Taiwania 60(1): 59‒62, 2015 doi: 10. 6165/tai. 2015. 60. 59



Yüklə 42.46 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü42.46 Kb.

Taiwania 60(1):59‒62, 2015 

DOI: 10.6165/tai.2015.60.59 

 

 

 

59 



 

 

NOTE 



 

Lectotypification and status of Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd. ex Brandis) 

Gamble (Myrtaceae) – an endemic myrtle of southern Western Ghats, India 

 

Muhammed S. Shareef 



(1) 

and Beegam A. Rasiya 

(1*)

 

 

1.



 

Jawaharlal Nehru Tropical Botanic Garden & Research Institute, Palode, Thiruvananthapuram - 695 562, Kerala, India 

* Corresponding author. Email: arasiyabeegam@gmail.com 

 

(Manuscript received 12 March 2014; accepted 5 November 2014) 



 

ABSTRACT: 

The lectotype of Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd. ex Brandis) Gamble is designated and its status is reviewed.

 

 



KEY WORDS: 

Lectotypification, Myrtaceae, Syzygium myhendrae, Western Ghats 

 

 

INTRODUCTION   



 

Richard Henry Beddome collected a species of 



Eugenia  from the erstwhile state of Travancore and 

identified it as Eugenia myhendrae. This name was 

validly published by Brandis (1906) based on 

Beddome’s collection 2902 without any collection date 

(s.d). While describing the species  E. myhendrae

Brandis did not cite type material. The specific epithet 



myhendrae  may probably be the name of type locality 

Mahendragiri hill (=Myhendra hill) of Travancore state 

now a part of Tirunelveli district of Tamil Nadu state of 

India. On the herbarium sheet it is written as 

‘Myhendra 4000’ perhaps meaning Mahendragiri 

4000ft. The new species was described on the basis of 

this only specimen.  Beddome’s herbarium specimen 

2902 is housed at British Museum and has been 

scanned with barcode BM000615099 (BM!).  After 

critical observation and study of Beddome’s specimen 

(BM 000615099 image!) in accordance to the Art. 9.12 

of International code of Nomenclature for Algae, Fungi 

and Plants (McNeill et al., 2012), the authors here by 

designate it as lectotype (marked specimen). 

It has been mentioned in TL. 1: 304 1976 that types 

and specimens of Brandis is housed in HBG, BONN, A, 

and K. Referred to this the authors contacted these 

herbaria for specimen of S. myhendrae. Only BONN 

herbarium was responded that they have no historical 

herbarium. Nothing informed by others. In Kew 

herbarium catalogue shows the specimen of Bourdillon 

later. Bourdillon (1908), the first forest conservator of 

erstwhile Travancore state had also collected the same 

species from Peermede now a part of Kerala state 

(K000821355 image!) and from Muthukuzhivayal now 

a part of Tamil Nadu, India (TBGT 03024!). 

Gamble (1915-1919) made some new combinations 

while transferring some species of south Indian 



Eugenia, including E. myhendrae  into  Syzygium  as 

Syzygium  myhendrae  (Bedd. ex Brandis) Gamble. 

While studying the Western Ghats endemic Syzygium 

species, the senior author (SMS) could collect 

specimens of Syzygium myhendrae from different parts 

of evergreen forests of Agasthyamala of 

Thiruvananthapuram and Pandimotta of Kollam 

districts of Kerala. Though many plant explorations 

were undertaken in the above said areas the species 

could not be recollected from its type locality earlier 

(Manickam  et  al., 2008). Sasidharan  et al.  (2002) 

rediscovered this species after a lapse of more than 100 

years from Shenduruny Wildlife Sanctuary in Kollam 

district and Periyar Tiger Reserve in Idukki district of 

Kerala, India. This species was categorised as Rare 

(Ahmedullah  &  Nayar, 1986), Indeterminate (Rao.  et 

al., 2003) and Endangered  (IUCN, 2012). Gopalan  & 

Henry (2000) opined that it is possibly extinct because 

they could not relocate it after repeated explorations in 

the Agasthyamalai hills. The species was not mentioned 

in the Flora of Agasthyamala (Mohanan  &  Sivadasan, 

2002) and Flora of Thiruvananthapuram (Mohanan  & 

Henry, 1994) and so it constitutes new addition to the 

flora of these places. The authors  could observe many 

populations and recognized that it is one of the 

dominant and common species in these localities. 

Major associates of this species are Dimocarpus longan

Syzygium 

lanceolatum

Syzygium 

munronii

Cinnamomum  verum,  Ficus  hispida,  Elaeocarpus 

munronii, Schefflera sp.,  Litsea  sp. and  Glochidion 

zeylanicum.  Each tree produces thousands of fruits 

every year and serves as major food resource to 

Malabar Giant Squirrel. The species shows 

morphological similarities with Syzygium rubicundum 

but differs in many ways. The citation, description and 

other details are given below along with photos to 

facilitate easy identification. 


 

Taiwania 

Vol. 60, No.1 

 

 

60 



 

 

 

 

Fig. 1: Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd. ex Brandis) Gamble A. Habit, B. Flower buds, C. Inflorescence, D. Fruits. 

 

 

March 2015               Shareef & Rasiya: Lectotypification and status of Syzygium myhendrae 

 

 

 



61 

 

TAXONOMIC TREATMENT 



 

Syzygium myhendrae  (Bedd. ex Brandis) Gamble, Fl. 

Madras 478. 1919 [1: 338. 1957 (Repr.)]; V. Chitra in 

N.C. Nair & A.N. Henry (Eds), Fl. Tamilnadu Anal. 1: 

157. 1983; Sasidh., Biod. Doc. Kerala pt. 6, Fl. Pl.: 178. 

2004; T.S. Nayar &  al., Fl. Pl. Kerala-Handb.: 451. 

2006.  Eugenia myhendrae  Bedd. ex Brandis, Indian 

Trees 325. 1906; Bourd., Forest Trees Travancore 189. 

1908; Rama Rao, Fl. Pl. Travancore 171. 1914.  

(Fig.1) 

 

Lectotype  (designated here) (Fig.  2): INDIA, 

Travancore, Myhendra, 4000ft., s.d., R.H. Beddome, 

2902, barcode No. BM000615099 (BM image!). 



 

Trees, to 20 m high., to 1.2 m girth; bark smooth, 

greyish-white, slightly fluted in older trees, blaze dark 

brown; branchlets quadrangular, become terete when 

mature. Young leaves crimson. Leaves opposite or 

rarely sub opposite, coriaceous, 3.5–7.5 x 1.5–3 cm, 

oblanceolate to obovate, cuneate at base, obtusely 

acuminate at apex, tip of acumen obtuse, pale brown 

beneath and dark brown on upper when dry;  midrib 

prominent beneath and channelled above, lateral nerves 

many, slender, closely parallel, reticulated, gland-dotted, 

more towards the midrib. Petioles to 5 mm long. 

Inflorescence of  terminal, corymbose cymes of 

umbellules, to 7.5 cm long; peduncle, branches and 

buds are pinkish when young; peduncle and branches 

quadrangular; flowers sessile, c. 1.8 cm across. Calyx 

tube turbinate, 3.7–4.5 mm long, lobes shortly or 

bluntly 4-toothed or lobed. Petals 4, calyptrate, 

orbicular to sub orbicular, white, 2–2.5 mm across, c. 

17 gland dots per petal. Stamens  3–6 mm long. Style 

filiform, shorter than stamens, to 5 mm long; stigma 

simple, acute; ovary 2-locular, many ovuled. Fruits 

globose, to 9 mm across, pink-purple, juicy, crowned 

by persistent calyx limb. Seed 1, globose. 

 

Habitat: Evergreen forests of 900–1800 m. 

 

Flowering & Fruiting: September–February. 

 

Distribution:  The species is endemic to the Western 

Ghats region of Karnataka, Tamil Nadu and Kerala. 

 

Uses: The tree is highly attractive and can be 

introduced as an ornamental. Fruits are edible, sweet, 

acidic taste with a tinge of mango flavour. 

 

Specimens examined: INDIA. Travancore: Myhendra   

 

 



Fig. 2: Lectotype of Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd. ex 

Brandis) Gamble (BM! Barcode: BM000615099 © The 

Natural History Museum, London) 

 

4000ft, s.d., Beddome 2902 (BM image!); 



Muthukuzhivayal, 3. 10. 1894, Bourdillon  Acc. No 

03024 (TBGT!); Peermede 3500ft, 5. 4. 1894, 



Bourdillon  213 (K image!).  Thiruvananthapuram

Ponmudi, 28. 9. 2010, S. M. Shareef 69354. 3. 11. 2010, 



S. M. Shareef 69360. 21. 11. 2010, S. M. Shareef 69359. 

29. 12. 2010, S. M. Shareef 70601 (TBGT); Chemunji, 

26. 9. 2012, S. M. Shareef 72497 (TBGT); Athirumala, 

7. 1. 2014, S. M. Shareef  76139. &  7. 1. 2014, S. M. 



Shareef  76141 (TBGT). Kollam: Pandimotta, 9. 1. 

2013, S. M. Shareef 76104 (TBGT). 

 

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

 

Authors are thankful to the Director, JNTBGRI for 

constant encouragement and facilities provided. Our thanks 

are also due to the Forest Department, Kerala for their help in 

field studies. We also extend our gratitude to Trustees of the 

British Museum for Beddome’s herbarium material. 

 

 

 



 

 

Taiwania 

Vol. 60, No.1 

 

 

62 



 

LITERATURE CITED 

 

Ahmedullah, M. and Nayar, M.P. 1986. Endemic Plants of 

Indian Region. Botanical Survey of India, Calcutta. p.108. 



Bourdillon, T.F. 1908. The Forest Trees of Travancore. The 

Government Press, Trivandrum. p. 189. 



Brandis, D. 1906.  Indian Trees.  An account of trees, shrubs 

and woody climbers, bamboos and palms indigenous or 

commonly cultivated in the British Indian Empire. 

Archibald Constable & co. Ltd. London. p. 325. 



Gamble, J.S. 1915-1919. Flora of the Presidency of Madras. 

Vol. 1. Adlard & Sons Ltd., 21, Hart Street W.O., London. 

p. 475. 

Gopalan, R. and Henry, A.N. 2000. Endemic plants of India. 

CAMP for the strict endemics of Agasthiyamalai  hills, 

southern Western Ghats. Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal 

Singh, Dehra Dun. pp. 398–400. 



IUCN Red List Plants of India. IUCN 2012. IUCN Red List 

of 


Threatened Species. 

Version 2012 

.2. 

www.iucnredlist.org. downloaded on 10 January 2013. 



Manickam, V.S., Murugan, C. and Jothi, G.J. 2008. Flora 

of Tirunelveli Hills (Southern Western Ghats) Vol.1. 

Polypetalae.  Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra 

Dun. 


McNeill, J., Barrie, F.R., Buck W.R., Demoulin, V., 

Greuter,  W., Hawksworth, D.L., Herendeen, P.S., 

Knapp, S., Marhold, K., Prado, J., PrudHomme van 

Reine, W.F., Smith, G.F., Wiersema, J.H. and Turland, 

N.J. (eds) 2012. International Code of Nomenclature for 

Algae, Fungi and Plants (Melbourne Code). Regnum 

Vegetabile154. Koeltz Scientific Books, Germany. 

Mohanan, M. and Henry, A.N.  1994.  Flora of 

Thiruvananthapuram. Botanical Survey of India, Calcutta. 



Mohanan, N. and Sivadasan, M.  2002.  Flora of 

Agasthyamala.  Bishen Singh Mahendra Pal Singh, Dehra 

Dun. 

Rao, C.K., Geetha, B.L. and Suresh, G. 2003.  Red list of 

threatened vascular plants species in India. ENVIS, 

Botanical Survey of India, Howrah. p. 68. 

Sasidharan, N., Sujanapal, P. and Augustine, J.  2002. 

Reappearance of Syzygium myhendrae (Bedd. ex Brandis) 

Gamble and Ellipanthus tomentosus Kurz in the southern 

Western Ghats. J. Econ. Taxon. Bot. 26: 609-611. 




Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə