This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached



Yüklə 220.96 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə2/3
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü220.96 Kb.
1   2   3

Author's personal copy

232


A.M.T.A. Gunaratne et al. / Forest Ecology and Management 262 (2011) 229–236

root competition on survival of transplants were determined for

the 256 seedlings per habitat growing in this combination of treat-

ments, but the only interaction terms included in the full model

were those testing the interactions of habitat with species and

habitat with root competition.

Data on height were converted into relative growth rate

per month (RGR

h

), using the formula RGR



h

= [ln(Ht


2

)

− ln(Ht



1

)]/T;


where, Ht

2

and Ht



1

are final and initial height, respectively, and T

is the number of months between the initial and final measure-

ments (i.e. 18 and 10 months for the two intervals analysed). Since

RGR

h

values were continuous and normally distributed, a linear



model was fitted using the lm function in the nlme library for

R (R version 2.8.1; R Core Development Team, 2008). The effects

of species, herbivory, root and shoot competition on the RGR

h

of



seedlings in the grassland and the effects of species, root compe-

tition and herbivory on RGR

h

in the forest were investigated using



this model structure. Minimal adequate models were obtained as

above. Residuals for the model for the second growth interval in

the grassland were not normally distributed (Shapiro-Wilk test,

p < 0.05), however removal of 23 outliers to correct this problem

did not change the pattern of statistical significance in the result-

ing model (

Appendix D; Tables D1 and D2

), which suggests that

our conclusions are robust to violation of this assumption. The dif-

ference in mean RGR

h

per month between the grassland and the



forest was tested using a linear model based on height measure-

ments of seedlings growing in equivalent treatments as described

for survival.

3. Results

3.1. Effects of species, herbivore exclusion, and root and shoot

competition on tree seedling survival and growth in grassland

Protection from root competition increased percentage survival

of tree seedlings in the grassland by 40% over the first 18 months

(F = 8.42, p < 0.01) and by 58% over the subsequent 10 months

(F = 11.5, p < 0.001;

Fig. 1

) (


Appendix E in Tables E.1 and E.2

). During

the first interval the response to root competition differed between

species (interaction F = 2.96, p < 0.05), and was much more marked

for Macaranga (

Fig. 1


a), but the interaction was not significant dur-

ing the second census interval (

Fig. 1

b). Survival was greater for



seedlings of Dimocarpus and Symplocos than those of Syzygium dur-

ing both the initial 18 months of the experiment (F = 13.8, p < 0.001)

and the subsequent 10 months (F = 16.7, p < 0.001). Seedling sur-

vival of Macaranga was similar to that of Syzygium in the presence

of root competition, but increased to that of Dimocarpus and Sym-

plocos when root competition was eliminated. Herbivore exclusion

and removal of the grass canopy to eliminate shoot competition

did not affect seedling survival in the grassland plots during either

interval.

Across all species, mean seedling RGR

h

was four times greater



in the absence of root competition during the first 18 months of

the experiment (F = 19.0, p < 0.001), but there was no effect of pro-

tection from root competition during the subsequent 10 months

(

Appendix E in Tables E.3 and E.4



;

Fig. 2


). During the first interval the

response to root competition differed between species (interaction

F = 5.61, p = 0.001), which is explained by significant responses for

seedlings of Syzygium, Macaranga and Symplocos, but not for those

of Dimocarpus (

Fig. 2


a). Dimocarpus seedlings also had the lowest

values of RGR

h

during both growth intervals (



Fig. 2

). There were

no significant effects of herbivore exclusion or removal of above-

ground competition on RGR

h

during either interval (



Appendix E in

Tables E.3 and E.4

).

0

10



20

30

40



50

60

70



80

90

Dimocarpus



Syzygium

Macaranga

Symplocos

P

e

rc

en

ta

g

e

 su

rv

iv

al

 af

te

r 18 

m

on

th

s

With root competiton

Without root competition

a

***



ns

ns

ns



0

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

80



90

Dimocarpus

Syzygium

Macaranga

Symplocos

Transplant Species

P

e

rc

e

n

ta

ge

 s

u

rv

iv

al

 be

tw

e

e

n 1

8

-2

8

 m

o

nt

hs

b

Fig. 1. Mean (and standard error) percentage survival in response to root compe-



tition treatments for seedlings of four native tree species planted into grassland in

Knuckles Forest Reserve during (upper panel) 0–18 months post-transplantation

and (lower panel) 18–28 months post-transplantation. The significance of the dif-

ference in seedling survival between root competition treatments for each species

during the first interval is indicated as follows: ns, not significant; ***, p < 0.001. The

treatment effect was not significant in the second interval (lower panel).

3.2. Effects of species, herbivory and root competition on survival

and growth in forest

Only the species term was significant in the minimum adequate

models for seedling survival in the forest over the two growth inter-

vals (F = 23.5, p < 0.001 and F = 14.3, p < 0.001 for 0–18 months and

18–28 months, respectively) (

Appendix E in Tables E.5 and E.6

).

Seedlings of Symplocos and Dimocarpus had consistently higher sur-



vival than those of Syzygium during both periods, while survival of

Macaranga seedlings was not significantly different to that of Syzy-

gium (

Fig. 3


). However, Macaranga seedlings had the highest RGR

h

over both time intervals and mean RGR



h

of both Macaranga and

Symplocos seedlings was significantly higher than that of Syzygium

during the first 18 months (

Fig. 4

). However exclusion of herbivores



and removal of root competition had no effect on the survival or

growth of tree seedlings during either time interval (

Appendix E

)

in Tables E.5, E.6, E.7 and E.8.



3.3. Differences in survival and growth between forest and

grassland

Survival differed between species during both intervals for

the subset of seedlings in equivalent treatments represented in

both grassland and forest, (F = 26.2, p < 0.001 and F = 18.5, p < 0.001,


Author's personal copy

A.M.T.A. Gunaratne et al. / Forest Ecology and Management 262 (2011) 229–236

233

Fig. 2. Mean (and standard error) seedling RGR



h

in response to root competition

treatments for four native tree species planted into grassland in Knuckles Forest

Reserve during the periods 0–18 months post-transplantation (upper panel) and

18–28 months post-transplantation (lower panel). The significance of the difference

in seedling RGR

h

between root competition treatments for each species during the



first interval is indicated as follows: ns, non significant; **, p < 0.01; ***, p < 0.001.

The treatment effect was not significant in the second interval (lower panel).

0

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

80



90

Dimocarpus

Syzygium

Macaranga

Symplocos

P

ercen

ta

g

e su

rvi

val

 0-18

 m

o

n

th

s

***


***

a

ns



0

10

20



30

40

50



60

70

80



90

Dimocarpus

Syzygium

Macaranga

Symplocos

Transplant Species

P

er

cen

tag

e su

rv

iv

al

 b

et

ween

 18-28

 

m

o

nt

hs

***


***

ns

b



Fig. 3. Mean percentage survival (bars show one standard error of the mean) of

seedlings of four tree species planted into lower montane rain forest fragments in

Sri Lanka. Survival is reported separately for (a) transplantation to 18 months and

(b) from 18 to 28 months. The significance of the differences in mean survival of

Macaranga, Symplocos and Dimocarpus compared to Syzygium is indicated as follows:

ns, not significant; ***, p < 0.001.

0

0.02


0.04

0.06


0.08

Dimocarpus

Syzygium

Macaranga

Symplocos

Transplant Species

Mean

 R

G

R

 in

 h

eig

h

t o

ver

 f

ir

st

 18 

mo

n

th

s

***


**

ns

(cm cm



-1

 month

-1

)

Fig. 4. Mean (and one standard error of the mean) RGR

h

per month for seedlings of



four tree species planted into forest fragments in Sri Lanka over the first 18 months

of the experiment. The significance of the differences in mean survival between the

RGR of Dimocarpus, Macaranga and Symplocos when compared to Syzygium indicated

as follows: ns, not significant; **, p < 0.01; ***, p < 0.001.

respectively), but there were otherwise no significant effects

of habitat or root competition treatment on seedling survival

(

Appendix E, in Tables E.9 and E.10



). During the first 18 months

of the experiment, mean RGR

h

was greater for seedlings protected



from root competition (F = 55.3, p < 0.001), and the response to

release from root competition was much greater in the grass-

land than the forest habitat (interaction F = 11.9, p < 0.001,

Fig. 5


a).

Mean RGR


h

also differed between species during this interval

0

0.02


0.04

0.06


0.08

0.1


0.12

0.14


Dimocarpus

Syzygium

Macaranga

Symplocos

Species

M

ea

n

 R

G

R

 in

 h

eig

h

t b

et

w

ee

n

  0

-1

Forest


Grassland

Species (d.f=3, F=58.45)           : p<0.001  

Habitat:Species (d.f=3, F=3.29): p<0.05

b

0



0.01

0.02


0.03

0.04


0.05

0.06


0.07

0.08


d

n

a



l

s

s



a

r

G



t

s

e



r

o

F



Habitat

M

ean

 R

G

R

 i

n

 h

ei

g

h



b

etween

  

0-

18 

m

ont

hs

With root competition

Without root

competition

Habitat (d.f=1, F=0.14):  p=0.716            

Root (d.f=1, F=55.29): p<0.001            

Habitat:Root (d.f=1, F=11.85): p<0.001 

a

(cm cm



-1

 month

-1

)

m

ont

hs

(cm cm

-1

 month

-1

)

Fig. 5. Mean (and one standard error of the mean) RGR

h

per month for seedlings of



four tree species planted into grassland and forest fragments in Sri Lanka over the

first 18 months of the experiment: (a) effects of the presence (closed grey bars) and

absence (open bars) of root competition for all species combined and (b) differences

in growth among species in grassland (open bars) and forest (closed grey bars).



Author's personal copy

234


A.M.T.A. Gunaratne et al. / Forest Ecology and Management 262 (2011) 229–236

(F = 58.5, p < 0.001) and species showed differential responses

to growth in forest vs. grassland (interaction F = 3.29, p < 0.05).

Macaranga seedlings had the highest mean values of RGR

h

and


these values did not differ between forest and grassland, while

Dimocarpus seedlings grew slowly and growth in the grassland

was only 21.5% that in the forest (

Fig. 5


b). By contrast mean

RGR


h

of Symplocos seedlings was 79.1% greater in the grassland

than the forest. During the subsequent 10 months mean relative

growth rate across all species was significantly greater (F = 13.6,

p < 0.001) in grassland (0.005

± 0.002 cm cm

-1

month


-1

) than forest

(

−0.002 ± 0.002 cm cm



-1

month


-1

), and differed between species

(F = 5.91, p < 0.001), but there were no effects of root competition

or interactions of habitat and either root competition or species

(

Appendix E in Tables E.11 and E.12



).

4. Discussion

4.1. Effects of competition and vertebrate herbivores on tree

seedling growth and survival

Root competition was a more significant constraint to tree

seedling growth and survival in the grassland than the shade

imposed by the grass canopy or the effects of vertebrate herbi-

vores. Up to now, competition for below-ground resources has

been implicated indirectly as a barrier to secondary succession in

degraded and/or abandoned pastures (

Holl et al., 2000; Nepstad

et al., 1996; Posada et al., 2000; Slocum, 2000; Sun and Dickson,

1996

), but few studies in restoration settings have isolated the dif-



ferential importance of competition for above- vs. below-ground

resources in abandoned grasslands (

Griscom et al., 2009; Hooper

et al., 2002

). Root competition is known to be an important con-

straint on tree seedling establishment in natural and semi-natural

plant communities, and to have differential impacts between sites

in relation to canopy cover, below-ground resource availability and

climate (

Coomes and Grubb, 2000; Putz and Canham, 1992

). Inhibi-

tion of tree seedlings by grasses may arise because grasses typically

have a much greater root length to mass ratio than tree seedlings,

and established grasslands possess a high fine root density in sur-

face soils (

Holl, 1988; Nepstad et al., 1996

). The finely-divided root

system of grasses is an efficient strategy for foraging for scarce

resources in soils, particularly immobile elements such as phos-

phorus (


Vance et al., 2003

). These effects are analogous to the

mechanisms that constrain tree seedling establishment in natural

tropical grassland along an increasing aridity gradient (

Coomes and

Grubb, 2000

). Our experiment cannot determine whether competi-

tion for nutrients and/or water contributed to the positive response

of tree seedling growth to release from root competition in the

grassland, but our measurements of soil nutrient and water avail-

ability (Table 1 in

Gunaratne et al., 2010

) suggest that either factor

might have been limiting. Since conversion from the natural for-

est, the soils at these grassland sites have been affected by removal

of top soil, erosion, multiple phases of cultivation, compaction by

grazing herbivores and increased direct exposure to solar radia-

tion, rainfall and high winds. These processes have led to significant

reductions in soil organic matter and in concentrations of most

major nutrient elements, and a loss of soil structure. We observed

that many tree seedlings planted into the grasslands showed symp-

toms of chlorosis, possibly arising from the low soil nutrient status

of the soils, and wilting of the tree seedlings during the dry seasons.

Further research is required to determine the relative importance

of low nutrient and/or water availability on tree seedling establish-

ment.


Vertebrate herbivory had no effect on the growth and survival

of tree seedlings planted into either grassland or forest habi-

tats. This result was surprising because our study sites provide

habitat for populations of both wild herbivores and domesticated

water buffaloes (see Section

2

: study site), and our results con-



trast with the conclusions of studies conducted in neotropical sites

(

Griscom et al., 2009; Holl and Quiros-Nietzen, 1999; Williams-



Linera et al., 1998

). The contrasting outcomes may reflect lower

herbivore population sizes or differences in foraging behaviour

between the herbivores resident at different study sites. In addi-

tion we observed that some fenced plants were attacked by

vertebrate herbivores that were able to climb over or under the

fences and feed on shoot tips and young leaves. The percent-

age of damaged seedlings was lowest in seedlings of Macaranga

(14%), intermediate in Syzygium (25%) and Dimocarpus (31%), and

highest in Symplocos (35%). Hence more research is needed to

determine the differential impacts of vertebrate herbivores of

small body size, such as rodents, on seedling fate at our study

site.

The impacts of root competition on tree seedling growth rate



were much more marked in the grassland than the forest habitat.

During the first 18 months of the experiment, mean relative growth

rate was greater for seedlings planted into the forest when root

competition was present, but greater in the grassland in the absence

of root competition. This interaction may have arisen through a

combination of mechanisms. It is well-known that seedlings of

woody plants growing in shade have a lesser capacity to increase

growth rate in response to an increase in nutrient availability

(

Canham et al., 1999; Grubb et al., 1996; Latham, 1992



), which may

explain the greater differential in growth rates in response to reduc-

tion in root competition for seedlings growing in exposed grassland

than the shaded forest understorey. However, the lower growth

rates of seedlings in grassland than forest habitats in the presence

of root competition suggests that, in addition, the lower availability

of nutrients and/or water in grassland than forest soils (

Gunaratne

et al., 2010

), combined with intense competition for those limited

resources with a high density of grass roots, more than compen-

sates for the reduction in irradiance beneath the forest canopy.

This perspective suggests that it is not the ‘harsh microclimate’

of the exposed grassland environment that causes a failure of tree

seedling establishment at this site, but an inability of tree seedlings

to cope with low below-ground resource availability in the pres-

ence of competing grass roots. However, we acknowledge that

the relative impact of shade compared to below-ground resource

availability on tree seedling growth would be greater in sites with

more nutrient-rich or more consistently moist soils (

Coomes and

Grubb, 2000; Putz and Canham, 1992

), which implies that man-

agement prescriptions for over-coming these abiotic barriers to

tree establishment are strongly site-specific (

Dalling and Burslem,

2008

).

During the first 18 months of the experiment, the impact of



root competition on growth and survival of tree seedlings in

the grassland differed strongly between species. The fast-growing

light-demanding species Macaranga indica was the most respon-

sive to the elimination of root competition in terms of survival,

while Macaranga as well as the intermediate species Symplocos and

the shade-tolerant species Syzygium all showed positive growth

responses to release from root competition. Dimocarpus, which

was the only species to show faster growth in forest than grass-

land habitats overall, was unresponsive to root competition in the

grassland in terms of either survival or growth. Other studies have

found that fast-growing and/or light-demanding plants are more

sensitive to nutrient supply (

Baraloto et al., 2006; dos Santos et al.,

2006; Lawrence, 2003

), but we know of only limited evidence that

these traits translate into a differential response in terms of release

from root competition in established plant communities (

Coomes


and Grubb, 2000

). Our study supports the suggestion that some

fast-growing light-demanding plants such as Macaranga indica

have limited capacity to persist in competition with established


1   2   3


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə