The study was aimed at investigating the



Yüklə 193.55 Kb.
PDF просмотр
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü193.55 Kb.

 

 



 

Abstract—The  study  was  aimed  at  investigating  the 

effectiveness  of  recovering  degraded  soil  chemical  qualities  to 

mitigate the mysterious forest dieback in a montane forest. Soil 

amendments  with  standard  compost,  montane  mycorrhizae, 

standard  compost  with  montane  mycorrhizae,  and  a  control 

were used as treatments. Syzygium rotundifolium saplings were 

used as the indicator plant. Soil pH, EC, Soluble soil Pb, Cd and 

soil  organic  matter  was  compared  at  0.20m  soil  depth.  Foliar 

samples  from  “treated”  saplings  were  tested  for  Pb  and  Cd. 

Contamination  of  soil  and  leaves  of  the  saplings  with  Pb  (p 

<0.001)  and  Cd  (p<0.001)  was  evident.  Positive  correlations 

between  soil  Pb  and  Cd  and  leaf  Pb  and  Cd  were  observed 

(p=0.001).  Soil  amendment  with  compost  and  montane 

mycorrhizae  reduced  the  soluble  Pb  content  (p=<0.001).  Soil 

amendment with standard compost and montane  mycorrhizae 

was  effective  in  saving  the  saplings  from  Pb  and  Cd  toxicity 

(p<0.001).  

 

Index  Terms—Montane  forest,  forest  dieback,  soil  chemical 

properties.  

 

I.



 

I

NTRODUCTION



 

The montane forest called „Horton Plain‟ in Sri Lanka has 

held  genetic  stocks  from  the  mountains  of  Gondwanaland 

and carries that history even todayThe canopy of commonly 

found  cloud  forest  is  dominated  by  the  endemic  keena 

(Calophyllum  walkeri)  in  association  with  varieties  of 

Myrtacea (Syzygium rotundifolium and S. sclerophyllum) and 

Lauraceae  (Litsea,  Cinnamomum  and  Actinodaphne 



speciosa).  Strobilanthes  spp.  (Acanthaceae)  dominates  the 

undergrowth,  except  when  in  competition  with  dwarf 

bamboo  (Indocalamus  and  Ochlandra  spp.).  There  are  54 

woody species, of which 27 (50%) are endemic to Sri Lanka, 

21  (39%)  are  restricted  to  the  forest  of  south  India  and  Sri 

Lanka, and the remaining 6 species (11%) are ubiquitous to 

the forests of south east Asia. Horton Plain is also home to a 

number  of  wild  relatives  of  domesticated  plants,  such  as 

pepper, guava, tobacco and cardamom.  

Horton  Plains  is  considered  to  be  the  most  important 

catchment area of the country as it is the originating point of 

the tributaries of three major rivers. These forests remained 

largely  untouched  by  the  3000-year-old  history  of  human 

agricultural  activity  on  the  island  and  the  hydraulic 

civilizations that shaped the landscapes of the lowlands left a 

comprehensive record that attests to this fact. Horton Plains is 

rich in biodiversity and most of the fauna and flora within the 

park  are  endemic  while  some  of  them  are  confined  to 

highlands of the island. 

 

Manuscript received March 5, 2014; revised May 28, 2014. 



H. K. S. G. Gunadasa is with Uva Wellassa University, Badulla, Sri Lanka 

(e-mail: sajanee2010@gmail.com).  

P.  I.  Yapa  is  with  Sabaragamuwa  University,  Belihuloya,  Sri  Lanka 

(e-mail: piyapa39@co.uk). 

It has been observed that trees belonging to different size 

and age classes within this type of forest have been dying due 

to a yet unknown factor. This phenomenon was first observed 

in the Horton Plains National Park. The earliest reports of a 

significant level of dieback in the forest were by [1] and [2] 

who suggested that this condition may have an earlier origin. 

However, the dying of the forest was later observed in several 

other  areas  including  the  Hakgala  montane  forest  in  Sri 

Lanka.  The  cause  of  dieback  is,  however,  still  very  poorly 

understood. 

Assessments  with  the  help  of  recent  satellite  images, 

combined with ground surveys, revealed that about 654 ha, 

equivalent  to  24.5%  of  the  forest  in  the  park  has  been 

subjected to dieback [3]. In Thotupolakanda and Kirigalpotta 

areas, dieback is more severe with over 75% of the canopy 

trees dead and the rest is in a state of degeneration. One of the 

worst affected trees was Syzygium rotundifolium followed by 

Cinnamomum  ovalifolium,  Neolitsea  fuscata,  Syzygium 

revolutum  and  Calophyllum  walkeri  [4].  It  has  also  been 

observed  that  the  seedling  establishment  and  forest 

regeneration appear to be at a very slow state within this area 

[3].  The  total  healthy  forest  in  the  park  amounts  to  an 

approximate 2012 ha. The extent of the damage to the forest 

from  dieback  appears  to  be  so  severe  that  the  standard 

structure  in  the  affected  areas  shows  dramatic  changes.  If 

dieback were to continue at the current rate, the majority of 

the  large  trees  will  disappear  from  the  forest  very  soon, 

converting the forest to a savanna. 

Many  researchers  have  been  working  on  identifying  the 

root causes of forest dieback in Horton Plains but have ended 

up  with  no  significant  clues  about  the  causal  agents  and 

remedial measures for the dieback. Therefore, this study has 

been  designed  to  investigate  the  effect  of  soil  chemical 

quality on forest dieback in the Horton Plains and the impact 

of  recovering  degraded  soil  chemical  quality  on  mitigating 

dieback. 

 

II.


 

M

ETHODOLOGY 



Horton  Plains  National  Park  was  the  location  of  the 

experiment,  the  highest  plateau  of  Sri  Lanka  between 

altitudes of 1,500 and 2,524m [5]. The geographical location 

is  about  32  km  south  of  Nuwara  Eliya  in  the  Central 

Highlands  of  Central  Province,  6‟47  –  6‟50‟N,  80‟ 

46‟-80‟50‟E. The annual rainfall in the region is about 2540 

mm [6], but for Horton Plains, it may exceed 5000 mm [7]. 

The  mean  annual  temperature  in  the  Horton  plains  is  13

o



and  the  temperature  fluctuations  during  the  dry  months, 



January  to  March,  are  higher  than  at  other  times.  Strong 

winds  at  gale  scales  are  common  during  the  south  west 

monsoons period [8]. The red-yellow podzolic (Order Ultisol 

according to USDA Soil Taxonomy) are characterized by a 

Soil Chemical Quality and Forest Dieback 

H. K. S. G. Gunadasa and P. I. Yapa

 

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015

1

DOI: 10.7763/IJESD.2015.V6.551



 

 

thick, black, organic layer at the surface [6]. 



Twenty-four  permanent  plots  of  20  m 

  20  m  were 



established in June 2008 to represent an affected area in the 

Horton  Plain  National  Park.  Randomized  Complete  Block 

Design (RCBD) was used with six replications. Plot locations 

were selected to cover a 21 – 40 % dieback of trees and to 

maintain  soil  and  topography  as  constant  as  possible.  The 

area  is  generally  exposed  to  the  wind  since  it  has  been 

reported  that  wind  accelerates  dieback  [3].  A  sketch  of  the 

area and the experimental plots mapped using GPS (Global 

Positioning System) points with 20 cm accuracy. 

Canopy health was assessed using a map published by [3]. 

Assessment  of  the  health  of  the  trees  were  assessed  using 

characteristics  like  crown  dieback,  stem  damage,  bark 

damage,  defoliation  and  so  on.  Seedlings  of  Syzygium 

rotundifolium  were  used  for  the  regeneration  of  dieback 

areas. 


Five 

saplings 

of 

Syzygium 

rotundifolium 

(approximately 1m in height and 1.5cm in Diameter of Breast 

Height (DBH)) were randomly selected from each sampling 

plot. The most important reason for the selection of the tree 

species Syzygium rotundifolium was due to the fact that of all 

species  that  have  been  affected,  this  specie  was  the  worst 

affected.  

Three soil amendments  plus  a  control,  were  used  for  the 

study.    They  were  Compost  (2  kg  per  sapling),  Montane 

mycorrhizae  (2  kg  of  topsoil  form  healthy  forest  area  per 

sapling), Compost and montane mycorrhizae (2kg of topsoil 

from healthy forest area and 2kg of compost) and Control (no 

any application). Well-prepared standard (certified) compost 

was used at a rate of 2 kg per sapling on the selected plants in 

each plot. The compost was carefully mixed with the soil at 

the base of the Syzygium rotundifolium saplings (50cm away 

from  the  stem  base  and  incorporated  to  soil)  to  a  depth  of 

about  25-30  cm,  assuring  minimum  disturbances  to  this 

sensitive  natural  ecosystem.  Natural  montane  mycorrhizae 

were collected  from  healthy areas  in  the  Horton  Plains  and 

used at a rate of 2 kg per sapling on the selected plants in each 

plot (50cm away from  the  stem)  and  incorporated  in  to  the 

soil with minimum disturbance.  

A comparison of key soil chemical properties was done for 

the selected area with 21% to 40% dieback severity. The soil 

samples were collected from a depth of 20cm, maintaining an 

approximate distance of 30-50 cm from the selected saplings. 

Soil  sampling  was  done  on  four  different  stages  within  the 

experimental period. The soil samples were analyzed for pH 

[9] and EC (Electrical Conductivity) [10]. Determination of 

toxic  elements  of  soil  Pb  and  Cd,  were  done  by  wet  ash 

method  [11]  and  the  extracts  were  analyzed  for  the  above 

elements by Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry [12]. In 

addition,  the  soil  organic  matter  content  was  determined 

using  the  method  of  total  organic  C  by  Walkley  and  Black 

described  by  Nelson  and  Sommers  [13].  Toxic  elements  of 

foliar samples such as Pb and Cd were determined using the 

wet ash method [11]. Death rate of the chosen saplings was 

calculated  by  keeping  records  about  dying  plants  and  dead 

plants throughout the experimental period  and counting the 

dead  saplings  after  two  years  of  the  experimental  period. 

Standard  GENSTAT  statistical  software  was  used  for 

analysis of variance (ANOVA), t-test and regression analysis 

of the results.  

 

III.


 

R

ESULTS



 

AND


 

D

ISCUSSION



 

The results shown here are based on the work done during 

the  two-year  study  period  in  Horton  Plains  National  Park 

(HPNP). The dieback area selected showed 21-40% severity. 

Average values of the soil parameters were used to compare 

the effect of different treatments. Rainfall, temperature, wind 

speed and direction data for the area are shown in Table I. 

 

TABLE



 

I:

 



P

REVAILED 

W

EATHER 


C

ONDITIONS 

D

URING THE 



S

TUDY 


P

ERIOD 


(M

ETEOROLOGICAL 

S

TATION 


-

 

N



UWARA 

E

LIYA 



-

 

L



ATITUDE

:

 



 

58'



 

11

 



N,

 

L



ONGITUDE

:

 



80°

 

46'



 

12

 



E) 

Sampling  

Stage 

 

 



Monthly 

Rainfall 

(mm) 

Monthly 


Temperature (

o

C) 



         

Wind Data

 

Max 


Min 

Mean 


Speed 

(Knot) 


Direction 

(

o



From 


North 

Stage 1 


 

154.7 


 

20.01 


 

12.29 


 

16.15 


 

5.1 


 

285 


 

Stage 2 


 

258 


 

21.17 


 

11.42 


 

16.29 


 

12.2 


 

   282 


 

Stage 3 


 

19.4 


 

22.09 


 

11.97 


 

17.03 


 

7.9 


 

97 


 

Stage 4 


283.6 

20.17 


13.45 

16.81 


11.5 

275 


 

According  to  climate  data,  rainfall  at  stage  3  was  nearly 

twelve times lower compared to the stages 2 and 4. Stage 1 is 

also  a  wet  period  but  the  monthly  rainfall  is  seven  times 

higher  than  that  of  Stage  3,  the  dry  period.  Not  much 

difference  in  temperature  was  observed  in  all  the  stages  of 

sampling. 

A.

 

Soil pH 

pH value of the soil points out that the soil in the entire area 

under investigation in the Horton plains is acidic. Soil acidity 

appears to be bit higher than normal (typical pH range of soil 

=  5  –  9)  [14]  though  the  level  of  acidity  may  not  be 

uncommon to montane forests. pH is significantly  different 

among  the  treatments  only  at  stage  1  (p=0.02)  and  stage  2 

(p=0.025)  in  the  0.20m  depth  (Fig.  1).  Values  of  soil  pH 

varied  between  4.3  and  6.3  and  similar  results  have  been 

obtained  by  [15].  Successful  vegetation  of  Rhododendron 



arboretum,  one  of  the  few  plant  species  that  shows 

exceptionally  higher  tolerability  to  soil  acidity,  and  the 

disappearance of acid susceptible plant species from the area 

also  provide  enough  evidence  to  support  the  claim  that  the 

soil  acidification  may  also  be  behind  the  problem  of 

degrading  forest  vegetation.  Acidic  pH  conditions  are  not 

favorable for the soil inhabiting beneficial microbes as well. 

Fungi may tolerate the acidic pH to some extent but bacteria 

and  actinomyceties  populations  are  severely  affected  by 

acidic  soil  pH  [16].  Therefore,  pH  results  could  be  used  to 

understand relatively poor microbial activities in the soils of 

Horton  Plains  [17].  Soil  microbes  play  a  key  role  in  plant 

nutrition  and  maintaining  soil-plant-water  relations  [18]. 

Therefore,  the  plants  growing  on  soils  with  poor  microbial 

activity  are  very  often  subjected  to  nutrient  and  toxicity 

2

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015



 

problems. Extreme acidic conditions in the soil even causes 

direct  root  damages  [19].  Mycorrhizal  associations  in  plant 

roots which are considered to be a natural survival strategy of 

forest vegetation are also affected by severe soil acidity [20]. 

Weakening  of  mycorrhizae  in  plant  roots  will  have  severe 

impacts  on  nutrient  absorption  by  plants.  Excessive 

availability of micro nutrient under acidic pH might lead to 

toxicity  problems  for  trees.  Acidic  pH  also  increases  the 

mobility of toxic heavy metals in the soil when compared to 

those in alkaline soils [21]. 

 

 

Stage 1 = Rainy season; Stage 2= Rainy season; Stage 3=Dry season; Stage 



4= Rainy season 

Means appear with same letter are not significant at p<0.05 

Fig. 1. Status of pH among treatments at four different stages of sampling in 

0.2m depth. 

 

B.

 

Soil EC 

For  purposes  of  definition,  saline  soils  are  those  which 

have  an  electrical  conductivity  (EC)  of  the  saturation  soil 

extract of > 4000 µs/cm at 25

o

C [22]. It is generally accepted 



that soils with EC in the range of 0.0 - 2000 µs/cm will not 

present  any  problem  to  the  germination  and  growth  of 

majority of forest trees and the previous studies indicated that 

the  extractable  quantities  of  soil  P  are  little  influenced  by 

raising the salinity levels of soils [22]. However, EC values 

of the soil in the study area indicate that the soil is non-saline 

(Fig. 2). It is expected that with excessively high rainfall in 

the area (annual rainfall = >2000mm), salinity development 

cannot  be  expected  in  the  Horton  Plains.  EC  is  also 

significantly different among the treatments at all 4 stages of 

sampling (p =0.04), (p =0.042), (p =0.035) and (p =0.041). 

 

 



Stage 1 = Rainy season ; Stage 2= Rainy season  ;Stage 3=Dry season ; Stage 

4= Rainy season 

Means appear with same letter are not significant at p<0.05 

Fig. 2. Status of EC (µs/cm) among treatments at four different stages of 

sampling (0.2m depth). 

C.

 

Heavy Metals in Soil (Pb and Cd) 

The level of soil Pb and Cd has gone up to 106 and 7.29 

ppm respectively. The maximum allowable limit of Pb is 100 

ppm while it is 3ppm for Cd under tropical moist evergreen 

forest ecosystems [23]. Even the smallest amount of both Pb 

and Cd may impose severe damages on plant‟s metabolism 

leading  to  dieback  [24].  Results  from  both  soil  and  foliar 

analysis  clearly  indicated  contamination  of  soil  and 

vegetation from these two trace elements in Horton Plains.  

Treatments  used  for  the  study  have  significantly 

influenced  the  soil  Pb  in  0.20m  depth  at  sampling  stages  1 

(p=0.01),  2  (p=0.004)  and  3  (p=0.004)  but  there  was  no 

significant  influence  detected  at  stage-4  (p=0.79)  (Fig.  3). 

The  highest  Pb  content  was  detected  in  the  control.  

Treatments significantly affected soil Cd at stage-1 (p=0.04) 

and stage-3 (p=0.042) though the highest Cd level in the soil 

was observed in the control (Fig. 4) at 0.20m depth.  

 

 



Stage 1= Rainy season; Stage 2= Rainy season; 3= Dry season; Stage 4= 

Rainy season 

Means appear with same letter are not significant at p<0.05 

Fig. 3. Status of Pb among treatments at four different stages of sampling in 

0.2m depth. 

 

 



Stage 1= Rainy season; Stage 2= Rainy season; 3= Dry season; Stage 4= 

Rainy season 

Means appear with same letter are not significant at p<0.05 

Fig. 4. Status of Cd among treatments at four different stages of sampling in 

0.2m depth. 

 

The main source of Pb and Cd to the soils of Horton Plains 



must be the rain for several reasons. For examples, external 

addition of soil amendments are not taken place within this 

well-protected  reserve  and  also  the  underlying  bed  rock 

mainly consists of Khondalite and Charnokites groups which 

are not considered to be rich with both Pb and Cd [25]. Status 

of air pollution in Kandy, a city that is less than 50km away 

from  Horton  Plains  has  been  documented  [26].  Therefore, 

during rainy period, continuous addition of Pb and Cd to the 

soil with rain is expected. The soil samples collected during 

3

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015



 

 

the rainy periods were all found in moist condition with rain 



water  soaked  into  the  soil.  Air-drying  the  samples  only 

removes water from the samples leaving Pb and Cd behind. 

Hence,  the  laboratory  analysis  would  have  reflected  these 

metals in higher concentrations for the soil samples collected 

during rainy periods. 

Harmful levels of both Pb and Cd in the soil have declined 

noticeably  during  the  dry  period  and  the  decline  was 

significant  for  both  Pb  (p=0.001)  and  Cd  (p=0.001).  A 

fraction  of  those  elements  may  leach  out  from  the  top  soil 

while  another  fraction  may  be  absorbed  by  the  vegetation. 

Results from foliar analysis indicated the entry of Pb and Cd 

into the plant bodies (see Table II). When the levels of Pb and 

Cd  in  the  soil  during  the  dry  period  are  considered,  plots 

treated  with  mycorrhizae  showed  lower  values  when 

compared  to  the  values  observed  in  the  other  plots.  Even 

though  this  decline  is  not  statistically  significant  under  α 

level  0.05,  the  results  cannot  be  ignored.  Mycorrhizae 

significantly  increase  the  absorption  of  various  elements 

from the soil including heavy metals such as Pb and Cd [27]. 

Therefore,  it  could  be  assumed  that  mycorrhizae  are 

responsible for the reduction of Pb and Cd in the soil treated 

with mycorrhizae.  

Results  clearly  indicated  the  influence  of  rain  on  the 

contamination of soil with Pb and Cd in Horton Plains while 

heavy  motor  traffic  may  be  the  main  cause  for  the 

atmospheric pollution from those elements. Kandy has been 

identified as the worst polluted city in Sri Lanka in terms of 

heavy  motor  traffic  and  resultant  vehicle  emissions  [28]. 

Burning diesel, gasoline and lubricants releases Pb and Cd to 

the  atmosphere.  Additionally,  the  friction  by  brake  pads, 

clutch  liners  and  tires  release  these  elements  to  the 

atmosphere.  Strong  monsoon  winds  seem  to  be  the  most 

possible transportation source of Pb and Cd from the polluted 

south  western  part  of  the  country  and  following  pioneer 

studies, Pb and Cd are subjected to long-range atmospheric 

transportation  to  a  greater  extent  [29]  where  Pb  can  be 

transported  for  a  distance  greater  than  120km  [30].  Past 

studies reported that forest soils exceeding 1800m elevation 

were  contaminated  with  higher  levels  of  Pb  and  the 

atmospheric  origin  of  the  excess  soil  Pb  was  confirmed  by 

high  Pb  levels  in  precipitation  [31].  Moreover,  with 

increasing visitors to the Horton Plains, motor traffic within 

Horton Plains itself has increased. Therefore, contamination 

of atmosphere may have been increased to an alarming level 

so that it is very unlikely the rain falling onto the area is free 

from  Pb  and  Cd.  Soil  microorganisms  play  a  vital  role  in 

maintaining overall soil quality. They have been proved to be 

effective  in  detoxifying  pollutants  in  the  soil  that  include 

heavy metals such as Pb and Cd. Additionally, beneficial soil 

microbes  provide  protection  for  the  plants  from  pathogens, 

help  with  nutrient  cycling  and  providing  consolation  for 

plants during stressful conditions such as drought [32]. Soil 

microbes,  on  the  other  hand,  maintain  extremely  useful 

symbiotic  associations  with  the  forest  vegetations  which 

provide additional advantage for the plants to mine nutrients 

and  water,  for  example,  mycorrhizal  association  [33]. 

However,  high  levels  of  heavy  metals  in  soils  have  been 

shown to decrease populations of soil microorganisms [34]. 

Contribution  of  the  microbes  in  humification  process 

during organic material decomposition should also be noted 

because humic substances formed during the process play a 

very  special  role  in  controlling  the  effects  of  organic  and 

inorganic pollutants in the soil [35]. So, the deterioration of 

the activities of soil microorganisms as a result of the acidity 

conditions in the soils of Horton Plains may have placed the 

forest vegetation in a vulnerable state for soil contaminants 

like Pb and Cd (Table II). Acidic pH conditions also increase 

the availability of micronutrients in the soil unnecessarily and 

this situation results in the development of toxic conditions 

from micronutrients on plants [36].  

 

TABLE


 

II:


 

V

ARIATION OF 



P

B AND 


C

D IN THE 

L

EAVES FROM 



D

IFFERENT 

T

REATMENTS



 

 

Treatment 



Control 

Compost 


 

Comp+ 


Myco 

Mycorrhizae 

Pb 

(ppm) 


Mean 

4.133 


2.1 

4.217 


4.217 

 

 



(0.04) 

(0.0) 


(0.05) 

(0.02) 


Cd 

(ppm) 


Mean 

6.467 


3.267 

3.6 


6.183 

 

 



(0.12) 

(0.08) 


(0.09) 

(0.06) 


Standard error for the respective mean is given within brackets. 

 

D.



 

Soil Organic Matter 

 

 



Stage 1 = Rainy season; Stage 2= Rainy season; Stage 3=Dry season; Stage 

4= Rainy season 

Means appear with same letter are not significant at p<0.05 

Fig. 5. Status of SOM% among the treatments at four different stages of 

sampling in 0.2m depth. 

 

The  soil  organic  matter  content  in  a  soil  expresses  the 



relationship between the sources of organic materials and the 

decomposing  factors  (soil  biota)  [37].  Soil  organic  matter 

(SOM)  level  in  the  study  area  of  Horton  Plains  has  not 

reached upper levels in the range, up to 12%, as expected in 

tropical  moist  evergreen  forests  [38].  In  ordinary  tropical 

moist evergreen forests, SOM content varies around 6% [39]. 

Relatively low plant nutrient levels in montane forests are not 

unusual according to past studies (e.g., [40], [41]. For each 

1000m  rise  in  altitude,  there  is  a  7

o

C  drop  in  temperature 



[42].  This  has  a  dramatic  effect  on  plant  and  animal 

distribution  in  this  ecosystem.  With  the  elevation  of  about 

2524m, Horton Plains is cold (mean annual temperature 15 

°

C)  and  contains  a  very  specific  vegetation  which  is  much 



more sensitive to the changes in the environment than normal 

tropical forests [43]. Under the prevailing conditions  in  the 

montane  environment–  low  sunlight,  low  temperature, 

shallow soil depth and so on, production of SOM is weaker in 

the  Horton  Plains  than  in  an  ordinary  tropical  forest  [44]. 

Lower levels and reduced rates of decomposition of SOM in 

4

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015


 

 

Horton Plains may have resulted in relatively lower N, P, K, 



Ca  and  Mg  levels  in  the  soils  since  the  source  of  those 

nutrient elements to the soil is mainly from SOM. 

The  SOM  content  was  significantly  different  among  the 

treatments in stage 1 (p = <0.001), stage 2 (p = <0.001), stage 

3 (p = <0.001) and stage 4 (<0.001) at the 0.20m depth (Fig. 

5).  The  soils  treated  with  compost  and  compost  with 

mycorrhizae  mixture  showed  higher  SOM  contents.  

Treatments  with  mycorrhizae  only  and  the  control  showed 

the lowest SOM levels at all four stages.  

Across  different  stages  at  0.2m  depth,  the  highest  SOM 

content  was  exhibited  in  the  stage  –  3  (dry  season)  but  the 

statistical analysis under α level of 0.05, was not significant. 

Over-night  frost  is  fairly  common  during  the  period  from 

January to March, and the stage -3 sampling was done within 

a dry period for Horton Plains which showed the lowest mean 

temperature of around 6

o

C [3]. Plant debris gets decomposed 



at  very  low  rates  and  further  decomposition  of  SOM  is 

restricted during this period due to low soil temperature and 

lower  soil  pH  levels  which  also  enhance  this  situation. 

Therefore,  it  may  be  possible  to  expect  relatively  higher 

SOM  levels  in  stage  -3  sampling  compared  to  the  other 

stages. Fluctuation of SOM levels in the area may be linked 

with temperature, rainfall, soil depth and addition of organic 

debris from the aggressively growing undercover vegetation 

such as Strobilanthus spp.  

The  function  of  SOM  springs  from  its  effects  on  soil 

structural  stability  (its  action  as  a  bonding  agent  between 

primary  and  secondary  mineral  particles  leads  to  enhanced 

amount,  size  and  stability  of  aggregates)  and  soil  water 

retention  (as  a  water  adsorbing  agent,  it  enhances  water 

acceptance  and  availability)  and,  hence,  on  infiltration  and 

percolation  [45].  At  the  same  time,  SOM  controls  soil 

nutrients  that  affect  biodiversity  and  system  productivity. 

Soil structural stability is influenced by  the  type  of organic 

matter, as well as its amount. Therefore, in some cases, high 

SOM content is not accompanied by high structural stability. 

Some  fungi  exude  oxalic  acid,  which  enhances  dispersion 

and breakdown of aggregates [46]. Humic substances are the 

components of SOM which play the key role in detoxifying 

the  soil  from  pollutants  such  as  Pb  and  Cd  residues  of 

agro-chemicals from surrounding areas [47]. Unsatisfactory 

levels of SOM exhibit the poor activity of humic substances 

and  resultant  soil  pollution.  Even  a  milder  form  of  soil 

contamination in the Horton Plains cannot be afforded since 

the  montane  vegetation  is  highly  sensitive  to  even  minute 

changes  in  the  environment.  This  condition  may  also  have 

triggered forest dieback in this specific forest.  

E.

 

Death Rate of Syzygium Rotundifolium Saplings 

It was clearly evident that the addition of standard compost 

and  mycorrhizae  has  significantly  controlled  the  death  of 

Syzygium  rotundifolium  saplings.  Treatment  effect  on  the 

death  of  saplings  was  significant  (p=<  0.001)  since  the 

control clearly showed the highest death rate (Table III). The 

standard  compost  consists  of  humic  acid  and  fulvic  acid 

formed  during  the  microbial  decomposition  of  organic 

materials.  These  specific  molecules,  known  as  humic 

substances, possess extraordinary capability of immobilizing 

soil contaminants such as Pb and Cd. Additionally, dozens of 

fractions  in  compost  help  the  plants  to  withstand  stressful 

conditions such as drought, nutrient imbalances, acidity and 

so on [27]. In addition, standard compost is a good reservoir 

of all forms of essential plant nutrients and growth factors of 

plants [27].  

 

TABLE



 

III:


 

V

ARIATION OF 



D

EATH 


R

ATE OF 



S

YZYGIUM 

R

OTUNDIFOLIUM 

S

APLINGS



 

 

Treatment 



Control 

Compo


st 

Comp+


Myco 

Mycorr


hizae 

Death 


rate (%) 

 

Mean 



46.67 

15.83 


17.67 

31.67 


 

 

(8.43) 



(0.40) 

(0.92) 


(3.07) 

Standard error for the respective mean is given within brackets. 

 

Mycorrhizae,  on  the  other  hand,  act  as  a  remarkable 



symbiotic mechanism for the plants to survive under stressful 

conditions  such  as  droughts,  nutrient  deficiency,  soil 

contaminants such as Pb and Cd [20]. Mycorrhiza helps the 

plants to recover the damages done by the toxic substances 

entered  into  plant  bodies  such  as  Pb  and  Cd  [48].  Some 

researchers have indicated the increased absorption of heavy 

metals  with  the  mycorrhizae  association  though  the 

importance  of  this  symbiotic  association  for  plants  to  face 

stressful conditions [48].  

Thus,  it  could  be  argued  that  treating  the  Syzygium 



rotundifolium  samplings  with  standard  compost  and 

mycorrhizae until they become grownup trees might help to 

fill the gaps caused by the dieback in the forest. 

F.

 

Lead in the Soil and Dieback of Plants 

The relationship between Pb concentration and the death 

rate of Syzygium rotundifolium saplings was significant (p = 

<0.001)  while  the  correlation  showed  the  death  rate  of 

saplings has been largely affected by the Pb concentration in 

the soil (Fig. 6). Therefore, the death rate of the saplings used 

for  the  experiment  has  appeared  to  be  increased  with  the 

increasing  availability  of  Pb  in  the  soil.  Results  further 

revealed that the crucial level of Pb in relation to the survival 

of Syzygium rotundifolium saplings was around 60ppm in the 

Horton Plains soil, beyond this level, even a slight increase of 

available Pb in the soil above this crucial level may impose 

severe  damages  on  plant‟s  metabolism  leading  to  dieback 

[24]. 

 

 



Fig. 6. Pb concentrations in the soil Vs Death rate of saplings.  

 

G.



 

Cadmium in the Soil and Dieback of Plants 

Death rate of the saplings (Syzygium rotundifolium) used 

for the experiment appeared to be increased with the increase 

5

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015



 

of  Cd  availability  in  the  soil.  There  is  a  tendency  (p=0.08; 

significant at  

 = 10%) to have a positive linear relationship 



between  the  available  Cd  in  the  soil  and  the  death  rate  of 

saplings (Fig. 7). It has been proven that the heavy metal Cd 

has disturbing effect on some crucial metabolic functions of 

plants and breaking down of them may have resulted in this 

relationship [49]. 

 

 



Fig. 7. Cd concentrations in the soil Vs Death rate of saplings. 

 

H.



 

Lead Concentrations in Soils Vs Pb Concentrations in 

Foliage Parts 

Results  showed  that  the  increase  of  Pb  level  in  the  soil 

results in an increase of the level of Pb in leaves of Syzygium 

rotundifolium  saplings.  The  relationship  between  soil  Pb 

level and the Pb in leaves was significant (p = 0.01) and the 

nature  of  the  relationship  is  linear  –  by  –linear  (hyperbola) 

(Fig. 8).  

 

 

Fig. 8. Pb concentrations in soils Vs Pb concentrations in foliage parts.  



 

I.

 

Cd Concentrations in Soils Vs Cd Concentrations in 

Foliage Part 

 

 



Fig. 9. Cd concentrations in soils Vs Cd concentrations in foliage parts (dry 

period). 

Cadmium  concentration  in  soil  used  for  the  experiment 

appears to have increased Cd in the leaves. The relationship 

between the available Cd in the soil and the Cd in leaves were 

statistically  significant  (p  =  0.02)  and  showed  a  liner 

increment Cd in the leaves of sapling with soil Cd levels (Fig. 

9).  


J.

 

Soil Organic Matter Content in the Soil and Dieback of 

Plants 

Results  showed  that  the  increase  of  SOM  level  helps  to 

reduce  the  death  rate  of  saplings.  The  relationship  between 

SOM  level  and  the  death  rate  of  the  saplings  (Syzygium 



rotundifolium) was significant (p = 0.05). The nature of the 

relationship  seems  to  be  linear-by-linear  and  it  further 

indicates  that  by  maintaining  SOM  level  somewhere  above 

4%,  the  death  rate  of  the  saplings  could  be  reduced 

significantly (see Fig. 10). Again, the presence of humic acid 

and fulvic acid molecules in SOM may have contributed to 

immobilize toxic metals such as Pb and Cd in the soil. 

 

 



Fig. 10. Soil organic matter content in the soil vs Death rate of saplings. 

 

IV.



 

C

ONCLUSION



 

The level of soil contamination in the dieback areas of the 

forest with Pb and Cd appears to have exceeded the tolerable 

levels  of  affected  forest  tree  species.    Treatment  of  the 

contaminated forest soil with standard compost and montane 

mycorrhizae  is  effective  in  saving  saplings  of  Syzygium 



rotundifolium  from  prevalent  soil  toxicity  in  the  forest. 

Soluble soil Pb concentration of ≈ 60 ppm in the study area 

appears  to  be  a  threshold  level  for  the  Syzygium 

rotundifolium saplings, beyond which, an abrupt rise of death 

rate  is  observed.  Coinciding  with  the  survival  of  Syzygium 



rotundifolium saplings with Pb toxicity, SOM% of ≈ 4 also 

appears to be a threshold level of SOM in relation to the death 

rate of the saplings. Successful regeneration programs in the 

forest  should  be  based  on  the  maintenance  of  SOM  level 

above  the  threshold  to  reduce  the  death  rate  of  Syzygium 

rotundifolium saplings in the dieback area. 

A

CKNOWLEDGEMENT



 

This experiment was conducted with the financial support 

of  the  Department  of  Wildlife  Conservation  and 

Sabaragamuwa  University  of  Sri  Lanka.  We  are  also 

indebted  to  the  Park  Warden  and  the  rest  of  the  staff  at 

Horton Plains National Park for their unquestionable support 

given throughout the study. Our very special gratitude should 

6

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015



 

 

go to the Rubber Research Institute of Sri Lanka for helping 



us  to  complete  classy  laboratory  analysis  related  to  the 

research. 

R

EFERENCES



 

[1]


 

W.  R.  H.  Perera,  “Thotupolakanda  -  an  environmental  disaster?”  Sri 



Lanka Forester, vol. 13, pp. 53-55, 1978. 

[2]


 

W.  L.  Werner,  “The  upper  montane  forests  of  Sri  Lanka,”  The  Sri 



Lanka Forester, vol. 15, pp. 119-135, 1982. 

[3]


 

N.  K.  B.  Adikaram,  K.  B.  Ranawana,  and  A.  Weerasuriya,  “Forest 

dieback in the Horton plains national park,” Sri Lanka Protected Areas 

Management and Wildlife Conservation Project, Department of Wild 

Life  Conservation,  Ministry  of  Environment  and  Natural  Resourses, 

Colombo, 2006, p. 8.  

[4]

 

K. B. Ranawana, R. L. R. Chandrajith, and N. K. B. Adikaram, “Follow 



up study of forest die-back in Horton Plains National Park,” in Proc. 

Wild Life Research SymposiumProtected Area Management and Wide 

Life Conservation Project, 2007. 

[5]


 

T. C. Whitmore, Tropical Rain Forests of the Far East, Claredon Press, 

Oxford, 1984. 

[6]


 

R. A. Wijewansa, “Horton Plains: a plea for preservation,” Loris, vol. 

16, pp. 188-191, 1983. 

[7]


 

S.  Ratnayeke  and  S.  Balasubramaniam,  “The  structure  and  floristic 

composition  of  the  montane  forest  in  the  Horton  Plains,  Sri  Lanka,” 

Institute of Fundamental Studies, Colombo, Sri Lanka, p. 14, 1989. 

[8]

 

S. Balasubramaniam, S. A. Rathnayake, and R. White, “The montane 



forests of the Horton Plains nature reserve,” in Proc. International and 

Interdisciplinary Symposium Ecology and Landscape Management in 

Sri Lanka, 1993, pp. 95–108.  

[9]


 

M.  Peech,  “Soil  pH:  Glass  electrode  method,”  in  Methods  of  Soil 



Analysis  Part  2,  C.  A.  Black  et  al.,  Ed.  Am.  Soc.  of  Agron.  Inc., 

Madison, Wisc, USA, 1983, pp. 910-918. 

[10]

 

C.  A.  Bower  and  L.  V.  Wilcox,  “Soluble  salts,”  in  Methods  of  Soil 



Analysis  Part  2,  C.  A.  Black  et  al.,  Ed.  Am.  Soc.  of  Agron.  Inc., 

Madison, Wisc, USA, 1983, pp. 933-936. 

[11]

 

USEPA,  “Acid  digestion  of  sediments,  sludges  and  soils,”  Method 



3050B, 1996. 

[12]


 

E.  Dale  and  H.  Norman,  “Atomic  absorption  and  flame  emission 

spectrometry,” in Methods of Soil Analysis, Part 2, 2nd ed. A. L. Page 

et al., Ed. American Society of Agronomy, Inc., Madison, WI, USA, 

1982, vol. 9, pp. 13-27. 

[13]

 

D. W. Nelson and L. E. Sommers, “Total carbon, organic carbon and 



organic matter,” in Method of Soil Analysis, Part 2, 2nd ed. American 

Society of Agronomy, Madison, WI, USA, 1982, vol. 9. 

[14]

 

H. Bohn, B. MeNeai, and G. O'Connor, Soil Chemistry, 2nd ed., John 



Wiley and Sons, New York, 1986. 

[15]


 

J.  A.  Ranasinghe,  A.  M.  Barnett,  K.  C.  Schiff,  D.  E.  Montagne,  C. 

Brantley, C. Beegan, D. B. Cadien, C. Cash, G. B. Deets, D. R. Diener, 

T.  K.  Mikel,  R.  W.  Smith,  R.  G.  Velarde,  S.  D.  Watts,  and  S.  B. 

Weisberg,  Southern  California  Bight  2003  Regional  Monitoring 

Program: III Benthic Macro Fauna, Southern California Coastal Water 

Research Project Authority, Costa Mesa, CA, 2007. 

[16]

 

H.  F.  Stroo,  T.  M.  Klein,  and  M.  Alexander,  “Heterotrophic 



nitrification  in  an  acid  forest  soil  and  by  an  acid-tolerant  fungus,” 

Applied  and  Environmental  Microbiology,  vol.  52,  pp.  1107-1111, 

1986. 


[17]

 

E. D. Vance and N. M. Nadkarni, “Microbial biomass and activity in 



canopy organic matter and the forest floor of a tropical cloud forest,” 

Soil Biology and Biochemistry, vol. 22, pp. 677-684, 1990. 

[18]


 

T. M. McCalla, “Influence of some microbial groups on stabilizing soil 

structure against falling water drops,” in ProcAmerican Soil Science 

Society, 1946, vol. 11, pp. 260–263. 

[19]


 

H. Marschner, “Mechanisms of adaptation of plants to acid soils,” in 



Proc. the Second International Symposium on Plant-Soil Interactions 

at Low pH, Beckley, West Virginia, USA, 1991, pp. 683–702. 

[20]


 

R.  B.  Clark,  “Arbuscular  mycorrhizal  adaptation,  spore  germination, 

root colonization, and host plant growth and mineral acquisition at low 

pH,” Plant and Soil, vol. 19, pp. 15-22, 1997. 

[21]

 

L. Keikens, Heavy Metals in Soils, John Willey and Sons, New York, 



1990, p. 279. 

[22]


 

R.  H.  Bray  and  L.  T.  Kurtz,  “Determination  of  total,  organic  and 

available forms of phosphorus in soils,” Soil Science, vol. 59, pp. 39-45, 

1945. 


[23]

 

A.  Kloke,  “Orientierungsdaten  für  tolerierbare  gesamtgehalte  einiger 



elemente in kulturboden mitt,” VDLUFAH., vol. 1-3, pp. 9-11, 1980. 

[24]


 

A. B. Pahlsson, “Toxicity of heavy metals, (Zn, Cu, Cd, Pb) to Vascular 

Plants,” Water, Air and Soil Pollution, vol. 47, pp. 287-319, 1989. 

[25]


 

V.  M.  Goldschmidt,  “The  principles  of  distribution  of  chemical 

elements in minerals and rocks,” Journal of the Chemical Society. vol. 

4, pp. 655-673, 1937. 

[26]

 

C. B. Dissanayake, J. M. Niwas, and S. V. R. Weerasooriya,  “Heavy 



metal pollution of the mid-canal of Kandy: an environmental case study 

from Sri Lanka,” Environmental Research, vol. 42, no. 1,  pp.  24-35, 

1987. 

[27]


 

I. Weissenhorn, C. Leyval, and J. Berthelin, “Bioavailability of heavy 

metals and abundance of arbuscular mycorrhizal in a soil polluted by 

atmospheric deposition from a smelter,” Biology and Fertility of Soils

vol. 19, pp. 22-28, 1995. 

[28]


 

O.  A.  Illeperuma,  “Kandy  air  most  polluted,”  Daily  News,  13  July, 

2010. 

[29]


 

T.  Berg,  O.  Røyset,  E.  Steinnes,  and  M.  Vadset,  “Atmospheric  trace 

element deposition: Principal component analysis of ICP-MS data from 

moss samples,” Environment Pollution, vol. 88, pp. 67-77, 1995. 

[30]

 

M. F. Billett, E. A. Fitzpatrick, and M. S. Cresser, “Long term changes 



in the Cu, Pb and Zn content of forest soil organic horizons from North 

– East Scotland,” WaterAir and  Soil Pollution, vol. 59, pp. 179-191, 

1991. 

[31]


 

T. G. Siccama, W. H. Smith, and D. L. Mader, “Changes in lead, zinc 

and copper, dry weight and organic matter content of the forest floor of 

white  pine  stands  in  central  Massachusetts  over  16  years,” 



Environmental Science and Technology, vol. 14, pp. 54-56, 1980. 

[32]


 

T.  Rudrappa,  K.  J.  Czymmek,  P.  W.  Pare,  and  H.  P.  Bais,  “Root 

secreted malic acid recruits beneficial soil bacteria,” Plant Physiology

vol. 148, pp. 1547-1556, 2008. 

[33]

 

M.  J.  Harrison,  “The  arbuscular  mycorrhizal  symbiosis:  An 



underground association,” Trends in Plant Science, vol. 2, pp. 54–59, 

1997. 


[34]

 

J.  Friedland,  R.  Gregory,  K.  Kilrenlampi,  and  A.  H.  Johnson,  “Zinc, 



Cu,  Ni  and  Cd  in  the  forest  floor  in  the  northeastern  United  States,” 

Water, Air and Soil Pollution, vol. 29, pp. 233-243, 1986. 

[35]


 

W. R. Jackson, HumicFulvicand Microbial Balance: Organic Soil 



Conditioning, Evergreen, CO: Jackson Research Center, 1993. 

[36]


 

F. G. Viets Jr., “Micronutrient availability, chemistry and availability 

of  micronutrients  in  soils,”  Journal  of  Agricultural  and  Food 

Chemistry, vol. 10, no. 3, pp. 174–178, 1962. 

[37]


 

D. J. Greenland and P. H. Nye, “Increase in the carbon and Nitrogen 

contents  of  tropical  soils  under  natural  fallows,”  Journal  of  Soil 

Science, vol. 10, pp. 284-299, 1959. 

[38]


 

P.  L.  Weaver,  E.  Medina,  D.  Pool,  K.  Dugger,  J.  Gonzales,  and  E. 

Cuevas,  “Ecological  observations  in  the  dwarf  cloud  forest  of  the 

Luquillo mountains in Puerto Rico,” Biotropica, vol. 10, pp. 278-291, 

1986. 

[39]


 

J.  Six  and  J.  D.  Jastrow,  “Soil  organic  matter  turnover,”  in 



Encyclopedia of Soil Science, R. Lal, Ed. Boca Raton, FL, 2002, pp. 

936–942.  

[40]

 

P. J. Grubb and P. J. Edwards, “Studies of mineral cycling in a montane 



rain forest in New Guinea. III, the distribution of mineral elements in 

the above ground material,” Journal of Ecology, vol. 70, pp. 623-48, 

1982. 

[41]


 

D.  Mueller-Dombois,  P.  M.  Vitousek,  and  K.W.  Bridges,  “Canopy 

dieback and ecosystem processes in Pacific forests: a progress report 

and  research  proposal,”  Hawaii  Botanical  Science,  vol.  44,  p.  100, 

1984. 

[42]


 

A. Kaplan, M. A. Cane, Y. Kushnir, A. C. Clement, M. B. Blumenthal, 

and  B.  Rajagopalan,  “Analyses  of  global  sea  surface  temperature 

1856-1991,” Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, vol. 103, no. 9, 

pp. 18567-18589, 1998. 

[43]


 

L. L. Loope and T. W. Giambelluca, “Vulnerability of Island tropical 

montane  cloud  forests  to  climate  change,  with  Special  Reference  to 

East Maui, Hawaii,” Climatic Change, vol. 39, pp. 503-517, 1998. 

[44]

 

P. J. Edwards and P. J. Grubb, “Studies of mineral cycling in a montane 



rain forest in New Guinea, I. The distribution of organic matter in the 

vegetation and soil,” Journal of Ecology, vol. 65, pp. 943-969, 1977. 

[45]

 

P.  Dutartre,  F.  Bartoli,  F.  Andreux,  J.  M.  Portal,  and  A.  Ange, 



“Influence of content and nature of organic matter on the structure of 

some sandy soils from West Africa,” Geoderma, vol. 56, pp. 459-478, 

1993. 

[46]


 

R.  P.  Voroney,  J.  A.  Van  Veen,  and  E.  A.  Paul,  “Organic  carbon 

dynamics in grassland soils, II. model validation and simulation of the 

long-term  effects  of  cultivation  and  rainfall  erosion,”  Canadian 



Journal of Soil Science, vol. 61, pp. 211-224, 1981. 

[47]


 

J.  W.  Doran,  M.  Sarrantonio,  and  M.  A.  Liebig,  “Soil  health  and 

sustainability,” Advances in Agronomy, vol. 56, pp. 1-5, 1996. 

7

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015



 

 

[48]



 

R.  Bradley,  A.  J.  Burt,  and  D.  J.  Read,  “Mycorrhizal  infection  and 

resistance to heavy metal toxicity in Calluna vulgaris,” Nature, vol292, 

pp. 335-337, 1981.  

[49]

 

W.  W.  Wenzel,  D.  C.  Adriano,  D.  E.  Salt,  and  R.  Smith, 



“Phytoremediation:  a  plant-micro  based  system,”  in  Remediation  of 

Contaminated Soils, D. C. Adriano, J. M. Bollag, W. T. Frankenberger 

Jr, and R. C. Sims, Eds. SSSA Spec Monogr, 1999, ch. 37, pp. 457-510. 

 

 

H. K. S. G. Sajanee was born in Sri Lanka on January 



30,  1979  and  received  a  B.Sc.  degree  from 

Sabaragamuwa  University  of  Sri  Lanka,  in  2005  with 

specialization  in  agriculture  and  horticulture.  Sajanee 

recieved  her  master  degree  of  philosophy  from  the 

University  of  Peradeniya,  Sri  Lanka  in  2012 

specializing in crop science and her research topic was 

“Assessing  the  nutrients  imbalance  and  its  impact  on 

forest dieback of Syzygium rotundifolium in Horton Plains”.   

She is a lecturer at Uva Wellassa University, Sri Lanka, and worked as an 

assistant  lecturer  and  demonstrator  at  Sabaragamuwa  University  of  Sri 

Lanka.  Her  previous  research  interest  was  crop  science  and  soil 

degradation, with current interest in environmental science. 

She has received the Postgraduate Research Award in 2012 from the Sri 

Lanka Association for the Advancement of Science (SLAAS), Sri Lanka.

 

 

 



P.  I.  Yapa was born in Sri Lanka on June 28, 1964 

and  received  a  B.Sc.  degree  from  the  University  of 

Peradeniya, Sri Lanka, in 1990 with specialization in 

agriculture and soil science. After the completion of 

the M.Sc. degree in soil science at the same university 

in  1996,  Yapa  earned  his  doctoral  degree  from  the 

University  of  Reading,  UK,  in  2003  specializing  in 

soil and environmental sciences. 

He is a lecturer at Sabaragamuwa University, Sri Lanka, and worked as a 

postdoctoral  research  fellow  at  Agriculture  and  Agri-Food  Canada.  His 

previous research interest was mitigation of greenhouse gas emission from 

farmland, with current interest in soil remediation. 

Dr.  Yapa  has  received  the  Postdoctoral  Fellowship  Awards  from 

National  Research  and  Engineering  Council,  Canada  and  Endeavour, 

Australia.

 

 



8

International Journal of Environmental Science and Development, Vol. 6, No. 1, January 2015


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə