The Journal of Phytopharmacology 2016; 5(4): 150-156



Yüklə 201.41 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü201.41 Kb.

 

 

150



 

The Journal of Phytopharmacology 2016; 5(4): 150-156 

Online at: 

www.phytopharmajournal.com

 

Research Article 

ISSN 2230-480X 

JPHYTO 2016; 5(4): 150-156 

July- August 

© 2016, All rights reserved 

 

Ifeoma Chinwude Ezenyi 

Department 

of 

Pharmacology 



and 

Toxicology, 

National 

Institute 

for 

Pharmaceutical 



Research 

and 


Development, Abuja, Nigeria  

 

Oluchi Nneka Mbamalu 

School  of  Pharmacy,  University  of  the 

Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa 

Lucy Balogun 

Department 

of 

Pharmacology 



and 

Toxicology, 

National 

Institute 

for 

Pharmaceutical 



Research 

and 


Development, Abuja, Nigeria  

 

Liberty Omorogbe 

Department 

of 

Pharmacology 



and 

Toxicology, 

National 

Institute 

for 

Pharmaceutical 



Research 

and 


Development, Abuja, Nigeria 

Fidelis Solomon Ameh 

Department 

of 

Pharmacology 



and 

Toxicology, 

National 

Institute 

for 

Pharmaceutical 



Research 

and 


Development, Abuja, Nigeria  

 

Oluwakanyinsola Adeola Salawu 

Department 

of 

Pharmacology 



and 

Toxicology, 

National 

Institute 

for 

Pharmaceutical 



Research 

and 


Development, Abuja, Nigeria 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence:

 

Dr. Ifeoma Chinwude Ezenyi 

Department 

of 

Pharmacology 

and 

Toxicology 

National 

Institute 

for 

Pharmaceutical 

Research 

and 

Development, PMB 21, Abuja, Nigeria 

Email: iphie_odike[at]yahoo.com 



Antidiabetic potentials of Syzygium guineense methanol 

leaf extract 

Ifeoma Chinwude Ezenyi*, Oluchi Nneka Mbamalu, Lucy Balogun, Liberty Omorogbe, Fidelis Solomon 

Ameh, Oluwakanyinsola Adeola Salawu 

 

ABSTRACT 

This study examines the effects of a methanol extract of Syzygium guineense leaves in streptozotocin (STZ) - 

induced diabetes, evaluates its effect on alpha glucosidase and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical. Diabetes 

was  induced  in  rats  by  a  single  intraperitoneal  injection  of  streptozotocin  (60  mg/kg).    An  oral  glucose 

tolerance test was performed after diabetes induction and repeated after 14 days of treatment with the extract. 

The extract elicited antihyperglycemic action in diabetic rats evidenced by an improved oral glucose tolerance. 

A  dose  of  250  mg/kg  of  extract  significantly  (P<0.01,  0.001)  enhanced  glucose  clearance  at  the  end  of 

treatment  period  and  was  comparable  with  metformin,  the  group  also  showed  increase  in  hepatic  glycogen 

content by 33.9% relative to the diabetic control. Serum biochemical analysis showed that the extract improved 

indices of renal and hepatic function by reduction in serum albumin, creatinine, liver enzymes, total and direct 

bilirubin. Similarly, the extract reduced serum cholesterol, triglycerides and high density lipoprotein (HDL) in 

a  non-dose  dependent  manner;  treatment  with  250  mg/kg  extract  caused  significant  (P<0.05)  reduction  of 

HDL. Groups which received 250 and 500 mg/kg of extract showed reversal of glomerular damage compared 

with  the  diabetic  untreated  group.  The  extract  also  exhibited  concentration-dependent  antioxidant  activity 

(EC


50

= 0.2 mg/ml) and statistically significant (P<0.01, 0.001)  alpha glucosidase inhibitory effect (IC

50

= 6.15 


mg/ml). These findings show the antidiabetic potential of S. guineense leaf extract, likely mediated through its 

ability to inhibit alpha glucosidase, scavenge free radicals and increase intrahepatic glucose uptake and storage.  

 

Keywords: 

Alpha glucosidase, Antioxidant, Syzygium guineense.



 

 

INTRODUCTION 

Diabetes mellitus is a major metabolic disorder and a global threat to health owing to its high prevalence

morbidity  and  mortality.  Diabetes  is  currently  prevalent  in  9%  of  adults  aged  18  years  and  older  and 

80% of diabetes-related deaths occur in low and middle-income countries 

[1,2]


. According to the World 

Health Organization, diabetes will be ranked the seventh leading cause of death by 2030 

[3]

. Non insulin-



dependent  diabetes  mellitus  or  type  II  diabetes  mellitus  is  a  multifactorial  disorder  caused  by  either 

deficient insulin secretion from pancreatic beta cells or failure in insulin action and is characterized by 

hyperglycemia,  impaired  lipid  metabolism,  defects  in  redox balance,  altered  metabolism  of  major  food 

substances 

[4]

. Long term health complications of untreated or poorly managed diabetes include diabetic 



nephropathy,  retinopathy,  neuropathy,  hypertension,  and  cardiovascular  disease.  Among  other  factors, 

free  radicals  have  been  recognized  to  play  an  important  role  in  the  development  of  diabetic 

complications 

[5]


.  Oxidative  stress  caused  by  persistent  hyperglycemia  leads  to  chronic  cellular  redox 

imbalance,  with  negative  effects  on  key  cellular  metabolic  processes  and  organelles;  necessitating 

adequate control of hyperglycemia to mitigate cellular damage 

[6]


. Oral antidiabetics commonly used to 

manage  type  II  diabetes  include  drug  classes  such  as  sulfonylureas,  thiazolidinediones, biguanides  and 

the  newer  incretin  mimetics/enhancers.  These  groups  of  drugs  stimulate  insulin  secretion,  sensitize 

tissues to insulin action or inhibit key carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes among other mechanisms 

[7]



Although oral antidiabetics are frequently employed to manage type II diabetes, they are occasioned with 



unwanted and sometimes life-threatening side effects like hypoglycemia, leading to a search for new and 

safer alternatives especially from natural sources. Herbal remedies have been used in traditional practice 

for the treatment of different diseases. For example,  Syzygium guineense (Myrtaceae) has been used to 

alleviate  symptoms  of  different  diseases  in  some  parts  of  Africa.    It  is  a  flowering  plant  native  to  the 

wooded savannah and tropical forests of Africa and bears edible fruits. Also known as ‘water berry’, the 

fruits and other parts of the plant are used locally as charcoal, timber, food, medicine, fodder, bee forage 

and  dyes 

[8]


.  S.  guineense  leaves  are  also  used  as  remedy  for  diarrhoea  and  dysentery 

[9]


.  Scientific 

investigation of extracts of the plant reveal its antibacterial and antihypertensive effects 

[10,11]

. In view of 



these, the present study was carried out to evaluate the antidiabetic potentials of  S. guineense methanol 

leaf extract in streptozotocin – induced diabetic rats. 



The Journal of Phytopharmacology 

 

 



151

 

MATERIALS AND METHODS

  

Drugs and chemicals 

Methanol,  dimethylsulfoxide,  2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydazyl  (DPPH), 

alpha 

glucosidase, 



p-nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside, 

sodium 


carbonate  (Sigma  Aldrich,  Germany),  metformin  hydrochloride 

(Glucophage

®

,  Merck,  France),  citric  acid  (BDH,  England), 



streptozotocin and concentrated citrate solution (Santa Cruz Biotech., 

Germany). Other reagents used were of analytical grade. 



Animals 

Adult Wistar rats of either sex were used for the study. The rats were 

housed  in  steel  cages  and  acclimatized  for  two  weeks  to  laboratory 

conditions before the study. They were maintained on standard rodent 

feed  and  allowed  unrestricted  access  to  potable  drinking  water.  All 

applicable  institutional  and  international  guidelines  for  the  care  and 

use of animals were adhered to in all procedures 

[12]




Plant material 

Fresh  leaves  of  S.  guineense  were  collected  in  October  from  Suleja, 

Niger  state,  Nigeria  and  identified  by  a  plant  taxonomist.  A  voucher 

specimen  was  prepared  (voucher  number:  NIPRD/H/6644)  and 

deposited in the herbarium of the National Institute of Pharmaceutical 

Research  and  Development  (NIPRD).    The  leaves  were  air-dried 

under  shade  for  two  weeks  then  milled  mechanically  to  coarse 

powder. 


Extract preparation and phytochemical screening 

A  200  g  quantity  of  S.  guineense  leaf  powder  was  extracted  by 

maceration  in  80  %v/v  methanol  (1:8)  at  room  temperature.  The 

mixture  was  filtered  after  48  h  with  Whatman  filter  paper  then  the 

filtrate  concentrated  under  vacuum.  The  concentrate  obtained  was 

dried  on  a  hot  water  bath  maintained  at  50

o

C.  The  dry  extract  (SG) 



was  stored  in  an  air  tight  container  in  a  refrigerator  at  4

o

C  until 



required.  Phytochemical  screening  of  the  extract  for  tentative 

identification  of  the  presence  of  free  anthraquinone  glycosides, 

combined  anthraquinone  glycosides,  saponins,  terpenes,  flavonoids 

and  alkaloids  was  carried  out  in  accordance  with  standard  rest 

procedures 

[13]




High  performance  liquid  chromatography  fingerprinting  of 

extract 

Chromatographic  separation  was  performed  using  a  C

18

  column  (25 



cm x 4.6 mm, 5 µm i.d. Phenomenex Luna

®

) with a compatible guard 



column  maintained  at  45°C.  The  mobile  phase,  consisting  of:  A, 

0.01%  formic  acid/acetonitrile;  B,  0.01%  formic  acid/water,  was 

filtered  through  a  0.45  µm  filter  and  degassed  prior  to  use.  A  20µL 

volume  of  extract  was  filtered  through  a  0.22  mm  filter  disk  and 

injected  into  the  column.  Flow  rate  of  the  mobile  phase  was 

maintained at 0.8 mL/min, and peaks were separated according to the 

following  linear  gradient  elution:  0  -  1  min,  82%  A/18%  B;  1  -  15 

min, 82% A /18% B to 75% A/25% B; 15 - 20 min, 75% A /25% B to 

65% A /35% B; 20 - 25 min, 65% A/35% B to 40% A/60% B; 25 - 26 

min,  40%  A/60%  B  to  82%  A/18%  B;  followed  by  an  equilibration 

with 82% A /18% B for 10 min. Wavelength for ultraviolet detection 

was 370 nm. 



Acute toxicity 

Acute  toxicity  test  in  rats  was  done using  a  modification  of  Lorke’s 

method, in two phases 

[14]


.  In the first phase, two groups of three rats 

each  were  given  orally,  300  and  1000  mg/  kg  of  body  weight  of  the 

methanol  extract  respectively  and  monitored  for  24  h  for  physical 

signs  of  toxicity  and  mortality.  The  rats  were  subsequently  observed 

for  two  weeks  for  delayed  signs  of  toxicity  and/or  mortality.  In  the 

second phase, three groups of three rats each were orally administered 

1250, 2500 and 5000 mg/kg respectively and monitored likewise. The 

median  lethal  dose  in  mice  (LD

50

)  was  calculated  as  the  geometric 



means  of  the  maximum  dose  producing  0%  mortality  and  the 

minimum dose that produced 100% mortality. 



ANTIHYPERGLYCEMIC SCREENING 

Induction of experimental diabetes 

Fifty  rats  were  fasted  overnight  on  day  zero  (0)  during  which  they 

were  granted  unrestricted  access  to  potable  drinking  water.  Fresh 

streptozotocin solution in ice cold citrate buffer (0.1 M, pH 4.5) was 

prepared  in  aliquots  and  protected  from  light.  The  solution  was 

immediately injected intraperitoneally to rats on day 1 at a dose of 60 

mg/kg  of  body  weight.  Thereafter,  the  rats  were  granted  access  to 

food  and  10%w/v  sucrose  solution  for  48  h.  After  an  overnight  fast, 

blood  glucose  was  taken  at  72  h  using  an  Accu-Chek  glucometer 

(Roche, Mannheim, Germany) with its corresponding strips. Only rats 

with  fasting  blood  glucose  concentration  (BGC)  above  200  mg/dL 

were considered diabetic and used for the 2 week study. 



Oral glucose tolerance test   

The  experimental  rats  were  fasted  overnight  but  allowed  access  to 

drinking  water.  After  the  fast,  the  rats  were  divided  into  5  groups 

(n=5)  and  individual  and  individual  pre-treatment  BGC  values  were 

recorded.  Group  1  was  the  diabetic  control  and  received  distilled 

water  (1  ml/kg).  Other  treatment  groups  comprised  diabetic  rats 

receiving  the  extract  (250,  500  and  1000  mg/kg)  and  metformin 

hydrochloride  (100  mg/kg).  Thirty  minutes  after  treatment  of  all  the 

groups,  each  rat  was  administered  an  oral  glucose  load  (1  g/kg)  and 

BGCs recorded at 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min.  



Study design 

Four  experimental  groups  were  used  for  the  study  and  treated  once 

daily  for  14  days  as  follows:  Group  1  served  as  the  diabetic  control 

and received the aqueous vehicle alone (1ml/kg). Groups 2 and 3 were 

treated with 250 and 500 mg/kg of extract prepared in aqueous vehicle 

while group 4 was treated with metformin hydrochloride (100 mg/kg). 

Oral glucose tolerance test was repeated again for all the groups at the 

end of the study period, as described previously.    



Serum biochemical analysis 

At  the  end  of  the  treatment  period,  the  rats  were  euthanized  by 

chloroform  inhalation.  Blood  samples  collected  from  each  rat  by 

cardiac puncture were dispensed into plain tubes, allowed to clot and 

centrifuged at 3500 rpm for 10 min. The serum was stored at -4°C and 

used for evaluation of biochemical parameters including electrolytes, 

creatinine,  urea,  alanine  transaminase  (ALT),  aspartate  transaminase 

(AST),  alkaline  phosphatase  (ALP),  lipids,  total  and  conjugated 

bilirubin, using commercial kits (Randox Laboratories, Antrim, UK). 

Effect of  extract administration on  kidney, liver weight and liver 

glycogen 

The  kidneys  and  liver  of  each  rat  was  excised  carefully  and  their 

weights were calculated relative to body weight of the rat on the same 

day.  Approximately  1  g  of  tissue  was  cut  from  each  liver  for 

estimation  of  glycogen  content  expressed  as  gram  per  gram  (g/g)  of 

liver tissue. 

[15]

.  


Renal and pancreatic morphology assessment 

Kidneys  and  pancreas  obtained  from  the  rats  were  fixed  in  10% 

formal  saline  for  at  least  48  h.  These  were  then  processed  routinely 


The Journal of Phytopharmacology 

 

 



152

 

and the tissues were embedded in paraffin wax. Histological sections 



were  cut  at  5  -  6  μm  and  stained  with  haematoxylin  and  eosin  (HE). 

Sample slides bearing codes  were examined by a pathologist blinded 

to  the  study  design  and  treatment  groups  to  identify  histological 

changes.  



Alpha glucosidase inhibitory test  

A chromogenic method described previously was used 

[16]

. Briefly, 20 



μL of extract  solution (0.625  – 10 mg/mL)  was incubated for 5 min 

with 80 μL of 100 mM phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.8) and 40 μL 

of  enzyme  solution  (0.76  unit/mL).  After  addition  of  40  μL  of  p-

nitrophenyl-α-D-glucopyranoside  (5  mM),  the  mixture  was  further 

incubated for 15 min. The reaction was stopped by addition of 20 μL 

of  200  mM  sodium  carbonate  and  p-nitrophenol  generated  was 

measured at 405 nm using a microplate reader (GF-M3000, England). 

Test  incubations  were  carried  out  in  triplicate.  Blank  and  control 

incubations  were  prepared  by  replacing  enzyme  and  extract  solution 

with  80  μL  buffer  solution  and  20  μL  DMSO  in  blank  and  control 

incubations respectively. Enzyme inhibition (%) was calculated using 

the relation: 

 1 −

B

A



  × 100

 

Where  A  =  absorbance  of  the  control  without  test  samples,  and  B  = 



net  absorbance  of  test  sample  (Test  minus  blank  absorbance).  The 

concentration of  extract  necessary  to  inhibit  enzyme  activity  by  50% 

(IC

50

)  was  calculated  by  linear  regression  where  the  abscissa  (x) 



represents  extract  concentrations  and  the  ordinate  (y)  represents  the 

average inhibition (%) of enzyme activity. 



Antioxidant effect of extract 

The  test  was  performed  as  described  previously  with  slight 

modification 

[17]


.  Here,  0.01%  w/v  solution  of  DPPH  was  freshly 

prepared in methanol and kept away from light. A 150 µL volume of 

this solution was added to 50 µl of various concentrations (0.1565 - 5 

mg/mL)  of  extract  prepared  in  methanol.  After  30  min  of  incubation 

in the dark, absorbance was taken at 492 nm.  Free radical scavenging 

activity was calculated using: 

100 − [ 

As − Ab


Ac

   x 100]

 

Where  A


s

  -  A


=  Net  absorbance  of  sample,  A

=  Absorbance  of 



control.  The  effective  concentration  of  extract  necessary  to  decrease 

the initial DPPH absorbance by  50% (EC

50

) was calculated by linear 



regression where the abscissa (x) represents extract concentrations and 

the  ordinate  (y)  represents  the  average  percentage  (%)  scavenging 

capacity. 

Data analysis 

Results  were  expressed  as  mean  ±  SEM.    Statistical  analysis  was 

carried  out  using  one-way  analysis  of  variance  (ANOVA)  using 

Graph  Pad  Prism  5.0  software.    The  data  obtained  was  further 

subjected to dunnet’s post hoc test; differences between treated groups 

and the untreated control were accepted as significant at P<0.05. 



RESULTS 

 

The extract did not cause any obvious toxicity at all the doses used in 

both  phases  of  the  acute  toxicity  test.  No  mortality  was  recorded 

within  2  weeks  following  administration  of  extract  doses  up  to  5000 

mg/kg. Orally administered extract produced dose-dependent decrease 

in  blood  sugar  in  diabetic  rats  in  an  oral  glucose  tolerance  test  after 

diabetes injection. All the diabetic groups showed impaired tolerance 

to  oral  glucose  seen  as  elevated  blood  sugar  concentration  for  over 

240  min  following  glucose  administration  (Table  1).  The  extract 

produced  dose-dependent  decrease  in  blood  glucose  concentration 

with  time  and  a  maximum  dose  of  1000  mg/kg  of  extract  produced 

31.35%  reduction  at  240  min  relative  to  the  control.  This  effect  was 

observed  to  be  higher  than  the  effect  produced  by  metformin.  In  a 

repeated glucose tolerance test after 14-day treatment, the extract (250 

mg/kg) 

significantly 



(P<0.05, 

0.01, 


0.001) 

decreased 

the 

hyperglycemic  peak  in  diabetic  rats,  as  seen  in  the  rapid  drop  in 



postprandial blood glucose concentration at a significantly  faster rate 

compared to the diabetic control (Table  2).  A similar  effect  was also 

produced by metformin (100 mg/kg). The onset of action was half an 

hour  after  extract  administration  and  lasted  for  over  2  h  in  a  time 

dependent  manner,  as  blood  glucose  concentration  decreased  to 

normoglycemic levels.  



Table 1: Effect of extract on oral glucose tolerance test following diabetes induction 

Treatment 

Dose 

mg/kg 


BGC (mg/dl)  

0 min 


 

30 min 


 

60 min 


 

90 min 


 

120 min 


 

180 min 


 

240 min 


Diabetic 

control 


 

SG 


 

 

 



 

 

Metformin 



 

 



 

250 


 

500 


 

1000 


 

100 


541±35.03 

 

 



541.4±32.96 

 

528.6±40.21 



 

518.2±43.55 

 

398.8±29.45 



551±23.53 

 

 



490.4±40.01 

 

491.6±60.73 



 

443.2±58.67 

 

446.6±27.20 



536±36.0 

 

 



477.2±38.02 

 

462±57.44 



 

415±46.50 

 

425.8±17.2* 



477±30.04 

 

 



436.8±33.49 

 

423.6±51.31 



 

383.2±46.85 

 

411±23.91 



465±20.20 

 

 



450.6±45.46 

 

417.4±52.85 



 

383.4±50.96 

 

344.6±15.25** 



436±20.95 

 

 



415±31.4 

 

368.6±55.01 



 

338±50.93 

 

300.6±19.98*



366.5±38.3 

 

 

413.4±41.6 



 

344±60.97 

 

251.6±59.3 



 

311.6±22.8 

NDNT 



71.8±2.60 



97.2±7.11 

80.8±4.20 

80.8±4.2 

96.3±6.40 

85.8±4.81 

80.3±2.11 

            NDNT: Non diabetic non treated group; *P<0.05; **P<0.01(Data analysis and post hoc test) 

 

Serum  biochemical  analysis  revealed  that  the  extract  did  not 



significantly  affect  electrolyte  and  urea  levels  but  elicited  dose-

dependent  reduction  of  serum  creatinine  compared  to  the  diabetic 

control (Table 3). Also, the extract caused a reduction in serum levels 

of liver marker enzymes, total and direct bilirubin and albumin; most 

of  these  reductions  were  observed  to  be  dose-dependent  (Table  4). 

Lipid  profile  results  show  that  the  250  mg/kg  extract  decreased 

cholesterol,  triglycerides  and  significantly  (P<0.05)  reduced  serum 

HDL  (Table  5).  These  changes  were  however  observed  to  be  non 

dose-dependent. 

 

 



The Journal of Phytopharmacology 

 

 



153

 

Table 2: Effect of extract on oral glucose tolerance test after 14-day treatment 

Treatment 

Dose 


(mg/kg) 

BGC (mg/dl)  

0 min 

 

30 min 



 

60 min 


 

90 min 


 

120 min 


 

180 min 


 

240 min 


Diabetic 

control 


 

SG 


 

 

 



Metformin 

 

NDNT 



 

 



250 

 

500 



 

100 


 

404±98.61 



 

 

108±22.73 



 

362±145.5 

 

141.8±29.3 



 

64.4±3.42 

365±54.85 

 

 



221.8±14.12* 

 

371±61.25 



 

178±12.76* 

 

92.8±4.51 



370.3±43.9 

 

 



167.8±12.8** 

 

360.3±45.54 



 

122.3±21.1*** 

 

86.8±5.77 



357.3±40.11 

 

 



96±10.55** 

 

344±39.46 



 

80.3±15*** 

 

73.6±4.12 



321.3±35.26 

 

 



91±10.46*** 

 

326.3±36.4 



 

69.25±8.3*** 

 

73.6±3.28 



280.3±62.41 

 

 



84.75±19.3** 

 

357.7±41.09 



 

71.25±3.82** 

 

69.0±3.29 



235.3±80.68 

 

 



66.25±30.96 

 

247.7±55.48 



 

67±4.42 


 

56.0±2.83 

     *P<0.05, **P<0.01, ***P<0.001(Data analysis and post hoc test) 

Table 3: Effect of extract on serum electrolytes and creatinine 

Treatment 

Dose (mg/kg) 

Na

+



 

K

+



 

Cl

-



 

HCO


-

 

Urea 



Creatinine 

Diabetic 

 

SG 


 

 

 



Metformin 

 



250 

 

500 



 

100 


 

136.7±2.4 

 

137±2.89 



 

137.7±1.2 

 

147.2±1.07** 



 

6.67±0.87 

 

7.70±0.35 



 

6.0±0.29 

 

18.34±5.96 



 

102.3±1.76 

 

105±3.46 



 

103.7±2.67 

 

117.6±2.71** 



 

23±0.58 


 

22.5±0.29 

 

23±0.58 


 

25.2±1.16 

 

11.77±0.96 



 

12.63±1.76 

 

13.4±1.25 



 

20.16±6.35 

 

40.33±12.41 



 

37±8.66 


 

28.67±1.20 

 

35.20±6.32 



  **P<0.01(Data analysis and post hoc test) 

Table 4: Effect of extract on liver enzymes, serum bilirubin and protein 

Treatment 

Dose 

(mg/kg) 


AST 

ALT 


ALP 

TBIL 


DBIL 

TP 


ALB 

Diabetic 

 

SG 


 

 

 



Metformin 

 



250 

 

500 



 

100 


 

386±184.6 

 

270.5±15.88 



 

257±74.45 

 

245±103.7 



 

154±24.58 

 

154.5±40.13 



 

131±28.69 

 

301±134.6 



 

362.7±110.9 

 

337.5±97.28 



 

430.7±51.34 

 

72.80±21.85* 



2.83±0.37 

 

2.8±0.51 



 

2.4±0.45 

 

9.34±1.5** 



1.53±0.43 

 

1.0±0.12 



 

0.87±0.13 

 

3.22±0.56 



60.67±7.62 

 

63.5±0.87 



 

56.67±4.91 

 

46.80±4.65 



24.0±4.36 

 

23.0±0.58 



 

20.0±2.89 

 

21.6±4.47 



   

*P<0.05, **P<0.01 (Data analysis and post hoc test)

 

Table 5: Effect of extract on serum lipid profile 

Treatment 

Dose(mg/kg) 

CHOL 


HDL 

LDL 


TGLY 

Diabetic 

 

SG 


 

 

 



Metformin 

 



 

250 


 

500 


 

100 


 

47.33±4.33 

 

25.0±6.93 



 

32.67±6.74 

 

44.8±8.81 



 

37.33±2.96 

 

20.50±6.06* 



 

26.0±6.11 

 

2.40±0.25*** 



 

1.0±0.58 

 

1.0±0.00 



 

1.33±0.67 

 

3.60±1.08 



 

54.33±7.42 

 

30.83±6.42 



 

39.33±9.6 

 

60.80±13.44 



             *P<0.05, ***P<0.001(Data analysis and post hoc test) 

 

Table 6: Antioxidant activity of S. guineense leaf extract 

Concentration 

(mg/ml) 


Antioxidant activity 

0.1565 


0.3125 

0.6250 


1.2500 

2.5000 


5.0000 

32.79 


77.28 

81.23 


82.41 

79.87 


73.91 

              

EC

50

= 0.2 mg/ml. 



 

 

Table 7: Alpha glucosidase inhibitory activity of S. guineense ethanol 

extract 

Concentration 

(mg/ml) 

mean absorbance due to 

p-nitrophenol generated 

Inhibition (%) 

Control 

0.625 


1.25 

2.5 


10 


3.071 ± 0.16 

2.615 ± 0.04** 

2.367 ± 0.01*** 

2.168 ± 0.04*** 

1.793 ± 0.04*** 

0.649 ± 0.04*** 

14.86 


22.94 

29.40 


41.63 

79.19 


     IC

50

= 6.15 mg/ml. **P<0.01; **P<0.001 (Data analysis and post hoc test) 



 

 

The Journal of Phytopharmacology 

 

 



154

 

Table 8: Effect of extract on absolute kidney, liver weight and liver glycogen 

Treatment 

Dose 


(mg/kg) 

Relative kidney weight 

(g) 

Relative liver weight (g) 



Liver glycogen  

(gram/gram of tissue) 

Diabetic control 

 

SG 



 

 

 



 

Metformin 

 



 



250 

 

 



500 

 

100 



 

0.66±0.03 

 

0.68±0.07 



 

 

0.70±0.05 



 

0.97±0.03** 

 

3.50±0.31 



 

2.99±0.19 

 

 

3.26±0.23 



 

3.35±0.23 

 

0.59±0.03 



 

 0.79±0.19  

(33.9%) 

 

0.55±0.004 



 

0.59±0.03 

 

                      Value in parenthesis (%) represents percentage increase in liver glycogen content relative to the diabetic control group. **P<0.01(Data analysis and post hoc test) 



  

Serum  biochemical  analysis  revealed  that  the  extract  did  not 

significantly  affect  electrolyte  and  urea  levels  but  elicited  dose-

dependent  reduction  of  serum  creatinine  compared  to  the  diabetic 

control (Table 3). Also, the extract caused a reduction in serum levels 

of liver marker enzymes, total and direct bilirubin and albumin; most 

of  these  reductions  were  observed  to  be  dose-dependent  (Table  4). 

Lipid  profile  results  show  that  the  250  mg/kg  extract  decreased 

cholesterol,  triglycerides  and  significantly  (P<0.05)  reduced  serum 

HDL  (Table  5).  These  changes  were  however  observed  to  be  non 

dose-dependent. 

An antioxidant effect was observed to be produced by the extract in a 

concentration-dependent  manner  (Table  6).  A  maximum  radical 

scavenging effect was produced at a concentration of 1.25 mg/mL of 

extract  and  a  concentration  of  0.2  mg/ml  was  estimated  to  be  the 

efficient  concentration  required  to  elicit  50  %  radical  scavenging 

capacity  (EC

50

).  Similarly,  the  extract  elicited  significant  (P  <  0.01, 



0.001), concentration-dependent inhibition of alpha glucosidase at all 

tested concentrations and the concentration required to inhibit enzyme 

activity by 50 % (IC

50

) was estimated to be 6.15 mg/ml (Table 7).  



Gross examination of excised liver and kidneys of treated and control 

groups revealed that the extract did not significantly alter the absolute 

and relative weights of these organs. Further studies however showed 

that  liver  glycogen  content  was  elevated  in  diabetic  rats  treated  with 

250 mg/kg extract, compared to the diabetic untreated control (Table 

VIII).  Histopathological  analysis  of  kidneys  of  the  diabetic  untreated 

control  revealed  complete  loss  of  nuclei  within  the  collecting  duct 

which  appeared  dense  with  epithelial  destruction  and  glomerular 

atrophy.  Diabetic  groups  which  received  metformin,  250  and  500 

mg/kg of extract showed normal glomeruli although the nuclei within 

collecting  duct  appeared  slightly  enlarged  or  diffuse  (Figure  1). 

Pancreatic  tissue  of  the  diabetic  untreated  group  appeared  to  have 

fewer  acinar  cells  with  widened  interstitial  spaces  compared  to  the 

normoglycemic and extract-treated groups (Figure 2).  

Alkaloids,  flavonoids,  saponins  and  terpenoids  were  detected  in  the 

extract,  whereas  glycosides  and  anthraquinone  derivatives  where  not 

detected.  High  performance  liquid  chromatoghy  fingerprint  of  the 

extract  revealed  rutin  and  quercitrin  as  some  of  the  polyphenolic 

constituents  (Figure  3).  Three  unknown,  prominent  constituents  with 

retention times of 3.538, 4.661 and 13.218 min respectively were also 

present in the extract.  

 

 



                                 A 

 

        B     



 

     C 


 

                D 

 

         E 



 

Figure 1: A- E: Photomicrographs (haematoxylin/eosin, ×400 magnification) of kidney tissue of A: Normoglycemic, B: Diabetic non treated, C: Diabetic + 250 

mg/kg extract, D: Diabetic + 500 mg/kg extract, E: Diabetic+ metformin groups 

 

 

                                 A 



 

        B     

 

     C 


 

                D 

 

         E 



 

Figure 2: A- E: Photomicrographs (haematoxylin/eosin, ×400 magnification) of pancreatic tissue of  A: Normoglycemic, B: Diabetic non treated, C: Diabetic + 

250 mg/kg extract,  D: Diabetic + 500 mg/kg extract, E: diabetic+ metformin groups

 

 

 



 

 


The Journal of Phytopharmacology 

 

 



155

 

 



 

Figure 3: High performance liquid chromatogram of S. guineense methanol leaf extract showing presence of: A. rutin, D. kaempferol-3-O-rutinoside, G. quercitrin 

and H. quercetin 

 

DISCUSSION 

 

The absence of  mortality at 5000  mg/kg  shows that the extract has a 



wide safety margin following oral acute administration. The induction 

of  diabetes  by  injection  of  streptozotocin  generates  free  radicals  and 

causes  breaks  in  DNA  of  pancreatic  beta  cells  and  these  results  in 

their  selective  destruction,  producing  a  type  II  diabetes  mellitus 

disease model 

[18]


. This ultimately manifests as insulin deficiency and 

hyperglycemia  and  is  characterized  by  increased  glycosylation  of 

haemoglobin,  lipid  peroxidation  and  reduced  glutathione  activity 

[18]


The  blood  glucose  lowering  effect  of  S.  guineense  leaf  extract 

observed  in  the  oral  glucose  test  before  sub  acute  treatment  may  be 

attributed to improved tissue uptake and storage of glucose, similar to 

the  mechanism  of  action  of  metformin 

[7]


.  In  addtion  to  this  effect, 

continuous treatment with the extract may also stimulate residual beta 

cells  to  secrete  insulin  and  improve  tissue  insulinotropic  responses 

such  as  glycogen  synthesis  and  storage,  facilitating  systemic  glucose 

clearance.  This  is  likely  as  some  Syzygium  species  have  also  been 

reported  to  improve  insulin  sensitivity  and  promote  insulin-mediated 

glucose  uptake  and  storage  in  liver  and  adipose  tissue 

[19]


.  The 

antioxidant activity exhibited by the extract may also mitigate disease 

progression,  as  reactive  oxygen  species  are  involved  in  the 

development  of  diabetic  complications.  Extracts  of  S.  guineense 

leaves have been shown to possess strong antioxidant effects and this 

supports  the  antioxidant  effect  of  the  extract  seen  in  our  study 

[20]



Tissue  damage  in  diabetes  is  mediated  by  free  radicals  which  act  on 



cell  membranes  and  cause  peroxidation  of  unsaturated  fatty  acids, 

ultimately  leading  to  extensive  membrane  damage  and  dysfunction 

[21]

. Also, there is an increased, uninhibited mobilization of free  fatty 



acids  from  adipose  tissue  when  insulin  is  deficient  causing  elevation 

in  serum  lipids.  Hence,  the  lipid  lowering  effects  and  antioxidant 

activity of the extract potentially contributes to its antidiabetic effects 

observed in this study. The anti-dyslipidemic effect of the extract may 

be  a  secondary  one,  following  the  simulation  of  insulin  release  and 

action which increase in lipoprotein lipase activity and lowers plasma 

triglyceride levels 

[22]


The  elevation  of  serum  biomarker  enzymes  such  as  ALT,  AST  and 

ALP  in untreated diabetes  is  an  indication of  impaired  liver  function 

due  to  hepatic  damage  induced  by  hyperglycemia 

[23]

.  The  ability  of 



the extract to reduce serum levels of  these  marker  enzymes indicates 

its  ability  to  alleviate  the  oxidative  degenerative  effects  of 

streptozotocin on hepatocytes. This finding is supported by a previous 

report on the antioxidant effects of S. guineense on oxidative stress in 

the  liver 

[20]


.  Likewise,  the  serum  creatinine-lowering  and  albumin-

reducing  effect  of  the  extract  may  also  be  attributed  to  its  ability  to 

ameliorate  the  progression  of  renal  dysfunction  in  diabetes.  Diabetic 

nephropathy  is  a  leading  cause  of  end  stage  renal  failure  and  a 

relatively common complication of diabetes mellitus that ocurs when 

there is progessive oxidative renal injury and fibrosis, which manifests 

in  early  stage  of  disease  as  albuminuria  and  inscrease  in  serum 

creatinine 

[24]

. The extract likely  scavenges  free radicals generated in 



renal tissue, reversing tubular damage. Further evidence to this is seen 

in  the  restorative  effect  in  kidneys  of  extract-treated  groups  where 

glomerular  damage  was  reversed,  similar  to  the  metformin-treated 

group.  


The inhibition of alpha glucosidase by the extract indicates its ability 

to  significantly  prevent  increase  in  blood  glucose  concentration 

following  a  meal.  Notably,  drugs  which  inhibit  carbohydrate 

metabolizing  enzymes  like  alpha  glucosidase  are  commonly  used  in 

combination  with  regulated  diet  to  control  post  prandial 

hyperglycemia 

[7]

. They prevent the breakdown of carbohydrates such 



as  dextrins,  maltose,  sucrose  and  starch  to  monosaccharides  in 

intestinal  brush  borders  and  retard  the  release  of  large  quantities  of 

glucose  from  the  intestine  into  bloodstream  and  its  absorption 

following a meal 

[25]

. In recent years, some plants have been known to 



be  important  inhibitors  of  these  enzymes  and  have  been  receiving 

attention  for  their  potential  for  development  as  antihyperglycemic 

agents 

[26]


.    The  inhibitory  action  of  the  extract  on  alpha  glucosidase 

elucidates  it  as  a  promising  agent  in  this  regard.  This  effect  may  be 

related  to  the  phytochemicals  contained  within  the  some  species  of 

Syzygium as species like S. cumini and S.aromaticum reportedly show 

alpha  glucosidase  inhibitory  activity 

[27,28]

.  Secondary  metabolites 



such  as  flavonoids  and  terpenoids  detected  in  the  extract  have  been 

shown to have antihyperglycemic effect in other plant extracts.  They 

may exert their effects by acting singly or synergistically to improve 

glucose  homeostasis  and  oxidative  metabolism  in  diabetes 

[29]

.  They 


have also been reported to reduce hyperglycemia through modulation 

of  a  glucose  transporter  protein 

[30]

.  Of  the  polyphenols;  rutin, 



kaempferol-3-o-rutinoside,  quercitrin  and  quercetin  identified  in  the 

chromatogram of the extract, rutin and quercetin have been reviewed 

as  promising  oral  antidiabetic  agents 

[31,32]


.  These  polyphenols  also 

scavenge  free  radicals  and  may  contribute  to  the  antioxidant  effects 

produced by the extract in this study. 

CONCLUSION 

 

This  study  shows  that  S.  guineense  methanol  leaf  extract  shows 

potential  for  development  as  an  antidiabetic  agent.  Antioxidant, 

enzyme  inhibitory  activities  and  tissue  glucose  uptake  are  likely 

mechanisms through which its antidiabetic effects are mediated. 

 

REFERENCES 

 

1.

 



World  Health  Organization.  Global  status  report  on  non-communicable 

diseases. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization; 2014. 

2.

 

World  Health  Organization.  Global  Health  Estimates:  Deaths  by  Cause, 



Age,  Sex  and  Country,  2000-2012.  Geneva,  Switzerland:  World  Health 

Organization; 2014. 

3.

 

Mathers  C.D.,  Loncar  D..  Projections  of  global  mortality  and  burden  of 



disease from 2002 to 2030. PLoS Med. 2006; 3:e442. 

4.

 



Scoppola A., Montechi F.R., Mezinger  G.,  Lala  A.. Urinary mevalonate 

excretion  of  rats  in  type  2  diabetes:  role  of  metabolic  control. 

Atherosclerosis 2001; 156:357–61. 

5.

 



Mercuri  F.,  Quagliaro  L.,  Ceriello  A..  Review  paper:  oxidative  stress 

evaluation in diabetes. Diabetes Technol. Ther. 2000;.2:589-600. 

6.

 

West I.C.. Radicals and oxidative stress in diabetes. Diabetic Med. 2000; 



17:171-80. 

The Journal of Phytopharmacology 

 

 



156

 

7.



 

Lorenzati  B.,  Zucco  C.,  Miglietta  S.,  Lamberti  F.,  Bruno  G..  Oral 

Hypoglycemic  Drugs:  Pathophysiological  Basis  of  Their  Mechanism  of 

Action. Pharmaceuticals 2010; 3:3005-20.  

8.

 

Guinand  Y.,  Lemessa  D..  Wild-food  plants  in  Southern  Ethiopia: 



Reflection  on  the  role  of  ‘Famine-foods’  at  a  time  of  drought.  Addis 

Ababa, 


Ethiopia, 

2000. 


http://www.africa.upenn.edu/eue_web/famp0300.htm   

9.

 



Abebe  D.,  Debela  A.,  Urga  K..  Medicinal  Plants  of  Ethiopia.  1st  Ed. 

Kenya: Camerapex Publishers International; 2003. 

10.

 

Djoukeng J.D., Abou-Mansour E., Tabacchi R., Tapondjou A.L., Bouda 



H.,  Lontsi  D..  Antibacterial  triterpenes  from  Syzygium  guineense 

(Myrtaceae). J. Ethnopharmacol. 2005; 101:283-6. 

11.

 

Ayele  Y.,  Urga  K.,  Engidawork,  E..  Evaluation  of  in  vivo 



antihypertensive  and  in  vitro  vasodepressor  activities  of  the  leaf  extract 

of Syzygium guineense (Willd) D.C. Phytother. Res. 2010; 24:1457–62.  

12.

 

National  Institutes of Health. Guide for the Care and Use of  Laboratory 



Animals. 8th Ed. Bethesda, MD; 2011.  

13.


 

Trease  G.E.,  Evans  W.C..  Pharmacognosy.  16th  Ed.  London:  Bailliere 

Tindall; 2009.  

14.


 

Lorke  D..    A  new  approach  to  practical  acute  toxicity  testing.  Arch. 

Toxicol. 1983; 54:275-87. 

15.


 

Okoli  C.O.,  Obidike  I.C.,  Ezike  A.C.,  Akah  P.A.,  Salawu  O.A..  Studies 

on  the  possible  mechanisms  of  antidiabetic  activity  of  extract  of  aerial 

parts of Phyllanthus niruri. Pharm. Biol. 2011; 49:248-55. 

16.

 

Kumar  G.S.,  Tiwari  A.K.,  Rao  V.R.,  Prasad  K.R.,  Ali  A.Z.,  Babu  K.S.. 



Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel benzyl-substituted flavones 

as free radical (DPPH) scavengers and α-glucosidase inhibitors. J. Asian 

Nat. Prod. Res. 2010; 12:978-84. 

17.


 

Choi C.W., Kim S.C., Hwang S.S., Choi B.K., Ahn H.J., Lee M.Y., Park 

S.H., Kim S.K.. Antioxidant activity and free radical scavenging capacity 

between  Korean  medicinal  plants  and  flavonoids  by  assay-guided 

comparison. Plant Sci. 2002; 163:1161-68. 

18.


 

Xiang  F.L.,  Lu  X.,  Strutt  B.,  Hill  D.J.,  Feng  Q..  NOX2  deficiency 

protects  against  streptozotocin-induced  beta-cell  destruction  and 

development of diabetes in mice. Diabetes 2010; 59: 2603-11. 

19.

 

Eddouks  M.,  Bidi  A.,  El  Bouhali  B.,  Hajji  L.,  Zeggwagh  N.A.. 



Antidiabetic  plants  improving  insulin  sensitivity.  J.  Pharm.  Pharmacol. 

2014; 66:1197-214.  

20.

 

Pieme  C.A.,  Ngoupayo  J.,  Khou-Kouz  Nkoulou  C.H.,  Moukette  B.M., 



Nono  B.L.N.,  Moor  V.J.A.,  Minkande  J.Z.,  Ngogang  J.Y..  Syzyguim 

guineense extracts show antioxidant activities and beneficial activities on 

oxidative  stress  induced  by  ferric  chloride  in  the  liver  homogenate. 

Antioxidants. 2014; 3:618-35. 

21.


 

Neethu P., Haseena P., Zevalu K., Thomas S.R., Goveas S.W., Abraham 

A..  Antioxidant  properties  of  Coscinium  fenestratum  stem  extracts  on 

streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetic rats. J. Appl. Pharm. Sci. 2014; 4: 

29-32. 

22.


 

Fryirs M., Barter P.J., Rye  K.A.. Cholesterol metabolism and pancreatic 

beta-cell function. Curr. Opin. Lipidol. 2009; 20:159-64.  

23.


 

Kashihara N., Haruna Y., Kondeti V.K., Kanwar Y.S.. Oxidative stress in 

diabetic nephropathy. Curr. Med. Chem. 2010; 17:4256-69. 

24.


 

Chow  F.W.,  Nikolic-Paterson  D.J.,  Atkins  R.C.,  Tesch  G.H.. 

Macrophages  in  streptozotocin-induced  diabetic  nephropathy:  potential 

role in renal fibrosis. Nephrol. Dial. Transplant 2004; 19: 2987-96. 

25.

 

Kwon  Y.I.,  Apostolidis  E.,  Shetty  K.  In  vitro  studies  of  eggplant 



(Solanum melongena) phenolics as inhibitors of key enzymes relevant for 

type 2 diabetes and hypertension. Bioresour. Technol. 2008; 99:2981-8. 

26.

 

Benalla W., Bellahcen S., Bnouham M.. Antidiabetic medicinal plants as 



a  source  of  alpha  glucosidase  inhibitors.  Curr.  Diabetes  Rev.  2010; 

6:247-54. 

27.

 

Shinde  J.,  Taldone  T.,  Barletta  M.,  Kunaparaju  N.,  Hu  B.,  Kumar  S., 



Placido  J.,  Zito  S.W..  Alpha-glucosidase  inhibitory  activity  of  Syzygium 

cumini  (Linn.)  Skeels  seed  kernel  in  vitro  and  in  Goto-Kakizaki  (GK) 

rats. Carbohydr. Res. 2008; 343:1278-81. 

28.

 

Adefegha  S.A.,  Oboh  G..  Inhibition  of  key  enzymes  linked  to  type  2 



diabetes  and  sodium  nitroprusside-induced  lipid  peroxidation  in  rat 

pancreas by water extractable phytochemicals from some tropical spices. 

Pharm. Biol. 2012; 50:857-65. 

29.


 

Song  Y.,  Manson  J.E.,  Buring  J.E.,  Howard  D.,  Simin  Liu  S.. 

Associations  of  dietary  flavonoids  with  risk  of  type  2  diabetes,  and 

markers  of  insulin  resistance  and  systemic  inflammation  in  women:  a 

prospective  study  and  cross-sectional  analysis.  J.  Am.  Coll.  Nutr.  2005; 

24:376–84. 

30.

 

Hajiaghaalipour  F.,  Khalilpourfarshbafi  M.,  Arya  A..  Modulation  of 



glucose  transporter  protein  by  dietary  flavonoids  in  type  2  diabetes 

mellitus. Int. J. Biol. Sci. 2015; 11:508-24. 

31.

 

Habtemariam  S.,  Lentini  G..  The  therapeutic  potential  of  rutin  for 



diabetes: an update. Mini Rev. Med. Chem. 2015; 15:524-8.  

32.


 

Kawabata K., Mukai R., Ishisaka A.. Quercetin and related polyphenols: 

new  insights  and  implications  for  their  bioactivity  and  bioavailability. 

Food Funct. 2015; 6(5):1399-417. 

 

HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE  

Ezenyi  IC,  Mbamalu  ON,  Balogun  L,  Omorogbe  L,  Ameh  FS,  Salawu  OA. 

Antidiabetic  potentials  of  Syzygium  guineense  methanol  leaf  extract.  J 

Phytopharmacol 2016;5(4):150-156. 



 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə