. 

 

3. Materials and methods  

   

This  study  was  based  on  both  field  study  and  laboratory  experiments.  While  the  field  study 

component  included  reconnaissance  survey  for  identification  of  the  tree  with  seeds,  seed 

collection  and  ethnobotanical  data  collection;  the  work  in  the  laboratory  included  moisture 

content determination and viability test of the seeds of S. guineense.    

 

 3.1 Study site and species identification  

 

             



  3.1.1 Study site 

 

 



Seed collection was carried out in Lephis, which is found in Reji site in Bonbaso Regi peasant 

association of Arsi Negelie Woreda, West Arsi Zone of Oromia Region. The sampling site was 

geographically  located  at  09°  00'N,  037°  07.5'E  about  25  km  South  of  Addis  Ababa.  The 

collection  site  was  a  school  compound  and  the  site  collection  primarily  based  on  the 

availability of mature seeds by time of the study.    

      


3.1.2 Species identification     

 

Herbarium  specimens  of  S.  guineense  were  collected,  pressed  and  identified  in  the  National 



Herbarium  of  the  Addis  Ababa  University  Ethiopia  to  identify  the  subspecies.  Species 

nomenclature follows flora of Ethiopia and Eritrea volume 2 part 2 (Friis, 1995).  



 

20 


 

 3.2 Field and laboratory methods  

 

 3.2.1 Seed collection and processing  

 

 

Ripe  fruits  of  S.  guineense  (Wild.)  DC.  spp.  afromontanum.  F.  White  at  the  point  of  natural 



dispersal  was  collected  from  four  neighboring  trees  at  the  same  stage  of  maturity  on  8  June 

2007. The  fruits were harvested by  climbing the  trees  and  cutting down large inflorescences. 

The  mature  fruits  were  collected  before  they  had  fallen  to  the  ground  to  avoid  the  risk  of 

contamination and to collect fruits with healthy seeds.   

 

During transport the fruits were kept in small quantity (about 10kg) of small bags to be well 



ventilated to avoid seed  suffocation and decay. The fruits were transported to the  Institute of 

Biodiversity Conservation, Addis Ababa, on a vehicle in an ambient condition within two days 

of collection. Two sub-samples were sealed (to prevent moisture loss or absorption) by plastic 

bags one for initial germination and the other for initial moisture content test. 

 

After arrival at IBC, the fleshy fruits were soaked in water for three hours to facilitate softening 



of the pulp (Fig. 1). The fleshy pulp was removed by rubbing between hands and continuous 

washing with water. The bulk sample was made to dry under shade of open air for monitoring 

of  regular  moisture  content.  The  initial  moisture  content  of  the  sub-sample  was  determined 

both with and without pulp by standard oven dry method. The initial germination and moisture 

content  tests  were  conducted  by  depulping  the  fruits  by  rubbing  between  hands  in  the 

laboratory. 

 


 

21 


 

Figure 1. Processing of S. guineense seeds at IBC 

 

3.2.2 Seed desiccation and moisture content determination        

 

 The  cleaned  seeds  were  slowly  dried  down  under  ambient  conditions  to  five  levels  of  target 



moisture contents for germination test. During drying, the seeds were allowed to be in a single 

layer to make the drying condition uniform for both seed groups.   

 

For  moisture  content  determination  5g  seeds  were  used  by  grinding  into  pieces  and  three 



replicates  were  used  for  each  measurement.  Each  replicates  were  weighed  before  and  after 

drying  for 17 hrs in  an  oven at 103ºc  following  the method recommended by Hanson (1985) 



 

22 


and  Rao  et  al.  (2006).  The  moisture  content  was  determined  by  taking  the  average  for  each 

replicate and was conducted for each subsequent germination test. 

 

The  germination tests  were done at six moisture content levels: 51, 44,  37, 32, 27, and 24%.  



Coming down in the moisture level, the range in the first two gradients was 7 each while the 

range  in  the  next  two  gradients  was  5  each.  The  range  in  lower  gradient  was  only  3%.    The 

reason to increase the frequency of germination test was that as the seeds dry to a lower level, 

seed death increases. This was, therefore, to determine the points in the gradient where severe 

seed death. 

  

3.3. Sampling  

 

 

In  this  study  sampling  for  germination  and  moisture  content  determination  were  applied  by 



randomly taking out eight samples from different parts of the seed lot which are called primary 

samples  and  then  mixing  them  into  a  large  sample  which  is  called  a  composite  sample 

following  ISTA  (2007).  The  composite  sample  was  then  reduced  to  a  working  sample  by 

dividing  into  the  required  quantity.  The  seed  population  was  thoroughly  mixed  before  any 

division to increase the homogeneity of the sample. 

 

 3.4 Germination experiments  

 

Germination  tests  were  employed  under  ambient  temperature  (15  to  21  ºC)  in  a  germinator 



room. Germination of seeds was conducted on plastic boxes of 6x18x26 cm with 13 randomly 

equidistant  holes  at  the  bottom.  The  holes  are  used  for  air  circulation  on  sand  medium 

moistened with 20ml of water for 1kg of sand. The sand was sterilized and the plastic boxes 

were  half  filled.  The  germination  was  in  sand  in  which  the  seeds  covered  with  the  sand  as 

recommended by Rao et al. (2006).  

 


 

23 


There were 25 seeds per plastic box for each germination test employed at the given moisture 

level  with  four  replicates  for  each  test  gives  a  total  of  100  seeds.  The  samples  were  watered 

during the whole germination period to maintain the moisture of the sand.  

 

 Each  plastic  box  was  put  in  a  polyethylene  bag  (38cmx45cm)  with  the open  end  folded  and 



clipped  at  one  point  to  keep  the  sand  moist  and  were  randomly  placed  in  the  germination  

room.  The  plastic  boxes  were  labeled  with  the  name  of  the  plant,  sowing  date  and  moisture 

content of sowed seeds (Fig. 2).    

  

 



 

Figure 2.  An illustration of the set up used for the germination experiment 

 

Germination assessments were made on weekly basis. Germination was based on    emerging 



of seedlings with visual  observation which have  the potential to be  grown to a healthy plant.  

Germinated  seeds  were  recorded  and  removed  (seedlings  evaluated  counted  and  removed) 

from the trays in each count. 


 

24 


 

3.5 Ethnobotanical data collection 

 

 Ethnobotanical data were collected through interaction with community members in Regi area 



following  Martin  (1995).    Data  collection  was  conducted  in  two  phases.  In  the  first  phase, 

some  preliminary  information  was  collected  during  seed  collection  on  June  2007.  The  local 

name and flowering and fruiting time of the plant was recorded when the informants reached to 

consensus. In the second phase, open ended and semi-structured interviews were employed on 

September  2007  using  pre-formulated  questions  (Appendix  2).  The  informants  were  135 

members of the local community with 60 female participants.   

  

3.6 Data analysis   

 

Germination  results  under  different  moisture  content  were  analyzed  using  SPSS  software 



program  (13.0)  (ASF,  2003).  One-way  analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  was  used  to  test  the 

significant  effect  of  moisture  content  on  the  germination  (Table  2).  The  ethnobotanical  data 

were analyzed using description and percentages. The data were interred into Microsoft Office 

Excel data sheet and used to analyze results of germination and responses of informants.   



 

 

 



 

 

 

 

 



 

 


 

25 


4. Results and discussion 

 4.1 Impacts of desiccation on the germination of seeds of S.  

guineense   

 

The  germination  tests  were  conducted  at  five  levels  of  moisture  content  following  drying  of 



seeds at room temperature. S. guineense initially germinated with 99% germination percentage. 

Seeds  showed  no  dormancy;  they  germinated  easily  at  harvest,  the  mean  moisture  content 

(fresh  weight basis) were 51% without pulp  and 68% with pulp. The  germination percentage 

went  on  decreasing  in-line  with  lowering  moisture  content  and  further  drying  reduced  the 

germination level to zero at 24% moisture content (Appendix 1).  The germination percentage 

declined significantly with reduction of moisture content (p< 0.01, Table 2).  

 

It is known that recalcitrant seeds are sensitive to desiccation. Pritchard  et al. (2004) pointed 



out that desiccation sensitive seeds are killed by drying to water contents as high as 20-30%. 

Berjak and Pammenter (1994) characterized recalcitrant seeds as  desiccation sensitive through 

a decreasing ability to withstand dehydration stress, to that of extreme sensitivity to even the 

slightest loss of water.  

 

This  research  finding  shows  that  S.  guineense  can  be  categorized  as  extremely  desiccation 



sensitive. The seeds have shown abrupt loss of viability at high moisture content level (37%). 

This  finding  is  in  a  similar  pattern  to  that  of  Normah  et  al.  (1997)  in  which  Garicinia 



mangostana

 with germination percentage 10% at 15% moisture content reported as extremely 

desiccation  sensitive.  In  addition  to  loss  of  viability  with  desiccation  moisture  content  at  the 

time  of  harvest  also  can  indicate  the  desiccation  sensitivity  of  Seeds.  This  character  is  also 

observed  in  this  species  which  was  51%  moisture  content  at  the  time  of  harvest.    Seeds  of 

recalcitrant  species  have  high  moisture  content  and  lack  dormancy  at  the  time  of  dispersal 

(Garwood and Linghton, 1990).  

 

When fresh recalcitrant seeds begin to dry, viability is first slightly reduced as moisture is lost 



but  then  begins  to  be  reduced  considerably  at  a  certain  critical  moisture  content    some  times 

termed  lowest  safe  moisture  content  (Hong  and  Ellis,  1996).  The  present  study  finding  is  in 



 

26 


agreement  with  this  justification  (Fig.  3).  Therefore,  the  lowest  safe  moisture  content  of  S. 

guineense

  can  be  between  37%  and  32%  moisture  content.  And  no  seeds  germinated  below 

24% moisture content.   

 

Although the critical moisture level for survival  varies among species, there is a threshold of 



minimal  value  of  water  content  below  which  there  is  damage  to  germination  of  recalcitrant 

seeds (Hong and Ellis, 1996; Barbedo and Bilia, 1998).   

 

Desiccation  sensitivity  has  been  used  by  other  authors  for  identifying  seeds  of  species.   



Pritchard  et  al.  (2004)  reported  results  for  10  species  on  the  basis  of  desiccation  tolerances 

alone. In their finding seeds were categorized as desiccation-tolerant if they survived drying to 

5% moisture content and desiccation-intolerant if the seeds had lost most of their viability after 

dehydration to 20% moisture content. 

 

Most  authors  who  studied  seed  behaviors  of  species  within  the  family  Myrtaceae  reported 



results  showing  desiccation  sensitivity  of  recalcitrant  seeds  have  high  initial  viability  which 

gradually decreased during desiccation and the seeds are sensitive to higher moisture contents 

compared  to  seeds  from  trees  of  other  families.    Wang  et  al.  (2004)  reported  that  seeds  of 

Acmena  acuminatissma

  which  belongs  to  the  Myrtaceae  family  are  sensitive  to  desiccation 

below  40%  moisture  content.  This  result  compares  well  with  this  research  finding  as  it  is 

shown that seeds of S. guineense are sensitive to desiccation below 37%. Baxter et al. (2004) 

assessed the responses of Syzygium cuminii seeds to desiccation. They reported that S. cuminii 

seeds are desiccation sensitive as none of the seeds germinated below 16% which was 24% for 

the present study. 

 

1   2   3   4   5


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə