This summary has been produced by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water



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This summary has been produced by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, 

Population and Communities (SEWPC) for the Natural Resource Management Spatial 

Information System.

It highlights important elements of the biodiversity of the region in two ways:

 • Listing species which may be significant for management because they are found only in 

   the region, mainly in the region, or they have a conservation status such as endangered 

   or vulnerable.

 

 • Comparing the region to other parts of Australia in terms of the composition and distribution 



   of its species, to suggest components of its biodiversity which may be nationally significant.

The summary was produced using the Australian Natural Heritage Assessment Tool 

(ANHAT),  which analyses data from a range of plant and animal surveys and collections from

across Australia to automatically generate a report for each NRM region. Data sources

(Appendix 2) include national and state herbaria, museums, state governments, CSIRO, Birds 

Australia and a range of surveys conducted by or for DEWHA.



Biodiversity Summary for NRM Regions

Guide to Users

Background

What is the summary for and where does it come from?

 • ANHAT currently contains information on the distribution of over 30,000 Australian taxa. 

   This includes all mammals, birds, reptiles, frogs and fish, 137 families of vascular plants (over 

   15,000 species) and a range of invertebrate groups. The list of families covered in ANHAT 

   is shown in Appendix 1. Groups not yet covered in ANHAT are not included in the 

   summary.

 • The data used for this summary come from authoritative sources, but they are not perfect.

   All species names have been confirmed as valid species names, but it is not possible to 

   confirm all species locations. The summary summarises the input data, so errors found in the

   original data would also be reflected in this summary.

 • The scientific names and taxonomic concepts used in this report reflect an ANHAT view of 

   the data and not necessarily that found in government censuses, databases or other

   authoritative lists.

Limitations

Australian Natural Heritage Assessment Tool

Groups not yet covered in ANHAT are not included in the

summary.

(ANHAT),

Page 1 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11



Reading the Biodiversity Summary

The summary is divided into two sections: Highlights



Species List.

and


Highlights section

This section draws attention to species of special interest, or characteristics of the biodiversity 

in the region which rate very highly compared to the rest of Australia. 

It contains the following:

 • Total number of nationally rare and threatened species found in the region and listed under

   the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation (EPBC) Act.  

 • A list of families which have a very high level of species richness or endemism compared to

   the rest of Australia. 

   

   - Species richness counts the number of different species found in a given area.



   - Endemism estimates the degree to which species found in a given area have small

     geographic ranges. The smaller the range of a species, the more it contributes to the

     endemism score. 

   In this summary, a threshold value of 2% was used. This means that compared to the rest

   of the country, the families listed in the summary may have a significant focus of diversity

   here, because all or part of the region has richness or endemism scores within the top 2% of

   areas in Australia.

 • A count of the number of species which have more than 50% of their recorded range

   within the region. If a species shows a value of 100% it indicates its distribution is restricted

   to that particular region as all the available records are in that region.

Page 2 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11


This section shows species which may be significant for biodiversity management in the region 

because:


 • they are listed in the EPBC Act as critically endangered, endangered, vulnerable, or

   conservation dependent;

 • their distribution lies entirely or primarily within the region.

For each plant or animal family listed, this section also gives the total number of species in the 

country, and how many of them are found in the region.

  

Note that this list covers species in the families listed in Appendix 1.



Many species found in the region will not be listed because they don’t meet either of the two 

criteria above. The aim of providing a selected species list is to narrow the view from a very 

large number of species, to those which may be a focus of conservation activity in the region. 

Species which are largely restricted to the region may not have any conservation concerns, but 

may deserve attention because their future lies with the region and those who manage it.

A list of all species in the region belonging to the families listed in Appendix 1 is also available.

For more information please see: www.environment.gov.au/heritage/anhat/index.html

Species List section

Page 3 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11



Highlights

Biodiversity Summary for NRM Region

Swan, Western Australia

This summary was produced by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, 

Population and Communities using the Australian Natural Heritage Assessment Tool (ANHAT).  

ANHAT is a database and decision support tool which uses over 33 million specimen and 

survey records for vertebrates, selected invertebrates and 137 vascular plant families (over 

15,000 species).  This Biodiversity Summary does not include exotic or extinct species.



Threatened species (Enviroment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act)

Total number of threatened species (Environment Protection and Biodiversity 

Conservation Act) in this region which belong to the families covered by this Biodiversity 

Summary (Appendix 1)

2 species declared as critically endangered

28 species declared as endangered

35 species declared as vulnerable

Compared to the rest of Australia parts of this region show a high level of richness for the 

following families. This means that the number of species in these families is in the top 2% 

compared to the rest of the country.



Species Richness

Vertebrate fauna

- Family Atrichornithidae - Scrub-birds

- Family Elapidae - Front fang snakes

- Family Myobatrachidae - Myobatrachid or Southern Frogs

- Family Pomatomidae - Bluefish, Tailor

- Family Pygopodidae - Legless lizards

- Family Scincidae - Skinks

Invertebrate fauna

Species Restricted to this Region

There are 307 species with greater than 50% of their recorded range in the region.

Of these species, 130 species have 100% of their recorded range in the region.

The proportion of sampled range (%) as shown in the Species List is an indication of the 

distribution of the species in the region in relation to other parts of Australia.   

See the Species List for details.

Page 4 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11


- Family Actinopodidae - Two-doored Trapdoor Spiders

- Family Aeshnidae - Hawker, Duskhawker and Emperor Damselflies

- Family Aleyrodidae - Whiteflies

- Family Apidae - Social Bees

- Family Artheneidae - 

- Family Asilidae - Robber Flies

- Family Barychelidae - Brush-footed Trapdoor Spiders

- Family Bulimulidae - Elongate High-spired Land Snails

- Family Cercopidae - 

- Family Cixiidae - 

- Family Colletidae - Short-tongued Bees

- Family Coreidae - 

- Family Cydnidae - Burrower Bugs

- Family Cymidae - 

- Family Dytiscidae - Dytiscidine Water Beetles

- Family Eurybrachyidae - 

- Family Formicidae - Ants

- Family Gelastocoridae - Toad Bugs

- Family Geocoridae - 

- Family Halictidae - 

- Family Hemicorduliidae - Emerald and Swamp Emerald Dragonflies

- Family Hyocephalidae - 

- Family Idiopidae - Trapdoor Spiders

- Family Lestidae - Ringtail, Reedling and Dusky Spreadwing Damselflies

- Family Lycosidae - Wolf Spiders

- Family Lygaeidae - 

- Family Megachilidae - 

- Family Miridae - Miridae

- Family Mydidae - Mydas Flies, Wasp-mimic Flies

- Family Nemesiidae - Funnel-web Spiders

- Family Oxygastridae - Orange Streamcruiser Dragonfly

- Family Pachygronthidae - 

- Family Paramelitidae - 

- Family Pentatomidae - Stinkbugs

- Family Petaluridae - Petaltail Dragonflies

- Family Piesmatidae - 

- Family Pomatiopsidae - Salt-lake Snails

- Family Psyllidae - 

- Family Reduviidae - Assassin Bugs

- Family Rhinotermitidae - Termite

- Family Rhyparochromidae - Seed Bugs

- Family Scutelleridae - 

- Family Succineidae - Amber Land Snails

- Family Synthemistidae - Spottail and Tigertail Dragonflies

- Family Termitidae - Termite

- Family Thaumastocoridae - 

- Family Therevidae - Stiletto Flies

- Family Tingidae - Lacebugs



Vascular flora

- Family Anarthriaceae - 

Page 5 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11


- Family Asteraceae - Daisies and Allies

- Family Boryaceae - Pincushion Lillies

- Family Casuarinaceae - She-oaks

- Family Centrolepidaceae - Centrolepid Sedges

- Family Colchicaceae - Nancies and Allies

- Family Cyperaceae - Sedges

- Family Dilleniaceae - Guinea Flowers

- Family Droseraceae - Sundews

- Family Epacridaceae - Southern Heaths

- Family Fabaceae - Peas

- Family Haemodoraceae - Bloodroots, Conostyles, Kangaroo Paws and their

- Family Hemerocallidaceae - 

- Family Hydatellaceae - Hydatellid Herbs

- Family Iridaceae - Irises and Allies

- Family Juncaginaceae - Water Ribbons

- Family Limeaceae - 

- Family Menyanthaceae - Marshwort

- Family Myrtaceae - Native Myrtles

- Family Orchidaceae - Orchids

- Family Portulacaceae - Purslane

- Family Potamogetonaceae - Sea Grasses and Horned Pondweeds, Pondw

- Family Proteaceae - Banksias, Grevilleas and Allies

- Family Restionaceae - Restiona Sedges

- Family Sterculiaceae - Kurrajongs and Bottletrees

- Family Stylidiaceae - Triggerplants and Allies

- Family Thymelaeaceae - Pimeleas

Page 6 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11


Compared to the rest of Australia parts of this region show a high level of endemism for the 

following families, placing them in the top 2% compared to the rest of the country.



Endemism

Vertebrate fauna

- Family Acanthizidae - Scrubwrens, Thornbills and Allies

- Family Atrichornithidae - Scrub-birds

- Family Carangidae - Amberjacks, Jacks, Pilotfishes, Pompanos, Queenfish

- Family Chelidae - Side-necked Tortoises

- Family Elapidae - Front fang snakes

- Family Eupetidae - Whipbirds, Quail-thrushes and Jewel-babblers

- Family Galaxiidae - Galaxias, Salamanderfish

- Family Meliphagidae - Honeyeaters and Australian Chats

- Family Percichthyidae - Australian Freshwater Basses, Australian Freshwat

- Family Plotosidae - Eel-Tailed Catfishes

- Family Pomatomidae - Bluefish, Tailor

- Family Pygopodidae - Legless lizards

- Family Scincidae - Skinks

- Family Tetraodontidae - Blowfishes, Pufferfishes, Puffers, Toadfishes, Toby

Invertebrate fauna

- Family Actinopodidae - Two-doored Trapdoor Spiders

- Family Aleyrodidae - Whiteflies

- Family Apidae - Social Bees

- Family Aradidae - Flat bugs, Bark bugs

- Family Artheneidae - 

- Family Asilidae - Robber Flies

- Family Austrocorduliidae - Hawk, Mosquitohawk and Swiftwing Dragonflies

- Family Barychelidae - Brush-footed Trapdoor Spiders

- Family Bulimulidae - Elongate High-spired Land Snails

- Family Cercopidae - 

- Family Cicadidae - 

- Family Cixiidae - 

- Family Colletidae - Short-tongued Bees

- Family Coreidae - 

- Family Corixidae - Waterboatmen

- Family Cydnidae - Burrower Bugs

- Family Cymidae - 

- Family Dytiscidae - Dytiscidine Water Beetles

- Family Eurybrachyidae - 

- Family Formicidae - Ants

- Family Gelastocoridae - Toad Bugs

- Family Glacidorbidae - Freshwater Snails

- Family Halictidae - 

- Family Hemicorduliidae - Emerald and Swamp Emerald Dragonflies

- Family Hesperiidae - Skippers, flats, awls & darts

- Family Hyocephalidae - 

- Family Idiopidae - Trapdoor Spiders

Page 7 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11


- Family Lestidae - Ringtail, Reedling and Dusky Spreadwing Damselflies

- Family Libellulidae - Perchers, Archtails and other Dragonflies

- Family Lycosidae - Wolf Spiders

- Family Lymnaeidae - Eutrophic Freshwater Snails

- Family Megachilidae - 

- Family Megapodagrionidae - Flatwing Damselflies

- Family Miridae - Miridae

- Family Mydidae - Mydas Flies, Wasp-mimic Flies

- Family Nemesiidae - Funnel-web Spiders

- Family Notonectidae - Backswimmers

- Family Nymphalidae - Browns, Nymphs, Danaines

- Family Ochteridae - Velvety Shore Bugs

- Family Oxygastridae - Orange Streamcruiser Dragonfly

- Family Pachygronthidae - 

- Family Paramelitidae - 

- Family Pentatomidae - Stinkbugs

- Family Petaluridae - Petaltail Dragonflies

- Family Piesmatidae - 

- Family Pomatiopsidae - Salt-lake Snails

- Family Psyllidae - 

- Family Reduviidae - Assassin Bugs

- Family Rhinotermitidae - Termite

- Family Rhyparochromidae - Seed Bugs

- Family Scutelleridae - 

- Family Succineidae - Amber Land Snails

- Family Synthemistidae - Spottail and Tigertail Dragonflies

- Family Thaumastocoridae - 

- Family Therevidae - Stiletto Flies

- Family Tingidae - Lacebugs

Vascular flora

- Family Aizoaceae - Pigfaces

- Family Anarthriaceae - 

- Family Aponogetonaceae - Pond Lilies

- Family Asteraceae - Daisies and Allies

- Family Boryaceae - Pincushion Lillies

- Family Casuarinaceae - She-oaks

- Family Centrolepidaceae - Centrolepid Sedges

- Family Chenopodiaceae - Saltbushes and Allies

- Family Colchicaceae - Nancies and Allies

- Family Cupressaceae - Native Cypress

- Family Cyperaceae - Sedges

- Family Dilleniaceae - Guinea Flowers

- Family Dioscoreaceae - Native Yams

- Family Droseraceae - Sundews

- Family Epacridaceae - Southern Heaths

- Family Fabaceae - Peas

- Family Haemodoraceae - Bloodroots, Conostyles, Kangaroo Paws and their

- Family Hemerocallidaceae - 

- Family Hydatellaceae - Hydatellid Herbs

- Family Hydrocharitaceae - Swamp Lily, Eel Weed, Frogbit and Water Thym

Page 8 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11



- Family Iridaceae - Irises and Allies

- Family Juncaginaceae - Water Ribbons

- Family Limeaceae - 

- Family Menyanthaceae - Marshwort

- Family Myrtaceae - Native Myrtles

- Family Orchidaceae - Orchids

- Family Portulacaceae - Purslane

- Family Potamogetonaceae - Sea Grasses and Horned Pondweeds, Pondw

- Family Proteaceae - Banksias, Grevilleas and Allies

- Family Restionaceae - Restiona Sedges

- Family Sterculiaceae - Kurrajongs and Bottletrees

- Family Stylidiaceae - Triggerplants and Allies

- Family Thymelaeaceae - Pimeleas

- Family Xyridaceae - Xyris Herbs

Page 9 of  53

Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

21-Jan-11


 

 

Common Name

 

EPBC

Status

Proportion of

sampled range

in the region (%)

Most

recent

record

Species List

Species are shown only if:

 - listed as Vulnerable, Critically Endangered, Endangered,

   or Conservation dependent under the EPBC Act;

 - the proportion of the sampled range in the region is above 50%.

Vertebrate fauna

Actinopterygii

Plotosidae

Eel-Tailed Catfishes

(1 out of 19 species in Australia)

Tandanus bostocki

Freshwater Cobbler

100


1982

This region rates highly for endemism of Plotosidae.

Tetraodontidae

Blowfishes, 

Pufferfishes, Puffers, 

Toadfishes, Tobys

(2 out of 18 species in Australia)

Polyspina piosae

Orangebarred Puffer

50

2006



This region rates highly for endemism of Tetraodontidae.

Amphibia

Myobatrachidae

Myobatrachid or 

Southern Frogs

(17 out of 121 species in Australia)

Crinia insignifera

Squelching Frog

50

2003



Heleioporus barycragus

Western Marsh Frog

67

2002


This region rates highly for richness of Myobatrachidae.

Page 10 of  53

21-Jan-11


Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

 

 

Common Name

 

EPBC

Status

Proportion of

sampled range

in the region (%)

Most

recent

record

Aves

Acanthizidae

Scrubwrens, Thornbills 

and Allies

(10 out of 43 species in Australia)

Dasyornis longirostris

Western Bristlebird

Vulnerable

4

1998


This region rates highly for endemism of Acanthizidae.

Atrichornithidae

Scrub-birds

(1 out of 2 species in Australia)

Atrichornis clamosus

Noisy Scrub-bird

Vulnerable

4

This region rates highly for richness and endemism of Atrichornithidae.

Cacatuidae

Cockatoos

(9 out of 14 species in Australia)

Calyptorhynchus baudinii

Long-billed Black-Cockatoo

Vulnerable

12

2001


Calyptorhynchus latirostris

Short-billed Black-Cockatoo

Endangered

23

2002



Diomedeidae

Albatrosses

(4 out of 5 species in Australia)

Diomedea exulans

Wandering Albatross

Vulnerable

1

1987


Thalassarche chrysostoma

Grey-headed Albatross

Vulnerable

22

1990



Eupetidae

Whipbirds, Quail-

thrushes and Jewel-

babblers

(2 out of 9 species in Australia)

Psophodes nigrogularis

Western Whipbird

Vulnerable

1

1992


This region rates highly for endemism of Eupetidae.

Megapodiidae

Mound-builders

(1 out of 3 species in Australia)

Leipoa ocellata

Malleefowl

Vulnerable



<1

1973


Procellariidae

Fulmars, Petrels, Prions 

and Shearwaters

(14 out of 22 species in Australia)

Halobaena caerulea

Blue Petrel

Vulnerable

10

1999


Macronectes giganteus

Southern Giant-Petrel

Endangered

4

2001



Macronectes halli

Northern Giant-Petrel

Vulnerable

4

2002



Pachyptila turtur

Fairy Prion

Vulnerable

1

1993



Page 11 of  53

Species are shown only if:

 - listed as Vulnerable, Critically Endangered,

   Endangered, or Conservation dependent

   under the EPBC Act;

 - the proportion of the sampled range

   in the region is above 50%.

21-Jan-11



Biodiversity summary for Swan WA

 

 

Common Name

 

EPBC

Status

Proportion of

sampled range

in the region (%)

Most

recent

record

Mammalia

Dasyuridae

Dasyurids (Quolls, 

Antechinus, Dunnarts 

and Allies)

(8 out of 55 species in Australia)

Dasyurus geoffroii

Western quoll

Vulnerable

19

2001


Sminthopsis griseoventer

Grey-bellied dunnart

Vulnerable

7

2004



Macropodidae

Wallabies, Kangaroos 

and Tree-kangaroos

(6 out of 41 species in Australia)

Setonix brachyurus

Quokka

Vulnerable



9

1995


Myrmecobiidae

Numbat

(1 out of 1 species in Australia)

Myrmecobius fasciatus

Numbat

Vulnerable



8

1976


Otariidae

Eared Seals

Каталог: system -> files -> pages -> 27ac7460-d929-4887-9da5-604b3c0751da -> files
pages -> Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area Values Study in the Cessnock Local Government Area and Surrounds
pages -> Wildlife Trade Operation proposal Harvest and export of native wildlife. Introduction
pages -> Draft banksia Woodlands of the Swan Coastal Plain – Draft description and threats
pages -> This summary has been produced by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water
pages -> Appendix b – additional information about the ecological community
pages -> Focusing on the Landscape Biodiversity in Australia’s National Reserve System
pages -> Verticordia harveyi (Autumn Featherflower) Advice Page 1 of 4 Advice to the Minister for the Environment and Heritage from the Threatened Species Scientific Committee
pages -> Consultation Document on Listing Eligibility and Conservation Actions
pages -> Approval of an artificial propagation program
files -> This list has been produced by the Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water


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