Short report



Yüklə 105.47 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü105.47 Kb.

SHORT REPORT                                                                                  

   

 

 

The article was published by Academy of Chemistry of Globe Publications 



www.acgpubs.org/RNP © Published  6 /17/2008 EISSN:

 

1307-6167 



 

 

 



 

Rec. Nat. Prod

. 2:2 (2008) 33-38 



 

 

Chemical composition of essential oil of Syzygium guineense 

(Willd.) DC. var. guineense (Myrtaceae) from Benin 

 

Jean-Pierre Noudogbessi



1

, Paul Yédomonhan

2

, Dominique C. K. 

Sohounhloué

1

, Jean-Claude Chalchat

3*

, Gilles Figuérédo



 

1

 Laboratoire d’Etude et de Recherche en Chimie appliquée (LERCA) 

Ecole Polytechnique d’Abomey-Calavi, Université d’Abomey-Calavi 

01 BP 2009 Cotonou, Republic of Benin 

 

2

 Herbier National, Département de Botanique, Faculté des Sciences et Techniques, Université 

d’Abomey-Calavi, Republic of Benin 

 

3

 Laboratoire de Chimie des Huiles Essentielles, Université Blaise-Pascal de Clermont, Campus des 

Cézeaux, 63177 Aubière cedex, France 

 

4

 Laboratoire d’Analyse des Extraits Végétaux et des Arômes (LEXVA Analytique) 

460 rue du Montant, 63110 Beaumont, France 

 

 

 (Received April 9, 2008; Revised June 2, 2008, Accepted June 5, 2008) 

 

Abstract:    Essential  oils  extracted  from  dried  leaves  of  Syzygium  guineense  harvested  at  Natitingou-Centre, 

Péperkou, Tchaourou and Térou were analysed by gas phase chomatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-

MS).  The  main  constituents  were:  caryophyllene  oxide  (7%), 

δ-cadinene  (7.5%),  viridiflorol  (7.5%),  epi-α-

cadinol (9.8%), 

α-cadinol (12.7%), cis-calamenen-10-ol (14%), citronellyl pentanoate (15.2%), β-caryophyllene 

(20.1%) and 

α-humulene (39.5%). 

 

Keywords:  Syzygium  guineense,  essential  oil,  GC-MS,  caryophyllene  oxide, 

δ-cadinene,  viridiflorol,  epi-α-

cadinol, 

α-cadinol, cis-calamenen-10-ol, citronellyl pentanoate, β-caryophyllene, α-humulene. 

 

1. Plant Source 



Syzygium  guineense

  (Myrtaceae)  is  an  odorous  species  native  to  the  wooded  savannahs  and 

tropical  forests  of  Africa  [1].  This  short-trunked  tree  grows  widely  in  northern  Benin.  Its  wild,  oval 

fruits are edible [1, 2].  

It is included among the African plant species that are active against malaria [3]. The bark of 

S. guineense

 is used in traditional medicine to treat gasto-intestinal upsets and diarrhoea. [4, 5, 6, 7]. 

                                                 

*

 J-Claude.CHALCHAT@univ-bpclermont.fr 



Essential oil of Syzygium guineense 

 

34 



In Benin, S. guineense is used to make brushes, for firewood, and for the treatment of mental 

disorders and amenorrhoea [1]. 

The  leaves  of  Syzygium  guineense  were  harvested  before  flowering  in  northern  Benin  at 

Natitingou-Centre, Péperkou, Tchaourou and Térou in June 2006. They were identified and certified at 

the National Herbarium of the University of Abomey-Calavi 

 

2. Previous Studies 

 

Triterpenes  isolated  and  characterised  from  the  plant  are  biologically  active  on  bacteria  [8]. 

Tsakala in 1996 showed an activity against strains of Salmonella E., Shigella D., Shigella F., E. coli 

and Enterobacter A. [4] of dry aqueous extract obtained after decoction. 

 

In  1987,  C.  Eyélé  Mvé-Mba  found large  amounts  of  cis-guaiene  (30%)  and 



β-caryophyllene 

(15.7 %) in essential oil from leaves of S. guineense from Gabon [9]. 

 

3. Present Study 

 

The  leaves  were  stored  in  the  laboratory  at  18-20°C  throughout  the  extraction  work.  The 

essential oils were obtained by water distillation of the leaves (250-300 g) for 6 hours in a Clevenger 

type apparatus. They were dried over anhydrous sodium sulphate and analysed by GC-MS. The yield 

of essential oil from the leaves of S. guineense was relatively low (Table 1). 

 

GC/MS:  The  essential  oil  were  analysed  on  a  Hewlett-Packard  gas  chromatograph  Model  5890, 

coupled to a Hewlett-Packad MS model 5871, equipped whith  a DB5  MS  column (30m X  0,25mm; 

0,25µm), programming from 50°C (5 min) to 300°C at 5°C/mn, 5 min hold. Helium as carrier gas (1,0 

ml/min)  ;  injection  in  split  mode  (1  :  30)  ;  injector  and  detector  temperature,  250  and  280°C 

respectively.  The  MS  working  in  electron  impact  mode  at  70  eV;  electron  multiplier,  2500  V;  ion 

source temperature, 180°C; mass spectra data were acquired in the scan mode in m/z range 33-450. 

 

GC/FID:  The  essential  oil  were  analysed  on  a  Hewlett-Packard  gas  chromatograph  Model  6890, 

equipped  whith  a  DB5  MS  column  (30m  X  0,25mm;  0,25µm),  programming  from  50°C  (5  min)  to 

300°C at 5°C/mn, 5 min hold. Hydrogen as carrier gas (1.0 mL/min) ; injection in split mode (1 : 60) ; 

injector and detector temperature, 280 and 300°C respectively. The essential oil is diluted in hexane: 

1/30. 

 

The  compounds  assayed  by  GC  in  the  different  essential  oils  were  identified  by  comparing 



their retention indices with those of reference compounds in the literature and confirmed by GC-MS 

by comparison of their mass spectra with those of reference substances [10-12]. 

26-46 compounds were determined in  the reported essential oils, representing 71.5-96.7% of 

total oil content. The main constituents of the essential oils of species was determined to be different.  

This  variation  may  be  due  to  different  climates,  seasons,  geographic  and  soil  conditions  and  harves 

periods of the plant. 

The main constituents were found to be  

α-cadinol (12.7%), cis-calamenen-10-ol (7.1%), epi-

α-muurolol  (5.7%),  caryophyllene  oxide  (5.5%),  cubenol  (5.3%),  viridiflorol  (3.8%),  spathulenol 

(3.6%), humulene-1,2-epoxide  (3.6%)  and 

α-muurolol  (3.1%)  in  species  collected  from    Natitingou-

Centre,  While  cis-calamenen-10-ol  (14%),  epi-

α-cadinol  (9.8%),  δ-cadinene  (7.5%),  epi-α-muurolol 

(6.2%), 


γ-cadinene  (6%),  α-humulene  (4.3%),  cis-β-guaiene  (4.1%), β-sinensal  (4%)  and  humulene-

1,2-epoxide (3.8%) from  Péperkou (Table 2).  

 

The  species  collected  from  Tchaourou  was  found  to  be  reach  for  viridiflorol  (7.5%), 



caryophyllene oxide (7%), humulene-1,2-epoxide (6.4%), trans-sabinene hydrate (6.1%), 

α-humulene 

(6%), 

α-cadinol (3.4%), cadalene (3.2%) and caryophylla-4(14),8(15)-dien-5-α-ol (3.1%). Finally, α-



Noudogbessi et al., Rec. Nat. Prod. (2008) 2:2 33-38

 

 

 



 

35 


humulene  (39.5%), 

β-caryophyllene  (20.1%)  and  citronellyl  pentanoate  (15.2%)  were  determined 

from the species collected from Térou (Table 2). 

 

We  note  that  only  the  essential  oil  from  Térou  contained 



β-caryophyllene  (20.1%)  and 

citronellyl pentanoate (15.2%). This pattern was observed for other highly representative compounds 

in the other volatile extracts: syn-syn-syn-heliofen-12-al-D (2.2%) and cubenol (5.3%) at Natitingou-

Centre, epi-

α-cadinol (9.8%), cis-β-guaiene (4.1%) and β-sensal (4%) at Péperkou, and trans-sabinene 

hydrate (6.1%), cadalene (3.2%), caryophylla-4(14),8(15)-dien-5-

α-ol (3.1%) and ischwarone (2.6%) 

at Tchaourou. 

We also note that none of the chemical compositions in our study comes close to that reported 

by C. Eyélé Mvé-Mba in Gabon, in which 

δ-guaiene was preponderant (30%). 

 

This  work  emphasises  the  diversity  in  the  chemical  composition  of  essential  oils  extracted 



from  the  leaves  of  Syzygium  guineense.  At  this  stage  it  is  premature  to  infer  chemotypes.  A  larger 

number of samples from different locations and harvested at different times need to be studied to help 

gain a better understanding of the different observed chemical composition patterns in essential oils of 

Syzygium guineense.

 

 



 

 Table 1.  Yields of essential oil of Syzygium guineense from different locations. 

 

Essential oil 



Syzygium guineense 

Place of harvest 

Natitingou-Centre 

Péperkou 

Tchaourou 

Térou 


Yield (

×10


-2

%) 


9.2 

± 1.0 


11.0 

± 1.0 


10.5 

± 0.2 


10.0 

± 0.1 


 

 

Table 2. Essential oil composition of Syzygium guineense collected from different locations (%) 

RI 


Compounds 

Natitingou-

Centre  

Péperkou  Tchaourou 

Térou 

929 


α-thujene 

0.4 



972 



sabinene 

0.2 


978 



1-octen-3-ol 



983 



(2)-dihydro-apofarnesal 



986 



β-pinene 

0.1 



991 



myrcene 



0.5 


1021  ortho-cymene 

0.2 



0.9 



1028  sylvestrene 





4.0 

1.4 


0.2 

1033  (Z)-β-ocimene 





1044  (E)-β-ocimene 





1054  γ-terpinene 





1069  n-octanol 





1079  para-mentha-2,4(8)-diene 





1096  linalool 

0.2 


0.2 


1101  n-nonanal 



0.1 


1178  naphtalene 

0.6 


0.2 


1183  para-cymen-8-ol 



0.9 





 

 

 

Essential oil of Syzygium guineense 

 

36 



 

Table 2. Continued 

1191  α-terpineol 

0.7 


1193  methyl chavicol 





0.3 

1214  trans-carveol 

0.2 


1.3 

1239  carvone 



0.1 


1278  neo-iso-3-thujyl acetate 



0.2 


1340  α-cubebene 



0.2 


1354  α-longipinene 





0.3 

1359  clovene 





0.1 

1368  α-ylangene 

0.4 



0.4 



0.4 

1376  α-bourbonene 

0.3 

0.9 


2.2 

1377  α-copaene 



1.1 


0.2 


1382  β-panasinsene 

1.3 




1383  β-elemene 

0.6 



0.8 

1414  α-cis-bergamotene 



1.8 


1417  sesquithujene 



0.3 



0.1 

1423  β-cedrene 

0.3 


 

1425  β

β

β

β-caryophyllene 





20.1 

1451  α

α

α



α-humulene 



4.3 



6.0 

39.5 

1452  α-neo-clovene 

0.6 



 



1454  allo-aromadendrene 



0.3 



1456  selina-4(15),7-diene 

1.9 


1467  sesquisabinene 



1.4 



1468  γ-gurjunene 



1.1 



1469  α-acoradiene 

1.9 


1472  9-epi-(E)-caryophyllene 



0.2 


0.1 


1475  β-germacrene 



0.1 


1481  oxydo calamemene 1,11 



0.3 

1482  γ-himachalene 



1.1 



1483  β-selinene 



0.6 



0.4 

1484  β-chamigrene 

0.7 


1490  α-muurolene 



1.1 

0.7 



1494  cis-β

β

β

β-guaïene 





4.1 



1498  α-selinene 



0.4 


1500  germacrene A 



0.1 


1504  (E, E)-α-farnesene 



0.1 


1505  γγγγ-cadinene 

2.1 

6.0 

1.0 


0.3 

1508  α-farnesene 





0.1 

1513  trans-calamenene 

0.6 



1.2 



 

1517  δ


δδ

δ-cadinene 



7.5 

1.7 


0.1 

1520  cis-calamenene 

1.6 


0.8 

1524  cis-myrtanyle isobutyrate 



0.7 



1.8 

1528  zonarene 

0.6 


1532  α-cadinene 



1.1 


1534  cis-nerolidol 





0.1 

1537  α-calacorene 

0.6 


1.6 

1552  cis-dracunculifolol 





0.3 

1556  γ-calacorene 

0.2 


1560  germacrene B 



1.8 





Table 2. Continued

 


Noudogbessi et al., Rec. Nat. Prod. (2008) 2:2 33-38

 

 

 



 

37 


1563  ledol 

0.4 



2.9 

1567  perillyle isobutyrate 



0.9 





1572  spathulenol 

3.6 

1.6 


1576 



trans-sabinene hydrate 



 

6.1 



1577  caryophyllene oxide 



5.5 



7.0 

0.1 

1580  globulol 





3.6 

1584  thujopsan-2-α-ol 

2.6 


1.8 


1586  thujopsan-2-β-ol 



0.4 


1589  β-copaen-4-α-ol 

1.2 


0.7 



1598  viridiflorol 

3.8 



7.5 



1603  humulene-1,2-epoxide 

3.6 

3.8 

6.4 

1.4 

1610  1,10-di-epi-cubenol 



1.1 


 

1616  citronellyle pentanoate 





15.23 

1621  syn-syn-syn-heliofen-12-al-D 

2.2 



1625  1-epi-cubenol 



1.7 


2.0 

1630  daucol 





2.2 

1631  caryophylla-4(14),8(15)-dien-5-α

α

α



α-ol 



3.1 

1636  caryophylla-4(14),8(15)-dien-5-β-ol 





1.5 

1638  cubenol 

5.3 





1640  epi-α

α

α



α-cadinol 



9.8 



1642  epi-α

α

α



α-muurolol 

5.7 

6.2 

1.4 


1644  selina-3,11-dien-6-α-ol 





1.7 

1646  α

α

α



α-muurolol 

3.1 

2.5 




1650  α

α

α

α-cadinol 



12.7 



3.4 

0.9 

1654  selin-11-en-4-α-ol 



2.2 



0.6 

1657  14-hydroxy-9-epi-(E)-caryophyllene 





0.6 

1662  neo-intermedeol 



0.9 





1665  cis-calamenen-10-ol 

7.1 

14.0 



1668  trans-calamenen-10-ol 

0.6 


1672  daucalene 



0.5 


1677 



cadalene 



3.2 

1679 


elemol acetate 



0.2 

1682 


ischwarone 



2.6 



1687  2-nerolidol acetate 

2.6 



0.4 

1694  β

β

β



β-sinensal 



4.0 



1700  10-nor-calamenen-10-one 

0.2 



2.1 

1705  (E)-aprotone 



0.1 


1707  (E)-3-butylidene phthalide 



0.5 



1723  cedr-8(15)-en-9-α-ol acetate 



0.4 



1761  benzyle benzoate 



1.5 



1802  nookatone 

0.1 


2094  methyle linoleate 





0.2 

 

Total 

71.5 

91.8 

74.7 

96.73 

t= trace (



<0, 05 %) 

 

 



 

 

 



 

Essential oil of Syzygium guineense 

 

38 



References 

[1]  E. J. Adjanohoun, V. Adjakidjè, M. R. A. Ahyi, L. Aké Assi, A. Akoègninou, J. d’Almeida,  F. Apovo, K. 

Boukef, M. Chadaré, G. Cusset, K. Dramane, J. Eymé, J.-N. Gassita, N. Gbaguidi, E. Goudoté, S. Guinko, 

P.  Houngnon,  Issa  Lo,  A.  kéita,  H.  V.  Kiniffo,  D.  Koné-Bamba,  A.  Musampa  Nseyya,  M.  Saadou,  Th. 

Sodogandji,  S.  de  Souza,  A.  Tchabi,  C.  Zinsou  Dossa,  Th.  Zohoun  (1989).  Médecine  Traditionnelle  et 

Pharmacopée -  Contribution aux études ethnobotaniques et  floristiques en République Populaire du Bénin, 

ACCT, 359. 

[2]    G.-A.  Ambé  (2001).  Les  fruits  sauvages  comestibles  des  savanes  guinéennes  de  Côte-d’Ivoire:  état  de  la 

connaissance par une population locale, les Malinké. Biotechnol. Agron. et Soc. Environ. 5(1), 43-58. 

[3]  P. S. Segawa and J. M. Kasenene (2007). Plants for malaria treatment in Southern Uganda: traditional use, 

preference and ecological viability. Journal of Ethnobiology27, 110-131. 

[4]    T.  M.  Tsakala,  O.  Penge  and  K.  John  (1996).  Screening  of  in  vitro  antibacterial  activity  from  Syzygium 



guineense

 (Willd) hydrosoluble dry extract. Ann. Pharm. Fr54, 276-279. 

[5]    F.  A.  Hamil,  S.  Apio,  N.  K.  Mubiru,  M.  Mosango,  R.  Bukenya-Ziraba,  O.  W.  Maganyi,  D.  D.  Soejarto 

(2000). Traditional herbal drugs of southern Uganda, I. Journal of Ethnopharmacology70, 281 - 300. 

[6]  O. G. A. Oluwolé, S. D. Pricilla, D. M. Jerome, P. M. Lydia  (2002). Some herbal remedies from Manzini 

region of Swaziland. Journal of Ethnopharmacology79, 109-112. 

[7]    M.  W.  Koné,  K.  K.  Atindehou,  H.  Tere,  D.  Traoré,  (2002).  Quelques  plantes  médicinales  utilisées  en 

pédiatrie traditionnelle dans la région de Ferkessedougou (Côte-d’Ivoire). Bioterre, Rev. Inter. Sci. de la Vie 

et de la Terre, Editions Universitaires de Côte d’Ivoire, N° spécial, 30-36. 

[8]  J. D.Djoukeng, E. Abou-Mansour, R. Tabacchi, A. L. Tapondjou, H. Bouda, D. Lontsi (2005). Antibacterial 

triterpenes from Syzygium guineense (Myrtaceae). Journal of Etnopharmacology101, 283-286. 

[9]    C.  Eyele  Mve-Mba  (1987).  Contribution  à  l’étude  chimique  des  constituants  volatils  extraits  des  plantes 

aromatiques de l’Afrique subéquatoriales. Thèse de Doctorat, Université de Montpellier II. 

[10] P.  Rösch,  J.  Popp,  W.  Kiefer (1999). Raman and  SERS  Investigations  on  Lamiaceae.  J. Mol.  Struct,  121

480-481. 

[11]  R. P. Adams  (1989). Identification  of essential  oils  by ion  mass  spectroscopy.  Academy Press, Inc, New- 

York. 

[12] A. A. Swigar,  R. M. Silverstein (1981).  Monoterpènes, Infrared, Mass, NMR  Spectra and Kovats  Indices, 



Aldrich Chem. Co. Milwaukee, WI, USA. 

 

 



 

© 2008 Reproduction is free for scientific studies 



 

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə