State-wide seed conservation strategy for threatened species, threatened



Yüklə 2.41 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix27.08.2017
ölçüsü2.41 Mb.
  1   2   3

State-wide seed conservation strategy for 

threatened species, threatened 

communities and biodiversity hotspots 

 

Project 033146a 



 

 

 



Final Report  

 

South Coast Natural Resource Management Inc. and 



Australian Government Natural Heritage Trust  

July 2008 

 

Prepared by Anne Cochrane 



Threatened Flora Seed Centre 

Department of Environment and Conservation 

Western Australian Herbarium 

Kensington Western Australia 6983 

 

 

         



 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 1 -



 

 

Summary 



 

In 2005 the South Coast Natural Resource Management Inc. secured regional 

competitive component funding from the Australian Government’s Natural Heritage Trust 

for a three-year project for the Western Australian Department of Environment and 

Conservation (DEC) to coordinate seed conservation activities for listed threatened 

species and ecological communities and for Commonwealth identified national 

biodiversity hotspots in Western Australia (Project 033146).  

 

This project implemented an integrated and consistent approach to collecting seeds of 



threatened and other flora across all regions in Western Australia. The project expanded 

existing seed conservation activities thereby contributing to Western Australian plant 

conservation and recovery programs. The primary goal of the project was to increase the 

level of protection of native flora by obtaining seeds for long term conservation of 300 

species. The project was successful and 571 collections were made. The project 

achieved its goals by using existing skills, data, centralised seed banking facilities and 

international partnerships that the DEC’s Threatened Flora Seed Centre already had in 

place. In addition to storage of seeds at the Threatened Flora Seed Centre, 199 

duplicate samples were dispatched under a global seed conservation partnership to the 

Millennium Seed Bank in the UK for further safe-keeping. Herbarium voucher specimens 

for each collection have been lodged with the State herbarium in Perth, Western 

Australia. The information is accessible through Florabase 

(http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/). 

 

The project was able to assist in the implementation of fundamental recovery processes 



for threatened flora by providing seed-based genetic resources for a number of flora 

reintroductions and by providing insurance against loss of plant species in the wild. 

Investigations into seed germination contributed to an understanding of the biology of 

the species, knowledge that underpins successful plant recovery and revegetation. 

 

This project provided training to community members and other stakeholders in correct 



methods for seed collection and helped to foster an appreciation and awareness of ex 

situ conservation and its role in the recovery of threatened species and communities. 

The project produced a number of awareness raising and promotional products, in 

addition to popular and scientific articles and conference presentations on seed 

conservation and its role in supporting the survival of plant species in the wild. 



 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 2 -



 

 

       



 

A selection of conservation flora from across the NRM Regions targeted for seed 

collection and conservation through this project.

 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 3 -



 

 

Introduction 



 

One in five of the 13,000 species, subspecies and varieties of plant life found in Western 

Australia are of conservation concern. The majority of this flora occurs in the South West 

of the State, an area recognised as the only global biodiversity hotspot in Australia due 

to the rich diversity of plant life and the high level of threat facing that flora. A legacy of 

land clearing has resulted in substantial habitat fragmentation and salinisation of the 

landscape. Grazing by introduced herbivores, frequent fire and weed invasion further 

threaten already degraded landscapes. The introduced water mould, Phytophthora 



cinnamomi, threatens 40 per cent of the flora in the south west corner. A mass extinction 

of biodiversity is projected under future climate change scenarios. Conserving 

ecosystems in a changing environment will be a challenge. Where habitats are in 

immediate danger of destruction, and where on ground actions cannot guarantee 

species survival, the collection and maintenance of plant material from the wild becomes 

necessary, acting as insurance.  

 

Seeds are nature’s genetic storehouse and are a ready source of plant material for 



utilisation in restoring degraded lands, reintroducing species into the wild and restocking 

depleted populations. Conserving seeds off site represents a means of saving vital 

natural resources for the future. It is a complementary approach to on ground actions 

and a cost effective and efficient way to conserve genetic diversity. Good quality 

collections with a broad genetic base are required to reinforce and benefit species 

survival. Under some scenarios, seed conservation is the only realistic tool for some of 

our most at risk species. 

 

This multi-regional, multi-year approach to delivering a major biodiversity conservation 



outcome aimed to increase the level of protection of native flora by collecting, conserving 

and making available material for recovery actions and seed research. Conservation of 

seed material provides insurance against loss of important flora in the wild and provides 

genetic material for its future use in reintroduction and restoration. Studies aimed to 

improve knowledge of seed biology, ecology and threatening processes underpin the 

management and conservation of plant species and lead to better on ground outcomes 

for the public benefit. 

 

This project was linked to a global seed conservation partnership between the Western 



Australian Department of Environment and Conservation through the Millennium Seed 

Bank, Royal Botanic Gardens Kew UK where duplicate collections of seeds were sent 

for safe keeping. 

 

 



Key investment areas addressed by this project. 

 

1. 



Increased level of protection of native flora through seed conservation 

Using existing skills, data and facilities this key investment area was met. A target of 300 

native plant species was set at the onset of the project and between 2005 and 2008 571 

collections (428 species and subspecies – see Appendix 1) were incorporated into, and 

are being actively managed in, DEC’s seed conservation facility in Perth (Threatened 

Flora Seed Centre). This facility and its staff use internationally accepted genebanks 

standards for seed collection and storage (low temperature and low moisture). Sixty-two 

per cent of the collections made (230 taxa) are conservation-listed in Western Australia 



 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 4 -



 

 

and include 163 Declared Rare flora collections, 192 Priority flora collections and 217 



non-conservation listed flora collections associated with Threatened Ecological 

Communities and Biodiversity Hotspots. In total 428 taxa from 45 families and113 

genera were collected from across the six NRM regions in Western Australia. Although 

only one half of the collections have been processed to date these collections amount to 

more than 10.5 kilograms of seeds (> 7 million individual seeds). All seed collections 

made through this project were accompanied by an herbarium voucher specimen that 

has been lodged at the Western Australian Herbarium. Details of these specimens can 

be accessed through the Department of Environment and Conservation herbarium 

database Florabase (http://florabase.dec.wa.gov.au/). Duplicate samples of 199 of these 

collections were dispatched to the Millennium Seed Bank at the Royal Botanic Gardens 

Kew United Kingdom for safe-keeping under an existing Access and Benefit Sharing 

Agreement between the Western Australian government and Kew.  

 

This project assisted the Western Australian government through DEC’s Threatened 



Flora Seed Centre to achieve and report against the international goals of Target 8 of 

the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation. The goals of this target are ’60 per cent of 



threatened plant species in accessible ex situ collections, preferably in the country of 

origin, and 10 per cent of them included in recovery and restoration programmes’

 

 



   

Ben Bayliss, Project Officer 

collecting seeds of Priority listed 

Dryandra stricta in the NACC Region. 

 

 



Project Manager, Anne Cochrane, 

documenting collection information 

in the Rangelands Region.  

 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 5 -



 

 

Table1.  Collections by NRM Region 



 

NRM Region 

No collections 

South Coast 

319 

Avon 


192 

South West 

25 

Rangelands 



23 

Northern Agricultural 

Swan 




 

 

 Table 2.  Collections by conservation status 

 

Conservation status  No collections 

Critically Endangered 

83 

Endangered 



30 

Vulnerable 

49 

Priority 1 



42 

Priority 2 

64 

Priority 1 



38 

Priority 2 

48 

Common 


217 

 

 



Todd Erickson, Project Officer, collecting seeds of Eucalyptus dolichorhyncha

 

 

2. Provision of material for recovery and information to assist recovery planning 

Seeds from a number of threatened flora collected through this project were provided for 



in situ recovery works, and included the Critically Endangered Lambertia fairallii, Banksia 

brownii, Dryandra anatona and Hemigenia ramossisima. The first three species have 

been planted into a ‘seed orchard’ in the South Coast Region. The fourth was planted 

into a reserve in the Avon Region. These plantings have contributed to increased 

protection of these species through increase in numbers of on ground plants and an 

accumulation of knowledge regarding their biology and ecology. 

 


 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 6 -



 

 

   



a.

b.

c.



 

d.

    e.   



 f. 

 

 



 

Examples of seeds collected under this project for long term conservation and 

utilisation. a. Dryandra; b. Caustis c. Dodonaea d. Banksia e. & f. Acacia. 

 

 



Ecological and biological data gathered at the time of seed collection has been stored in 

a departmental database. Information on fruit and seed production, population health 

and size, phenology and descriptions of fruit and seeds are data that assist our 

knowledge and understanding of native flora that lead to a better conservation outcome.  



 

 

 

Albany Rare Flora Recovery team assisting DEC scientists with Banksia brownii. 



 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 7 -



 

 

 

 

Herbivore-proofing seedlings of Banksia brownii after reintroduction into a new 

safe location near Albany in the SCNRM Region. 

 

 

3. Improvement in understanding biological processes 

Germination trials for species collected through this project are providing information on 

seed dormancy and germination characteristics, information that is essential for 

achieving successful recovery and restoration of native species. Quality assessment has 

been made for more than 50% of collections – this is an ongoing process as is the 

monitoring of seed viability over time.  



 

All seedlings derived from the routine germination investigations, and not required in on 

ground recovery actions, have been screened by DEC scientists for their response to 

inoculation with the dieback disease Phytophthora cinnamomi in order to gain an 

understanding of species susceptibility to the deadly disease. The results of these tests 

provide vitally important information for land managers. Susceptible species can be 

targeted for spraying with the fungicide Phosphite to prevent their decline in areas 

infested with the disease. Appropriate measures to control disease incursions can be 

adopted to help prevent species extinction and hygiene protocols can be implemented 

on site. This is particularly pertinent in the South Coast, South West and Swan Regions. 

 

Recent laboratory investigations on seeds collected through this project have provided 



knowledge on species response to temperature during germination and early seedling 

growth in order to predict species potentially at risk of extinction due to climate change. 

 


 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 8 -



 

 

 



Routine germination investigations assess viability of seeds before storage. 

 

 

4. Skills & training  

Through this project both formal and informal training was provided by project staff 

(project manager and project officers) for interested stakeholders.  



Formal: over the three years of the project, the project manager has provided a formal 

seed conservation training module within the DEC Flora Management Course for 

government employees involved in flora conservation. This course has recently become 

nationally recognised by becoming aligned to the TAFE Unit of Competency ‘Monitor 

Biodiversity’ and contributes to a Certificate IV in Conservation and Land Management. 

These government employees will in turn be able to pass on their knowledge and skills 

to community members in their own Regions throughout the State. A formal training day 

in seed collection and conservation was provided to members of the Friends of William 

Bay National Park and three government staff in 2004.  

 

 



Presentation to DEC Flora Management Course 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 9 -



 

 

 



Informal: Training volunteer members of the community and government and industry 

stakeholders in seed collection activities has been an ongoing process for this project. 

Training varied from a single days on ground activities to a seven day intensive 

collection training in the field.  Participants have ranged from members of the Wildflower 

Society of Western Australia, an indigenous cadet, an overseas student, members of the 

Badjaling Aboriginal Community, mining employees and government flora officers from 

DEC.   

 

5. Public awareness and communications  



Contact with community members on a constant basis through emails and face to face 

contact with seed collection volunteers and through seed collection training (as above) 

has increased the profile of seed conservation within the community. Progress in 

communication with the mining industry yielded considerable awareness and support for 

seed conservation activities in some regions. Specific products, articles and 

presentations produced as a result of this project are detailed below, in addition to other 

products produced for seed conservation activities in general: 

 

Brochures/posters 

•••• 

Seed Conservation brochure 2006.  

•••• 



Seed Conservation poster produced for Albany Show 2006.  

•••• 



Tackling threats to plant diversity on the South Coast poster produced for Australian 

Network for Plant Conservation national conference 2008. 

•••• 

Seed Conservation fridge magnet 2008. 

 

  



Seed conservation fridge magnet 

 

 

Popular Articles: 

•  Cochrane A, Crawford A, Monks L 2007 Achieving Target 8 of the GSPC in Western 

Australia. Samara 13, 11-12.  

•  Cochrane A 2008 Preserving our flora’s future. LANDSCOPE 23 (3), 17-21.  

These articles detail the good news that seed conservation in Western Australia has 

helped to achieve global targets set by the Convention on Biological Diversity through 

the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation and specifically mentions the role that the 

South Coast NRM plays in supporting seed conservation in Western Australia.  

 

Conference presentations: 

•  Cochrane A, Crawford A, Monks L 2005 The significance of ex situ conservation to 

plant recovery in Southern Australia. Paper presented to the international Advances 


 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 10 -



 

 

in plant conservation biology: implications for flora management and restoration 

conference Perth, Western Australia 25-27 October 2005. 

•  Cochrane A, Daws M 2007 Temperature limits to recruitment in narrow range 

endemics in south west Western Australia. Paper presented to the international 

‘Seed Ecology’ conference in Perth, Australia September 6-13, 2007. 

•  Barrett S, Cochrane A 2007 Conservation in action: recovery of threatened flora in 

South West Western Australia. Paper presented to the Biodiversity Extinction Crisis. 



A Pacific response conference (Inaugural Meeting of the Society for Conservation 

Biology Australasia) Sydney July 2007  

•  Anon 2008 Tackling Threats to Plant Diversity on the South Coast of Western 

Australia. Poster paper presented at the Our Declining Flora – Tackling the Threats 

Australian Network for Plant Conservation national forum, Sydney, Australia 21-24 

April, 2008. 

 

These presentations at national and international conferences helped foster an 



awareness of ex situ conservation and its role in species recovery in Western Australia. 

 

Scientific Articles  

•  Barrett S, Cochrane A 2007 Population demography and seed bank dynamics of the 

threatened obligate seeding shrub Grevillea maxwellii McGill (Proteaceae). Journal of 



the Royal Society Western Australia 90, 165-174. 

•  Cochrane A, Crawford A, Monks L 2007 The significance of ex situ seed 

conservation to threatened plant reintroduction. Australian Journal of Botany 55, 356-

361 


 

Other presentations: 

•  Wildflower Society Western Australia (Albany) 

•  WA Chief Scientist (Dr Lynn Beazley)  

 

Attendance and presentations at Albany and Esperance Rare Flora Recovery Team 



meetings on seed conservation outcomes. 

 

 



Albany Rare Flora Recovery Team field meeting 2007 

 


 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 11 -



 

 

Products, services and other activities 



 

This project built capacity for those involved through publicity, training and awareness 

raising of seed conservation issues in Western Australia, including formal seed 

conservation. Project planning included compilation of data for targeted species 

(includes herbarium specimens and associated herbarium collection information, 

taxonomic descriptions, rare flora report forms) and production of maps highlighting 

those species within targeted collection areas. Assessment of health and reproductive 

status of threatened and other significant flora on site and quality assessment of seed 

collections through laboratory studies was a major service of this Project. On ground 

works other than seed collection included some botanical survey that identified new 

populations of conservation-listed species and discovery of potentially new species. 

 

 



Mapping species in the Avon Region for seed collection 

 

             



 

Herbarium voucher specimen examples 

 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 12 -



 

 

 



Seed conservation poster 

 


 

Department of Environment and Conservation

 

 

- 13 -



 

 

Lessons learnt 



 

Some of the lessons learnt through this project include the need for early identification of 

threatened species status to maximise diversity so that collections can be made before 

population size and genetic diversity decline. This is particularly important in areas 

where pathogens threaten the survival of plant diversity. Meeting conservation goals 

without impacting on wild populations is an on-going challenge. Whilst many collections 

made during the course of this project are quite small, they still provide material that can 

prove vital for long term species survival.  





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:
  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə