This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached



Yüklə 220.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/3
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü220.96 Kb.
  1   2   3

This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached

copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research

and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution

and sharing with colleagues.

Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or

licensing copies, or posting to personal, institutional or third party

websites are prohibited.

In most cases authors are permitted to post their version of the

article (e.g. in Word or Tex form) to their personal website or

institutional repository. Authors requiring further information

regarding Elsevier’s archiving and manuscript policies are

encouraged to visit:

http://www.elsevier.com/copyright

Author's personal copy

Forest Ecology and Management 262 (2011) 229–236

Contents lists available at

ScienceDirect

Forest Ecology and Management

j o u r n a l h o m e p a g e :

w w w . e l s e v i e r . c o m / l o c a t e / f o r e c o

Release from root competition promotes tree seedling survival and growth

following transplantation into human-induced grasslands in Sri Lanka

A.M.T.A. Gunaratne

a

,



, C.V.S. Gunatilleke

a

, I.A.U.N. Gunatilleke



a

, H.M.S.P. Madawala Weerasinghe

a

,

D.F.R.P. Burslem



b

a

Department of Botany, University of Peradeniya, Peradeniya 20400, Sri Lanka



b

Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Cruickshank Building, St. Machar Drive, Aberdeen AB24 3UU, Scotland, UK

a r t i c l e i n f o

Article history:

Received 27 November 2010

Received in revised form 18 March 2011

Accepted 18 March 2011

Available online 20 April 2011

Keywords:

Above ground competition

Abandoned human-induced grasslands

Herbivory

Relative growth rate

Root competition

Survival

a b s t r a c t

The density of colonising tree seedlings is often very low in degraded human-induced tropical grass-

lands. To investigate the mechanisms that constrain seedling establishment in grasslands on former

tea plantations in Sri Lanka we planted seedlings of the native tree species Dimocarpus longan Lour.,

Macaranga indica Wight, Symplocos cochinchinensis (Lour.) S. Moore and Syzygium spathulatum Thw. and

examined effects of vertebrate herbivory, and above- and below-ground competition exerted by the

grass sward on seedling growth and survival over 28 months. Seedlings of the same species were also

planted in remnant patches of lower montane rain forest to determine the effects of habitat on seedling

growth and survival. Less than 40% of seedlings survived to 28 months post-transplantation. The high-

est survival was recorded for Symplocos cochinchinensis in both grassland and forest, while Macaranga

indica seedlings had the highest relative growth rate of height (RGRh) in both habitats. Root competi-

tion reduced survival of Macaranga indica and the RGR

h

of Macaranga indica, Symplocos cochinchinensis



and Syzygium spathulatum in the grassland, while above-ground competition and exclusion of vertebrate

herbivores had no effects on seedling establishment. These results suggest that Symplocos cochinchi-

nensis would be suitable for re-establishing forest cover on degraded grasslands, although Macaranga

indica would be more likely to catalyse succession because it possesses animal-dispersed fruit. Mea-

sures that overcome or restrict the effects of root competition from grasses would enhance tree seedling

growth and survival more than manipulation of the light environment or protection from vertebrate

herbivores.

© 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

1. Introduction

Deforestation and degradation of abandoned tropical lands have

been responsible for widespread erosion of biodiversity and ecosys-

tem services (

Chapman and Chapman, 1999; Hooper et al., 2002;

Lamb, 1998; Parrotta et al., 1997

). The extent of abandoned, tree-

less lands in the tropics continues to increase (

Hau and Corlett,

2003


), but reversing deforestation by catalysing natural succes-

sion is proving to be very difficult. In the absence of propagule

sources and suitable microclimates for seed germination and estab-

lishment, it may take decades to centuries for degraded sites to

recover to forest (

Cohen et al., 1995; Gunaratne et al., 2010; Uhl

et al., 1982

).An alternative approach is to reforest degraded lands

by direct transplantation of tree seedlings (

Benítez-Malvido et al.,

2005; Hooper et al., 2002; Lamb, 1998; Lamb et al., 2005; Nepstad

et al., 1991; Parrotta and Knowles, 2001

). In the past, species

∗ Corresponding author. Tel.: +94 81 2394529; fax: +94 81 2388018.

E-mail addresses:

thilankag@pdn.ac.lk

,

thil27@yahoo.com



(A.M.T.A. Gunaratne).

selection for reforestation efforts has been biased in favour of well-

known species from a relatively small number of genera, such as

Pinus, Acacia and Eucalyptus, which are often non-native to the

planting location (

Dalling and Burslem, 2008

). The use of native

species is often constrained by a lack of basic information on their

ecology and ecophysiology, shortage of seeds and seedlings in suf-

ficient quantities, and a lack of available technology and finance

(

Hooper et al., 2002; Perera, 1998; Zhuang, 1997



). In Sri Lanka,

after nearly two decades of experimentation with indigenous tree

species, foresters have failed to identify those that would exceed the

growth and survival of exotic species (

Vivekanandan, 1988

). Thus


human-induced grasslands dominated by Cymbopogon nardus (L.)

Rendle, on derelict former tea plantations and deforested scrubland

are usually reforested with exotic Pinus species (

A.H. Perera, 1988;

W.R.H. Perera, 1988

)

In recent years there has been an increased interest in the facil-



itation of forest regrowth on abandoned post-agricultural lands

using mixtures of native tree species rather than pure stands of

exotic tree species (

Butterfield and Fisher, 1994; Griscom et al.,

2009; Hau and Corlett, 2003; Holl et al., 2000; Loik and Holl, 1999;

0378-1127/$ – see front matter © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

doi:

10.1016/j.foreco.2011.03.027



Author's personal copy

230


A.M.T.A. Gunaratne et al. / Forest Ecology and Management 262 (2011) 229–236

Redondo-Brenes, 2007

). For example, previously untested native

tree species have performed well, or in some cases even better than,

the widely used exotic species in reforestation trials in Costa Rica

and Panama (

Butterfield and Fisher, 1994; Butterfield, 1995; Piotto

et al., 2010; Wishnie et al., 2007

). Although researchers have rec-

ommended using indigenous species for reforestation in Sri Lanka,

and their growth when inter-planted into Pinus plantations has

been promising (

Ashton et al., 1997b; Wood, 1988

), no recom-

mendations exist for species selection for restoration of degraded

lands. Native Sri Lankan tree species may have desirable attributes,

but factors such as competition with grasses, seasonal drought,

herbivory, low soil nutrient availability and harsh microclimatic

conditions limit tree seedling establishment in other tropical

regions, and information on management interventions to offset

these constraints is scarce (

Aide and Cavelier, 1994; Butterfield and

Fisher, 1994; Hau and Corlett, 2003; Holl and Quiros-Nietzen, 1999;

Holl et al., 2000; Nepstad et al., 1996

).

Both biotic and abiotic factors limit growth or survival of planted



tree seedlings. Competition exerted by grasses, weeds or shrubs

can inhibit tree seedling establishment on degraded tropical lands

(

Davis et al., 1998; Hau and Corlett, 2003; Holl et al., 2000; Hooper



et al., 2005; Nepstad et al., 1991; Sun et al., 1995

). Herbivory by

leaf cutter ants (Atta sexdens) and rabbits (Sylvilagus dicei Har-

ris) reduce tree seedling survival in neotropical pastures (

Holl and

Quiros-Nietzen, 1999; Nepstad et al., 1996

), but the effects of her-

bivores on planted tree seedlings in grasslands are poorly explored

(

Griscom et al., 2005



). Woody plant establishment on eroded,

highly degraded slopes may also be limited by low soil nutri-

ent availability (

Aide and Cavelier, 1994; Hau and Corlett, 2003

),

although nutrient status did not inhibit forest regeneration in aban-



doned pastures in flat lowland landscapes in Panama (

Hooper et al.,

2005

) or Amazonia (



Nepstad et al., 1996

). In low fertility tropical

soils, arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) can enhance seedling establish-

ment and the progress of succession (

Fischer et al., 1994; Zangaro

et al., 2003

) as most vascular plants depend to some extent on AM

for nutrient uptake (

Janos, 1980

). Although competition, herbivory

and low nutrient availability have all been shown to inhibit tree

seedling growth or survival, they are rarely studied in combination

and therefore the relative importance of these factors cannot be

generalised (but see

Griscom et al., 2009

).

Human-induced grasslands at our study sites in upland cen-



tral Sri Lanka are dominated by the aggressive grass Cymbopogon

nardus L. Rendle, and are heavily grazed by domestic and wild herbi-

vores (

Gunaratne et al., 2010



). In this paper we test the hypotheses

that above- and/or below-ground competition by grasses, as well

as vertebrate herbivory, might limit the establishment of native

tree species. Although facilitating natural regeneration may be the

cheapest method to restore forests on grasslands, our research

has suggested that forest succession in these grasslands is lim-

ited by seed availability and seedling emergence success even

when herbivory and fire are excluded (

Gunaratne, 2007; Gunaratne

et al., 2010

). Therefore the only way to promote succession might

be through direct transplantation of tree seedlings. The aims

of our research were to test the suitability of four native tree

species for restoration of human-induced grasslands in central

Sri Lanka, and to determine the effects of vertebrate herbivory

and competition by the grass sward on the establishment of

these four species, in order to develop cost effective methods for

reforestation.

We tested the hypotheses that (a) tree seedling growth and sur-

vival would increase in the absence of root competition exerted by

grasses in grassland and by forest trees in forest; (b) vertebrate her-

bivory would reduce the growth and survival of the tree seedlings

in both habitats; (c) tree seedlings released from root competi-

tion would show greater resilience to vertebrate herbivory; and

(d) removal of the grass canopy would increase the growth of tree

seedlings through increased access to light, but the effect would be

transient and of lower magnitude than that caused by the reduction

in root competition.

2. Methods

2.1. Study site

The research was conducted from July 2005 to October 2007 at

c. 1000 m a.s.l. in four grassland blocks, each adjacent to a remnant

forest patch on the eastern slopes of the Knuckles Forest Reserve

(KFR), which is a Man and Biosphere Reserve in Sri Lanka (7

21

to 7



24 N, 80


45 to 80


48.5 E) (

Appendix A

). The climate, micro-

climatic conditions and vegetation of this study site are described

in detail elsewhere (

Gunaratne, 2007; Gunaratne et al., 2010

), and


summarised below.

Most of the lower montane forests on the steep slopes of the

KFR were cleared during the colonial era (1815–1948) for coffee

plantations, which were then replaced by tea plantations. The land

preparation activities for coffee and tea included intensive weeding

and scraping of the top-soil, and resulted in soil degradation and a

loss of productivity. Cymbopogon nardus was used extensively for

soil conservation and improvement of soil structure on tea planta-

tions of Sri Lanka. However, when the plantations were abandoned

this grass species invaded and its spread was enhanced by fire,

which destroyed the remnant tea bushes. Thus unproductive tea

lands became converted into grasslands after abandonment.

The natural forest patches at the research site are composed

of species from both the dry and wet lower montane forest types

(

Bambaradeniya and Ekanayake, 2003



). Seedlings of primary for-

est species are almost absent from the grasslands, although there

are occasional shrubs and a high density of naturally established

seedlings of Pinus caribaea in sites that are downwind of Pinus

plantations (

Medawatte, 2009

). These grasslands are used exten-

sively by herbivores including feral water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis),

elephant (Elephas maximus), wildboar (Sus scrofa), sambur (Cervus

unicolor), mouse deer (Tragulus meminna) and black-naped hare

(Lepus nigricollis).

Microclimatic conditions and soil properties differed greatly

between the forest and the grassland. Photosynthetically active

radiation at 12 cm above-ground and soil temperature at 5 cm

depth were higher in the grassland than within the forest during

both the wet and dry seasons (Appendix S3 in

Gunaratne et al.,

2010


). Air temperature at 10 cm above-ground was only marginally

higher in the forest than the grassland during the wet season and

differed very little between vegetation types during the dry sea-

son. Surface soil samples (0–10 cm) from the grassland had lower

pH and concentrations of total C, N and P, exchangeable Ca, Mg

and Na, and lower cation exchange capacity and total exchangeable

bases than samples collected from the forest. The mean soil water

potential at 0–10 cm depth was nearly 30 times and 10 times lower

during the dry season than the wet season in the grassland and the

forest respectively (Table 1 in

Gunaratne et al., 2010

).

2.2. Experimental design



Information about site history was obtained by interviewing

local people, aerial photographs and ground surveys, and was used

to select four replicate blocks for the study with aspects of E, NE,

E and SE, respectively. Each block spanned a remnant fragment of

lower montane forest and an adjacent abandoned grassland at an

elevation of 1058–1157 m. A 5 m wide fire belt was maintained

around each grassland component of the block by uprooting all

grasses in that area during the two dry seasons of the study.



Author's personal copy

A.M.T.A. Gunaratne et al. / Forest Ecology and Management 262 (2011) 229–236

231

Table 1


The biology, ecology and importance of the four tree species planted into grasslands and forest at the Knuckles Forest Reserve, Sri Lanka. Sources: Interviews with 10 villagers

living adjacent to the study site and personal observations of the authors;

Ashton et al. (1997a, b, c)

and Senaratna (2001).

Scientific name

Symplocos cochinchinensis

(Lour.) S. Moore

Syzygium spathulatum Thw.

Dimocarpus longan Lour.

Macaranga indica Wight

Common name (Sinhala)

Bombu


Kola Heen

Mora


Kenda

Common name (Tamil)

Not known

Not known

Nurai

Vattakanni



Family

Symplocaceae

Myrtaceae

Sapindaceae

Euphorbiaceae

Origin


Native

Endemic


Native

Native


Life form

Tree (5 m)

Tree (10 m)

Tree (30 m)

Tree (10 m)

Ecology


Montane forest

understorey, scrub

Intermediate, montane and

rainforest understorey,

scrub, and grassland

Monsoon and intermediate

forest, subcanopy and

rainforest understorey

Secondary forest, fringes

and scrub

Phenology

Main flowering season

January–February

May–July


May–July

June–July

Main fruiting season

March–April

August–October

August–November

August–October

Economic importance

Whole plant

Ornamental





Roots

Medicinal

Ornamental

Ornamental, medicinal

Medicinal, ornamental

Bark


Fracture treatment

To chew with betel, to cure



snake bites (medicinal)

Medicinal

Wood

Fuel, construction, fencing



Fuel, fencing, construction

of mud houses

Construction, fuel, fencing

handles on mamotee

Fuel, light construction

Branches


Fuel

Fuel, ornamental

Fuel

Fuel


Leaves

Eye treatment

Fuel, medicinal



Food wrapper

Fruits


Food for animals

Edible, medicinal

Food for animals

Flowers





Medicinal

E. Rambanda, K.M. Kapilarathne, E.M. Bisomanike, M.A.G. Karunarathne, S.B. Ekanayake, D.G. Vijesinghe, P.G. Lokubanda, E.M. Rambanda, M.G. Vijerathne, G.G. Nawarathne.



Three native non-endemic (Macaranga indica Wight, Symplo-

cos cochinchinensis (Lour.) S. Moore and Dimocarpus longan Lour.)

and one endemic (Syzygium spathulatum Thw.) tree species were

selected to sample a broad range of life history attributes and

economic values (

Table 1


). The species are referred to by their

genus names from hereon. They include a fast-growing pioneer

of open sites and forest edges (Macaranga), specialists of shaded

forest understorey environments (Dimocarpus, Syzygium) and one

generalist species that is found in a wide range of light envi-

ronments (Symplocos). Seedlings of the four tree species were

collected in sites on the eastern slopes of the Knuckles Forest

Reserve during November and December 2004. They were subse-

quently planted in polythene bags (29.3 cm diameter and 30 cm

length) containing forest soil and stored prior to the start of the

experiment beneath shade in a nursery located at the study site.

Seedling roots of the four tree species were colonised (% root

length colonised) by arbuscular mycorrhizas to varying degrees

at the time of transplantation: mean values of 43%, 36%, 16% and

15% for Macaranga, Syzygium, Dimocarpus and Symplocos, respec-

tively.


In June 2005, 48 individuals of each species were planted using

a randomised design in a belt between 20 m and 40 m from the for-

est/grassland edge into the grassland (32 individuals) and the forest

(16 individuals) in each of four blocks (768 seedlings in total). The

belt formed a rectangular grid with 16 rows and eight columns

in the grassland, and 16 rows and four columns in the forest in

each of the four blocks (

Appendix B

). The spacing between adja-

cent seedlings was 1 m. Each planting point in the grassland was

allocated at random to one of eight treatments from the facto-

rial combination of the presence or absence of root competition,

shoot competition and herbivory, up to a maximum of four repli-

cate seedlings per species for each treatment. Only four treatments

were established inside the forest as the effect of removing above-

ground competition was not tested. Initial dimensions of planted

seedlings were different for the four species at the time of planting

(

Appendix C1 and C2



).

Root competition was excluded by planting seedlings inside

polythene bags with drainage holes in the base (300

␮m thick-

ness, 29.3 cm diameter and 30 cm depth). Removal of above-ground

competition from grasses was achieved by clipping the grass sward

to a height of 10 cm above ground level to a distance of 0.5 m from

the base of the seedling every two weeks starting from July 2005.

To exclude vertebrate herbivores, fences were constructed to a

height of 1 m using a wire mesh (1.7 cm

× 1.7 cm) to a distance of

30 cm around each seedling allocated to this treatment. Since the

seedlings were small and they were planted at the beginning of

the dry season, they were watered daily for the first three months.

Therefore the experiment provides a conservative test of the impor-

tance of competition for water on initial survival. Seedlings that

died within the first month of the experiment were replaced. The

stem height (height to the apical meristem measured on the ups-

lope side) was measured to a precision of 1 mm every three months

for 28 months. For this paper we have analysed growth and survival

data for the two intervals from planting to 18 months and from 18

to 28 months separately, in order to determine whether the rel-

ative importance of factors affecting establishment changes over

time.


2.3. Statistical analysis

The effects of herbivore exclusion, species, and root and shoot

competition on seedling survival in the grassland plots from plant-

ing to 18 months and from 18 to 28 months were determined

using generalised linear models (GLM) on counts of surviving

seedlings based on a quasi-poisson error structure (log link func-

tion) to compensate for over-dispersion, using R version 2.8.1 (R

Core Development Team, 2008). The full model including all main

effects and their interactions was fitted first and then simplified by

sequential removal of the non-significant terms (

Crawley, 2007

).

Since the data were over-dispersed, model simplification was car-



ried out using F tests (

Crawley, 2007

). An analogous approach was

used to investigate the effects of species, herbivory and root com-

petition on seedling survival in the forest. The difference in mean

survival between grassland and forest habitats was examined using

seedlings growing in equivalent treatments in the two habitats (i.e.

excluding grassland seedlings in the grass clipping treatment). In

this analysis, the effects of habitat, species, herbivore exclusion and

  1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə