The kwongan foundation : 4 July : 2014 Vision



Yüklə 208.49 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü208.49 Kb.

1

Kwongan

NEWSLETTER OF THE KWONGAN FOUNDATION : 4

July : 2014


Vision

 

The patrons of the Kwongan 



Foundation look forward to a 

t i m e  w h e n  W e s t e r n 

Australians  are  proudly 

c o m m i t t e d  t o  t h e 

m a n a g e m e n t 

a n d 


conservation  of  the  State’s 

unique native biodiversity.



Objectives

1. provide  resources  for  research  

and study at UWA;

2. implement  the  gathering  and 

sharing of knowledge; 

3. enable long-term planning;

4. attract world-class researchers;

5. achieve  tangible improvements in 

the  long-term  conservation 

prospects of  endangered species 

and associations.

Patrons

Professor Hans Lambers 

Dr Marion Cambridge 

Dr Rob Keogh

Dr Cleve Hassell 

Mr Jock Clough 

Professor John Pate 

Lady Jean Brodie-Hall 

Professor Richard Hobbs 

Assoc/Prof William Loneragan



Honorary Patrons

Professor Alan Robson

Mr. Peter Cundell

Ms Marion Blackwell 

Professor Steve Hopper

Ms Philippa Nikulinsky

2

The Kwongan Foundation for the Conservation of

 Australian Native Biodiversity 

School of Plant Biology

University of Western Australia, Crawley WA 6009

www.plants.uwa.edu.au/alumni/kwongan

The Kwongan Foundation is a not-for-profit foundation 

within the University of Western Australia’s Hackett 

Foundation, a Deductible Gift Recipient organisation  

(ABN:37 882 817 280)

Cover photo is of Verticordia grandis taken on Marchagee Rd Nov 2013 by Sue Radford


This  is  the fourth  issue of Kwongan 

Matters, and the third that has  been 

produced  under  Susan  Radford’s 

editorship.    Sue  continues  to 

compile  issues  of  Kwongan  Matters 

and  I  am  most  grateful  for  her 

efforts.

In  my  contribution  in  the  previous 

Kwongan Matters

, I showed how the 

biodiversity in our global biodiversity 

hotspot  increases  as  soils  become 

poorer,  with  phosphorus  being  the 

key  factor.    Last  year,  a  group  of 

authors  has  explored  this  issue  in 

much  greater  depth,  working 

t o w a r d s  a  n e w  b o o k  o n  t h e 

kwongan, for which I acted as editor.  

It  is  entitled  “

Plant  Life  on  the 

Sandplains in Southwest Australia, a 

Global  Biodiversity  Hotspot

”.    It  will 

be  published  1st  Sept  2014  by 

University  of  Western  Australia 

Publishing,  Crawley,  and  made 

available  at  an  affordable  price. 

Everyone  who  contributed  towards 

this  book  has  done  this  out  of  love 

for  the  kwongan,  without  any 

financial  gains.    The  book  will  be 

published  three  decades  after  the 

book that John Pate and John Beard 

edited, entitled “Kwongan. Plant Life 

of  the  Sandplain”,  published  by 

University  of  Western  Australia 

Press, Nedlands.   That book is now 

out of print and out of date, because 

of  a  wealth  of  discoveries  made  by 

numerous  people,  including  many 

who contributed to our new book.

W h i l s t  e d i t i n g  o u r  b o o k  a n d 

contributing  some  of  the  chapters, 

one  realises  how  much  we  have 

learned  in  the  past  30  years  about 

our  precious 

kwongan

,  which 



continues  to  be  under  threat.  

Having visited  the  cerrado in  Brazil, 

3

Hans Lambers



Founder and Patron of the 

Kwongan Foundation



Verticordia grandis 

Marchagee Road Nov 2013  (Kim Sarti)



another  biodiversity  hotspot,  which 

functions in a very similar way to our 

own  sandplains,  one  notices  one 

major  difference.    In  Brazil,  many 

large  areas  in  the  biodiversity 

hotspot  comprising  the  sandplain 

vegetation  are  world-heritage-listed, 

whereas  in  south-western  Australia 

there  are  none.    A  significant 

achievement, which may well be the 

first  step  towards  heritage-listing  of 

our  kwongan,  is  having  southern 

proteaceous  kwongkan  listed  as 

t h r e a t e n e d  b y  t h e  F e d e r a l 

Government. As  far  as  I  am  aware, 

this is the first widespread plant and 

animal  community  so  protected 

within  the  Southwest  Australian 

Floristic  Region.    It  is  noteworthy 

that  the  word  “

kwongkan

”  is  used, 

i n s t e a d 

o f 


kwongan


”.    In  a 

fascinating  chapter 

in our new  book on 

our sandplain flora, 

S t e v e  H o p p e r  

explains  why  we 

s h o u l d  p r e f e r 

kwongkan


,  rather 

than 


kwongan

.   


O u r  n e w  b o o k 

s u m m a r i s e s 

current  knowledge 

o f  o u r  g l o b a l 

b i o d i v e r s i t y 

hotspot,  aiming  to 

make  that  knowledge  available  to 

those who care and those who make 

decisions.   That is why we need the 

Kwongan  Foundation,  which  we 

established  in  2006.    To  get  the 

message  out,  we  have  organised 

Kwongan  Colloquia,  Kwongan  Field 

Trips,  and  Kwongan  Workshops.  

Our  recent  activity,  our  fourth 

Kwongan  Workshop

  on  WA’s  Arid 

Zone,  was  on  22  July  2014,  at 

UWA’s University Club.

Kwongan  Matters

  aims  to  ensure 

that  far  more  people  will  become 

proudly  committed  to  what  our  only 

Global  Biodiversity  Hotspot  in 

Australia  has  to  offer  and  ensure 

that  our  natural  heritage  will  be 

conserved.    This  Kwongan  Matters 

is,  again,  full  of  stories,  based  on 

careful  research.  Knowledge  of  our 

unique system  is essential, if we are 

to  manage  our  biodiversity.    We 

need  solid  background  information 

to  advise  with  mining  operations, 

development,  and  agricultural 

procedures,  that  do  not  destroy  our 

natural  heritage.    That  is  why  the 

Kwongan  Foundation  sponsors 

research with  a  focus  on our native 

biodiversity.    The  next  issue  will 

focus on our department research at 

the University of Western Australia. 

4

Kwongan near Frenchman’s 



Peak with pink Verticordia

Photo by Graham Zemunik



Preface

Plant life on the sandplains in southwest 

Australia, a global biodiversity hotspot - 

Introduction

Chapter 1: Kwongan, from geology to 

linguistics

1A: On the origins, geomorphology and 

soils of the sandplains of south-western 

Australia 

1B: Sandplain and kwongkan: historical 

spellings, meanings, synonyms, 

geography and definition



Chapter 2: Biogeography of kwongan: 

origins, diversity, endemism and 

vegetation patterns 

Chapter 3: A diverse flora - species and 

genetic relationships



Chapter 4: Plant mineral nutrition 

Chapter 5: Carbon and water relations 

Chapter 6: Plants and fire in kwongan 

vegetation



Chapter 7: Plant-animal interactions 

Pollination

7A. Evolution of pollination strategies 

7B.  The  beguiling  and  the  warty  – 

pollination of kwongan orchids 

7C. Pollination vectors: invertebrates 

7D. Pollination vectors: vertebrates 



Herbivory

7E. The Honey Possum, Tarsipes 



rostratus, a keystone species in the 

kwongan 

7F. Fluoroacetate, plants, animals and a 

biological arms race

7G. You are what you eat: plant-insect 

synergies in the kwongan



Animals providing ecosystem services

7H. Ecosystem services of digging 

mammals

Chapter 8: Conservation of the kwongan 

flora: threats and challenges



Chapter 9: Human relationships with and 

use of kwongan plants and lands



Epilogue

The book can be ordered for as little as 

$69.99 (Including postage within Australia) 

at 


http://uwap.uwa.edu.au/books-and-

authors/book/plant-life-on-the-sandplains-

in-southwest-australia/

5

Plant life on the Sandplains in Southwest 



Australia

 

A Global Biodiversity Hotspot 

Hans Lambers: Editor



6

In the above book the spelling of 

kwongan 

is changed in the chapters  by Prof 

Steve Hopper to 

kwongkan


 to reflect more closely the way it is pronounced in 

Aboriginal  dialects.  There  is  no  emphasis  on  syllables  in  Aboriginal 

pronunciation, so I  have chosen to keep the name of the newsletter the same 

for purposes of continuity. I urge the reader to pronounce the word 

kwongan

 as 


kwon-gan

, with equal emphasis on the 2 syllables.

As  you can see  in this issue,  there are flowers  to be seen at  all  times of  the 

year in the 

kwongan

 and everywhere. The everlastings are wonderful but there 



is so much more. Editor

Verticordia lining road near Hawks Head

(Graham Zemunik)



Verticordia nitens

(Graham Zemunik)



Greg & Bronwen Keighery

Overview 

Biologically  the  ‘

wheatbelt

’  is  an 

artificial  area  in  that  it  is  the  major 

agricultural  zone  of  wool  and  row 

cropping  for  Western Australia.  The 

Agricultural  Zone  extends  south 

from  north  of  Kalbarri  to  east  of 

Esperance. The ‘

clearing line

’ is the 

landward  boundary  well  east  of  the 

600  mm  rainfall  isohyets,  at  about 

300  mm.  The  Western  boundary  is 

the Jarrah forest. Within this area of 

230,000 sq km about 74% is cleared 

of native vegetation.

The  remaining  26%  of  native 

vegetation is found scattered in: 

612

 

nature  reserves  with  a  median  size 



of 

116


 hectares; 

5000 


miscellaneous 

government  reserves  of  generally 

less than 

4

 hectares; and more than 



20,000

  private  remnants  typically 

very small being less than 

1

 hectare. 



Most  large  reserves  are  on  the 

margins  of  the  Agricultural  Zone. 

Unfortunately  this  has  led people to 

believe  that  the  Agricultural  Zone 

has  less  biological  or  scenic 

treasures than the sandplains or the 

goldfields.

In  2004  the  results  of  a  major 

biodiversity survey  of the plants and 

animals of the Agricultural Zone was 

published  (Keighery,  G.J.,  Halse, 

S.A.,  Harvey,  M.S.  and  McKenzie, 

N.L.  (2004) 

A  biodiversity  survey  of 

the  western  Australian  agricultural 

zone.

  Records  of  the  Western 

7

The Avon Wheatbelt : an 

Underrated Biodiversity Hotspot

Wheatbelt Eucalyptus Wandoo woodland  

Insert : Rhyncharrhena linearis Bush bean : 

Summer (Bronwen Keighery)



Australian  Museum  Supplement  no. 

67).  This  study  highlighted  the 

biological richness, past and present 

and  the  issues  facing  the  flora  and 

fauna  in  this  highly  fragmented 

landscape.

The  most  natural  part  of  the 

Agricultural  Zone  is  the  Avon 

Wheatbelt Bioregion (Map 1). 

Map  1


The  Avon  Wheatbelt  is  divided  into 

two subregions: the Avon Wheatbelt 

1  to the  east  where  the drainage  is 

very  ancient  and  towards  the  east; 

and  the  Avon  Wheatbelt  2  where 

more  recent  geological  changes 

have  caused  uplift,  the  rivers  are 

more  incised  and  flow  to  the  west. 

This  core  area has over 85%  of the 

natural vegetation cleared. 

S o u t h w e s t  A u s t r a l i a  i s  a n 

i n t e r n a t i o n a l l y  r e c o g n i z e d 

biodiversity  hotspot  for  flowering 

plants 


and although most attention is 

focused  on  the  richness  and 

endemism  of  the  kwongan  of  the 

sandplains  of  the  Esperance  and 

Geraldton sandplains bioregions, the 

Avon Wheatbelt  is  a key part of the 

Southwest Land Division. 

The Avon Wheatbelt contains a very 

rich  flora  of  over  5,000  species  of 

f l o w e r i n g  p l a n t s  o f  w h i c h 

approximately  80%  are  endemic  to 

the Southwest.  The Avon  Wheatbelt 

is  the  centre  of  diversity  for  a 

number  of  iconic  groups  including 



Acacia and Verticordia

Even  though  the Avon  Wheatbelt  is 

flat  it  has  a  great  diversity  of  major 

ancient habitats ranging from granite 

rocks,  fresh  and  saline  wetlands, 

sandplains,  dunes,  loam  and  clay 

f l a t s ,  l a t e r i t i c  u p l a n d s  a n d 

greenstones,  each  with  their  own 

floras.  Within  these  habitats  are  a 

diverse  series  of  communities 

ranging  from  herbfields,  succulent 

shrublands,  shrublands  and  heaths 

to low and tall woodlands. 

T h e  r a n g e  o f  h a b i t a t s  a n d 

communities  of  the  Wheatbelt  is 

greater  than  any  other  area  in 

Southwest.

 

The flora of two habitats: 



naturally  saline  areas  and  granite 

8

Verticordia nitens

(Graham Zemunik)


rocks,  is  the  most  diverse  in  the 

world


The  saline  habitats  are 

e s p e c i a l l y  r i c h  i n  d a i s i e s 

( A s t e r a c e a e )  a n d  s a m p h i r e s 

(Chenopodiaceae). 

WA  is  the  world 

centre of diversity for samphires.

Subsequent  to  the  release  of  the 

Agricultural  Zone  survey  all  data 

from  this  study  was  placed  on 

N

a

t



u

r

e



m

a



(

www.naturemap.dec.gov.au

). 

To  build  on this  information a  major 



effort  was  undertaken  to  gather 

baseline  data  on  the  region  and 

present  this  in  publicly  accessible 

formats  on  Naturemap  under  the 



Wheatbelt  NRM  Baselining  Project

.  


Five  major  reports  are  available  on 

N a t u r e m a p



A  B i o d i v e r s i t y 

Assessment  of  the  Wheatbelt

;  the 


Avon  Vegetation  Map  Project

  (over 


400  Reserves  have  had  baseline 

v e g e t a t i o n  m a p s  d i g i t i z e d ) ; 



Classification  and  Description  of 

E u c a l y p t  W o o d l a n d s  o f  t h e 

Wheatbelt

  (with  155  fact  sheets  on 

the  93  woodland  types); 

Wheatbelt 

Wetlands 

and


  Plant  Communities of 

Gypsum Soils.

All  biological  data  (plants  and 

animals)  were  the  basis  for  the 

listing of the Avon Wheatbelt area as 

one  of  Australia’s  15  biodiversity 

hotspots, hotspot 10 (

Map 2

).

Map 2



9

As  an  example  of  the  diversity  of  the  Avon  Wheatbelt,  we  have  recorded  more  than  813  

species  of  flowering  plants  in  Dryandra  Woodland,  including  73  Orchids,  70  Myrtaceae,  

68  Proteaceae,  95  Peas,  60  Daisies,  37  Trigger  plants,  29  Epacridaceae,  29  Lilies,  29  

Goodeniaceae  and  29  Sedges  (Cyperaceae).    These  are  the  typical  species  diverse  families  

of  the  kwongan  (heathlands)  of  southern  Western  Australia.  

Keighery  G.,  Keighery  B.  (2012).  Vascular  flora  of  Dryandra  Woodland  (Lol  Gray  and  

Montague  state  forests).  Western  Australian  Naturalist  28,  pp.  73–106.).  

This  richness  is  equal  to  much  of  the  northern  and  southern  sandplains

Isopogon trilobus : Spring

(Bronwen Keighery)



Stylidium uniflorum : Spring

(Bronwen Keighery)



Where  to  see  the  Biodiversity  of 

the Avon Wheatbelt

With  the  Avon  Wheatbelt  as  the 

focus  of  interest,  a  series  of  five 

‘Wildflower  Loops’  centered  on  the 

shires  that  administer  these  areas, 

can  introduce  travellers  to  the 

biodiversty  of  this  vast  landscape. 

These  loops  are  a  series  of  drives 

through  sets  of  reserves,  which 

represent  the  original  landscapes  of 

the  Avon  Wheatbelt.  All  roads  are 

suitable  for  2WD,  but  extra  care 

should  be  taken  on 

gravel roads. 

Sections  of  these 

loops  are described in 

detail  in 

J

im  Barrow’s 



How  to  Enjoy  WA 

Wildflowers.  Wajon 

Publishing Co. (2013)

The  websites  given 



below  lead  you  to 

shire  sites  that  cover  the  routes, 

facilities and accommodation.

One  could  easily  spend  a  week  in 

each  of  five  areas  to  view  the 

amazing  range  of  species  and 

c o m m u n i t i e s  p r e s e n t .  P e a k 

flowering time is 

Spring

 but there are 



always  some  species  in  flower  at 

every time of the year. For example: 

Autumn

  and 


Winter

  for  the  heaths 

(Epacridaceae); 

Summer


 for 

the  mallee; 

late  Spring

  for  the 

d i s p l a y s  o f  V e r t i c o r d i a ;  f o r 

woodlands  see  their  new 

bark  in 

Autumn


  when  the 

trees are at their best; layers 

of  small  herbs,  including  the 

orchids  peak  flower  in 

early

 

Spring



;  everlastings  peak  in 

late Spring

; and the tuberous 

h e r b s  ( P l a t y s a c e  a n d 



A r t h r o p o d i u m )  u s e d  b y 

Aboriginal  peoples,  flower  in 

Summer

.

10



Rhodanthe manglesii : mid Spring

(Bronwen Keighery)



Wurmbia drummondii

Winter (B.Keighery)

Focus Avon Wheatbelt 2 - 

Rejuvenated Drainage

Northern Western Wheatbelt

 

Starting  in  Perth,  head  towards 



Moora  to  see  heaths  of  the 

Dandarragan  Plateau,  then  east  to 

Wongan  Hills  and  across  to  the 

M a n m a n n i n g  r e s e r v e s  a n d 

Marchagee  Nature  Reserve through 

the Shires  of Moora, Victoria Plains, 

Northam,  Cunderdin,  Goomalling, 

Dowerin  and  Wongan-Ballidu.  Then 

continue  on  to  the  Shires  of 

Dallwallinu,  Mingenew,  Mullewa, 

Morawa,  Perenjori,  Carnamah  and 

Three Springs (see self drive trail at 

www.wildflowercountry.com.au

).

One  can  return  to  Perth  either  via 



the  Geraldton  Sandplains  or  via 

Great Northern Highway and diverge 

through  Julimar  Conservation  Park 

to  see  the transition  to the  northern 

Jarrah  Forest.  This  is  partially 

covered  in  the 

red  trail

  in  Barrow 

(2013)  between  Mullewa,  Canna, 

Dalwallinu and Wongan Hills.



Southern Wheatbelt 

This  trip  goes  beyond  the  Avon 

11

In  terms  of  +loral  diversity  the  Shire  of  Kulin  has  over  1,300  native  +lora  species,  the  



adjacent  Shire  of  Kondinin  over  1,400.  For  the  two  large  upland  reserves  (Bendering  

and  North  Karlgarin)  we  have  recorded  over  740  species,  including  41  species  of  



Acacia  (114  in  Shire);  20  Eucalyptus  (75  in  Shire);  24  Verticordia  (24  in  Shire);  26  

Melaleuca  (55  in  Shire)  and  6  Leucopogon  (17  in  Shire,  8  undescribed!).  

There  is  more  to  be  found  and  recorded.



Austrostipa elegantissima : Summer

(Bronwen Keighery)



Wheatbelt  into the  Mallee  Bioregion 

(Map  1),  east  of  the  Agricultural 

Zone.  Travel  through  the  Shires  of 

Wagin,  Dumbleyung,  Lake  Grace 

and  Kent  starting  from  Narrogin. 

From  Narrogin  head  to  Harrismith 

townsite  reserve  (Banksia  baueri 

h e a t h s )  a n d  D o n g o l o c k i n g 

Reserves;  then  to  Tarin  Rock 

reserve  (diverse  heaths);  east  to 

Dragon  Rocks,  Dunn Rock  Reserve 

and  then  Frank  Hann  reserve 

V e r t i c o r d i a  d i s p l a y s ) .  T h e 

Agricultural  Zone  margins  of  two 

other  bioregions,  Jarrah  Forest  and 

Esperance  Sandplains,  are  touched 

on.  These  are  the  shires  of 

B r o o m e h i l l ,  Ta m b e l l u p  a n d 

Gnowangerup. 

A  good  trail  can  be  found  at 

www.australiasgoldenoutback.com.au

Barrow’s purple route.



Western Wheatbelt

This  is  in  an  area  of  rejuvenated 

drainage (rivers run west to the sea) 

that  abuts  the  Jarrah  Forest,  but 

also  includes  the  most  cleared 

shires  of  the  Avon  Wheatbelt 

(Corrigin,  Quairading  and  Tamin). 

This  region  includes  the  shires  of 

Wandering,  Williams,  West  Arthur, 

Narrogin,  Cuballing,  Kojonup, 

Pingelly,  Corrigin,  Beverley  and 

Tamin.  This  is  partly  covered  in 

B a r r o w ’s 

r e d  r o u t e

  b e t w e e n 

Quairading,  Merredin,  Muckinbudin 

and back through Dryandra. 

To  see  the  diversity  of  plant 

communities  and  plants,  do  a  loop 

from  Perth  south  to  the  reserves  of 

Boyagin  and  Dryandra.  After 

Dryandra, loop through Tutanning to 

see  lateritic  heaths.  On  the  second 

day  go  to  Corrigin  Water  Reserve, 

and  back  to  Perth  either  via 

Quairading  and  Charles  Gardner 

National  Park  (Tammin)  for  a  wide 

variety  of  sandplain  heaths  (Mallee, 

Banksia  and  Shrub  dominated);  or 

continue east to Hyden/Kulin.



Focus Avon Wheatbelt 1 - 

uncoordinated drainage

.  


Central and South Eastern 

Wheatbelt

This includes the Shires of Wickepin, 

Kondinin,  Kulin,  Bruce  Rock  and 

Narembeen.  Here  the  focus  is 

centered  on  Kulin.  From  Corrigin 

continue  towards  Hyden  and  at 

K o n d i n i n  h e a d  n o r t h  o n  t h e 

Williams-Kondinin  Road  then  east 

on Bendering Reserve Road through 

Bendering  and  North  Kalgarin 

Reserves. 

These  areas  display  a  wide  variety 

of  habitats  and  communities 

12

Styphelia tenuiflora Autumn

(Bronwen Keighery)

Eucalyptus drummondii : Spring

(Bronwen Keighery)



including  granite  areas,  woodlands, 

mallet  woodlands  and  a  diverse 

range  of  lateritic  and  sandplain 

heaths.  Travelling  back  towards 

Kulin  from  Hyden  though  Kalgarin 

Nature  Reserve  (Hyden  to Kondinin 

road) are wonderful woodlands, then 

south  on  Kalgarin  road  to  Pederah 

Road and west to  the  Kondinin  Salt 

marsh  to  see  examples  of  the  flora 

of gypsum-dominated, natural saline 

communities. 

From  Kulin  itself  you  can  easily 

spend  a day  or two visting the local 

reserves.  Start  in  the  Macrocarpa 

Trail  just  outside  the  town  which 

features the Shire’s Floral Emblem.

The reserves and roads are listed in 

Shire website (

www.kulin.wa.gov.au

)  

under  /tourism/wildflowers  and  /file/



wildflowerbrochure.pdf).  This  is 

partially  covered  in  Barrow’s 

red 

route


 Corrigin to Kulin.

North-Eastern 

The  shires  of  Beacon,  Bencubbin, 

D o w e r i n ,  K o o r d a ,  M e r r e d i n , 

Mukinbuddin,  Nungarin,  Southern 

Cross,  Trayning,  Westonia  and 

W y l a l k a t c h e m  h a v e  b a s i c    

w i l d f l o w e r  v i e w i n g  t r a i l s 

(

www.westernaustralia.com.au



as

 



well  as  a  granite  rock  trail  and 

W a v e 


R o c k 

t r a i l 

(

w w w. w h e a t b e l t w a y. c o m . a u



(

www.wheatbelttourism.com.au



). 

Kulin has a branch of the Wildflower 

Society  of  Western  Australia  and 

hosts  a  herbarium.  Recently  it  was 

the location for the State Conference 

of the Wildflower Society (WSWA).

Kulin  has  approximately  2%  of 

natural  bush  vegetation  left  in  the 

area, but is well worth seeing. There 

is  much hard  work  and  commitment 

from  the local people, who put huge 

amounts  of  time  and  energy  into 

conserving the local flora; working to 

maintain  and  grow  the  herbarium 

that  the local WSWA has developed 

Working with the local landowners to 

keep ahead of  invading weeds  with 

13

KULIN SHOWCASE



Hakea scoparia

Macrcarpa Trail : June 2014

(Kim Sarti)

Eucalyptus macrocarpa

(Sue Radford)



the  ‘Spotters  Program’,  designated 

‘Walkers”  search  for  any  incidence 

of weed invasion. This early warning 

system allows the weeds to be dealt 

with before they become a problem. 

Up to 20 areas have been identified 

for  conservation  at  Kulin.  The  best 

known  is  the  Macrocarpa  Walk, 

which  is  located  on  the  way  into 

town from the north and is on private 

land.  Even  in late  October last  year 

there  was  a  wonderful  show  of 

wildflowers  from  tall  shrubs  to 

abundant ground covers.

Other  areas  of  significance  are:  the 

Kulin  Road  Nature  Reserve;  Jilakin 

Rock,  which  is  an  A  class  reserve 

maintained  by  the  shire  and  the 

Windmill  Hill  block,  which  is  a 

remnant  vegetation where the  ‘Kulin 

wattle’  is  to  be  found  (

See  Flora 

Base for photos by Sandra Murray

). 


In  addition  there  is;  ‘Our  Patch’,  an 

area of sandalwood with Acacia spp. 

as  hosts,  which  is  fenced  and 

managed  for  weed  control;  part  of 

the  golf  course  and  the  ‘Rock 

P a d d o c k ’  w h i c h  i s  c u r r e n t l y 

undergoing  a  management  survey. 

There is  remnant  vegetation next to 

the  airstrip,  where  surveys  have 

found  a  beautiful  orange  eucalypt, 

possibly a variant of E. erythronema. 

14

Grevillea excelsior

Macrocarpa Trail, Kulin :Oct 2013

(Kim Sarti)



Verticordia tumida

Macrocarpa Trail : Kulin, Dec 2013

(Kim Sarti)

Dampiera sp : Macrocarpa Trail : Kulin: 

Oct 2013. (Sue Radford)



There  is  a  good  population  of 

Eremophila  veneta  on  the  road 

verge  near  the  town  on  the 

Lake  Grace  road,  marked  by 

DPaW  ‘hockey’  sticks,  which  is 

being monitored. Part of the old 

c a r a v a n  p a r k  h a s  b e e n 

r e v e g e t a t e d  u s i n g  d i r e c t 

seeding  using  branches  from 

local plants.

This  rich  floral 

h e r i t a g e  i s 

b e i n g 

replanted  on 

s o m e  l o c a l  

properties.

15

Calytrix sp:Marcrocarpa Trail: 

Kulin : Oct 2013

Photo Kim Sarti



Lepidosperma  

and


 

Verticordia chrysantha

October: Kulin -Corrigin Rd (Robin Campbell)



Allocasuarina sp Oct 

Kulin (Kim Sarti)



Thysonotus Sp. : Dec 

(Robin Campbell)



Ptilotus manglesii : Nov. 

(Robin Campbell)



Lichens on live shrub at Jilakin Rock

(Robin Campbell)



Grevillea hookeriana : Oct

(Robin Campbell)



Drosera bulbosa : Jilakin rock

(Robin Campbell)



Beaufortia orbifolia : Nov: 

(Robin Campbell)



Dr  Terry  Houston

Research  Associate:Terrestrial 

Zoology

Western Australian Museum



Formerly Curator of Insects

Native  bees  are  among  the  most 

efficient  pollinators  of  kwongan 

plants  and  while  some  of  them  are 

generalists,  visiting  a wide  range  of 

plant  taxa,  many  others  specialize. 

There  are  bees  which  confine  their 

foraging to flowers of just one family,

genus or even just a single species. 

Highly specialized bees tend to have 

much  more  confined  geographic 

ranges  and  flight  seasons  than  the 

generalists  and  their  discovery 

requires  being  in  the  right  place  at 

the  right  time.  Discoveries  of  ‘new’ 

species  of  bees  are  not  uncommon 

and we can  only  wonder how  many 

more  bee  species  await  discovery. 

Western  Australia’s  floristically  rich 

kwongan  habitats  have  yielded 

many previously unknown species of 

bees over the years, some exhibiting 

fascinating  adaptations  to  their 

16

How many more bees?



Female of the common blue-banded beeAmegilla chlorocyanea. Blue-banded bees are 

supreme generalists in terms of the range of flowers they can exploit for nectar and 

pollen. 

Photo: Bryony Fremlin.

forage plants. In this article, I  outline 

a  few  examples  that  have  come  to 

my attention over the years and look 

to  what  we  might  hope  to  find  in 

future.

Among  the  members  of  the  family 



Myrtaceae  are  some  taxa  that 

p r o d u c e  o i l y  p o l l e n  ( e . g . 



Chamelaucium,  Darwinia  and 

Verticordia).  In  some  species,  the 

oily  pollen  is  held  on  the  anthers, 

while in others, it gets transferred in 

the bud stage to a substigmatic ring 

of  hairs  on  the  style.  Many  insects, 

including  bees,  are  attracted  to 

these  flowers  to feed  on nectar and 

are  likely  to  be  daubed  with  the 

pollen/oil  mixture.  The  majority  of 

bees,  though, are unable  to  harvest 

pollen  from  such  flowers.  Only  one 

group  of  bees  is  adapted  to  do  so 

w h i c h 

g r o u p 

i s 

t h e 


‘euryglossines’  (members  of  the 

subfamily  Euryglossinae  in  the 

family  Colletidae).  They  swallow 

pollen,  whether  oily  or  not,  and 

transport it to the nests in their crops 

(called ‘honey stomachs’). 

One  of  the  first  species-specific 

e u r y g l o s s i n e  b e e s  t h a t  I 

encountered  was  the  tiny  Morrison 

Bee,  Euhesma  morrisoni.  It  proved 

to  be the  exclusive  pollinator  of  the 

Morrison  Feather-flower,  Verticordia 



nitens, the brilliant orange flowers of 

which  appear  in  profusion  on  the 

Swan Coastal Plain in summer. Like 

other  members  of  the  Verticordia 

(Chrysoma)  group,  V.  nitens  retains 

its oily pollen beneath curious hoods 

17

Left: a female of the solitary native bee, Euhesma morrisoni, lapping oil and pollen from anthers of 

Morrison Feather-flower, Verticordia nitens. Right: a female of an unnamed species of Euhesma on 

flowers of Verticordia cooloomia. In both cases, the bee and plant species appear to be mutually 

dependent. Photos: T. Houston.


or  appendages  on  the  anthers. 

Females  of  the  specialist  bee  lick 

each anther to extract the pollen and 

oil (Houston et al. 1993). 

Following  the  discovery  of  this 

species,  I  went  on  to  find  other 

species  of  Euhesma,  and  some  of 

Dasyhesma,  which  appeared  to  be 

specific  to  various  other  Verticordia 

species  (including  some  exhibiting 

secondary  pollen-presentation). 

While  the  Dasyhesma species were 

described  and  named,  thanks  to 

euryglossine  specialist  Dr  Elizabeth 

E x l e y  ( 2 0 0 4 ) ,  t h e  a d d i t i o n a l 



Euhesma species are still unnamed. 

Unfortunately,  Dr  Exley  died  before 

she  could  complete  her  revision  of 

this genus. The great majority of the 

1 0 2  r e c o g n i z e d  s p e c i e s  o f 

Verticordia have  yet  to  be  surveyed 

for bee visitors and who knows how 

many  more  Verticordia-specialist 

bees remain to be discovered?

From  my  earliest  days  of  bee-

collecting in Western Australia, I was 

intrigued  by  the  peculiar  ‘woolly’ 

flowers  of  the  smokebushes, 



C o n o s p e r m u m  s p e c i e s ,  a n d 

wondered  what  pollinated  them. 

Persistent  watching  eventually  paid 

off  with  the  discovery  of  three 

species  of  small,  solitary  bees  that 

specialized in such flowers and form 

w h a t  i s  n o w  k n o w n  a s  t h e 

Leioproctus  conospermi  group. 

Males  are  densely  clothed  in  white 

pubescence and when settled on the 

flowers,  are extremely  hard  to spot. 

As females  are less hairy and much 

easier  to  see  while  foraging,  I 

believe  it  is  a  case  of  males  being 

camouflaged for ‘ambush mating’. 

  

Left:  flowers  of  Tree  Smokebush, 

Conospermum  triplinervium.  Above:  a 

m a l e  o f  t h e  s m o k e b u s h  b e e , 

Leioproctus pappus (not to same scale 

as flowers)Photos: T. Houston.

Another  interesting  aspect  of 

smokebushes  is  their  explosive 

pollen release mechanism. When an 

insect  inserts  its  proboscis  into  a 

smokebush  flower,  it  triggers  an 

instantaneous  mechanical  reaction: 

the  style  snaps  across  the  corolla 

18


tube and the anthers burst, releasing 

their  pollen.  An  insect  inserting  a 

long,  thin  proboscis  risks  getting  it 

trapped  between  the  style  and 

c o r o l l a  t u b e  w a l l .  F e m a l e 

smokebush  bees,  though,  are  well-

adapted  to  the  flowers,  having  a 

short, stubby proboscis covered with 

stiff  bristles.  The  bristles  serve  to 

hold  a  load  of  pollen  around  the 

proboscis  until  the  female  can 

groom  it  off  and  transfer  it  to 

specialized hairs on the hind legs. 

Members  of  the  L.  conospermi 

group  have  been  recorded  visiting 

flowers  of  four  Conospermum 

species  (crassinervium,  incurvum, 

stoechadis,  and  triplinervium).  The 

genus  Conospermum  comprises  53 

species exhibiting considerable floral 

diversity. For most of them we do not 

know  the pollen vectors.  How  many 

more  of  them  will  be  found  to  be 

pollinated  by  native  bees  and  how 

many of those will be specialized?

The  endemic  WA  genus  Synaphea 

with  56  species  is closely  related to 



Conospermum  and shares with it an 

explosive  pollen-release  system.  Its 

flowers,  then,  appear  to be adapted 

for insect pollination. 

  

Flowers  of  Synaphea  spinulosa 

(enlarged)Photo: T. Houston.

My  first  sighting  of  bees  working 

flowers  of  this  genus  came  in  the 

spring of 2008 while I was working in 

Boonanarring  Nature  Reserve  north 

of  Gingin.  I  observed  numerous 

males  and  females  of  a  black, 

m e d i u m - s i z e d  s o l i t a r y  b e e 

(Leioproctus  species)  collecting 

pollen and nectar from  flowers  of  S. 



grandis. The  bees  were not seen to 

visit  flowers  of  any  other  kind. 

Around  the  same  time  in  the  same 

reserve,  I  collected  just  a  single 

specimen  of  a  different  Leioproctus 

on flowers  of S. spinulosa.  It wasn’t 

u n t i l  s p r i n g  t h i s  y e a r  t h a t  I 

encountered  this  second  species 

again  in  Yanchep  National  Park.  I 

found  both  sexes  numerous  about 

flowers  of  S.  spinulosa.  I’m  puzzled 

as to why I hadn’t observed either of 

19

Synaphea spinulosa

Photo. T. Houston


these  Synaphea  specialists  during 

the previous  30-odd  years  I’d  spent 

collecting bees in Western Australia. 

It hadn’t been for lack of looking. So, 

the  question  now  is  what  bees  visit 

and  pollinate  the  remaining  54 

species of Synaphea?

The kwongan flora is so diverse that 

I  think  we  can  be  assured  of  many 

further  discoveries  of  new  bee 

species  and  interesting  bee-flower 

r e l a t i o n s h i p s .  G i v e n  m y 

experiences,  it  may  require  many 

observers to survey the floral visitors 

of  particular  plant  taxa  over  many 

years  before  we  can  be  confident 

that we know all of the bees that are 

associated with those plants. 



References

Exley,  E.M.  2004.  Revision  of  the 

genus  Dasyhesma  Michener 

( A p o i d e a :  C o l l e t i d a e : 

Euryglossinae). Records of the 

Western  Australian  Museum 

22: 115-128.

Houston,  T.F.  1989.    Leioproctus 

bees  associated  with  Western 

Australian  smoke  bushes 

(Conospermum  spp.) and their 

adaptations  for  foraging  and 

concealment  (Hymenoptera: 

Colletidae:  Paracolletini).  



Records  of  the  Western 

A u s t r a l i a n  M u s e u m  1 4 

275-92.


Houston,  T.F.,  Lamont,  B.B., 

Radford,  S.,  Errington,  S.G. 

1993.    Apparent  mutualism 

between Verticordia nitens and 



V. aurea (Myrtaceae) and their 

oil-ingesting  bee  pollinators 

(Hymenoptera:  Colletidae). 

Australian  Journal  of  Botany 

41: 369-80.

20

Verticordia nitens   Dec

(Ken McNamara)


Dr Jim Barrow

Former  Chief  Research  ScienZst    :  CSIRO

Fans  of  David  Attenborough  will 

remember  him  talking  about  buzz 

pollination.  To  demonstrate  it,  he 

brings  a  tuning  fork,  tuned  to  the 

correct frequency, up to the flower in 

order to induce it to eject its pollen. 

The tuning fork mimics the action of 

several  species  of  bee  that  also 

vibrate  their  wing  muscles  at  the 

appropriate  frequency  and  this 

causes  the  anthers  to  shed  their 

pollen.  These  flowers  don’t  provide 

nectar;  the  pollen  is  the  reward. 

About 180  species of our plants  are 

buzz  pollinated.  Several  species  of 

native bee, such as the blue-banded 

bees,  can do  it. Honeybees  cannot, 

but bumblebees can.  The anthers of 

buzz  pollinated  flowers  are  typically 

long and thin and have a pore at the 

top  end.  This  flower  structure  is 

common  in  Solanaceae  species 

including  tomato  which  is  why 

growers  of  glasshouse  tomatoes 

would  like  to  import  bumble  bees 

into mainland Australia. 

If  a  flower  is  to  rely  on  buzz 

pollination,  it  needs  to  attract  the 

appropriate bees  to the flower.    It is 

therefore  a  good  idea  to  adopt  a 

common  colour  scheme  and  a 

similar  structure.  Many  buzz 

pollinated flowers mimic the solanum 

colour  scheme,  that  is,  blueish-

mauve  petals  (and  sepals  for 

monocots)  and  bright  yellow 

anthers. These  colours  are  used  by 

plants in widely differing families. 

Buzz  pollination  also  occurs  in 

Conostephium  (Pearl  Flowers)  and 

there the colour scheme is white and 

purple.  However  buzz  pollination 

also occurs in yellow flowers such as 



Hibbertia, Senna and  Labichea (see 

photos below). So why are blue and 

yellow  flowers  used  by  many 

21

ON BUZZ POLLINATION 



AND BEE PURPLE 

Hibbertia

 

sp



species  but  yellow  flowers  used  by 

others?


Hibbertia  is  a  genus  with  about 

150  species  in  Australia  and 

about  85  in  Western  Australia. 

The  genus  takes  its  name  from 

George  Hibbert  (1757-1837)  an 

eminent  merchant  and  amateur 

botanist. Here, in the south-west, 

there  would  be  few  patches  of 

bushland  without  at  least  one 

species of Hibbertia present. For 

all but three species of Hibbertia

the  flowers  are  yellow.  For  the 

three exceptions they are shades 

of orange.



Senna  and  Labichea  are  both 

legumes  and  for  many  years, 

botanists  were  uncertain  how  to 

classify  the  three  kinds  of 

legumes.  The  three  kinds  are: 

those  with  a  pea  flower;  those 

with a mimosa flower such as the 

wattles  and  those  with  cassia 

type  flower.  Are  there  three 

separate families, all members of 

a  “super-family”?  This  was  the 

arrangement  adopted  by  the 

Western Australian Flora Descriptive 

Catalogue  published  in  2000.  Or  is 

there just one large family with three 

s u b - f a m i l i e s ?  T h i s  i s  t h e 

arrangement now preferred. 

This  large  family  used  to  be  called 

Leguminosae  so  that,  in  common 

with  other  large  and  important 

families  such  as  the  grass,  the 

carrot,  and  the  cabbage  families,  it 

broke the rule that families are to be 

named after the type genus but with 

the  ending  changed  to  “aceae”. 

These  errant  families  have  now 

been  brought  into  line.  For  the 

legumes,  the  type  genus  is  Faba 

a n d  s o  t h e  f a m i l y  b e c o m e s 

Fabaceae.

The  Senna  genus  has  had  a 

complex  taxonomic  history.  For  a 

long time, it was included in Cassia

and Australian species were thought 

to belong to that genus. That is why 

the  common  name  of  many  of  the 

22


species  is  ‘cassia’.    For  example, 

Senna  artemisioides  is  known  as 

Silver cassia.

 As currently recognised, Senna has 

about  350  species  world  wide  with 

about  80%  of  them  occurring  in 

America.  Western  Australia  has 

about  40  species,  mostly  occurring 

outside  the  better-watered  areas  of 

the  south-west.  The  “standard” 

number  of  stamens  is  10. 

However,  in  many  species, 

three  of  them  are  infertile 

and  the  remaining  seven 

may be modified so that two 

deposit  their  pollen  on  the 

back  of  the  bee  and  the 

others  provide  it  with  the 

reward.


Labichea  is  a  much  smaller 

g e n u s  w i t h  a b o u t  1 4 

species, nine of which occur 

in  Western  Australia,  with 

t h e 

r e m a i n d e r 



i n 

Q u e e n s l a n d  a n d  t h e 

Northern  Territory.  It  is 

named  for  Jean  Jacques 

Labiche,  second  lieutenant 

of  Uranie  on  Frecenet’s 

voyage.  It  differs  from 

Senna in that there are only 

two  stamens.  Of  our  nine 

species, only two are common in the 

south-west.  These  are  L.  punctata 

(with  anthers  of  similar size)  and  L. 

lanceolata (with one anther bigger).

You  may  not  have  noticed  these 

plants.  It  is  easy  to  walk  past  them 

thinking  the  flowers  are  “just” 

another Hibbertia. And that  is  worth 

thinking  about.  Why  the  similarity? 

To  have  produced  such  similarity, 

there must have  been a very strong 

selection  pressure  and considerable 

advantage  to  the  plant.  This 

selection  pressure  was  exerted  by 

bees  who  also  recognise  the 

solanum  colour pattern. The answer 

to  this  question  may  be  in  the  way 

that  bees  and  humans  perceive 

colour. See the above chart.

Bees  and  humans  both  have three-

colour  vision.  However,  we  see 

different  parts  of  the spectrum.  Bee 

23


v i s i o n  i s  s h i f t e d  t o  s h o r t e r 

wavelengths;  they  do  not  see  red 

and  for  them  the  longest  visible 

wavelength  is  yellow,  but  they  see 

well  into  the  ultraviolet  down  to 

wavelengths that are invisible to us. 

When we  see a  mixture  of  the long 

wavelength  red,  and  the  short 

wavelength  blue,  we  interpret  the 

resulting  colour  as  purple.  When 

bees  see  a  mixture  of  their  long 

wavelength,  which  is  yellow,  and 

their  short  wavelength  ultraviolet, 

they  also  interpret  it  as  a  different 

colour  which  is  sometimes  referred 

to as “bee-purple”.

The  remaining  part  of  the  puzzle  is 

concerned with  the colour spectrum 

of the yellow buzz-pollinated flowers.

So far as I  know, this has only been 

measured for one species: Hibbertia 

scandens.  It  has  been  shown  to 

strongly reflect ultraviolet light. Bees 

do  not  perceive  its  petals  as 

yellow,as  we  do,  but  as  bee-purple. 

For  them,  the  colour  scheme  is 

“super-solanum“.

So  in  the  spirit  of  “Yes  Minister”, 

here is a brave proposal. The yellow 

buzz-pollinated  flowers  are  not 

perceived  by  bees as  yellow  but  as 

bee-purple  and  thus  as  having  the 

super-solanum  colour  pattern.  It’s  a 

brave  proposal  because  it  is  based 

on just one measurement.

 

A good research project perhaps!



24

UPCOMING EVENTS FOR THE KWONGAN FOUNDATION 

KWONGAN

 

WORKSHOP



 was on The Ecology of Western Australias’s Arid Zone

22nd July

.

Contact Barbara Jamieson 



barbara.jamieson@uwa.edu.au

 

for 2015 bookings



EDITORIAL    

This edition gives facts about remnant bushland, where to find it and some further 

avenues of research. There are over 200 flowers out around Kulin this month alone. 

Enjoy going wildflower hunting this year.

The next newsletter will focus on the great research being done to help us understand 

better our unique and globally significant Biodiversity Hotspot and how to care for it.

Offers of articles for the next issue of 

Kwongan


Matters

 are requested by end of September 2014.

Please contact me: 

suepr22@yahoo.com

or Prof Hans Lambers 

hans.lambers@uwa.edu.au

 if you would like to submit an 

article, small item or photos.   

cheers

                  



Sue Radford

Eucalytus salubris : Kulin

(Robin Campbell)



25

DONATION FORM

Please accept my tax deductible gift of 

$........................... to

The Kwongan Foundation for the Conservation 

of Australia’s Biodiversity. *

Please make your cheque payable to

The University of Western Australia

or debit my credit card

Annually ☐ Once only ☐

Mastercard ☐ Visa ☐ Amex ☐ Diners ☐

Cardholder’s Name:

………………………………………………………

Signature:…………………………………………



Expiry Date:………………../…………………….

* A gift of $5,000 or more entitles you to 

become a Patron.

Please contact 

barbara.jamieson@uwa.edu.au

 

if you wish to become a Corporate Sponsor



Send to: The School of Plant Biology M084,

The University of Western Australia,

35 Stirling Highway, CRAWLEY WA 6009

Tel: 08 6488 1782 Fax: 08 6488 1108



Back ground photo by Graham Zemunik

 


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə