Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora



Yüklə 136.72 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü136.72 Kb.

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Naturetrek Tour Itinerary 

 

 

 



 

Naturetrek 

Mingledown Barn 

Wolf’s Lane

 

Chawton 


Alton 

Hampshire 

GU34 3HJ 

UK 


T:

 

+44 (0)1962 733051



 

E:

 

info@naturetrek.co.uk



 

W:

 

www.naturetrek.co.uk



 

 

Outline itinerary 



 

 

Day 1 

Fly Colombo. 

Day 10/11  Sinharaja Forest. 

Day 2 

Muthurajawela Sanctuary. 



Day 12 

Return Colombo. 



Day 3/4 

Sigiriya. 



Day 13 

Fly London. 



Day 5/7 

Kandy. 


 

Day 8/9 

Nuwara Eliya and Horton Plains. 



 

 

Blue Whales extension 



Days 12/14  Mirissa. 

Day 15 

Colombo. 



Day 16 

Fly London. 



Dates 2018 

Saturday 17th March 

 Thursday 29th March 2018 



Extension: Wednesday 28th March 

 Sunday 1st April 2018 



Dates 2019 

Saturday 16th March 

 Thursday 28th March 2019 



Extension: Wednesday 27th March 

 Sunday 31



st

 March 


Cost  

£2,695 (London/London); £2,195 (Colombo/Colombo) 

£795 for Blue Whales extension 

Single room supplement 

£695 (Add: £195 for Blue Whales extension) 



Grading 

Grade A. A leisurely botanical tour, including  

gentle forest walks 

Focus 

Sri Lankan flora and other natural history 

 


Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Tour Dossier 

 

 



© Naturetrek      

 

NB. Please note that the itinerary below offers our planned programme of excursions.  However, adverse 



weather  &  other  local  considerations  can  necessitate  some  re-ordering  of  the  programme  during  the 

course  of  the  tour,  though  this  will  always  be  done  to  maximise  best  use  of  the  time  and  weather 

conditions available.   

Introduction 

From a casual inspection of a map it may appear that the tropical island of Sri Lanka is a mere adjunct of southern 

India: in reality there are many differences between the two countries, not least the stunning flora and fauna which 

demonstrate more affinities with south-east Asia than with the Indian sub-Continent. Sri Lanka is a lush, verdant 

country  in  which  plant  growth  flourishes,  indeed  it  is  said  that  almost  anything  planted  in  the  ground  will  grow 

within days! This attribute was fully exploited by the various colonists occupying the island over the centuries and 

each in turn added to the diversity of species through their ornamental and commercial introductions. In this way an 

extraordinary flora has developed, rich in unique endemic species but also augmented by a myriad of additions from 

all  over  the  world.  This  tour  will  celebrate  the  richness  of  the  flora  by  visiting  wonderful  natural  habitats  where 

native  species  occur  as  well  as  Botanical  Gardens  where  large  collections  have  been  amassed  by  generations  of 

horticulturists.  We  shall  also  be  visiting  Spice  Gardens  and  Tea  Estates  ensuring  that  we  do  not  neglect  these 

important industries which have developed because of the ideal growing conditions.  



Day 1  

Saturday 

In Flight 

We depart London in the evening at 2030 on a direct Sri Lankan Airlines scheduled flight to Colombo. We will be 

in-flight overnight. If you would prefer to fly on any other airline from London to Colombo, we can arrange this for 

you (availability permitting), though this is likely to involve extra cost. Call Rajan on 01962 733051 for details.  

Day 2  

Sunday 

Colombo 


We arrive in Colombo early this afternoon at 1245 and will be met at the airport by our Sri Lankan naturalist guide, 

who will be with us throughout the tour. From the airport we will be transfer to a hotel close to the airport. The rest 

of the morning is available for relaxation after the long flight or for those eager to begin botanising, a stroll in the 

leafy hotel gardens. In the evening, we plan an excursion to the Muthurajawela Mangrove Reserve, a coastal lagoon 

marshland  of  reed  beds,  shrubs  and  mangroves.  The  mangroves  comprise  of  Acanthus  volubilis,  Acanthus  ilicifolius

Acrostichum aureumAcrostichum speciosum (the only Mangrove Fern), Bruguiera cylindricaBruguiera gumnorhizaRhizophora 

apiculataRhizophora mucronataSonneratia albaSonneratia caseolarisSonneratia griffithiSonneratia ovataNypa fruticans (the 

only  Mangrove  Palm  in  Sri  Lanka).  In  the  open  shallow  water  submerged  and  floating  aquatic  plants  such  as 



AponogetonPotonogetomSalvinia and Nymphaea species can be seen. 

Day 3 / 4   

Monday 



 Tuesday 

Sigiriya 

After  breakfast  we  leave  the  coast  and  drive  to  Sigiriya.  Initially  we  travel  through  extensive  coastal  estates  of 

Coconut (Cocus nucifera), some of it underplanted with Pineapple, and Rubber (Hevea brasiliensis) plantations, some 



Tour Dossier  

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

 

 





© Naturetrek      

 

admixed  with  Cocoa  (Theobromo  cacao).  It  is  a  very  attractive  landscape  and  in  the  villages  many  of  the  gardens 



contain  useful  food  plants  such  as;  Mango  (Mangifera  indica),  Areca-Nut  (Areca  catechu),  Guava  (Psidium  guajava), 

Breadfruit (Artocarpus incisus), Jack-Fruit (A. heterophyllus) and Lime (Citrus aurantifolium). The ‘home-garden’ system of 

agriculture has a long history in Sri Lanka, where crops for food, drink, fuel and traditional medicines were all grown 

on one plot. Mahogany and Teak are often planted for timber and all woody garden waste serves as fuel for the 

kitchen fires. The King Coconut, a variety with golden-orange fruits, is much esteemed for the sweet sterile water 

contained  in  the  unripe  fruit  and  is  commonly  sold  at  the  roadside,  a  very  cheap  but  totally  refreshing  natural 

alternative to bottled drinks.  

 

At  Sigiriya  we  find  ourselves  in  the  Dry  Zone  of  Sri  Lanka  and  the  forest  type  here  is  described  as  dry  mixed 



evergreen. Although a few deciduous species occur in these forests the evergreen character is maintained by some 

widespread species. Therefore these forests are also referred to as semi-evergreen forests. The sanctuary around the 

ancient  Rock  Citadel  is  comprised  of  many  flowering  plants  such  as  Calatropis  gigantea  (Sodom’s  Apple),  Capparis 

zeylanicaCassia fistulaCrataeva adansoniiOchnalanceolataMartynia diandra (Tigers’ Claws) and tree species like Drypetes 

spp., Manilkara hexandra, and Diospyros ebanum

 

King Kasyapa was responsible for the building of a city 



fortress  on  Sigiriya  rock  in  477  AD.  Standing  at  the 

foot  of  the  rock  today  it  seems  a  staggering 

achievement but a palace and complex of gardens were 

constructed on the three-acre summit and for eighteen 

years  served  as  a  royal  citadel.    Visitors  can  reach  the 

site by ascending flights of steps hewn in the rock but it 

is a stiff climb and not recommended for anyone with a 

fear  of  heights.  A  few  frescoes  are  all  that  remain  of 

some 500 paintings that formerly graced the rock walls 

and  these  can  be  viewed  during  the  ascent.    Shahin 

Falcons nest on the rock and the surrounding primary 

forest  is  superb  for  birds,  containing  many  interesting 

species  which  keen  birders  may  find  an  attractive 

alternative to scaling the rock.  Birds to look for include 

Woolly-necked  Stork,  Crested  Serpent-Eagle,  Emerald 

Dove,  Orange-breasted  Green  Pigeon,  Alexandrine 

Parakeet,  Grey-bellied  Cuckoo,  Racket-tailed  Drongo, 

Black-crested  Bulbul,  Paradise  Flycatcher,  White-

browed Fantail, White-rumped Shama, Forest Wagtail, 

Oriental  White-Eye,  Brown-capped  Babbler  and  Pale-

billed Flowerpecker. 

Day 5  

Wednesday 

Kandy 


After breakfast we drive to Kandy visiting a Spice Garden en route where we will see many spices such as Zingiber 

officinale (Ginger), Curcuma longa (Turmeric), Piper nigrum (Pepper), Capsicum annuum (Chilli), Vanilla fragrans (Vanilla), 

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Tour Dossier 

 

 



© Naturetrek      

 

Elettaria cardamomum (Cardamom), Myristica fragrans (Nutmeg), Murraya koenigii (Curry leaves), Piper betle (Betel leaves) 

and other useful fruit trees - Papaya, Avocado, Mango, Mangosteen, Bread-fruit, Jack-fruit, Durian etc. grown in 

home gardens. 

 

Coffee and Cocoa are both frequently grown in the Low Country and property boundaries marked by tall Kapok 



Trees  (Ceiba  pentandra).  Kitul,  or  Toddy  Palms  are  cultivated  to  provide  sugar  and  as  a  source  of  alcohol  in  the 

national  drink,  Arak.  Watch  out  also  for  the  giant  Talipot 

Palm  (Corypha  umbraculifera)  which  produces  an  enormous 

inflorescence at the end of its 40 year lifespan. The spectacular 

Katuimbul  (Bomlax  malabaricum)  is  also  striking  when  in 

flower. 


 

Interspersed among plantations are paddyfields for the small-

scale cultivation of rice which occurs in many local varieties. 

As  we  ascend  the  hills  these  fields  become  more  and  more 

steeply terraced, in places becoming mere irrigated strips just a 

few metres wide. 

 

After our visit to the Spice Garden in Matale, we will travel to 



Riversturn and later to Kandy late in the evening. 

 

Kandy  is  steeped  in  history  and  was  the  capital  for  a 



succession of Kandyan Kings until captured by the British in 

1815. The famous 'Temple of the Tooth' beside Kandy lake is 

one of the best known Buddhist temples in the country and 

attracts thousands of visitors every year. Kandy is traditionally 

a centre of music and dance and most nights it is possible to 

witness  demonstrations  of  both  art  forms  at  special 

performances, which will be advertised in our hotel.  

Day 6  

Thursday 

Kandy 


Today  we  drive  to  the  picturesque  Knuckles mountains  where  a  tract of  lower  montane  forest  near Rangala is  a 

prime example of a fast disappearing habitat. 

 

Leaving  the  wide  Dumbara  Valley  behind,  we  ascend  through  extensive  tea  estates  on  the  lower  slopes  of  the 



Knuckles range to reach the Kaladeniya Tea Estate at an altitude of about 1300 metres. From here we climb another 

170  metres  on  foot  to  the  edge  of  the  forest.  Roadside  plants  include  naturally  growing  Sandlewood  (Santalum 



album), Wild Sunflower (Tithonia diversifolia), Ceylon Mahogany (Melia dubia), Kapok Tree (Ceiba pentandra) with their 

bursting capsules of kapok and Fern-leaf Tree (Felicium decipiens). We may also see the endemics Vernonia wightiana



Osbeckia octandraO. asperaKnoxia platycarpa and Exacum trivernium. The tea estates are dotted with large shade trees 

such as the flat-topped Albizia falcataria and Grevillea robusta (Silky Oak). 

 


Tour Dossier  

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

 

 





© Naturetrek      

 

Many of these native forests have been underplanted with Cardamom (Elettaria cardamomum) which in the long term 



is  harmful  to  the  development  of  the  natural  vegetation  and  leads  to  the  demise  of  the  forest.  In  this  particular 

stretch of forest there is a rich floral diversity and the average height of the canopy is 8-15 metres. Dominant tree 

species include Calophyllum spp, Garcinia ecinocarpaSyzygium umbrosum and Lauracaea such as Litsea spp and Neolitsea 

spp. 


Day 7  

Friday 

Kandy 


A  further  day  in  the  Kandy  area  to  investigate  some  of  the  cultural  attractions  of  this  famous  city  such  as  the 

Temple of the Tooth or perhaps a visit to the Peradiniya Botanical Gardens with its wealth of species. 

 

The  Peradiniya  Botanical  Gardens  in  a  suburb  of  the  Kandy  city.  Extending  over  147  acres,  the  gardens  were 



established in 1820 by Alexander Moon and are situated in a bend of Sri Lanka's longest river, the Mahaweli Ganga. 

Peradiniya is crammed full of interesting trees and plants set out in a very attractive style and the orchid house is 

particularly worth a visit. Birds flock to enjoy the many fruiting trees in the gardens and we may find two endemic 

parrots, the diminutive Sri Lanka Hanging Parrot and Layard's Parakeet. Other regular visitors include Hill Myna, 

Velvet-fronted Nuthatch and Tickell's Blue Flycatcher. A large colony of Indian Flying Foxes can be watched in the 

heart of the gardens and as dusk approaches, the giant fruit bats become increasingly active as they prepare for their 

nocturnal forays into the surrounding country. It is difficult to single out botanical highlights in a place so richly 

endowed but the Gymnosperm collection, spice garden, medical garden, National Herbarium and arboretum are all 

worthy of inspection and the long avenue of Coco-de-mer palms is a spectacular sight away from the Seychelles.  

Day 8  

Saturday 

Nuwara Eliya 

After  breakfast  we  drive  higher  into  the  hill 

country  for  a  stay  in  the  hill  station  of 

Nuwara  Eliya  which  lies  at  an  elevation  of 

1,890  metres.  Village  plots  along  the  side  of 

the  road  contain  a  variety  of  interesting 

vegetables 

including 

Snakegourd, 

Bottlegourd, 

Bittergourd, 

Ridgegourd, 

Ashgourd,  Yam,  Winged  Bean  and  many 

other unfamiliar species but nearer to Nuwara 

Eliya there are extensive market gardens and 

the  roadside  produce  for  sale  is  more 

recognisably  European  featuring  bunches  of 

bright  orange  Carrots,  Onions  and  Potatoes. 

Soon  after  leaving  Kandy  we  begin  to  pass 

through one tea estate after another and this 

main export crop is a dominant feature of the central hill country. En route we will stop at one of the factories to 

observe  the  tea  production  process  which  has  hardly  changed  since  the  industry  began  although  these  days  the 

marketing and sales have become hi-tech! The clearance of natural vegetation for tea estates has denuded many of 



Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Tour Dossier 

 

 



© Naturetrek      

 

the  hills  but  expanses  of  forest  still  cling  to  the  more  precipitous  slopes  and  occasional  waterfalls  spill  down  to 



create wonderful photographic opportunities. The old colonial style buildings of Nuwara Eliya are surrounded by an 

abundance  of  pine  trees  which  frame  the  golf  course  and  race  track  giving  a  distinctly  British  feel  to  the  town. 

Nearby the highest peak in Sri Lanka rises to over 2,700 metres.  

 

After a late lunch the remainder of the afternoon is at leisure. One possibility is to look at the small reserve adjacent 



to our hotel where several endemic bird species and Giant Squirrels may be observed. An excursion into the town 

would  permit  a  stroll  in  Victoria  Park,  delightful  well-maintained  gardens  in  the  heart  of  the  town  where  an 

interesting range of hill country birds may be seen including a number of endemics. Although on a much smaller 

scale than Peradiniya, the gardens are a tribute to the careful attention of generations of gardeners and contain many 

island specialities as well as plants imported from Europe. 

Day 9  

Sunday 

Horton Plains  

A full day will be spent in Horton Plains National Park, Sri Lanka's highest and most isolated plateau. Although only 

28 kilometres from Nuwara Eliya, the road is in poor condition and the final ascent to the plateau involves some 

steep inclines. We may stop to look at and photograph the handsome tree ferns – Cyatha crinita and C. walkeri. This is 

a fascinating place, a mixture of open grassy expanses, dotted with the endemic Rhodedendron zeylanicum, and patches 

of  stunted  forest,  much of the  latter festooned  with  epiphytes. The scenery  is  spectacular  and  on  clear  days  it  is 

possible to see  the distant summit of Adam's Peak. At World's End, the plateau drops steeply to the plains over 

1,000 metres below and this becomes a swirling cauldron of cloud as the day progresses.  

 

The Plains are often immersed in cloud and the damp atmosphere has determined the appearance and composition 



of  the  forests.  Stunted  and  twisted  trunks,  gnarled  branches  and  umbrella  shaped  crowns  are  typical.  Epiphytic 

Lichens,  Mosses,  Ferns  and  Orchids  proliferate  in  this damp,  misty  environment. The  tree  species  on  the  Plains 

include;  Actinodaphne  spp.,  Neolitsea  spp.,  Litsea  spp.,  Syzygium  spp.,  Calophyllum  walkeri,  Rhododendron  arboreum  and 

Gordonia spp. Under the canopy there is a rich shrub layer containing mostly Lasianthus spp., Strobilanthes spp., and 

climbers such as Piper montanaKendrickia walkeri and Toddalia asiatica. The grasslands and marshy areas are dominated 

by; Pennisetum sp., Cyambopogan sp and Chrysopogon sp. In wet places Lycopdella clavata and carnivorous plants such as 

Drosera sp. and Utricularia may be found. 

 

Many interesting birds and mammals may be found in this wild and airy National Park. Endemic hill birds such as 



Yellow-eared  Bulbul  and  Dull  Blue  Flycatcher  are  relatively  numerous  whilst  less  obvious  residents  include  Sri 

Lanka Woodpigeon, Sri Lanka Bush Warbler and the shy Sri Lanka Whistling Thrush or Arrenga. Sambar Deer are 

often to be seen grazing at the forest edge, Giant Squirrels and the handsome highland race of Purple-faced Leaf 

Monkey inhabit the tree canopy and Leopards are not infrequently observed at night. It is also worth keeping a look 

out for small reptiles as several endemic species occur here. 

 

At the end of a fascinating day we return to Nuwara Eliya for a second night at our hotel. 



 

Tour Dossier  

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

 

 





© Naturetrek      

 

Day 10  



Monday 

Sinharaja 

A long but interesting drive is in prospect as we descend via numerous snaking loops in the road to the southern 

lowlands and make our way north to the rain forest of Sinharaja. The first of a number of stops punctuating the 

journey will be to visit the Thangamalai Sanctuary, a small montane forest near the town of Haputale. The dominant 

trees  here  belong  to  the  Lauraceae,  Theaceae  and  Euphorbeaceae.  The  herbaceous  flora  is  rich  in  ground  orchids, 



Anoectochilus setaceusCalanthe sp., and a variety of balsams including Impatiens grandis. There are also many ferns and 

the rare  Legocia aurauitica. From Haputale we gradually  descend along the southern slope of the central mountain 

range through tea estates, natural grasslands and savannah. This sparsely populated area has only recently become 

accessible as a result of the Samanalawewa hydroelectric project. The trees in the grassland are widely spaced at 10-

15 m and the vegetation is largely fire resistant, as it is regularly rejuvenated by burning. Many plants in this system 

have medical value and are used in ayurweda. The trees are mainly Bridelia retusaPhyllanthus embilica (Euphorbiaceae), 



Grewia  damine  (Tiliaceae),  Pterocarpus  marsupium,  (Fabaceae),  Terminalia  bellerica,  T.chebula  (Combretaceae),  Helicteres  isora 

(Sterculiaceae), Careya arborea (Lecythidaceae) and Cycas circinalis, the only native gymnosperm in Sri Lanka.  Chrisopogon 

spp. and Chrisopogon nadus are the prominent grass components. During the rainy season the herbaceous diversity in 

these grasslands is very high.  

 

We will stop at Belihyuloya for Lunch and continue to our overnight destination and stay at Blue Magpie Lodge at 



Sinharaja. 

Day 11   

Tuesday 

Sinharaja Forest 

A full day spent in the Sinharaja Forest. This Biosphere reserve is the largest, and most important lowland forest 

remaining on the island. So many things about Sinharaja are unique; 80% of the Sri Lankan endemic birds breed in 

the reserve, 60% of the trees are found nowhere else as are a good proportion of the plants, reptiles and insects. 

Threatened by logging and encroachment it has somehow survived and is an essential element of any natural history 

tour of Sri Lanka. 

 

Below the Dipterocarpus giants which comprise the major tree components of the forest is a sparse shrub and herb 



layer and the low penetration of light to the forest floor encourages considerable saprophytic and parasitic activity. 

Delicate Bamboo Orchids and various pitcher plants grow beside the forest trails and other epiphytic orchids are 

numerous  on  the  branches  and  trunks  of  the  trees.  Ferns  include  the  local  ‘bracken’  Lindsea  repens,  which  is 

collected for shoring up the sides of the open gem mines, a delicate rambling fern Dicranopteris linearis, a small tree 

fern Cyathea sinuate, and a large palm-like fern, Blechnum orientalis.  

 

Over 200 species of flowering plants occur at Sinharaja and we will enjoy a full day in the forest admiring the flora 



and scenery as well as observing some of the wonderful birdlife and exotic butterflies that inhabit this magical place. 

To prolong our time in the reserve we will stay overnight at the Blue Magpie, a small lodge adjacent to the forest 

which obviates the long drive back to Ratnapura. 

 


Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Tour Dossier 

 

 



© Naturetrek      

 

The Gateway, Katunayake 



Day 12  

Wednesday 

Katunayake  

We return to Katunayake today but before leaving the Blue 

Magpie  we  will  enjoy  another  morning  of  birding  in  the 

vicinity  of  the  hotel  where  Green-billed  Coucals  are  often 

easy  to  find  at  first  light  and  other  interesting  residents 

include  Spot-winged  Thrush,  Chestnut-backed  Owlet, 

Oriental Dwarf Kingfisher and Black-throated Munia. 

 

Eventually we can postpone the moment no longer and will 



set off on the southern highway for a four hour drive north. 

Upon  arrival  in  Katunayake,  we  will  check  into  our  4-star 

The Gateway Airport Garden Hotel Colombo for some rest 

and a good night’s sleep! 



Day 13  

Thursday 

London 


We have a mid-morning transfer to Katunayake airport to catch our afternoon Sri Lankan direct flight to London at 

1250. We are due to arrive in London by early evening at around 1910. 

 

Blue Whales extension 

Cost: £795 

Single room supplement: £195 

 

(The minimum number of people required to run this extension is five; however, we may decide to operate it with 



fewer people, at our discretion, with local guides.) 

 

Introduction 

The Great Whales are a source of wonder and fascination 

to land-based humans as we struggle to comprehend their 

alien, unfettered existence roaming the mysterious depths 

of  the  world’s  oceans.  There  is  a  seemingly  insatiable 

desire  to  savour  the  experience  of  being  close  to  these 

magnificent  creatures  and  wherever  feeding  or  breeding 

imperatives  bring  numbers  of  whales  to  congregate  in  a 

particular  area  there  will  invariably  be  local  boatmen 

taking  visitors  to  enjoy  a  few  precious  moments  sharing 

the  ocean  with  these  leviathans.  The  largest  of  all  the 

Blue Whale 



Tour Dossier  

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

 

 





© Naturetrek      

 

cetaceans, indeed the largest of all mammals, the Blue Whale, has always been something of an enigma, a true ocean 



wanderer living a pelagic lifestyle which rarely brings them with any predictability close to land. Gradually however, 

scientists are beginning to gain some understanding of the enormous migrations undertaken by Blue Whales and 

one discovery has been their regular appearances close to the south coast of Sri Lanka between November and early 

April. It is this annual event that we will be taking advantage of during this extension in a country that has long been 

a Naturetrek favourite. 

Day 12  

Wednesday 

Weligama 

Today we leave the group and travel by road to our delightful Resort Hotel Fisherman's Bay at Weligama. Areas of 

the  south-west  coastline  were  devastated  during  the 

Tsunami  but  the  Sri  Lankans  are  resilient  people  and 

much reconstruction has taken place since the tragedy  in 

2004.  Fortunately  the  delightful  Resort  Hotel  at  Paradise 

Beach  Mirissa  was  spared  from  damage  and  this  resort 

hotel  will  be  our  base  for  three  nights  of  our  extension 

tour.  The  drive  from  Sinharaja  will  probably  take  4-5 

hours  and  after  settling  in  to  our  rooms  a  period  of 

relaxation will no doubt be welcome and give us a chance 

to sample the resort amenities or perhaps simply sit on the 

sandy beach watching the waves breaking on the sand with 

binoculars  ready  in  case  a  huge  White-bellied  Sea  Eagle 

glides  along overhead  or terns  begin fishing  offshore. Sri  Lanka  is  a  remarkably  lush,  verdant tropical  island and 

trees  surround  the  hotel  offering  further  birdwatching  opportunities  which  might perhaps  be taken  advantage  of 

from the comfort of a lounger beside the swimming pool! Typical species of such forest edge include Magpie Robin, 

Yellow-billed Babbler, three species of sunbird, Koel, Coppersmith Barbet and Flameback Woodpecker. The local 

bird list is sure to grow with each day spent at Mirissa. 



Day 13   

Thursday 

Weligama 

Ten minutes drive from the hotel is the small fishing port of 

Mirissa and it is here that we board a whale-watching vessel 

for a four hour morning excursion in search of Blue Whales. 

The distance sailed will very much depend on whale sightings 

and  sea  conditions  but  we  may  go  up  to  ten  kilometers 

offshore although it is more likely that most observations will 

be  much  closer  to  land.  The  seas  off  Sri  Lanka  are  rich  in 

marine life but it is only comparatively recently that scientists 

have  discovered  the  regular  appearances  of  Blue  Whales 

between November and early April. Up to a dozen or more 

of these enigmatic ocean wanderers may be lingering off the 

coast and we will rely on our skipper’s expertise to locate as 

Spinner Dolphins 

The Beach at Mirissa 



Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Tour Dossier 

 

 



© Naturetrek      

 

Fishing boats with Galle Fort behind 



many individuals as possible during each excursion. Despite their huge bulk, Blue Whales have a very small dorsal 

fin  and  are  not  always  easy  to  find  on  the 

surface  but  they  do  have  an  extremely  tall 

columnar  blow  and  it  is  this  9  metre  high 

plume of condensed water vapour that usually 

betrays  the  presence  of  a  whale.  Blue  Whales 

also tend to display their huge curved tail flukes 

before each dive and this again is an indicator 

of where to look. The captain will take the boat 

as close as he can without causing disturbance 

to the whales and we will hope that by drifting 

with the current we can allow the creatures to 

approach  alongside  the  vessel,  hopefully  near 

enough  to  be  able  to  smell  their  distinctive 

pungent breath! We may have to content ourselves with longer distance views on this first outing but there will be 

more  chances  for  close-ups  on  the  following  days.  Whilst  Blue  Whales  will  be  our  principal  quarry,  many  other 

cetacea  occur  in  these  waters  and  species  observed  during  the  previous  seasons  included;  Bryde’s,  Sperm, 

Humpback and Short-finned Pilot Whales, Indopacific Bottlenosed, Pantropical Spotted and Spinner Dolphins, the 

latter  sometimes  in  pods  numbering  several  hundred  animals.  Birdlife  is  less  plentiful  at  this  time  of  year  but 

possibilities include Flesh-footed and Wedge-tailed Shearwaters, Pomarine Skua, Crested, Bridled and White-winged 

Terns. 

 

The sailing will last about 3-4 hours and on return to land we will retire for a leisurely lunch before  enjoying the 



birding around the resort. There are no boat rides in the afternoon as outings are less productive and the sea can be 

rough, please note boat rides are weather dependent and can be cancelled without prior notice. At the end of our 

boat trip as we return to the Paradise Beach Hotel we will hope to be celebrating some memorable encounters with 

the largest creature on earth.  

 

On one of the afternoon in Mirissa we will enjoy an 



excursion  to  Galle,  which  was  a  thriving  port  long 

before  colonial  times;  on  the  southwest  of  the 

country,  it  attracted  Arabs,  Persians,  Romans  and 

Greeks  on  their  way  across  the  Indian  Ocean.  In 

1505  the  Portuguese  attacked  and  settled  the  town, 

135 years later conceding it to the Dutch, who built 

the  famous  fort.  In  1796  the  British  took  over  and 

used the fort as their headquarters. Today, Galle Fort 

is  the  old  part  of  the  city,  a  UNESCO  World 

Heritage  Site  and  the  best  preserved  colonial  sea 

fortress in Asia. It is a cosy little town in its own right 

with  narrow  streets,  churches,  cloistered  courtyards 

and  shuttered  mansions  standing  testament  to  their  colonial  past.  Galle  Fort  has  recently  received  a  lot  of 

investment from expatriates living in South East Asia and is now bristling with boutique hotels, art galleries, tiny 

shops, cafes and restaurants. There are several museums as well as the Dutch Reformed Church and the lively Arab 

Blue Whale and remoras 



Tour Dossier  

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

 

 



10 

© Naturetrek      

 

Quarter. The entrances to Galle National Maritime Museum and Fort are not included and can be paid locally. At 



the time of writing there is no entrance fees to visit Galle Fort and £4 to visit Galle National Maritime Museum.  

Day 14  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     Friday 

Weligama  

Today in the morning we will repeat the whale-watching excursion from Mirissa and with the ever-changing ocean 

will  hope  for  further  Blue  Whale  sightings  as  well  as  appearances  by  other  whales,  dolphins  and  birds.  In 

characteristic fashion, the dolphins often swim in the bow-wave of the vessel offering spectacular views as they do 

so. The huge pods of Spinner Dolphins are not a predictable phenomenon but if we are fortunate enough to witness 

one of these there will be plenty of employment for cameras as the seas become a turmoil of activity and scores, or 

even hundreds, of dolphins progress across the ocean in a loose assembly, leaping out of the water at great speed as 

they  pursue  their  prey.  Sea  conditions  in  March  and  early  April  are  usually  calm  allowing  the  best  chances  for 

observations  and  making  whale  ‘spouts’  visible  over  a  long  distance.  Seas  may  however  be  a  little  rougher  in 

November and December. 

 

 



 

After lunch at the hotel we will spend the cooler end 

of  the  afternoon  birdwatching  in  the  local  areas 

where  a  wide  range  of  species  is  possible  including 

Red-wattled  Lapwing  and  White-breasted  Waterhen, 

Purple  Swamphen,  terns  and  waterbirds  as  well  as 

more  forest  inhabitants.  Alternatively  tour  members 

may choose to relax or swim off the beach. Later in 

the  day  we  can  look  for  Indian  Flying  Foxes  as  the 

night  settles  and  maybe  witness  enormous  Indian 

Flying  Foxes  flapping  off  from  their  roost  site  to 

begin  some  nocturnal  foraging.  These  huge,  fruit-

eating bats are widespread on the island but declining in numbers and colonies are always a welcome sight on our 

tours. 


 

 

 



 

Indian Flying Foxes 



Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Tour Dossier 

 

 



© Naturetrek      

11 

 

Day 15  



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Saturday 

Katunayake  

Our  plans  today  are  somewhat  flexible  depending  upon  the  success  of  the  previous  days.  If  necessary,  a  further 

whale-watching trip could be taken at extra cost but hopefully we will have achieved our marine objectives and can 

conclude our tour. Eventually we can postpone the moment no longer and will set off on the southern highway for 

a four hour drive north. Upon arrival in Katunayake, we will check into our 4-star The Gateway Airport Garden 

Hotel Colombo for some rest and a good night’s sleep! 

Day 16  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Sunday 

London   

We have a mid-morning transfer to Katunayake airport to catch our afternoon Sri Lankan direct flight to London at 

1250. We are due to arrive in London by early evening at around 1910. 

 

Climate 

Generally  hot  and  sunny  with  temperatures  in  the  low  country  ranging  from  25ºC  to  35ºC  with  high  humidity, 

particularly in the Wet Zone. Temperatures decrease in the hills to a range of 10ºC-16ºC around Nuwara Eliya. Rain 

can occur at any time but is not usually prolonged outside the monsoon seasons, although showers are an almost 

daily occurrence at Sinharaja. 

Accommodation & food 

We  use  standard  tourist  hotels  throughout  the  itinerary  and  these  are  of  three  or  four  star  standard,  some  with 

swimming pools and other amenities. The exception, is the Blue Magpie Lodge near Sinharaja which is a simple but 

comfortable Rest House.  Accommodation for this tour is in twin rooms with private facilities (single rooms being 

available on request).  All food is included in the price of the tour.  

Entry requirements 

All UK passport holders and most other nationalities require an Electronic Travel Authorisation (ETA) visa for Sri 

Lanka,  which  is  obtainable  in  advance  by  filling  the  ETA  form  on 

http://www.eta.gov.lk/slvisa/

.  No 

vaccinations are mandatory for entry, but as recommended in our brochure we think it is wise to also be protected 



against polio, tetanus and hepatitis A, and malaria. Please note that, although we are aware of a banner at Colombo 

airport which announces ‘Welcome to a Malaria Free Country’, there are cases of malaria each year in Sri Lanka, and 

we strongly recommend that you seek medical advice regarding any requirement for prophylactics for your visit to 

the island. MASTA Travel Clinics are located across the UK and provide a full range of travel immunisations. For 

your nearest clinic, visit 

www.masta-travel-health.com

. You can also register on the website and fill out the details of 

your holiday to obtain a country specific ‘Health Brief’. 



 

Tour Dossier  

Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

 

 



12 

© Naturetrek      

 

Flights 

We  use  scheduled  Sri  Lankan  Airlines  direct  flights  for  all  our  tours  to  Sri  Lanka.  All  these  flights  depart  from 

London Heathrow. If you wish to travel from Manchester, Newcastle, Edinburgh, Glasgow or Aberdeen there will 

be an additional charge of around £195 and these flights will be with British Airways.  

 

The sole disadvantage of Sri Lankan Airlines flights to Sri Lanka is that sometimes the service is slow and special 



requests for seats and meals are not easily available. If you would prefer to fly with Emirates, Qatar Airways, or Jet 

Airways please note that these flights are not direct. If you wish to fly with Emirates, Qatar Airways, or Jet Airways 

we will gladly arrange it for you, but please give us plenty of warning and you can expect to pay between £100 and 

£200 extra for these indirect flights. Due to a difference in arrival and departure times, you will also expected to pay 

an extra £150 per person (minimum two people are required) for the additional transfer fees. If you would prefer to 

travel  in  Business  class  (normally  available  at  a  supplement  charge  of  around  £2,595).  These  prices  are  only 

approximate and could vary according to availability and season. We will be pleased to approach the airline and offer 

you a quote on request. 

 

Return flights with Sri Lankan Airlines are scheduled to arrive at London Heathrow at 1900. Please note that, your 



return flight might not connect with British Airways flights to regional airports, and you may require an extra night 

in London. If you would like to travel from one of the above regional airports, please let us know at the time of 

booking so that we can make the necessary arrangements and obtain a competitive fare. 

Grading 

This tour is graded A/B. Most of the botanical walks are gentle and suitable for any age and level of fitness.  There 

are also a couple of slightly more strenuous longer walks included in the itinerary. 

 

Your safety & security  

You have chosen to travel to Sri Lanka.  Risks to your safety and security are an unavoidable aspect of all travel and 

the best current advice on such risks is provided for you by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.  In order to 

assess and protect against any risks in your chosen destination, it is essential that you refer to the Foreign Office 

website – www.fco.gov.uk/travel or telephone 0870 6060290 regularly prior to travel. 

Blue Whale with remoras 


Sri Lanka's Tropical Flora 

Tour Dossier 

 

 



© Naturetrek      

13 

 

How to book your place 

In order to book your place on this holiday, please give us a call on 01962 733051 with a credit or debit card, book 

online  at 

www.naturetrek.co.uk

,  or  alternatively  complete  and  post  the  booking  form  at  the  back  of  our  main 

Naturetrek brochure, together with a deposit of 20% of the holiday cost plus any room supplements if required. If 

you  do  not  have  a  copy  of  the  brochure,  please  call  us  on  01962  733051  or request  one  via  our  website.  Please 

stipulate  any  special  requirements,  for  example  extension  requests  or  connecting/regional  flights,  at  the  time  of 

booking. 



 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə