September’s excursion set out to complete a tour of



Yüklə 52.18 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü52.18 Kb.

  

 

 



TREES OF 

CAIRNS CITY

 

September’s excursion set 



out to complete a tour of 

Cairns city started in March 

this year.  In March, we 

looked at the trees of the 

southern end of the city – 

September’s goal was to 

look at the trees growing at 

the northern end of town.   

We met at midday by the 

war memorial on the 

Esplanade.  David and Mary 

grabbed a table in the 

shade of an old 

Calophyllum inophyllum, 

one of the grandest and 

most cyclone resistant of 

our coastal trees.  They 

bravely held the table 

against the backpacker 

hordes until Coralie, Tony 

and Trudi arrived.   

A fine pair of mature native 

trees were visible  from our 

lunch spot – Dillenia alata 

and Carallia brachiata, 

both festooned with felt 

fern (Pyrrosia longifolia).  

After a pleasant lunch we 

wandered up to the Cairns 

Civic Theatre Gardens, 

passing attractive examples 

of Syzygium fibrosum, 

Syzygium luehmannii and 

Adenanthera pavonina 

along the way.   

The gardens of the Cairns 

Civic Theatre are home to 

some of the most 

interesting and rarely 

planted trees in Cairns.  

Near the corner of Grafton 

and Florence Street, a 

group of beautiful small 

leaved paperbarks (possibly 

SGAP Cairns

Newsletter 

143 

September 



2014 

Society for Growing Australian Plants, Cairns Branch

 

this issue



August Excursion Report P.1

Banks and Solander Beds P.2

News from the ATH P.3

Upcoming events  P.4

EXCURSION REPORT 

AUGUST 2014 

Melaleuca foliolosa) has been planted adjacent to a 

tall, slightly dirty Corymbia torelliana.  Further down 

Grafton Street, a stunning Parinari nonda shades the 

memorial garden of Michiko Okuyama, awfully 

murdered in Cairns in 1997.  Dotted around the 

gardens are other well-established natives – Intsia 

bijuga, Guettarda speciosa, Euroschinus falcata, and 

Syzygium bamagense.  There were lots of palms too, 

but we chose to ignore those because nobody knew 

what they were. 

One of the great features of tropical gardens is the 

abundance of epiphytes which appear on mature 

trees.  Our walk found no shortage of attractive 

natives filling the trees.  The ferns Pyrrosia rupestris, 

Pyrrosia longifolia, Platycerium hillii and Drynaria 

rigidula were common.  There were even a few 

orchids – Cymbidium madidum, Dendrobium discolor 

and some very large Dendrobium teretifolium 

flowering for our pleasure.  

We proceeded down to the Cairns Hospital, where we 

had been asked to identify a few trees. near the 

eastern entrance.  Here we found a tiny patch of 

native rainforest, occupied by pigeons and smoking 

health workers.  Shading this pleasant picnic spot 

were a couple of impressive Terminalia microcarpa 

and their smaller cousins, Terminalia muelleri.  We 

also noted Ficus benjamina, Archontophoenix 

alexandrae, Euroschinus falcata, and Tamarindus 

indica. 

We then completed the loop walk by following 

the coast path down along the Esplanade.  Along 

the strand there are a few typical beachside 

natives that have been planted, or allowed to 

grow, by Council staff – Casuarina equisetifolia, 

Clerodendrum inerme, Heritiera littoralis, 

Scaevola taccada, Melaleuca leucadendra, 

Mimusops elengi, Cupaniopsis anacardioides and 

Deplanchea tetraphylla.  We finished our walk 

with a well-earned ice cream cone from Muddy’s 

Café. 


If you’re interested in finding out a little more of 

the street trees of Cairns, a marvelous little 

booklet has been put together by Fran Clayton.  

“The Fabulous Flowering Trees of Cairns City.  A 

Walking Guide.” illustrates the best of the native 

and exotic trees growing around town.  The 

revised edition was published in 2013, and is 

available from Limberlost Nursery, or  

directly from the author (franclayton 

@bigpond.com). 

More photos, page 3 


 

  Help Needed - Banks & Solander Beds  



  

 

NEWS FROM THE ATH 



Absolutely critical to the 

naming of all living 

organisms, is the “type 

specimen”.  The type is the 

key reference specimen 

against which all members of 

a species are compared.  If 

they match the type (or the  

written, published 

description of the type), then 

the name used for the type 

can be applied.  In day to day 

use of plant names, we don’t 

really have to give much 

thought to type specimens, 

but without them, biology 

would be a mess. 

Usually types are hidden 

away in museums and 

herbaria.  Many Australian 

type specimens are held in 

Britain – not much help to 

the local research 

community.  Conversely, the 

type specimens held in the 

Australian Tropical 

Herbarium are difficult to 

access for researchers based 

in Europe.  But a recent 

grant has enabled the 

herbarium to purchase 

camera equipment with 

which to take high resolution 

images of our types, which 

will be available on the web 

to researchers around the 

world. 

High resolution image of 



the type specimen of 

Chionanthus axillaris, 

collected by Banks and 

Solander and held in the 

British Museum. 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



The 7

th

 of September is 



also Carnival on Collins 

Day.  This is the perfect 

opportunity to engage 

with the public, and 

maybe win a few 

members.  We’ll be 

setting up a table and 

have banners advertising 

our organisation. 

We’ll need help with:  

  Setting up in the 

morning (0830) 

and packing up 

after planting 

  Staffing the desk 

  Planting 

  Mulching 

  Providing native 

flowers or potted 

plants for display 

If you’re available to help 

on the day (even one 

hour would be great), 

please let Tony or Stuart 

or Boyd know by email –  

  t.roberts@cairns.qld.gov.au 

  worboys1968@yahoo.com.au 

  boydlenne@hotmail.com 

Boyd and Tony have 

organised the gardening 

tools.  You’ll need to 

bring: 


  gloves 

  drinking water 

  sandfly repellent 

  covered shoes 

Hope to see you!  

PS Do any of you fine 

people have some 

stockings we could use 

for tying the golden 

orchids to their new 

home?  Bring some along 

on the day. 

 

Left: Mulching the Banks and 



Solander Beds at Cooktown 

Botanic Gardens, June 2007. 

 

As foreshadowed in the 



last newsletter, 7 

September

 is now 

confirmed as the planting 

day for the Banks and 

Solander beds at the 

Cairns Botanic Gardens. 

The plan is to plant and 

mulch the beds on 7 

September.  There are 

about thirty plants to go 

in, as well as relocating 

some Dendrobium 

discolor orchids from a 

nearby tree.   


   AUGUST 2014 EXCURSION – THE STREETS OF CAIRNS 

 

 

    Scaevola taccada (Cardwell Cabbage) 



 

 

 



Syzygium fibrosum 

 

  



 

    Magnificent Deplanchea tetraphylla (Wallaby Wireless or Golden   

Enormous dome shaped Ficus benjamina in the Esplanade gardens,  

    Bouquet) 

 

 

 



 

 

 



outside Cairns Hospital. 

 

 



 

    


Hidden Cymbidium madidum flowers   

    Dendrobium teretifolium and Dendrobium 

    Cupaniopsis anacardioides (tuckeroo) 

 

 



 

 

 



    discolor, growing together in a mango in  

 

 



 

 

 



    Munro Martin Park  

 


 

 



 

www.sgapcairns.org.au 

 

Upcoming Events 



 

TABLELANDS SGAP 

Meetings on the 4

th

 Wednesday of 



the month

.  


Excursion the following Sunday. 

Any queries, please contact Chris 

Jaminon on 4091 4565 or email 

hjaminon@bigpond.com 

 

 

TOWNSVILLE SGAP 



Meets on the 2

nd

 Wednesday of 



the month

, February to 

November, in Annandale 

Community Centre at 8pm, and 

holds excursions the following 

Sunday. 


See 

www.sgaptownsville.org.au/ 

for more information. 

 

OTHER EVENTS OF INTEREST 



20 September  2014 

1 – 3 pm. Talks at the Botanic 

Gardens Visitor Centre to mark 

Biodiversity Month.  Sponsored by 

the Wet Tropics Management 

Authority.  

2-4 October 2014 

2014 BGANZ Queensland Regional 

Conference, Cairns Botanic 

Gardens.  

 

CAIRNS SGAP 



Sunday 7 September 

8:30 am.  Planting and Stall at the 

Cairns Botanic Gardens – coincides 

with Carnival on Collins.  Meet at 

the Banks and Solander beds at 

0830.  


Bring morning tea, water, gloves, 

sandfly repellent . 

Sunday 21 September 

12 noon.  Excursion - lower Lamb’s 

Head Track.  Directions: 

  Drive toward Mareeba 

from Cairns. 

  Turn left on to the Davies 

Creek Road.  The turnoff 

is 22.8 km from the 

Barron River bridge at 

Kuranda. 

  Continue along Davies 

Creek Road, past the 

picnic and camping 

areas, all the way to the 

end.   The road passes 

through woodlands and 

ends in rainforest next to  

a clear creek. 

SGAP CAIRNS 2014 COMMITTEE 

Chairperson 

Boyd Lenne 

Vice-chairperson   Pauline Lawie 

Treasurer  

Stuart Worboys 

Secretary  

Boyd Lenne 

Newsletter  

Stuart Worboys 

Webmaster  

Tony Roberts 



 



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə