Short report



Yüklə 103.9 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix19.08.2017
ölçüsü103.9 Kb.

SHORT REPORT                            

 

Thearticlewaspublishedby Academy of Chemistry of Globe Publications 



www.acgpubs.org/RNP © Published 06/01/2015 EISSN:1307-6167 

 

 



 

Rec. Nat. Prod. 9:4 (2015) 592-596 

 

Leaf Essential Oil Composition of Six Syzygium Species from the 

Western Ghats, South India 

Koranappallil B. Rameshkumar

1*

, Anu Aravind A. P.

1

 and  

Tharayil G. Vinodkumar



 



Phytochemistry and Phytopharmacology Division, Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden and 

Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram, Kerala, India 695 562 



Department of Botany, St. Thomas College, Ranni, Pathanamthitta, Kerala, India 689673 

 

(Received December 28, 2012; Revised April 02, 2015, Accepted April 02, 2015)

 

 



Abstract:    The  Syzygium  (Family:  Myrtaceae)  species  are  well  known  for  their  aromatic  nature.  Though  45 

Syzygium species are reported from the Western Ghats region of India, the volatile oil chemistry of most of these 

aromatic plants are uninvestigated. The present study reports the chemical constituents of the leaf essential oils 

of 6 Syzygium species, S. arnottianum Walp., S. caryophyllatum (L.) Alston, S. hemisphericum (Wight) Alston

S.  laetum  (Buch.  Ham.)  Gandhi,  S.  lanceolatum  (Lam.)  Wight  &  Arn.    and  S.  zeylanicum  (L.)  DC.  var. 

zeylanicum, collected from the Western Ghats of Kerala. Sesquiterpenoids were the 

 in 


all 

Syzygium  species  studied 

-caryophyllene  and  caryophyllene  oxide  were  present  in  all  the  oils 

except S. laetum. The open chain sesquiterpenoids (Z,E)-α-farnesene and (E)-nerolidol were characteristic of S. 

laetum while phenyl propanoids were exclusively present in S. lanceolatum.  

 

KeywordsEssential Oil; GC-MS; Syzygium arnottianum; Syzygium caryophyllatum; Syzygium hemisphericum; 



Syzygium laetum; Syzygium lanceolatum; Syzygium zeylanicum. © 2015 ACG Publications. All rights reserved.

 

 

1. Plant Source 

Fresh  leaves  of  the  Syzygium  species  were  collected  from  the  forests  of  southern  Western 

Ghats, Kerala, India and voucher herbarium specimens (TBGT No.) of Syzygium arnottianum Walp. 

(66407),  Syzygium  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston  (50993),  Syzygium  hemisphericum  (Wight)  Alston 

(50959),  Syzygium  laetum  (Buch.  Ham.)  Gandhi  (66409),  Syzygium  lanceolatum  (Lam.)  Wight  & 

Arn.(50992)  and  Syzygium  zeylanicum  (L.)  DC.  var.  zeylanicum  (50995)  were  deposited  at  the 

JNTBGRI  herbarium  (TBGT).  The  plant  materials  were  identified  by  Dr.  T.  G.  Vinodkumar,  St. 

Thomas College, Ranni, Kerala.  

2. Previous Studies 

The  genus  Syzygium  Gaertner  (Family:  Myrtaceae)  is  represented  by  nearly  1200  species  in 

the old world tropics and 45species are reported in the Western Ghats of India [1]. Literature searches 

showed  that  there  are  no  previous  studies  on  the  volatile  constituents  of  the  six  Syzygium  species 

___________________________ 

* Corresponding author: E- Mail:

 kbrtbgri@gmail.com 

(K.B. Rameshkumar), Phone: +91-472-2869226  



Fax: + 91-472-2869626. 

 

reported here, while a few species such as S. aromaticum [2,3], S. cumini [4,5,6], S. guineense [7], S. 



cordatum  [8],  S.  gardneri [9]  and  S.  semarangense  [10]  were  investigated  for  their  leaf  volatile 

 

Rameshkumar et.al.Rec. Nat. Prod. (2015) 9:4 592-596 

593 

 

chemical  constituents.  Though  S.  caryophyllatum  (L.)  Alston  is  different  from  S.  aromaticum  (L.) 



Merr. & Perry (common clove tree), the chemistry of S. aromaticum has been reported under the title 

of S. caryophyllatum (L.) Alston [3]. 



 

3. Present Study 

Isolation  of  Essential  Oil:  The  essential  oils  were  isolated  by  hydrodistillation  of  the  fresh 

leaves  (300g  each)  for  3  h.  using  a  Clevenger  type  apparatus.  The  oils  were  dried  over  anhydrous 

sodium sulphate and stored at 4

o

C until the analyses. 



Analysis  of  Essential  Oil:  The  GC-FID  analysis  was  done  on  a  Varian  CP-3800  gas 

chromatograph  fitted  with  CP  Sil  8CB  fused  silica  capillary  column  (30  m,  0.32  mm  i.d.,  film 

thickness 0.25 µm) with FID detector using nitrogen as  a carrier gas at flow rate of 1mL/ min. The 

split  ratio  was  1:40,  and  0.1μL  oil  sample  (1:5  dilution  in  diethyl  ether)  was  injected.  Oven 

temperature  programme:  injector  temperature  220

o

C,  oven  temperature  50-230



o

C  at  3


o

C/  min., 

detector  temperature  250

o

C.  Relative  percentage  of  components  was  obtained  from  the  peak  area  of 



volatiles. The GC/MS analysis was done on a Hewlett Packard 6890 gas chromatograph fitted with a 

cross-linked  5%  PH ME  siloxane  HP-5  MS  capillary  column  (30  m  x  0.32  mm,  film  thickness  0.25 

µm) coupled with a 5973 series mass selective detector under the following conditions with splitless 

injection of 1.0 µL of essential oil (1:10 dilution in diethyl ether), helium as the carrier gas at 1.4 mL/ 

min  constant  flow  mode.  The  temperature  programme  for  the  analysis  of  the  oils  were,  injector 

temperature 220

o

C, oven temperature 60



o

C to 246


o

C (3


o

C/min) and interface temperature 290

o

C. Mass 


spectra:  Electron  Impact  (EI

+

)  mode,  70  eV  and  ion  source  temperature  250



o

C.  The  essential  oil 

components  were  identified  based  on  by  MS  library  search  (Wiley  2.75),  relative  retention  indices 

calculated  with  respect  to  homologous  of  n-alkanes  (C

6

-C

30



,  Aldrich  Chem.  Co.  Inc.)  [11]  and  by 

literature reference [12]. 

The  leaf  essential  oil  yield  (%v/w)  was  higher  for  S.  zeylanicum  (0.33%),  followed  by  S. 

hemisphericum  (0.17%),  S.  arnottianum  (0.12%)  and  S.  lanceolatum  (0.10%),  while  the  yield  was 

negligible  for  S.  laetum  (0.01%)  and  S.  caryophyllatum  (0.01%).The  major  volatile  constituents 

identified from the leaf essential oil of Syzygium species were caryophyllene oxide (15.4%) and selina-

11-en-4


-ol  (13.0%)  for  S.  arnottianum, 

-caryophyllene  (32.4%),  1-epi-cubenol  (11.8%)  and 



-

cadinene  (10.0%)  for  S.  caryophyllatum



-caryophyllene  (40.5%)  and 

-humulene  (39.7%)  for  S. 



hemisphericum,  (Z,E)-α-farnesene  (21.5%),  γ-amorphene  (12.1%)  and  epi-α-cadinol  (10.2%)  for  S. 

laetum

-humulene  (23.1%),





-caryophyllene  (16.1%)  and  phenyl  propanal  (13.5%)for  S. 



lanceolatum,  and 

-caryophyllene  (11.1%),  α-cadinol  (12.2%),  humulene  epoxide  II  (17.6%) 



caryophyllene oxide (18.9%) and 

-humulene (24.0%) for S. zeylanicum.



 

 

Sesquiterpenoids were the predominant



compounds in all the



Syzygium species studied (Table 

1).  Among  the  sesquiterpenoids,  caryophyllene  or  its  derivatives  were  detected  in  all  the  Syzygium 

species.  In  S.  hemisphericum,  84.4%  of  the  volatile  constituents  were  caryophyllene  analogues, 

followed  by  S.  zeylanicum  (71.6%),  S.  lanceolatum  (54.2%),  S.  caryophyllatum  (44.3%),  S. 



arnottianum (20.2%) and S. laetum (2.8%). 

-Caryophyllene and caryophyllene oxide were present in 



all  the  oils  except  S.  laetum. 

-Humulene  was  a  predominant  constituents  in  all  the  oils  except    S. 



arnottianum  and  S.  laetum.  Selinene  and  derivatives  constituting  36.2%  were  predominant  in  S. 

arnottianum  while  the  open  chain  sesquiterpenoids  (Z,E)-α-farnesene  and  (E)-nerolidol  were 

characteristic of  S. laetum. Phenyl propanoids were exclusively present (14.4%) in S. lanceolatum and 

phenyl  propanal  can  be  considered  as  the  chemotaxonomic  marker  compound  for  S.  lanceolatum

Monoterpenoids were present in negligible amount only in S. hemisphericum(0.2%) and S. zeylanicum 

(0.9%). 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Leaf essential oil chemistry of Syzygium species 

 

594 


 

Table 1.Essential oil constituents of the leaves of Syzygium species. 

Compound 

RRI 


S.arn 

S.car 

S.hem 

S.lat 

S.lan 

S.zey 

β-Pinene 

969 





0.2 





(Z)

-



-Ocimene 

1032 




0.4 



Linalool 

1093 




0.5 



Phenyl ethyl alcohol 

1100 




0.9 


Phenyl propanal 

1156 





13.5 



δ-Elemene 

1332 





0.3 



-Copaene 



1368 

5.8 





1.3 

-Bourbonene 



1381 

1.0 






-Elemene 

1383 


3.0 



5.6 


-Gurjunene 



1400 



0.6 



-Caryophyllene 



1411 

1.0 


32.4 

40.5 


16.1 


11.1 

Aromadendrene 

1431 





1.2 



-Humulene 



1445 

5.1 



39.7 

23.1 



24.0 

Alloaromadendrene 

1451 





0.5 



γ-Muurolene 

1472 





1.8 




(Z,E)-α-Farnesene 

1475 





21.5 




-Selinene 

1477 


3.8 





Selina-(4,11)-diene 

1479 




0.6 


-Selinene 



1481 

8.8 


0.4 


2.9 


-Selinene 



1484 



0.5 



γ-Amorphene

1487 




12.1 



-Selinene 

1490 

3.9 


0.6 


3.1 


α-Muurolene 

1493 





0.2 



-Bisabolene 



1497 



0.7 



δ-Amorphene 

1504 





7.2 




-Cadinene 

1506 


1.3 

4.2 


0.1 





trans-calamenene 

1513 




1.8 


-Cadinene 



1515 

1.8 


10.0 

1.4 


0.9 



(E)-iso-γ-Bisabolene 

1519 


0.1 





(Z)-Nerolidol 

1523 


2.5 





(E)-Nerolidol 

1553 




6.9 



Isocaryophyllene oxide 

1555 


1.0 





Caryophyllenyl alcohol 

1563 


1.6 



2.8 



Spathulenol 

1569 




4.1 


Caryophyllene oxide 

1576 

15.4 


6.8 

1.3 


7.5 


18.9 

Globulol 

1583 





2.1 


Viridiflorol 



1585 

4.2 




0.7 

0.8 


Salvial-4(14)-en-1-one 

1587 


3.4 





Widdrol 

1589 


1.3 





Guaiol 

1590 


5.0 





1,5,5,8-Tetramethyl, 3,7-

cycloundecadien-1-ol 

1598 





6.0 



Humulene epoxide II 

1600 





1.3 

7.1 



17.6 

1,10-Di-epi-cubenol 

1611 

1.5 


0.9 


3.0 



1-Epi-cubenol 

1619 


11.8 




Epi-α-cadinol 

1628 





10.2 


Alloaromadendrene epoxide 



1629 



0.4 



Caryophylla-4(12),8(13)-

dien-5-ol 

1630 


1.1 

0.2 



0.4 


Epi-


-muuralol 

1631 

 

4.1 



0.5 

 



8.2 

Selina,3,11-dien-6

-ol 


1634 

6.7 




0.5 

α-Muurolol 



1635 



0.2 

 



Cubenol 


1636 



0.6 



-Cadinol 



1638 





1.8 

α-Cadinol 

1643 





1.0 

4.6 


12.2 


Selina-11-en-4

-ol 



1649 

13.0 




(Z)-14-Hydroxy 



isocaryophyllene 

1655 


1.7 





Eudesm-7(11)-en-4-ol 

1689 


0.8 





Cyclocolorenone 

1747 


1.9 





Total identified 

82.8 

80.2 

98.7 

72.2 

91.5 

97.7 

 

 

Rameshkumar et.al.Rec. Nat. Prod. (2015) 9:4 592-596 

595 

 

Monoterpene hydrocarbons 



0.2 



0.4 



Oxygenated monoterpenes 





0.5 

Total monoterpenes 



0.2 



0.9 



Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons 

24.6 


57.5 

84.2 


42.6 

55.8 


37.3 

Oxygenated sesquiterpenes 

58.2 

22.4 


14.3 

29.6 


21.3 

59.5 


Total sesquiterpenes 

82.8 


80.2 

98.5 


72.2 

77.1 


96.8 

Phenyl propanoids 





14.4 


 RRI:  Relative  retention  index  calculated  on  HP-5  column,  with  respect  to  homologous  of  n-alkanes  (C

6

-C

30



Aldrich  Chem.  Co.  Inc.).

 

S.arn-  Syzygium  arnottianum,  S.car-  Syzygium  caryophyllatum,    S.hem-  Syzygium 

hemisphericum,  S.lat- Syzygium laetum,  S.lan- Syzygium lanceolatum, S.zey- Syzygium zeylanicum 

 

4. Conclusion 

Though  the  genus  Syzygium  includes  important  spice  plants  and  medicinal  plants  like  S. 



aromaticum, S. cumini and S. jambos, most of the Western Ghats endemic Syzygium species are least 

explored for their volatile constituents and bioactivities [13]. Essential oils are important as source of 

valuable  aroma  chemicals,  flavoring  components  and  bioactive  agents  and  the  volatile  chemical 

profiles  of  Syzygium  species  revealed  sesquiterpenoids,  particularly  caryophyllene  isomers  and 

oxygenated  derivatives  of  caryophyllene  as  the  characteristic  constituents.  Caryophyllene  and  their 

derivatives  are  known  for  their  anti-inflammatory,  analgesic,  antipyretic,  and  platelet-inhibitory 

actions, while its oxide has proven to be cytotoxic [14,15]. The present study is the first report of the 

leaf volatile constituents of six Syzygium species, of which two are endemic to the Western Ghats of 

south India. 

 

References 

 

[1]   



S. M. Shareef, E. S. Santhosh Kumar and T. Shaju (2012). A new species of Syzygium (Myrtaceae) from 

the southern Western Ghats of Kerala, India, Phytotaxa. 71, 10 16. 

[2] 

A. K. Srivastava, S. K. Srivastava and K. V. Syamsundar (2005). Bud and leaf essential oil composition 



of Syzygium aromaticum from India and Madagascar, Flavour Fragr. J. 20, 51–53. 

[3]   


M. N. I. Bhuiyan, J. Begum, N. C. Nandi and F. Akter (2010). Constituents of the essential oil from leaves 

and buds of clove (Syzigium caryophyllatum (L.) Alston), African J. Plant Sc4, 451-454.  

[4] 

H.  O.  Elansary,  M.  Z.  M.  Salem,  N.  A.  Ashmawy  and  M.  M.  Yacout  (2012).  Chemical  Composition, 



Antibacterial  and  Antioxidant Activities  of  Leaves  Essential  Oils  from  Syzygium  cumini  L.,  Cupressus 

sempervirens L. and Lantana camara L. from Egypt, J. Agri. Sc. 4, 144-152. 

[5]     A.  A. Craveiro, C. H. S. Andrade, F. J. A. Matos, J. W. Alencer and M. I. L. Machado (1983). Essential 

oil of Eugenia jambolanaJ. Nat. Prod46, 591-592. 

[6]  


A. Kumar, A.  A. Naqvi, A.  P. Kahol and S. Tandon (2004). Composition of leaf oil of Syzygium cumini 

L, from north India, Indian Perfum48, 439-441. 

[7]  

J.  P.  Noudogbessi,  P.  Yedomonhan,  D.  C.  K.  Sohounhloue,  J.  C.  Chalchat  and  G.  Figueredo  (2008). 



Chemical  composition  of  essential  oil  of  Syzygium  guineense  (Willd.)  DC.  var.  guineense  (Myrtaceae) 

from Benin, Rec. Nat. Prod2, 33-38. 

[8]  

R.  K.  Chalannavar,  H.  Baijnath  and  B.  Odhav  (2011).  Chemical  constituents  of  the  essential  oil  from 



Syzygium cordatum (Myrtaceae),  Afr. J. Biotechnol10, 2741-2745. 

[9]  


G. Raj, V. George, N. S. Pradeep and M. G. Sethuraman (2008) Chemical composition and antimicrobial 

activity of the leaf oil of Syzygium gardneri Thw., J. Essent. Oil Res20, 72-74. 

[10]   L. J. Reddy and B. Jose (2011). Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of the volatile oil from 

the leaf of Syzygium samarangense (Blume) Merr. & L.M. Perry, Asian J. Biochem. Pharmaceutical Res



1, 263-269. 

[11] 


H. Van den Dool and P. D. Kratz (1963). A generalization of the retention index system including linear 

temperature programmed gas Liquid partition chromatography, J. Chromatogr11, 463-471. 

[12] 

R. P. Adams (2007). Identification of essential oil components by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry, 



4

th

 Edition. Allured publishing Co. Carol Stream. 



[13]   D.  Chattopadhyay,  B.  K.  Sinha  and  L.  K.  Vaid  (1998).  Antibacterial  activity  of  Syzygium  species, 

Fitoterapia 69, 356-367.  

 

Leaf essential oil chemistry of Syzygium species 

 

596 


 

[14]   R. R. P. Machado, D. F. Jardim, A. R. Souza, E. Scio, R. L. Fabri, A. G. Carpanez, R. M. Grazul, J. P. R. 

F. de Mendonça, B. Lesche and F. M. Aarestrup (2013).The effect of essential oil of Syzygium cumini on 

the development of granulomatous inflammation in mice, Rev. Bras. Farmacogn. 23, 488-496. 

[15]   J.  J.  Neung,  M. Ashik, Y.  M.  Jeong,  J.  Ki-Chang,  L.  Dong-Sun,  S. A.  Kwang  and  K.  C.  Somi  (2011). 

Cytotoxic activity of β-caryophyllene oxide isolated from jeju guava (Psidium cattleianum Sabine) Leaf, 



Rec. Nat. Prod. 5: 242-246. 

 

 



 

© 2015 ACG Publications 



 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə