The forested area with 21-40 dieback severity



Yüklə 110.02 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü110.02 Kb.

 

 



 

Abstract—

The  forested  area  with  21-40%  dieback  severity, 

Horton  Plains  was selected for the study and twenty-four permanent 

plots  were  established.  Standard  compost,  montane  mycorrhizae, 

standard compost with montane mycorrhizae, and a control were used 

as  treatments  and  the  indicator  plant  used  was  Syzygium 



rotundifolium.  Treatments  were  applied  to  five  randomly  selected 

Syzygium  rotundifolium  saplings  of  approximately  1m  height  and 

0.015m diameter at the cotyledon scar existing in each plot. Soluble 

soil  Pb  and  soil  organic  matter  (SOM)  were  compared  using  soil 

samples  collected  at  0.20m  depth.  Foliar  samples  from  the  saplings 

were  tested  for  Pb.  The  health  status  of  the  saplings  were  duly 

recorded  during  the  experimental  period.  The  results  from  soil  and 

foliar  analysis  revealed  the  status  of  Pb  (p  <0.001)  contamination 

which  appears  to  have  significantly  linked  with  forest  dieback. 

Positive correlations between soil Pb and leaf Pb were significant (p

0.001). Soil amendment with compost and montane mycorrhizae was 

effective  in  reducing  the  Pb  level  significantly  (p  =  <0.001) and the 

amendment  appears  to  be  significantly  effective  (p  <0.001)  in 

protecting saplings from dieback. 

 

Keywords



 Montane forest, dieback, compost, heavy metals

 

I.



 

I

NTRODUCTION



 

he upper montane forest called „Horton Plains‟, Sri Lanka 

is  a  low,  dense,  slow-growing  forest  with  a  healthy  and 

vigorous  appearance  [1].  It  is  one  of  the  key  catchment 

areas  of  the  country.  Tributaries  of  the  three  major  rivers 

which  are  crucial  for  the  agriculture  in  the  country,  originate 

from  the  forest.  The  land  area  covered  by  the  forest  is 

approximately 3,160 ha. There are 54 woody species, of which 

27  (50%)  are  endemic  to  Sri  Lanka.  Belonging  to  different 

sizes and age classes, tree species have been dying due to a yet 

unknown  factor.  This  phenomenon  was  first  observed  in 

Horton  Plains  by  [2]  and  [3]  and  about  654  ha,  equivalent  to 

24.5% of the forest in the Horton Plains has been subjected to 

dieback  [4].    One  of  the  worst  affected  trees  was  Syzygium 



rotundifolium followed by Syzygium revolutum, Cinnamomum 

ovalifoliumNeolitsea fuscata and Calophyllum  

 

 

 

 



1

HKSG  Gunadasa  (Ms)  -  M.Phil.  (University  of  Peradeniya  Sri  Lanka), 

B.Sc.  (Sabaragamuwa  University  of  Sri  Lanka)  Lecturer  at  Uva  Wellassa 

University, Sri Lanka  (E mail: sajanee2010@gmail.com) 

 

2

  PI  Yapa  (PhD)  –  PhD  (Reading,  UK),  MSc.  And  BSc.  ((University  of 



Peradeniya  Sri  Lanka)  Senior  Lecturer  at  Sabaragamuwa  University,  Sri 

Lanka 


(Email: piyapa39@yahoo.co.uk) 

 

walkeri  [5].  Also,  seedling  establishment  and  forest 

regeneration in the area is slow [4].  

  Healthy  forest  in  the  park  amounts  to  about  2012  ha.  The 

extent of the damage to the forest from dieback appears to be 

so  severe  that  the  stand  structure  in  affected  areas  showed 

dramatic  changes.  If  this  dieback  continues  with  the  current 

rate,  the  majority  of  the  large  trees  will  disappear  from  the 

forest  soon  and  the  forest  will  later  converted  to  a  savanna. 

The vital functions offered by this precious forest will then be 

subjected  to  significant  changes  most  probably  towards  the 

negative  side.  Work  done  by  many  researchers  so  far  has 

ended up with no significant clues about the causal agents and 

remedial  measures  for  the  dieback.  This  study  was  based  on 

the hypothesis that the forest is polluted with Pb as a result of 

increased  vehicle  emissions  in  the  country  and  the 

consequential  soil  pollution  has  strong  links  with  forest 

dieback  and  the  sapling  mortality  of  Syzygium  rotundifolium

Soil toxicity caused by Pb could effectively be neutralized by 

enhancing soil organic matter level.     

II.

 

 



M

ATERIALS 

A

ND 


M

ETHODS


 

  Horton  plains,  the  highest  plateau  of  Sri  Lanka  between 

altitude of 1500 and 2524m and the geographical location is in 

the Central Highlands of the Central Province, 6‟47 – 6‟50‟N, 

80‟ 46‟- 80‟50‟E [6] was the area selected for the study.  The 

landscape  characteristically  consists  of  gently  undulating 

highland  plateau  at  the  southern  end  of  the  central  mountain 

massif of Sri Lanka and soil order Ultisol is characterized by a 

thick, black, organic layer at the surface [7]. Temperatures are 

low,  with  an  annual  mean  of  13°C,  and  ground  frost  is 

common in February [8].  Annual rainfall in the region is about 

2540 mm [9]. 

  Plot locations were selected to cover a 21 – 40 % of dieback 

severity  area  and  to  maintain  soil  and  topography  as  constant 

as possible. Twenty-four permanent plots of 20 m 

 20 m were 



established and Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) 

was  used  with  six  replications.  The  experimental  plots  were 

mapped using GPS (Global Positioning System) points with 20 

cm  accuracy.  Five  saplings  of  Syzygium  rotundifolium  with 

approximately  1m  in  height  and  0.015m  in  diameter  at  the 

cotyledon  scar  of  saplings  were  randomly  selected  from  each 

sampling  plot.    Syzygium  rotundifolium  was  specifically 

selected  as  the  indicator  tree  because  it  is  the  worst  affected 

[4].  Four  treatments  (a).compost  -  2kg/sapling,  (b).compost 

and  montane  mycorrhizae  -  4kg/sapling.  (c).  montane 

mycorrhizae  -  2kg/sapling  including  a  control  were  used  for 

the  study.  The  soil  samples  were  collected  from  0.20m  depth 

and  0.3m-0.5m  away  from  each  sapling  representing  four 

Mitigation of Pb-Induced Forest Dieback in Sri 

Lanka: Use of Soil Organic Matter

 

Gunadasa HKSG

1

 and Yapa PI



2

 

 



T

 

International Conference on Agricultural, Ecological and Medical Sciences (AEMS-2015) Feb. 10-11, 2015 Penang (Malaysia)



http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0215118

14


 

 

different time periods within 02 years.  Soil Pb was measured 



by  wet  ash  method  [10]  and  the  extracts  were  analyzed  using 

Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry [11]. Death rates of the 

saplings  were  calculated  by  keeping  records  of  the  selected 

saplings  throughout  the  experimental  period  and  counting  the 

deaths  at  the  end  of  the  trial.    Standard  GENSTAT  statistical 

software  was  used  for  the  analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA),  t-

test and regression analysis of the results [12]. 

III.


 

R

ESULTS



 

  The  results  shown  here  are  based  on  the  work  done  during 

the two-year study period within the 21-40% dieback severity 

areas selected in Horton Plains. 



3.1 Soil organic matter 

  Addition of compost has increased SOM content in the soil 

(Figure 1). Also, the effect of the treatments on SOM content 

was significant for all four stages of sampling – e.g. Stage-1 (p 

=  <0.001),  Stage-  2  (p  =  <0.001),  Stage-3  (p  =  <0.001)  and 

Stage-4 (<0.001) at the 0.20m depth.  

 

 

(Mean comparison was done for different seasons separately 



and the means appear with same letter were not significant at 

p<0.05) 

Fig.1.  Status of SOM% among the treatments at four different 

stages of sampling in 0.20m depth 

3.2 Lead (Pb) in the soil 

  Results of soil and foliar analysis clearly indicated the status 

of soil contamination with Pb in Horton Plains.  

 

 



 

 

 



(Mean comparison was done for different seasons separately and the 

means appear with same letter were not significant at p<0.05) 

Fig. 2.  Status of Pb among treatments at four different seasons of 

sampling in 0.2m depth. 

 

  Differences among the treatments were observed in terms of 



soil  Pb  level  in  0.2m  depth  during  Season-1  (p=0.01),  -2 

(p=0.004)  and  -3  (p=0.004)  but  there  was  no  significant 

influence  detected  at  Season-4  (p=0.79)  (Figure  2).  The 

highest Pb content was detected in the control during Season-1 

whereas,  the  lowest  was  observed  under  the  treatment 

Mycorrhizae,  again  during  Season-1.  However,  the  control 

showed the highest soil Pb level during the Season-1 while the 

treatments  Compost,  Compost  with  Mycorrhizae,  and 

Mycorrhizae  showed  significantly  lower  soil  Pb  levels 

compared to the control.  



3.3 Death rate of Syzygium rotundifolium saplings 

  Soil  amendments  with  standard  compost  and  mycorrhizae 

are  effective  in  controlling  the  death  of  Syzygium 

rotundifolium  saplings.  Treatment  effect  on  the  death  rate  of 

saplings was significant (< 0.001) and the control showed the 

highest death rate (Table 1). 

   

T

ABLE 



  

V



ARIATION 

O



D

EATH 


R

ATE 


O



S



YZYGIUM 

R

OTUNDIFOLIUM 

S

APLINGS



 

Treatment 

Control 

Compost 


Comp + 

 

Mycorrhiz



ae 

Mycorrhiza

Death rate 



(%) 

46.67 


15.83 

17.67 


31.67 

 

(8.43) 



(0.40) 

(0.92) 


(3.07) 

Standard error for the respective mean is given within 

brackets 

3.4 Lead in the soil and dieback of plants 

  The  relationship  between  Pb  concentration  and  the  death 

rate  of  Syzygium  rotundifolium  saplings  was  significant  (p  < 

0.001)  and  the  correlation  showed  that  the  death  rate  of 

saplings  has  been  largely  affected  by  the  Pb  concentration  in 

the  soil  (Figure  4).  Therefore,  the  death  rate  of  the  saplings 

used  for  the  experiment  appeared  to  have  increased  with  the 

increasing  availability  of  Pb  in  the  soil.  Results  further 

revealed  that  the  crucial  level  of  soil  Pb  in  relation  to  the 

survival  of  Syzygium  rotundifolium  saplings  was  around 

60ppm in the area  and beyond this level, even a slight increase 

of  available  Pb  in  the  soil  may  impose  severe  damages  on 

plant‟s  metabolism  leading  to  dieback.  The  results  are  in 

agreement with the work done by [13].    

International Conference on Agricultural, Ecological and Medical Sciences (AEMS-2015) Feb. 10-11, 2015 Penang (Malaysia)

http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0215118

15


 

 

 



 

Fig. 3 Pb concentrations in the soil Vs Death rate of saplings 

 

3.5 Lead (Pb) concentrations in soils vs Pb concentrations 

in foliage parts 

Parallel to the increment of Pb levels in the soil, the Pb level in 

the  leaves  of  Syzygium  rotundifolium  saplings  have  also 

increased.  The  relationship  between  soil  Pb  and  the  leaf  Pb 

was significant (p = 0.01) and the nature of the relationship is 

linear – by –linear (hyperbola) (Figure 4).  



 

 

Fig 4.  Pb concentrations in soils Vs Pb concentrations in foliage. 



 

3.6 Soil organic matter vs Pb in the soil 

  The content of soil Pb is inversely proportional to the SOM 

content  and  the  relationship  between  them  was  statistically 

significant  (p  =  <0.001).  The  findings  indicate  that  the 

availability of Pb in the soil for plants in the study area could 

be reduced by increasing SOM level. The nature of decline of 

soil  Pb  with  the  increasing  SOM  level  seems  to  be  linear-by-

linear  (Figure  5).  Immobilization  of  soluble  Pb  by  the  humic 

and  fulvic  acid  molecules  present  in  SOM  has  been 

documented by several researchers (e.g., [14]). 

SOM %

40

3



5

7

25



9

30

11



35

4

8



10

6

55



50

45



(p

 p



 m

)

 



 

Fig 5. Soil organic matter Vs Pb in the soil at four different stages 

 

3.7 Soil organic matter content in the soil and dieback of 

plants 

  Results  showed  that  the  increase  of  SOM  level  helps  to 

reduce  the  death  of  saplings.  The  relationship  between  SOM 

level  and  the  death  rate  of  saplings  (Syzygium  rotundifolium

was  significant  (p  =  0.05).  The  nature  of  the  relationship 

seems  to  be  linear-by-linear  and  it  further  indicates  that 

maintenance of SOM level approximately above 4% will result 

a  significant  reduction  of  the  death  rate  of  the  saplings  (see 

figure 6). 

S OM  %


6

40

7



50

5

60



70

80

20



8

30

4



D

 e

 a



 t 

 r 



t e


 %

 

Fig 6.  Soil organic matter content in the soil vs Death rate of 



saplings 

IV.


 

D

ISCUSSION



 

  Deterioration of both quantity and the quality of soil organic 

matter in terms of humic substances appears to have influenced 

on the development of Pb toxicity on Syzygium rotundifolium

Forest  dieback  may  be  linked  with  dozens  of  reasons  which 

include  Pd  toxicity  as  well.  Effect  of  the treatments consisted 

of SOM justified the argument that improvement of SOM will 

be  effective  in  controlling  the  dieback  of  Syzygium 

P b (p p m ) s o i l

 

1

 



3

 

2.0



 

5

 



2.5

 

3.0



 

3.5


 

4.0


 

4

 



6

 

2



 

P

 b



 (p

 p

 m



o



 l 



g

 e

 



 

Y = 7.9 -6.2 / (1+0.1X)  

R

2

=38% 



P = 0.01 

 

P b (p p m)



 

30

 



40

 

40



 

50

 



50

 

60



 

60

 



70

 

80



 

45

 



20

 

55



 

D e a


 t 

h

  



 r 



%

 

Y= 24.14 - 0.001/ (1-0.02X)  

R

2



 = 55% 

P = < 0.001 

 

Y = 20.3 – 1.8 / (1-0.3X)  



R

2

= 62% 



P = 0.05 

 

Y = 7.9 -6.2 / 



(1+0.1X)  

R

2



=38% 

P = 0.01 

 

International Conference on Agricultural, Ecological and Medical Sciences (AEMS-2015) Feb. 10-11, 2015 Penang (Malaysia)



http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0215118

16


 

 

rotundifolium.  One  of  the  most  important  fractions  of  SOM, 

the  humic  substances,  are  highly  effective  in  neutralizing  the 

effects of toxic substances (e.g. Pb) in the soil [14].  

  Soil  organic  matter  is  often  viewed  as  the  thread  that  links 

the biological, chemical and physical properties of a soil. It has 

been  associated  with  numerous soil functions such as nutrient 

cycling, water retention and drainage, erosion control, disease 

suppression and pollution remediation etc. 

Just as soil organic matter buffers the soil from rapid changes 

in soil pH, it also binds organic pollutants, keeping them out of 

the  soil  solution  where  they  would  be  taken  up  by  plants  or 

leached  into  ground  water.  Soil  Organic  Matter  (SOM)  also 

provides sites for microbes to colonize and decompose organic 

pollutants [15]. 

  The  lower  the  level  of  SOM,  the  higher  the  level  of 

available  soil  Pb  and  therefore,  the  enrichment  of  forest  soils 

in the affected areas with quality organic matter with standard 

levels of humic substances could be recommended as a control 

measure  of  forest  dieback.  This  argument  is  backed  by  the 

death  rate  of  the  saplings  where  the  results  showed  that  the 

lowest level of SOM represents the highest death rate.  

The  level  of  soil  Pb  has  gone  up  to  106  ppm.  However,  it 

should be noted that the maximum allowable limit for soil Pb 

is  about  100  ppm  [16].  Even  the  smallest  amount  of  Pb  may 

impose  severe  damages  on  plant‟s  metabolism  leading  to 

dieback.  Lead  (Pb)  at  toxic  levels  has  been  identified  as  an 

agent  causing  damages  on  plants‟  respiratory  mechanism  in 

particular.    [13].  Horton  Plains  is  an  upper  montane  forest 

consisting  of  specific  montane  forest  vegetation  which  is 

considered  to  be  much  more  sensitive  to  the  changes  in  the 

environment  [17].  Therefore,  together  with  other  unidentified 

causative  agents,  soil  Pb  at  toxic  level  may  have  caused  a 

severe  impact  on  the  forest  vegetation  triggering  forest 

dieback.    

  The main source of Pb to the soils in Horton Plains must be 

the rain for several reasons.  For example, external addition of 

soil amendments are not taken place within this well-protected 

reserve  and  also  the  underlying  bed  rock  mainly  consists  of 

rock types Khondalite and Charnokites do not contain Pb [18].  

  Status of air pollution in Kandy with vehicle emissions and 

dust  loaded  with  Pb  and  some  other  contaminants  has  been 

documented  by  [19].    Kandy  is  a  city  less  than  50km  away 

from Horton Plains. [20]  also has identified Pb as one of the 

major  air  pollutants  in  Sri  Lanka.  As  identified  by  [21], 

troposphere  above  another  two  cities  in  Sri  Lanka,  Colombo 

and  Kurunegala,  is  polluted  with  Pb  and  the  researchers have 

identified  vehicle  emission  as  the  main  source  of  Pb  to  the 

troposphere.  Therefore,  during  rainy  seasons,  continuous 

addition  of  Pb  to  the  soil  with  rain  is  anticipated.  Rapid 

industrialization in the neighboring India may also  have some 

links  with  the  polluted  airflow  with  Pb  and  many  other 

pollutants towards Horton Plains.  

The  soil  samples  collected  during  the  rainy  periods  were  all 

found  in  moist  condition  with  rain  water  soaked into the soil. 

Air-drying  the  samples  only  removes  water  from  the  samples 

leaving Pb behind. Hence, the laboratory analysis would have 

reflected  these  metals  in  higher  concentrations  for  the  soil 

samples collected during rainy periods.    

  Parallel  to  the  increase  of  soil  Pb,  leaf  Pb  has  also  been  

increased. It means that the root absorption of Pb appears to be 

enhanced  by  the  increasing  concentration  of  soil  Pb. 

Therefore, the development Pb toxicity in the forest appears to 

create Pb toxicity in the vegetation.  

V.

 

C



ONCLUSIONS

 

  One  of  the  toxic  heavy  metals,  Pb,  may  have  exceeded  the 



tolerable 

level 


by 

the 


montane  vegetation  studied. 

Improvement of the quantity and the quality of SOM in terms 

of humic matter content appears to mitigate the Pb toxicity on 

forest vegetation. The level of SOM had better be  maintained 

roughly  above  3.5%  in  order  to  help  the  saplings  to  escape 

from untimely death.  

A

CKNOWLEDGMENT



 

  This  study  was  conducted  with  the  financial  support  of  the 

Department  of  Wildlife  Conservation  and  Sabaragamuwa 

University  of  Sri  Lanka.  We  are  also  grateful  to  the  Park 

Warden and the rest of the staff at Horton Plains National Park 

for  their  unquestionable  support  given  throughout  the  study. 

Our  very  special  appreciation  should  go  to  the  Rubber 

Research  Institute  of  Sri  Lanka  for  helping  us  to  complete 

classy laboratory analysis related to the research. 

R

EFERENCES  



 

[1]


 

T.W.    Hoffmann,  The  Horton  Plains,  Good  and  Bad  news.  Loris. 

1988.18 (1), 4-5. 

[2]


 

W.R.H.  Perera,  Thotupolakanda  -  an  environmental  disaster?  The  Sri 

Lanka Forester. 1978. 13, 53- 55. 

[3]


 

W.L. Werner, The Upper Montane forests of Sri Lanka. The Sri Lanka 

Forester. 1982.15, 119-135. 

[4]


 

N.K.B.  Adikaram,    K.B.  Ranawana,  and  A.  Weerasuriya,    Forest 

dieback in the Horton Plains National Park.  Sri Lanka Protected Areas 

Management  and  Wildlife  Conservation  Project.  Department  of  Wild 

Life  Conservation,  Ministry  of  Environment  and  Natural  Resourses, 

Colombo: 08. 2006. 

[5]

 

K.B. Ranawana, R.L.R. Chandrajith and N.K.B. Adikaram,  Follow up 



study  of  forest  die-back  in  Horton  Plains  National  Park,  wild  life 

research  symposium,  protected  area  management  and  wide  life 

conservation project. 2007. 

[6]


 

T.C.Whitmore,  Tropical  Rain  Forests  of  the  Far  East.  Claredon  Press, 

Oxford. 1984. 

[7]


 

R.A. Wijewansa, Horton Plains: a plea for preservation. Loris. 1983.16, 

188-191. 

[8]


 

K.H.G. Silva de, Aspects of the ecology and conservation of Sri Lanka's 

endemic  freshwater  shrimp  Caridina  singhalensis.  Biol.  Conserv. 

1982. 24, 219-231. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0006-3207(82)90059-3 

[9]


 

R.A.,  Wijewansa,  Horton  Plains:  a  plea  for  preservation.  Loris. 

1983.16, 188-191. 

[10]


 

USEPA,  Method  3050B.  Acid  digestion  of  sediments,  sludges  and 

soils. Revision 2. 1996. 

[11]


 

 E.  Dale,  and    H.  Norman,  Atomic  absorption  and  flame  emission 

spectrometry,  in:  Page,  A.  L.,  Miller,  R.H.,  Keeney,  D.R.  (Eds.), 

Methods  of  Soil  Analysis.  Part  2,  second  ed,  Agronomy  9.  American 

Society of Agronomy, Inc., Madison, WI, USA. 1982. pp. 13-27. 

[12]


 

 Genstat., VSN International, UK. 2010. 

[13]

 

 A.B.  Pahlsson,    1989.  Toxicity  of  heavy  metals  (Zn,  Cu,  Cd,  Pb)  to 



Vascular Plants. Water Air Soil Poll. 47,  287-319. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF00279329 

[14]

 

J.  Drozd,  S.S.  Gonet,  N.  Sensei,  J.  Weber,  ,  and  I.  Pavasaras,  1997. 



Complexsation  of  Europium  by  an  Aquatic  Fulvic  Acid:  Iron  as  a 

International Conference on Agricultural, Ecological and Medical Sciences (AEMS-2015) Feb. 10-11, 2015 Penang (Malaysia)

http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0215118

17


 

 

Compeering  Ion.  The  Role  of  Humic  Substances  in  the  Ecosystems 



and in Environmental protection, Wroclaw, Poland. 

[15]


 

 R.L.  Chaney,  S.L.  Brown,  Y.M.  Li,  J.S.  Angle,  T.I.  Stuczynski,  W.L. 

Daniels,  C.L.  Henry,  G.  Siebelec,    M.  Malik,    J.A.  Ryan    and  H. 

Compton,  2000. “Progress in Risk Assessment for Soil Metals, and In-

situ  Remediation  and  Phytoextraction  of  Metals  from  Hazardous 

Contaminated  Soils.  U.S-EPA  “Phytoremediation:  State  of  Science  ”, 

May 1-2, 2000, Boston, MA. 

[16]


 

A.  Kloke,  1980.  Orientierungsdaten  für  tolerierbare  gesamtgehalte 

einiger elemente in kulturboden mitt. VDLUFA. H.1-3, 9-11. 

[17]


 

D.  Mueller-Dombois,  P.M.  Vitousek  and  K.W  Bridges,  1984.  Canopy 

dieback  and  ecosystem  processes  in  Pacific  forests:  a  progress  report 

and research proposal. Hawaii Bot.Sci. 44, 100-102. 

[18]

 

V.M  Goldschmidt,  1937.    The  principles  of  distribution  of  chemical 



elements in minerals and rocks. J. Chem. Soc. 4, 655-673. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1039/jr9370000655 

[19]

 

C.B.    Dissanayake,        J.M.  Niwas,  and    S.V.R.  Weerasooriya,  1987.   



Heavy  metal pollution of the mid-canal  of  Kandy:  an  environmental  

case study  from Sri  Lanka. Environ. Res. 42 (1), 24-35. 

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0013-9351(87)80004-X 

[20]


 

 O.A. Ileperuma, 2000. Environmental pollution in Sri Lanka: a review. 

J. Natl.Sci.Fdn. SL. 24 (4), 321-325. 

[21]


 

 P.A.D.H.N. Gunathilaka,  R.M.N.S. Ranundeniya, M.M.M. Najim and 

S. Seneviratne, 2011. A determination of air pollution in Colombo and 

Kurunegala,  Sri  Lanka,  using  energy  dispersive  X-ray  fl  uorescence 

spectrometry on Heterodermia speciosa. Turk. J. Bot. 35 (2011), 439-

446. 

 

 

 

International Conference on Agricultural, Ecological and Medical Sciences (AEMS-2015) Feb. 10-11, 2015 Penang (Malaysia)



http://dx.doi.org/10.15242/IICBE.C0215118

18


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə