September excursion combined groups barbecue at babinda



Yüklə 87.3 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü87.3 Kb.

In this issue...

OCTOBER 2015 EXCURSION 

REPORT – IN SEARCH OF 

RAINFOREST GIANTS..........1

B

OONJIE


 S

PECIES


 L

IST


 ....3

SEPTEMBER EXCURSION – 

COMBINED GROUPS 

BARBECUE AT BABINDA......3

B

OULDERS


 P

ICNIC


 A

REA


 

S

PECIES



 L

IST


 ................4

WHAT IS “FASCIATION”?.....5

WHAT'S HAPPENING...........7

C

AIRNS



 B

RANCH


 

C

HRISTMAS



 B

REAKUP


 .....7

T

ABLELANDS



 B

RANCH


......7

T

OWNSVILLE



 B

RANCH


......7

Society for Growing Australian Plants

Cairns Branch

Newsletter 154-155

October-November 2015

O

CTOBER



 2015 E

XCURSION


 R

EPORT


 – I

N

 



S

EARCH


 

OF

 R



AINFOREST

 G

IANTS



Don Lawie

Cairns SGAP’s October trip was to the Boonjie Scrub to look for the fabled jungle 

giants Stockwellia quadrifida. The Scrub lies on the western slopes of Mount Bartle 

Frere, Queensland’s highest mountain, in an area of high and frequent rainfall, at an 

altitude of about 700 metres. The so-called track (more a rough, poorly marked trail) 

to the Stockwellias branches off the road which leads to the start of the Mount Bartle 

Frere walking track.  Coralie was the  only one of us who had been there recently, so 

she was elected Expedition Leader. 

Rain fell steadily throughout the trip, varying from light mist to dinkum tropical rain. 

We had all come prepared with hats and raincoats and didn’t let a bit of rain deter us, 

but it made sightseeing quite difficult. To look up was to get an eyeful, and the footing

was so difficult that one had to stop to look at anything. Stopping for even a few 

seconds gave the hordes of leeches a chance to commence climbing up to meet their 

counterparts who dropped on us from the tree branches and those that leapt on us as

we brushed any leaves on the narrow, unkempt track.  They were very affectionate – 

blood brothers one could say.

The early part of the track is an old, degraded logging road which deteriorates into a 

sort of a trace of slippery, steep yellow mud with a runnel of water in the middle. 

Most of us had trekking poles which were invaluable in ascending and descending but 

nevertheless falls were inevitable. That presented a bigger target for the leeches. 



Botanical scrutiny was not

easy under the

circumstances but we

were able to record some

items: Cassowary scats,

often large were

thoughtfully deposited on

the  track, indicating a

healthy population of the

big birds. Fallen fruits

which cassowaries eat

were plentiful, notably

including the intriguing

Wax Berry or Cloud Fruit, 



Irvingbaileya australis.

The fruit consists of a thin,

bright green covering on a

soft waxy white type of

aril about the size of half a

thumb. (Who was going to

wave a ruler about in this

weather?).  Cassowaries

eat it, and Satin

Bowerbirds arrange them

in their bowers.  

Irvingbaileya is named

after a prominent 19th

century American

botanist.  There is only

one species in the genus and only 

one genus in the family 

Irvingbaileyaceae, but they have now

been placed in the family 

Icacinaceae. 

There were plenty of uneaten fruit on

the ground, a good sign that 

cassowaries are well fed

since October/November

is hatching time for new

chicks. Various species of 

laurel were plentiful,

including Beilschmeidia

tooram, Endiandra 

montana, and the large E.

insignis. A rarely seen

palm, Oraniopsis



appendiculata, is a

feature of the Boonjie

Scrub – a handsome

feather palm which must

have horticultural

potential.  

We found a bower of the

Tooth-Billed Catbird (well, not 

difficult, it too was in the middle of 

the track). Instead of using his usual 

lure of upturned leaves of Brown 

Bollywood (Neolitsea dealbata) this 

bloke had some pale green, upturned

leaves of a species of Polyscias.  We 

heard him making all the calls of the 

forest birds but didn’t see 

him – he probably 

couldn’t see us either in 

the murky drizzle. 

Numerous flowers of the 

Jucunda Vine 

(Neosepicaea jucunda

littered the  ground, and a

young vine of about 10 cm

diameter snaked its way 

to the canopy. These can 

grow quite large.  A 

surprise find in this dense 

primary forest was a 

Davidson’s Plum 

(Davidsonia pruriens) in 

fruit. I usually associate 

these with more open 

country. 

But the Stockwellias: are 

they as big as we 

remembered?  My last 

visit was about twenty 

years ago and on the way 

home we visited the Twin 

Kauri trees at Lake 

Barrine: they looked like 

saplings after the 

Stockwellias.  The first Stockwellia to 

appear is on a ridge and is quite a 

large tree but nothing to get excited 

about; it’s a bit of a teaser.  The next 

is a really big tree with massive 

buttresses, then one comes to a 

damaged tree with  a hollow core 

which one can climb 

inside.  Several others 

were in sight and there 

may be even bigger ones 

further on but we had 

achieved our aim; Pauline

wanted to go further but I

was almost knackered. It 

would have been foolish 

to stop and rest in such 

leech country so we had a

short pause and returned 

to the vehicles, muddy, 

bloody, wet but 

triumphant with myself in

a falling-down state. My 

sincere thanks to the 

Team for their support. 

SGAP Cairns Branch Newsletter 

2

Cassowary's breakfast - Cerbrea inflata (cassowary plum), 

Irvingbaileya australis (wax berry), Austrobaileya scandens 

(austrobaileya), possibly Syzygium papyraceum (paperbark 

satinash) and a Sapindaceae for desert.

But the Stockwellias: are they as big as we remembered?


We adjourned to beautiful Lake 

Eacham for a mid-afternoon lunch 

and a welcome hot drink from our 

thermoses. Was it worth it? Oh, Yes. 

Would I do it again? Only in a 

helicopter! 

NOTE: Stockwellia quadrifida is the 

sole described species in the genus, a

part of the Family Myrtaceae.  Found 

only in an area of the Queensland 

Wet Tropics rainforests  at an altitude

of 700 – 900 metres (probably also in

the unexplored vicinity) the trees 

grow to a height of 40 metres. They 

were discovered, in 1971, in a co-

operative effort by State Forestry 

men Vic Stockwell and Stan Gould in 

a joint aerial photography  survey 

followed by ground-truthing.  Their 

unique status (their nearest living 

relatives occur in Arnhem Land and 

New Guinea) was recognised and all 

logging in the area was immediately 

halted.  The species name refers to 

the way in which the typically 

myrtaceous flower opens in four 

parts [Editors Note: A little more 

detail on the story can be found on 

page 15 of the Australian Systematic 

Botany Society Newsletter No. 113, 

found here: 

http://www.asbs.org.au/newsletter/

pdf/02-dec-113.pdf]. 

The Stockwellias are an Australian 

botanical treasure hidden away in a 

barely accessible forest. They deserve

wider scrutiny and less strenuous 

access.  



Boonjie Species List 

Don Lawie

Basal Angiosperms

AUSTROBAILEYACEAE

Austrobaileya scandens

LAURACEAE

Beilschmeidia tooram

Endiandra insignis

Endiandra montana

Monocots

ARECAEAE

Oraniopsis appendiculata

Eudicots

APOCYNACAE

Cerbera inflata

ARALIACEAE

Polyscias sp.

BIGNONIACEAE

Neosepicea jucunda

CUNONIACEAE

Davidsonia pruriens

ICACINACEAE

Irvingbaileya australis 

MYRTACEAE

Stockwellia quadrifida

?Syzygium payraceum

SGAP Cairns Branch Newsletter 

3

S

EPTEMBER



 E

XCURSION


 – C

OMBINED


 G

ROUPS


 

B

ARBECUE



 

AT

 B



ABINDA

Stuart Worboys 

September's SGAP outing was a long-planned gathering of north Queensland SGAP groups.  Invitations were sent

to all groups from Townsville north, and we were pleased to have visitors from the all over.  For such a big 

meeting, we chose one of the richest and most biodiverse spots in north Queensland – the Babinda Boulders.  

Here, at the foot of Queensland's highest mountain, -

Rob Jago and myself lead two groups down to the lookout over the gorges and channels that have been the subject

of so many tragic accidents.  This is Rob's home territory, and he had a story for everything green.  He pointed out

a couple of rare, Wet Tropics endemics growing right next to the carpark – Diploglottis pedleyi and Neostrearia 



fleckeri.  For the visitors from drought-stricken Townsville, this was a rare opportunity to view lowland rainforest 

at its best. Rob's full species list can be seen on the next couple of pages.

Whilst we were out botanising, Boyd and Coralie were busy at the barbecue, pulling together a fantastic feed of 

sausages, sauce, bread and salad.  There was even some honey-soy marinated tofu for those note inclined to 

munch on a “mystery bag”.  After lunch, we took the opportunity to discuss the future of SGAP in the tropical 

north.  Most groups find it difficult to attract new members, and questions were asked about what changes, if any, 

should be made.  I'm not sure that answers were arrived at, but the discussion was both lively and frank.  

Thanks to everyone who contributed to making this day a success.  I trust we can hold another joint meeting next 

year.

Oraniaopsis appendiculata (Image by 

tanetahi, commons.wikimedia.org)


Boulders Picnic Area

Species List 

Rob Jago

“cv” = cultivated



* = exotic

Ferns and fern allies

CYATHEACEAE

Cyathea cooperi

Scaly Tree Fern

LYCOPODIACEAE

Phlemariurus phlegmaria

Tassel Fern

Phlegmariurus phlegmarioides

Layered Tassel Fern

Basal Angiosperms

ANNONACEAE

Cananga odorata

Woolly Pine

ATHEROSPERMATACEAE

Doryphora aromatica

Northern Sassafras

LAURACEAE

Beilschmiedia tooram

Tooram Walnut

Cryptocarya grandis

Cinnamon Walnut

Cryptocarya murrayi

Murray's Laurel

Cryptocarya pleurosperma

Poison laurel

Endiandra bellendenkerana

Bellenden Ker Walnut

Endiandra cowleyana

Rose Walnut

Endiandra globosa

Ball-fruited Walnut

Endiandra insignis

Hairy Walnut

Endiandra sankeyana

cv

Sankey's Walnut

Litsea leefeana

Bollywood

MYRISTICACEAE

Myristica globosa subsp muelleri

Nutmeg or Babinda-blood-in-

the-Bark

PIPERACEAE

Piper macropiper

Piper mestonii

Monocots

ARACEAE

Epipremnum pinnatum

ARECACEAE

Archontophoenix alexandrae

Alexandra Palm

ORCHIDACEAE

Robiquetia gracilistipes

Eudicots

ANACARDIACEAE

*Mangifera indica cv

Mango

APOCYNACEAE

Alstonia scholaris

Milky Pine

Wrightia laevis

cv

Millgar

ARALIACEAE

Polyscias elegans

Celery-wood

Schefflera actinophylla

Umbrella Tree

BIGNONIACEAE

Deplanchea tetraphylla

cv

Golden Bouquet Tree

CLUSIACEAE

Calophyllum inophyllum

cv

Beach Calophyllum

Garcinia warrenii

Native Mangosteen

CONVOLVULACEAE

Merremia peltata

CUNONIACEAE

Gillbeea adenopetala

Pink Alder

Karrabina biagiana

Brush Mahogany

Pullea stutzeri

Hard Alder

ELAEOCARPACEAE

Elaeocarpus grandis

cv

Silver Quandong

EUPHORBIACEAE

Homalanthus novoguineensis

Native Bleeding Heart

FABACEAE

Castanospermum australe

Black Bean

Entada phaseoloides

Matchbox Bean

*Inga vera

cv

Icecream Bean

*Samanea saman cv

Raintree

HAMAMELIDACEAE

Neostrearia fleckeri

ICACINACEAE

Irvinghaileya australis

Cloud Fruit

LAMIACEAE

Faradaya splendida

Potato Vine

Gmelina fasciculiflora

cv

White Beech

LECYTHIDIACEAE

Barringtonia calyptrata

Cassowary Pine

LORANTHACEAE

Dendrophthoe curvata

Mistletoe

MALVACEAE

Argyrodendron peralatum

Red Tulip Oak

Brachychiton acerifolius

cv

Flame Tree

MELIACEAE

Dysoxylum alliaceum

Buff Mahogany

Dysoxylum arborescens

cv

Mossman Mahogany

Dysoxylum klanderii

Buff Mahogany

Dysoxylum pettigrewianum cv

Spur Mahogany

MENISPERMACEAE

Carronia pedicellata

MORACEAE

Ficus benjamina

Weeping Fig

Ficus hispida

Boombil

Ficus leptoclada

Atherton Fig

Ficus pleurocarpa

Banana Fig

Ficus variegata

Variegated Cluster Fig

Ficus virens

Banyan Fig

Ficus virgata

MYRTACEAE

Melaleuca viminalis

cv

Red Bottlebrush

Ristantia pachysperma

Sour Hardwood

Syzygium boonjee

Boonjee Satinash

Syzygium cormiflorum

Bumpy Satinash

Syzygium eucalyptoides subsp 

eucalyptoides

cv

Bush Apple

Syzygium forte subsp forte cv

Flaky-barked Satinash

Syzygium gustavioides

Grey Satinash

Syzygium hedraiophyllum

Gully Satinash

Syzygium leuhmannii

cv

Cherry Satinash

Syzygium tierneyanum

cv

Creek Satinash

SGAP Cairns Branch Newsletter 

4


Xanthostemon chrysanthus cv

Golden Penda

PHYLLANTHACEAE

Glochidion harveyanum var 

harveyanum

Harvey's Buttonwood

Glochidion sumatranum

Buttonwood

PITTOSPORACEAE

Pittosporum trilobum

Red Pittosporum

PROTEACEAE

Buckinghamia celsissima

cv

Ivory Curl Tree

Buckinghamia ferruginflora cv

Noah's Silky Oak

Cardwellia sublimis

Northern Silky Oak

Carnarvonia araliifolia var araliifolia

Caledonian Oak

Darlingia darlingiana

Brown Silky Oak

Helicia nortoniana

Norton's Silky Oak

Hollandaea sayeriana

RHAMNACEAE

Sageretia hamosa

RHIZOPHORACEAE

Carallia brachiata cv

Corkybark

RUTACEAE

Acronychia vestita

White Aspen

SALICACEAE

Casearia dallachii

Dallachy's Silver Birch

Sclopia braunii

cv

Flintwood

SAPINDACEAE

Sarcoteryx martyana

cv

Toechima erythrocarpa

Pink Tamarind

Toechima erythrocarpum

Pink Tamarind

XANTHOPHYLLACEAE

Xanthophyllum octandra

cv

MacIntyre's Boxwood

SGAP Cairns Branch Newsletter 

5

W

HAT



 

IS

 “F



ASCIATION

”?

Ian Walker, Bowen

Amongst the joys of plant-watching are the many nuances to be found.  Beyond “what species is that?” are a 

whole range of subtle or not-so-subtle differences caused by genetics, the environment and their interaction.

An interesting and often spectacular but lesser known example of this is fasciation.  This is a flattening of the 

stem or flowers.  The results are often bizarre and hideous but sometimes they can be interesting enough to be 

used in horticulture e.g. the bedding plant cockscomb - Celosia

Something has clearly gone wrong with the growing point 

of these plants and the cause is associated with its 

damage.  As you might expect, this damage isn’t restricted

to a single cause and a wide range of causes have been 

found including genetics, bacteria (especially Rhodococcus



fascians), viruses and physical damage caused by such 

things as insects, mites, frost, chemicals or mechanical 

injury.

Last year, while walking along a railway line in Bowen, I 



found two Tridax procumbens plants with fasciated 

flowers within 50 metres of each other (next page).  This 

is unusual and may just be chance or perhaps indicative of

a common causal agent like spraying along the line or proximity to the Bowen Cokeworks.  Tridax is a native of 

the tropical Americas but has long been naturalised in Queensland and around the world.  It is an aggressive 

weed but is reported to have a wide range of potential therapeutic activities.   I spend a lot of time removing it 

from my lawn in Bowen but I have a soft spot for it as it was the first plant I ever keyed out.

I collected seed from these two seed heads (the remainder of the plants were unaffected) and I’ll see if the 

fasciation is carried through to the next generation.  Usually it isn’t and the mutation has to be maintained by 

vegetative propagation.

Sometimes fasciation can be a problem in plant collections, as in the propagation of tassel ferns, and sometimes 

it gives rise to interesting and valuable forms as in the numerous “Cristata” forms of cacti and succulents.  Either 

way, it is another dimension to that rich tapestry we call botany.  Keep an eye out for it next time you’re 

botanising.



Fasciated lycopod.

SGAP Cairns Branch Newsletter 

6


Cairns Branch 

Christmas Breakup

 

Meetings and excursions on the 3



rd

 

Sunday of the month.



Sunday 15 November, 12 noon.

We'll be winding up the year at the 

Australian Tropical Herbarium.  

Construction works are causing havoc

to normal car parking arrangements, 

so please meet at the front of 

Crowther Lecture Theatre, Building 

A3, James Cook University Cairns 

Campus, McGregor Road Smithfield.

Ashley Field has kindly agreed to 

discuss the development of the new 

interactive Fern Key, and we will 

follow this with 

It's Christmas! Bring a plate of 

goodies to share!  Look forward to 

seeing you all.



Tablelands Branch

Meetings on the 4

th

 Wednesday of 



the month.  Excursion the following 

Sunday. Any queries, please contact 

Chris Jaminon on 4091 4565 or email 

hjaminon@bigpond.com 



Townsville Branch

Meets on the 2nd Wednesday of the 

month, February to November, in 

Annandale Community Centre at 

8pm, and holds excursions the 

following Sunday. 

See www.sgaptownsville.org.au/ for 

more information. 

SGAP Cairns Branch Newsletter 

7

To Smithfield 



Shopping Centre, 

Cairns

W

HAT



'

S

 H



APPENING

SGAP CAIRNS 2015 COMMITTEE 

Chairperson  Boyd Lenne  

 boydlenne@hotmail.com

Vice-chairperson  Pauline Lawie 

Treasurer   Stuart Worboys 

Secretary   Coralie Stewart 

Newsletter   Stuart Worboys 

         worboys1968@yahoo.com.au 

Webmaster   Tony Roberts



Park here

Meet at Building 

A3 (Crowther 

Lecture Theatre), 

12 noon.

Document Outline



Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə