The Effect of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict on the Water Resources of the Jordan River Basin



Yüklə 140.31 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix04.08.2017
ölçüsü140.31 Kb.

 

 

 



 

Full citation: 

Ferragina, Eugenia. "The Effect of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict on the 

Water Resources of the Jordan River Basin." Global Environment 2 (2008): 

152–170. 

http://www.environmentandsociety.org/node/4596

 

First published: 



http://www.globalenvironment.it

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



   

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

Rights: 



All rights reserved. Made available on the Environment & Society Portal for 

nonprofit educational purposes only, courtesy of Gabriella Corona, Consiglio 

Nazionale delle Ricerche / National Research Council of Italy (CNR), and XL 

edizioni s.a.s. 



oday  the  great  global  challenges,  such  as 

environmental change or the depletion of 

natural resources, are turning into strategic 

issues, capable of inl uencing international 

peace and security.

1

 h



  e connection between 

security and the environment comes to the 

fore  wherever  a  struggle  for  the  control 

of  natural  resources  aggravates  conl ictual 

situations  or,  conversely,  a  conl ict  causes 

T

The Effects 



of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict 

on Water Resources 

in the Jordan River Basin

Eugenia Ferragina



GE

153

the destruction of natural resources; or, again, when the increasing 

frequency of extreme climatic events determines migrations of so-

called “environmental refugees”, and lead communities to compete 

for the two fundamental resources for survival: land and water. In 

1993, Myers indicated environmental degradation as a potential risk 

for international peace and security, although he did not regard it as 

the exclusive cause of political instability.

National security is no longer about i ghting forces and weaponry alone. It 

relates to water-sheds, croplands, forests, genetic resources, climate and other 

factors  rarely  considered  by  military  experts  and  political  leaders,  but  that 

taken together deserve to be viewed as equally crucial to a nation’s security as 

military prowess.

2

An emblematic case of the connection between security and the 



environment in the Mediterranean is the Israeli-Palestinian conl ict. 

Here  we  i nd  both  competition  for  land  and  water  –  the  one 

inseparable from the other – and the devastating ef ects of prolonged 

conl ict  on  the  environment  and  natural  resources.  A  historical 

reconstruction of the water dispute in the Middle East shows that 

a situation of prolonged political instability has led Israel to follow 

a  politics  of  appropriation  of  the  main  surface  and  underground 

resources of the Jordan basin. h

  is politics, aimed at guaranteeing 

the  country’s  hydraulic  security  in  a  hostile  regional  context,  has 

legitimized a race for the exploitation of water resources among the 

other countries along the lower course of the Jordan (Jordan and the 

Palestinian Territories); a race that has shoved into the background 

the issue of saving and protecting water resources.

Today, the ef ects of global problems such as climatic change tend 

to be amplii ed at the regional scale. h

  is is because the ancient war 

for water now takes place within an environmental context subjected 

to strong anthropic pressure and gradual parching of the soil. Water 

1

 B. Buzan, O. Waever, J. Wilde, Security. A New Framework for Analysis, Lon-



don 1998.

2

 N. Myers, Ultimate Security. h



  e Environmental Basis of Political Stability, 

Norton, New York, 1996.



AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

154

thus becomes a strategic bone of contention, capable of inluencing 

peace and regional securities.

hus, the connection between security and the environment is 

increasingly inluenced by current global dynamics; a challenge that 

would call for an environmental management at the global scale that 

our weak international institutions are incapable of providing. We 

hear many declarations of principles, but there is no consensus on 

the strategies to be followed to face environmental crises and their 

political and economic efects.

The water of discord

he  environmental  context  of  the  geopolitics  of  water  in  the 

Middle East – that is, the political rivalry between the countries of 

the Jordan basin as regards the parceling out of the river’s water and 

the exploitation of underground hydrogeological resources – is one 

of aridity and scarce precipitation resulting in low-low and highly 

saline watercourses.

he Jordan basin extends from Mount Hermon in the north to 

the Dead Sea in the south. It lies within the territories of ive states: 

Syria,  Israel,  Palestine,  Lebanon,  and  Jordan.  I  will  mainly  focus, 

however, on the countries along the lower course of the Jordan, viz., 

Israel, Jordan, and the Palestinian Territories of Gaza and West Bank, 

which appear to be more dependent on the water of the Jordan river 

and more exposed to water scarcity.

he  Jordan  originates  from  the  slopes  of  Mount  Hermon.  It 

receives  three  tributaries  along  its  upper  course:  the  Hasbani,  the 

Dan,  and  the  Banyas.  he  river  then  runs  across  northern  Israel, 

through Lake Tiberias, and then southward. About 6.5 kilometers 

from Lake Tiberias it receives its main tributary, the Yarmuk, which 

marks the boundary between Syria and Jordan and then that between 

Israel and Jordan. Immediately after its conluence with the Yarmuk, 

the Jordan runs in its homonymous valley for about 110 kilometers. 

his stretch marks the boundary between Jordan and Israel, and then 

that between Jordan and West Bank. he river inally lows into the 

Dead Sea, over 400 meters below sea level. he low of the Jordan is 


GE

155

subject to frequent seasonal and interannual variations. It is about 

1500 millions of cubic meters per year, so a mere 2% of that of the 

Nile and 6% of that of the Euphrates (Fig. 1).

h

  e  dispute  over  the  Jordan  basin  waters  precedes  the  Arab-



Israel conl ict, but it intensii ed in the years immediately following 

the  birth  of  the  state  of  Israel,  especially  since  1953,  when  Israel 

began the construction of the “National Water Carrier”. h

  is great 

aqueduct, destined to convey the waters of the Jordan stored in Lake 

Tiberias  along  the  Mediterranean  coast  all  the  way  to  the  distant 

and arid Negev, diverts the course of the river outside of its basin, 

de facto snatching it from the control of the other countries of the 

basin (Lebanon, Syria, and Jordan).

3

As the United States gradually came to the fore as a hegemonic 



actor  on  the  Middle  Eastern  scene,  they  sought  to  come  up  with 

solutions for the main regional strategic issues. Realizing the conl ict 

potential inherent in the question of control of water resources, they 

sought to act as mediators. h

  e Johnston plan, presented in 1955 

by  an  envoy  of  President  Eisenhower,  was  the  result  of  a  careful 

hydrological analysis and an accurate negotiation work in which the 

chancelleries of all the countries of the basin were involved. h

  e plan 

proposed an allocation of the water of the Jordan and its tributaries 

taking account both of the available water and of the supplements 

required to meet the water needs of all the regional actors involved.

h

  e  Johnston  plan  eventually  failed,  essentially  for  political 



reasons. Israel regarded the quotas it was assigned under the plan as 

insui


  cient, insofar as they did not take account of the increasing 

inl ow of diaspora Jews. h

  e Arabs, in their turn, refused to enter 

the agreement as they would thereby be implicitly recognizing the 

existence of Israel. Furthermore, the Arab countries saw the United 

States’ mediation as an attempt to consolidate Israel’s position in the 

region.

4

 In fact, the geopolitical objectives of security and control over 



3

 h

  e Lowdermilk plan, submitted in 1944 with the support of the World Zio-



nist Organization, was the i rst plan for the partition of of the Jordan basin water.

4

 United States pressure also takes the form of promises of technical and i nan-



cial aid for the carrying out of hydraulic projects.

AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

156

Figure 1. The Jordan river system

Source: M.R. Lowi, Water and Power, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1993


GE

157

water  resources  outweighed  strategic  considerations,  which  would 

have called for an ef ort to reach an agreement on the allocation of 

the Jordan waters and the undertaking of joint projects.

h

  e  rejection  of  the  Johnston  plan  put  an  end  to  all  hopes  for 



regional  cooperation  in  the  water  sector  and  was  followed  by  the 

launching of national hydraulic plans (Fig. 2). h

  e resulting dynamics 

took the form of a zero-sum game where water gained by one country 

was water lost to the others. h

  e consequences were an amplii cation 

of  political  tensions  and  a  strong  pressure  on  water  sources.  h

  us, 


over the decades water became an increasingly scarce resource and a 

limiting factor for the socio-economic development of the region.

5

Israel completed its National Water Carrier in 1964. In the same 



year,  the  Arab  countries  responded  by  launching  a  plan  to  divert 

the waters of the Banyas and the Hasbani, both tributaries of the 

upper course of the Jordan, to the Yarmuk river. h

  eir objective was 

twofold: on the one hand, to increase the l ow of the Yarmuk, which 

is mainly utilized by two Arab countries (Syria and Jordan); on the 

other, to reduce the l ow of the Jordan, which feeds Israel’s National 

Water Carrier, by ca. 35%. Israel saw the Arab diversion project as 

a serious attack against its water interests. After several battles along 

the Syrian border – two months before the outbreak of the Six Day 

War – the Israeli army bombed the Arab deviation structures.

Jordan – the weakest actor, as regards both water availability and 

geographical position within the basin – turned to the Yarmuk for 

the construction of its own national waterway. It deviated the river 

at Adasya and conveyed its waters to the Jordan Valley through the 

East  Ghor  Canal.  A  joint  project  with  Syria  for  the  creation  of  a 

large basin – the Maqarin dam – to gather the waters of the Yarmuk, 

intended to rescue Jordan from its summer water emergency, met 

with  i rm  opposition  from  Israel,  which  feared  a  reduction  of  the 

Jordan’s l ow. In this case, too, no punches were pulled in the struggle 

5

  A.  Amendola,  G.  Autiero,  “Gestione  delle  risorse  comuni  e  incentivi  alla 



cooperazione”, in L’acqua nei paesi del Mediterraneo. Problemi di gestione di una 

risorsa scarsa, E. Ferragina (ed.), Il Mulino, Bologna 1998, p. 198.

AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

158

Figure 2. The Jordan basin: major existing and proposed 

projects 

Source: M.R. Lowi, Water and Power, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge 1993



GE

159

for the control of water resources: the i rst structures of the Maqarin 

dam were destroyed shortly before the Six Day War.

6

The 1967 war and the changes in the balance



of power within the Jordan basin

h

  e  1967  war,  although  it  was  not  a  “war  for  water”,  did  have 



water as one of its main stakes. h

  e conl ict was concluded with Israel 

acquiring  a  positional  advantage  along  the  upper  Jordan,  and  thus 

de  facto  taking  control  of  the  main  regional  water  resources.  Israel 

achieved this through its occupation of Golan, which is crossed by the 

tributaries of the upper course of the Jordan (the Dan and Banyas), and 

West Bank, with the rich aquifers of Mountain, and the coastal aquifer 

of Gaza. h

  rough its control of Golan, Israel gained total control of 

the Jordan and was able to use water as a negotiating weapon. h

  e 


occupation of this strategic area thwarted the Arab countries’ water-

diverting  plans.  h

  e  only  source  that  remained  outside  of  Israel’s 

control was the Hasbani, which originates in southeast Lebanon.

Among  the  Arab  countries,  Jordan  was  the  one  whose  water 

problems were most aggravated by the conl ict. It lost West Bank and, 

as a consequence, its access to the Mountain aquifers; its water needs 

were  increased  by  the  immigration  of  about  300,000  Palestinian 

refugees; and it suf ered the ef ects of the extension of Israeli control 

along the north bank of the Yarmuk from 6 to 12 kilometers. Jordan 

was  forced  to  accept  the  new  geopolitical  situation  as  ineluctable. 

h

  e water dispute thus entered into a pragmatic phase during which 



the country, aware of its weakness, strove to maximize its access to 

ever scarcer water resources through technical agreements with Israel 

that did not challenge the new status quo.

As  to  Israel,  even  before  1967  it  had  already  depended  for  its 

water  supply  on  the  Mountain  (Yarkon-Taninim)  aquifers  in  the 

western part of West Bank, whose water could be tapped within the 

Green  Line  by  means  of  very  deep  wells.

7

  After  1967,  Israel  took 



6

 E. Ferragina, L’acqua nei paesi del Mediterraneo cit., p. 337.



AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

160

direct control of the aquifer and introduced strict restrictions on its 

use by the local Palestinian populations, notably:

– he digging of wells was prohibited under military ordinance 

158  of  30  October  1967,  without  permission  from  the  Israeli 

authorities. Such permission was only given sporadically, and only 

for domestic use.

–  Pumping  was  forbidden  along  the  mountain  ridge  overlying 

the Yarkon-Taninim aquifer.

– he use of earlier wells adjoining Israeli wells was prohibited.

hese  restrictions  were  imposed  because  the  aquifer  lows 

westward, and the West Bank rainwater hence feeds into areas within 

Israeli territory. hus, these limitations to Palestinian exploitation of 

the  area  uphill  of  the  aquifer  resulted  in  an  increased  availability 

of  water  in  the  downhill  area  exploited  by  Israel.  he  years  after 

the occupation witnessed a de facto congealing of Palestinian water 

consumption, which actually increased, but very slightly, especially 

when  compared  with  the  Palestinian  population’s  high  rate  of 

demographic growth.

New perspectives for the settling of the water dispute appeared to 

open with the Oslo agreement of 1993, which airmed the importance 

of the environment and water resources in the peace process, laying 

the foundation for future cooperation in this sector. he pro tempore 

agreement  of  1995  (Oslo  II)  marked  a  turning  point  in  water 

negotiations. For the irst time, Israel recognized the Palestinians’ right 

to a quota of West Bank’s water resources, although they put of the 

allocation plan to the inal phase of the negotiations. his delay was 

partly due to the fact that the water question is indissolubly connected 

with other key issues that were also put of until the inal phases of 

the negotiations, such as refugees’ right to return, the tracing of the 

boundaries of the future Palestinian state, and the inal status of East 

Jerusalem. All these aspects could potentially exert a decisive inluence 

on the inal allocation of water quotas to the two populations.

7

 he Green Line marked Israel’s boundary before the outbreak of the Six Day 



War in 1967.

GE

161

Oslo II also marked the beginning of an autonomous institutional 

organization  of  the  water  sector,  with  the  creation  of  the  Palestinian 

Water  Authority  and  the  passing  of  the  2002  law  on  water,  which 

formally incorporated the principles of environmental sustainability and 

integrated management of water resources. Due to the lack of democracy 

of  Palestinian  institutions,  however,  the  law  was  passed  without 

previous consultation of local administrations. h

  is resulted in a lack of 

coordination between the Palestinian Water Authority, which draws the 

guidelines of water policies; the Ministry of Local Government, which 

manages the urban water supplying networks; local administrations; and 

private individuals using the water for agricultural purposes. In the years 

following the Oslo agreements, the Water Authority only exercised a 

weak control over the sector, limiting itself to the application of counters 

to the wells placed within the territory of the autonomy, and to putting 

a tax on extraction in excess of assigned quotas; without, furthermore, 

being actually able to enforce even these measures.

h

  e reform of the water sector in Palestine was complicated by 



the limited autonomy of the Water Authority. h

  e W.A.’s action was 

bogged down by innumerable limitations, not the least being the need 

to  supplement  the  small  water  quotas  assigned  to  the  Palestinians 

with quotas purchased from the Israeli water agency Mekorot. h

  ese 


problems were compounded by the territorial fragmentation of West 

Bank,  which  complicated  infrastructural  action,  and  by  technical 

and  organizational  shortcomings  in  the  management  of  the  water 

sector.  As  a  consequence,  no  measures  were  taken  to  expand  and 

maintain the water supplying network, to control extraction, or to 

safeguard water resources.

h

  e  failure  of  all  attempts  at  cooperation  in  environmental 



protection in the years following the signing of the Oslo agreement 

has  been  largely  determined  by  the  two  populations’  dif erent 

perceptions of the objectives of the peace process and its modes of 

enactment. h

  e Israelis are mainly interested in setting up a regional 

cooperation  that  would  allow  them  to  dodge  the  thorny  issue  of 

the  partition  of  the  water  of  the  Mountain  aquifer.  h

  is  explains 

their  attempts  to  revive  major  water  transfer  projects  such  as  the 

importation  of  water  from  Turkey  via  Antalya,  the  Peace  Canal, 



AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

162

and the proposed Red Sea-Dead Sea conduit, as well as their huge 

investments in research on new desalting technologies.

8

 At the same 



time, Israel is inclined to limit its cooperation with the Palestinians to 

technical aspects connected to the qualitative deterioration of water 

resources, such as the joint management of wastewater collection and 

processing systems by Palestinian villages and Israeli settlements.

he Palestinians, on their part, although they agree on the need 

for cooperative efort to safeguard water resources, see the problem 

from  a  political  perspective.  hey  prioritize  gaining  recognition 

of their rights to the Mountain aquifer and the drawing up of an 

allocation plan. his explains the refusal of Palestinian municipalities 

to  cooperate  with  the  Israeli  settlements  within  the  Palestinian 

Territories,  as  this  would  imply  recognizing  the  legitimacy  of  the 

colonies. Water has become, one again, the terrain on which political 

distances  and  contrasting  objectives  are  gauged  and  weighed,  and 

this ampliies the pressure on resources.

Furthermore, ever since the second Intifada, political emergency 

has caused what limited control and regulation power had existed 

previously in the sector to lapse, allowing non-sustainable ways of 

exploiting water resources to spread even more.

Unequal access to water and its environmental 

repercussions on water resources

Renewable water resources in the countries of the lower course of 

the Jordan (Israel, Jordan, West Bank, and Gaza) amount to about 

3.3 billions of cubic meters. Of these, Israel controls about 2 billion, 

Jordan 1 billion, and Palestine a mere 296 million.

9

 his translates 



8

 he Peace Channel project, launched by Sadat in 1978, conveys water from 

the Nile to Sinai. An extension to Israel is envisaged. he Red-Dead project, in-

stead, aims at digging a canal from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea. he Dead Sea is 

to be used as a reservoir for the Red Sea Water. he plan also envisages the buil-

ding of desalting plants exploiting the gradient between the two basins.

9

 he data on Israel are from the Water Resources Institute, those for Palestine 



from the Central Bureau of Statistics. hey are updated to 2005.

GE

163

to an average per capita availability of 157 cubic meters a year for 

Jordan, 344 for Israel, and 93 for the Palestinians. All three countries 

are far below the minimum annual threshold of 1000 cubic meters 

per capita recommended by the World Bank.

10

h



  ese  dif erences  in  water  availability  among  the  countries  of  the 

lower course of the Jordan depend both on the balance of power between 

them  and  on  positional  advantages  within  the  basin.  Jordan,  a  weak 

strategic  and  military  actor  compared  to  Israel,  is  placed  at  a  further 

disadvantage  by  its  downstream  position  along  the  river.  h

  e  waters 

of the Jordan River running through Jordanian territory after l owing 

out of Lake Tiberias are subject to strong upstream extraction by Israel 

af ecting its quality as well as its quantity. Because of the limited l ow of 

the Jordan’s lower course and the many saltwater tributaries it receives, 

the river’s contribution to Jordan’s water balance is irrelevant.

h

  us, over the years the country has been facing an increasing gap 



between water supply and demand. In some areas of the northeast 

plateaus,  water  extraction  for  agricultural  use  has  exceeded  local 

recharge rates. An equally strong pressure on underground water is 

observable in urban areas, especially in the Amman-Zarqua-Wadi Sir 

conurbation. By 2000, about 2500 wells all over the country were 

drawing water in excess of aquifer recharge rates.

11

One  of  the  environmental  repercussions  of  the  water  crisis  is 



the growing exploitation of the main fossil aquifer of the country, 

the Disi-Mudawarra, on the border with Saudi Arabia. h

  e failure 

of  cooperation  attempts  with  neighboring  countries  –  i rst  and 

foremost Jordan’s 1994 peace treaty with Israel, which failed to lead 

to the launching of joint projects – has led Jordan to set its sights on 

this huge fossil deposit to meet the capital’s water needs.

As  to  the  Palestinian  Territories  of  Gaza  and  West  Bank,  the 

water  situation  there  is  aggravated  by  Israeli  occupation.  h

  e 


10

 E. Ferragina, D. Quagliarotti, “L’ambiente. Cooperazione e i nanziamenti 

allo sviluppo sostenibile nel Mediterraneo”, in Rapporto sulle economie del Mediter-

raneo, P. Malanima (ed.), Il Mulino, Bologna 2007, pp. 185-212.

11

 M. Hadadin, Water Resources in Jordan, Resources for the Future, Washing-



ton 2006, p. 98.

AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

164

resources presently allocated to the Palestinian population of West 

Bank include 80 million cubic meters of underground water and 50 

MCM of supericial water, or a total of 130 MCM. A clear example 

of unequal access of Israelis and Palestinians to water sources is the 

fact that the Palestinian Territories, although most of the Mountain 

aquifer  lies  within  their  territory,  exploit  the  least  quantity  of  its 

water. Israel utilizes 57.1% of the total groundwater resources, the 

Palestinians only 8.2%. he daily average per capita consumption is 

270 liters for the Israelis, 93 for the Palestinians.

12

here  is  also  a  strong  gap  in  domestic  consumption:  98  cubic 



meters per capita for the Israelis, 34 for the Palestinians. Because of 

frequent cutofs in water supplies and leaks along the pipelines, in the 

Palestinian towns this already limited consumption is further reduced 

to  50  liters  per  day:  half  of  what  the  World  Health  Organization 

regards as the minimum required to meet basic hygienic and sanitary 

standards. he gap is even more dramatic when we relate the igures 

for water consumption of the Palestinians and the Israeli colonists to 

their respective populations (2.3 millions vs. 230,000). he colonists 

are consuming 5 times more water than the Palestinians.

Most of the Palestinian wells were dug in the Fifties or Sixties, 

when West Bank was under Jordanian control. hey are of limited 

depth, plunging down only slightly below the top of the aquifer, and 

are hence exposed to gradual drying up as a result of the operating of 

the Israeli wells, which are a lot deeper. During the Sixties, these wells 

contributed to a gradual change in the Palestinian rural landscape, 

characterized by a transition from surface irrigation to drop-by-drop 

irrigation and the spread of intensive agriculture.

Investments  in  the  hydraulic  sector  have  been  declining  over 

the  last  decades,  as  nothing  has  been  done  after  1967  for  the 

maintenance of water infrastructures. Oicially, 69% of Palestinian 

villages  are  reached  by  the  hydraulic  network,  but  only  46%  of 

these are constantly supplied. In the rest, the water supply is often 

interrupted.  he  networks  are  obsolete  and  losses  are  higher  than 

12

 he Palestinian Environmental NGO’s Network (Pengon), he Wall in Pa-



lestine, Jerusalem 2003, p. 53.

GE

165

45%. Because of the poor condition of the infrastructures, the water 

supply  is  exposed  to  contamination  from  wastewater  and  garbage 

from the Palestinian villages and the Israeli settlements.

Increasing restrictions on free circulation within the Palestinian 

Territories  of  Gaza  and  West  Bank  often  prevents  Palestinian 

villages  from  taking  their  waste  to  dumping  areas.  h

  is  results  in 

garbage accumulation that causes health problems and contaminates 

groundwater.  h

  e  poor  condition  of  sewage  systems  adds  to  the 

pollution.  Both  the  Palestinian  villages  and  the  Israeli  settlements 

are  often  forced  to  discharge  their  waste  water  in  watercourses  or 

allow  it  to  rise  above  the  safety  level  in  cesspools.  h

  us,  the  years 

of  Israeli  occupation  have  brought  on  a  general  decline  of  the 

environmental  situation  in  the  Palestinian Territories.  h

  ere  is  no 

system for the collection and disposal of solid refuse and wastewater, 

and the quality of water sources keeps going down.

An emblematic example of the damage done to water sources is 

observable in the Gaza Strip, which extends for 45 kilometers along 

the coast of the Mediterranean and has one of the highest demographic 

densities  in  the  world,  with  1,300,000  Palestinians  –  900,000  of 

whom  refugees  –  living  within  an  area  of  360  square  kilometers. 

Until  their  dismantling  in  2006,  the  Israeli  colonies  used  about 

35% of the water of the coastal aquifer underlying the Strip, causing 

environmental  degradation  through  excessive  pumping.  h

  e  water 

situation in this area has further deteriorated since 1996, when the 

Palestinian population reacted to the end of Israeli control by digging 

about 200 unauthorized wells. h

  e increased extraction has resulted 

in a lowering of the aquifer and the consequent intrusion of seawater, 

which  has  made  the  aquifer  unusable  for  human  and  agricultural 

consumption.  Since  water,  whether  superi cial  or  subterranean, 

knows  no  political  boundaries,  the  environmental  disaster  of  Gaza 

has  had  serious  repercussions  in  Israel  as  well.  As  some  researches 

have shown, some two thirds of wells in central Israel are polluted by 

ini ltration of unprocessed wastewater from West Bank.

13

13

 R. Twite, “A Question of Priority – Adverse Ef ects of the Israeli-Palestinian 



Conl ict on the Environment of the Region over the Last Decade”, in Security and 

AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

166

he  outbreak  of  the  Second  Intifada  in  September  2000  had 

further  environmental  repercussions.  While  the  destruction  of 

harvests  and  olive  groves,  the  illing  up  of  wells,  and  damages  to 

hydraulic infrastructures cannot be regarded as a deliberate strategy 

that  Israel  is  enacting  against  the  Palestinian  population,  they  are 

certainly a heavy cost that natural resources have to pay in a no-holds-

barred conlict where water, once again, has become an instrument 

of collective punishment and political blackmail.

The construction of the Barrier 

and its impact on water resources

In  2001,  Israel  began  the  construction  of  a  wall  to  prevent 

Palestinian  suicide  attackers  from  accessing  the  territory  of  Israel. 

he wall is planned to run for 790 km in the West Bank (the irst 

phase involved the districts of Jenin, Tulkarem, and Qalqilya) and 

will  afect  about  500,000  Palestinians,  or  ca.  22%  of  the  overall 

population of West Bank.

14

he 8-meter-tall barrier does not run along the 1967 boundary, 



but pushes about 6 kilometers into West Bank, forming an about 

12,000-hectare cushion zone between the wall and the Green Line. 

his zone is thus de facto isolated from the rest of the Palestinian 

territory.  In  2003,  Israel  announced  completion  of  the  irst  27 

kilometers  of  the  wall.  he  lands  the  wall  runs  through,  with  its 

security systems (barbed wire, electronic control systems, etc.), are 

under  temporary  seizure  by  the  Israeli  authorities,  as  the  building 

of the wall is regarded as a temporary measure and, as such, not in 

violation of the interim agreement signed in 1995, which prohibits 

unilateral modiications of the boundaries.



Environment in the Mediterranean, H. Gunter Brauch, P.H. Liotta., A. Marquina, 

P.F. Rogers, M. El-Sayed Selim (eds), Springer, Berlin 2003, pp. 563 - 572.

14

 On 9 July 2004, the Le Hague International Justice Court declared the Wall 



illegal and ordered its destruction. On 20 July, the National Assembly of the Uni-

ted Stations endorsed the Court’s judgment with 150 votes in favor, 6 contrary, 

and 6 abstained.


GE

167

In this i rst phase, the building of the wall led to the destruction 

of some 30 kilometers of infrastructure, the uprooting of 102,320 

trees,  the  demolition  of  85  shops,  and  the  loss  of  14  hectares  of 

cultivable land. h

  e directly af ected communities – that is, those 

residing  within  the  wall  or  in  the  area  between  the  wall  and  the 

Green Line – are about 65, for a total of about 206,000 individuals.

15

 

h



  e  uncertainty  introduced  by  the  wall  has  contributed  to  the 

deterioration of living conditions and aggravated poverty. According 

to a World Bank report, the number of people with a daily income 

of less than $ 2 (the international poverty threshold) increased from 

600,000 to 1,200,000 between 2000 and 2001. h

  e percentage of 

the population below the poverty threshold rose from 20% before 

the outbreak of the Second Intifada to more than 60% in 2002.

16

h

  e  social  and  economic  disruption  and  the  isolation  of  Gaza 



and West Bank has enormously increased since the security barrier 

was built. In the period immediately following the Oslo agreements, 

living  conditions  in  the  Palestinian  territories  along  the  Green 

Line had improved, thanks to new opportunities to provide labor, 

artifacts, and services to the Israelis at extremely competitive prices. 

A  lot  of  this  complementarity  between  the  Israeli  and  Palestinian 

economies was disrupted by the building of the wall.

h

  e Palestinian Hydrology Group has conducted an investigation 



on  the  37  wells  impacted  by  the  i rst  phase  of  the  construction 

of  the  Wall.  Of  these,  22,  which  had  yielded  about  4.3  MCM 

of  water  per  year,  were  directly  impacted,  as  they  were  coni ned 

behind the wall. h

  e remaining 15, which supply 2.65 MCM of 

water,  were  af ected  indirectly,  as  the  land  they  used  to  irrigate 

now lay beyond the wall. 32 of these wells were in the district of 

Qalqilya, the remaining 5 in that of Tulkarem. h

  e wall destroyed 

12,000 meters of irrigation networks. 37% of the families who had 

utilized the wells in the districts of Jenin, Tulkarem, and Qalqilya 

15

 h



  e Palestinian Environmental NGOs Network (PENGON), h e Wall in 

Palestine cit.

16

 World Bank, Two Years of Intifada, Closure and Palestinian Economic Crisis



World Bank, Washington 2002.

AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

168

were deprived of water for agriculture.

17

he conditions for the Palestinians’ access to water, and indeed 



its very possibility, depend on the location of their wells. Palestinian 

water  consumption  is  drastically  reduced  under  the  following 

circumstances:

1. he well lies west of the wall and the hydraulic network it feeds 

lies totally or partially east of the wall;

2. he well lies east of the wall, but within the “security zone”, i.e., 

the cushion zone created to prevent attacks against the wall itself;

3. he well lies east of the wall and the hydraulic network it feeds 

lies totally or partially west of the wall;

4. he well lies in the path of the wall.

he construction of the barrier has had especially negative efects 

on the private wells dug during the Fifties and Sixties, reducing the 

quantity of water available for domestic and agricultural uses, and 

forcing the population to buy tank water for 3 to 5 times the price 

of private-well water.

Diicult  access  to  water  resources  is  the  worst  threat  to  the 

Palestinian  economy.  he  aquifers  supplying  the  best  and  most 

abundant  water  to  the  West  Bank  Palestinians  are  those  of  the 

western Mountain. In the areas of Tulkarem and Qalqilya there are 

142 wells, from which the Palestinians extract about 20.4 MCM, 

about a third of the total yield of the three underground basins of 

West Bank (60.4 MCM). hese were also the areas in West Bank with 

the highest agricultural yields. he three districts housed 22% of the 

total population, but accounted for 45% of the overall agricultural 

production. 60% of their population depended on agriculture for 

their  livelihood,  directly  or  indirectly.

18

  According  to  2003  data 



of  the  Ministry  of  Agriculture,  the  decline  of  the  contribution  of 

17

 Palestinian Hydrology Group (PHG), Water For LifeContinued Israeli As-



sault on Palestinian Water, Sanitation and Hygiene during the Intifada. Water, Sani-

tation and Hygiene Monitoring Project 2005.

18

  he  Impact  of  Israel’s  Separation  Barrier  on  Afected West  Bank  Communi-



ties,  Report  of  the  Mission  to  the  Humanitarian  and  Emergency  Policy  Group 

(HEPG) 2003, p. 11. 



GE

169

agriculture to the Gross National Income was about 75%, mainly 

as  a  consequence  of  land  coni scation  and  isolation  following  the 

building of the barrier.

19

In  sum,  while  the  water  supply  issues  determined  by  the 



construction  of  the  Wall  have  not  attained  the  proportions  of  a 

veritable humanitarian crisis, they certainly pose a major constraint 

to  Palestine’s  economic  development  and  contribute  to  the 

deterioration  of  the  Palestinians’  living  conditions.  A  troublesome 

question is that of uncertainties regarding water property and usage 

rights. In a number of situations, access to water is unequal not just 

between  the  Palestinian  and  the  Israeli  population,  but  within  the 

Palestinian population itself. h

  e Palestinian economy is still based 

on  agriculture.  To  further  reduce  Palestine’s  already  scarce  water 

supply and undermine the integrity of the irrigation network is to 

impede the emerging of a Palestinian economy that is autonomous 

from that of Israel.

Conclusions

In the light of the unsatisfactory results of past negotiations for 

the allocation of the water resources of the Jordan basin, can we still 

look forward to a successful “water diplomacy” in the Middle East? 

A  hypothesis  that  has  been  gaining  favor  lately  is  that  the  “water 

stress” the area has been subjected to for years may eventually act 

as  a  catalyst  for  regional  cooperation,  since  the  future  of  the  area 

now more than ever depends on the satisfying of the water demand 

in an arid environment exposed to climatic variability.

20

 Problems 



such as rainfall l uctuations, aquifer deterioration, and watercourse 

pollution  do  not  directly  depend  from  the  Arab-Israel  conl ict. 

However, political instability in the area does stand in the way of 

19

 Palestinian Hydrology Group (P.H.G.), Continued Israeli Assault on Palestini-



an Water, Sanitation and Hygiene during the Intifada, Ramallah (Palestine) 2006. 

20

 I. Ray, G. Baskin, Z. al Qaq, W. M. Hanemann, “Environmental Diplo-



macy in the Jordan Basin”, in Institute on Global Confl ict and Cooperation (IGCC) 

Policy Papers, 42, 2001, pp.1-21.

AROUND THE WORLD / FERRAGINA

170

attempts to ind common solutions to an environmental crisis that 

extends beyond national boundaries.

Alternative  strategies  are  required  to  assuage  regional  water 

competition.  Above  all,  conidence  building  measures  are  needed. 

No hypothesis for the allocation of the water of the Jordan basin can 

be put forward as long as water is used as a means to put pressure 

on rivals, and as long as deep inequalities in access to water continue 

to exist between Israel and the other countries of the basin. A new 

negotiation strategy employing impartial mediators is called for.

In  an  international  basin  such  as  that  of  the  Jordan  River, 

marked by a high imbalance of power and the hegemony of Israel, 

the involvement of external actors is needed to facilitate the peace 

process  and  guarantee  equity  in  the  parceling  out  of  common 

resources.  he  major  international  inancial  institutions  should 

only  grant  funding  to  hydraulic  projects  under  condition  that 

they  comply  with  environmental  sustainability  standards.  hey 

should also exert pressure on Israel to put a stop to all use of water 

as  an  instrument  of  political  pressure.  Incentives  to  cooperation 

in  the  water  sector  are  needed.  Something  like  the  “dividends  of 

peace” - as Peres called them - granted in the period immediately 

following the launching of the peace process in the Middle East. If 

a virtuous process were activated, involving technology exchanges, 

the undertaking of common projects, a revival of the tourist sector, 

improved  management  and  safeguarding  of  water  sources,  water 

could become the motor of regional economic development.



21

21

 S. Peres, he New Middle East, Holt, New York 1993.





Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə