Tronox management pty ltd cooljarloo west titanium minerals


  Significance of Vegetation



Yüklə 32.99 Mb.
Pdf просмотр
səhifə6/102
tarix24.08.2017
ölçüsü32.99 Mb.
1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   102

3.8  Significance of Vegetation 

In this report, the local distribution of a VT  is defined as the mapped distribution within the 

Study Area, and the  regional  distribution refers to the total  known distribution of the  VT in 

Western Australia.   

 

The  local  significance  of  VTs  can  be  measured  by  the  mapped  extent  of  the  VT  within  the 



Study Area, and the type and extent of landforms they are associated with.  They may also be 

significant in containing a particularly significant flora taxon or taxa that may be uncommon 

or  restricted  (e.g.  T-DRF  and  rare  or  restricted  Priority  flora,  or  a  disjunct  occurrence  of  a 

particular  taxon).    Table  6  presents  local  conservation  significance  rankings  of  VTs  in  the 

Study  Area,  based  on  these  criteria,  with  ‘Very  Low’  indicating  the  lowest  conservation 

significance ranking, and ‘Very High’the highest. 

 

Table 6: 

Descriptions  of  Local  Conservation  Significance  Ranking  of  Vegetation 

Types in the Study Area 

 

Conservation 



Significance 

Ranking 

Description 

Very Low 

The  VT  is  very  widespread  through  the  Study  Area  (occupies  >30  %  of  the 

Study Area); and 

VT does not represent preferred habitat for Threatened (T) Flora, and such flora 

has not been recorded in the VT 

Low 

The  VT  is  widespread  through  the  Study  Area  (occupies  >10  %  of  the  Study 



Area); and  

VT does not represent preferred habitat for Threatened (T) Flora, and such flora 

taxa have not been recorded in the VT 

Moderate 

The  VT  is  widespread  through  the  Study  Area  (occupies  >10%  of  the  Study 

Area); and  

VT does represent preferred habitat for Threatened (T) Flora, and such flora taxa 

have been recorded in the VT 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

25.



 

Conservation 

Significance 

Ranking 

Description 

High 


The VT is moderately restricted in the Study Area (occupies < 10 % of the Study 

Area; or 

VT is mapped on a relatively restricted landform type (i.e. claypans, areas with 

lateritic substrate) 

VT may represent preferred habitat for Threatened (T) flora, and such flora have 

been recorded in VT 

Very High 

The  VT  is  corresponds  with  a  State  or  Commonwealth  listed  Threatened 

Ecological Community or Priority Ecological Community; or 

The VT is highly restricted in the Study Area (occupies <1% of the Study Area); 

and 

The VT is preferred habitat for Threatened (T) Flora species, or flora taxa ranked 



as P1 or P2 

 

Determining the regional conservation significance of the VTs is difficult as there is no broad 



regional dataset  including the Study Area  available.  The nearest  publicly  available regional 

dataset  (as  presented  by  Gibson  et  al.  1994)  does  not  extend  northwards  to  cover  the  Study 

Area.  Likewise, the vegetation of the majority of nearby nature reserves has not been mapped 

at  a  VT  level.    However,  there  is  limited  regional  data  available  through  historical  work 

undertaken by Woodman Environmental (2007b; 2009a), including quadrats placed in nearby 

Eneminga Nature Reserve, R 40916, as well as in UCL.  There is also some qualitative data 

available  with  regards  to  the  restricted  wetlands  survey  undertaken  by  Woodman 

Environmental (Woodman Environmental 2013c).   

 

The descriptions of VTs mapped within the Study Area are also compared against listed TEC 



and  PEC  descriptions  (both  listed  at  State  and  Federal  levels)  (DEC  2013b;  2013c;  DoE 

2013c)  to  determine  the  likely  presence  of  these  communities  within  the  Study  Area.    By 

definition, any TECs or PECs are considered to be regionally significant. 

 

The quadrat data collected within the Study Area can be considered a sub-regional dataset in 



itself.  The Study Area covers 34 402 ha, the majority of which (32 452 ha; 94 %) is located 

on  vegetation  system  association  Bassedean_1030.    A  total  of  30  1306  ha  of  this  area  is 

uncleared;  this  represents  37  %  of  the  current  extent  of  this  vegetation  system  association 

throughout Western Australia (38 % of the current extent of this vegetation system association 

in IBRA subregion SWA02). 

 

A qualitative assessment with regard to the regional conservation significance of VTs of the 



Study  Area  has  been  undertaken.      The  assessment  has  taken  into  account  the  known 

distribution  of  these  VTs  outside  of  the  Study  Area,  the  likelihood  of  any  of  the  VTs  being 

listed  TECs  or  PECs,  and  the  extent  of  these  VTs  mapped  within  the  Study  Area  in 

combination with the types of landforms on which these VTs have been mapped. 



3.9  Vegetation Condition Mapping 

Vegetation condition was recorded at all quadrats, and also opportunistically within the Study 

Area during the 2012 survey where significant areas of disturbance to vegetation were noted 

(e.g.  weed  infestations).    Vegetation  condition  was  described  using  the  vegetation  condition 

scale  for  the  South  West  Botanical  Province  (Keighery  1994),  as  displayed  in  Table  5.  

Vegetation  condition  polygon  boundaries  were  developed  using  this  information  in 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

26.



 

conjunction with aerial photography interpretation, and were digitised as  for vegetation  type 

mapping polygon boundaries. 

3.10  Survey for Conservation Significant and Introduced Flora 

As  per  Table  3,  and  shown  on  Figure  6,  survey  for  CS  and  introduced  flora  taxa  has  been 

historically  undertaken  in  areas  of  likely  impact  by  future  operations,  and  more  widely 

through  the  Study  Area.    These  studies  include  survey  of  exploration  drilling  lines  for  CS 

flora  taxa,  (including  survey  for  indivdiuals  both  on  and  away  from  proposed  drilling  lines) 

and  searching  for  CS  and  introduced  flora  taxa  during  more  widespread  mapping  exercises, 

including  during  quadrat/site  assessment  and  travelling  between  quadrats/sites.    Due  to  the 

relatively  high  intensity  of  historical  surveys  throughout  the  Study  Area,  the  distribution  of 

both CS and introduced flora taxa are generally well known.  

 

Due to the level of historical survey for CS and introduced flora taxa within the Study Area, 



specific targeted searches for these taxa within areas of proposed impact were not undertaken 

during  the  2012  flora  and  vegetation  survey.    However,  both  CS  and  introduced  taxa  were 

recorded while conducting the current vegetation survey, including within quadrats and whilst 

traversing between quadrats.   

 

Where  populations  of  CS  taxa  were  identified  during  the  current  survey  a  representative 



collection  of  material  was  made,  and  the  abundance  and  spatial  distribution  (using  GPS 

coordinates)  of  individuals  within  each  population  was  recorded.    Any  occurrences  of 

introduced flora were treated as for populations of CS flora. 

3.11  Significance of Conservation Significant Flora Populations 

In  this  report,  the  local  distribution  of  a  flora  taxon  is  defined  as  one  occurring  within  the 

Study  Area,  and  the  regional  distribution  refers  to  the  known  distribution  of  the  taxon  in 

Western  Australia.    Locations  of  plants  are  considered  separate  populations  if  there  is  a 

distance of more than approximately 500 m between locations (Stack 2010). 

 

The  significance  of  a  local  population  of  a  CS  flora  taxon  to  the  regional  conservation 



significance of the taxon depends upon the extent of the regional distribution of the taxon, the 

number of known populations of the taxon, and the location of local  distribution (i.e. within 

the Study Area) within the overall regional distribution of the taxon (i.e. throughout the State).  

The  significance  of  the  local  population/s  of  CS  flora  taxa  within  the  Study  Area  to  the 

regional conservation significance of the taxon has been determined using Table 7.   

 

Table 7: 



Significance of Local Populations to the Overall/Regional Conservation of 

Species 

 

Ranking 



Description 

High 


 

Known range of taxon either entirely located within the study area, or within the 



survey area and to a radius of <5km of the study area; or 

 



Taxon known from <5 discrete populations, including within the survey area; and 

 



Study area on boundary of known regional distribution; or 

 



Taxon listed as Threatened 

Moderate 

 

Known range of taxon extends <50km; and 



 

Taxon known from >5 discrete populations; and 



 

Study area may be on boundary of known regional distribution 



Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

27.



 

Ranking 

Description 

Low 


 

Known range of taxon extends >50km; and 



 

Taxon known from >20 discrete populations; and 



 

Study area not on boundary of known regional distribution 



 

3.12  Limitations of Survey 

Table  8  presents  the  limitations  of  the  flora  and  vegetation  survey  of  the  Study  Area  in 

accordance with EPA Guidance Statement No. 51 (EPA 2004). 

 

Minor  limitations  have  been  noted  with  regard  to  aspects  such  as  disturbance  levels  (fire 



history) and access issues, affecting both structure and composition of the vegetation in some 

areas  and  ability  to  access  vegetation;  however,  these  were  seen  as  being  minor.    The 

historical  level  of  information  with  regards  to  CS  flora  taxa  is  high;  however,  additional 

survey of final footprints to determine the level of impact to such taxa is likely to be required, 

especially  for  newly  recorded  species  such  as  Paracaleana  dixonii  (T-DRF).    Further 

investigation  including  analysis  of  several  VTs  may  in  future  be  warranted,  after  moderate 

levels of variability were seen. 

 


Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

28.



 

Table 8: 

Limitations of the Flora and Vegetation Survey of the Study Area 

 

Potential Limitation Factor 



Level of Limitation on Survey 

Comment 

Level of survey. 

No limitation. 

Level  2  (Detailed)  Survey:    A  detailed  survey  was  conducted  throughout  September  to 

November 2012 within the usual peak flowering season in the Northern Sandplain Region 

over  the  majority  of  the  Study  Area.    Replicated  quadrats  were  established  in  each  VT 

identified by initial aerial photograph interpretation  over the Study Area.  There was also 

inclusion of historical data (both recorded in spring and other seasons) for portions of the 

existing Cooljarloo mining area. 

Competency/experience 

of 

the 


consultant(s) carrying out the survey. 

No limitation. 

Woodman  Environmental  personnel  have  had  experience  in  conducting  similar 

assessments in the Northern  Sandplain  Region,  with  mentoring  given to less experienced 

botanists  throughout  the  survey.    All  data  collected  in  the  field  was  quality  assessed  by 

senior Woodman Environmental personnel and all plant identifications verified by senior 

Woodman Environmental personnel. 

Scope  (floral  groups  that  were  sampled; 

some  sampling  methods  not  able  to  be 

employed because of constraints?) 

No limitation. 

All vascular groups that were present during the detailed survey were sampled; good foot 

and vehicle access to most of the Study Area allowed for appropriate sampling techniques 

(quadrat  establishment,  foot  transects)  to  be  employed.  Survey  over  most  of  study  area 

undertaken at usual peak flowering time (Spring). 

Proportion  of  flora  identified,  recorded 

and/or collected. 

No limitation. 

High proportion (approximately 80 % of total expected taxa in the area; see Section 3.6) of 

perennial and ephemeral vascular taxa recorded; adequate intensity and method of survey, 

and  good  average  rainfall  totals  prior  to  commencement  of  survey  (between  June  and 

August 2012).    All vascular taxa recorded had at least one reference specimen collected, 

with  specimens  identified  at  the  WAHerb  and  a  selection  of  new  taxa  for  the  area 

recorded. 

Sources  of  information  e.g.  previously 

available  information  (whether  historic 

or recent) as distinct from new data. 

No limitation. 

Sources  include  government  databases  (DPaW  TP  List,  TPFL  and  WAHerb  databases) 

and numerous unpublished studies undertaken both by Woodman Environmental and other 

consultants  within  or  adjacent  to  the  Study  Area;  historical  locations  of  CS  flora  taxa 

within  the  Tronox  database  also  accessed.    Good  contextual  information  was  available 

including previous local experience of Woodman Environmental. 

The  proportion  of  the  task  achieved  and 

further work which might be needed. 

Minor  limitation  on  survey  of 

distribution of CS flora taxa. 

Level  2  survey  complete,  intensity  considered  to  be  adequate.    Statistical  analysis 

considered  adequate,  however  delineation  of  VTs  may  benefit  from  additional  statistical 

analyses.    Further  survey  of  CS  flora  to  accurately  define  impacts  may  be  required, 

especially in relation to newly recorded CS flora. 


Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

29.



 

Potential Limitation Factor 

Level of Limitation on Survey 

Comment 

Timing/weather/season/cycle. 

No limitation. 

Detailed  field  survey  conducted  throughout  September  to  November  2012.    Peak 

flowering  season  for  the  area,  with  average  rainfall  over  the  usual  ‘wet’  winter  months 

(June  -  August)  and  leading  up  to  the  survey;  taxa  of  both  ephemeral  and  perennial  taxa 

flowering at the time of the survey. 

Disturbances  (e.g.  fire,  flood,  accidental 

human  intervention  etc.),  which  affected 

results of survey. 

Minor limitation. 

Previous fire history of parts of the Study Area influenced patterns discernible from aerial 

photography and also existing structure and composition of the vegetation in some areas; 

this had a minor effect on the survey results in regard to vegetation polygon boundaries. 

Intensity of survey. 

No limitation. 

Survey intensity adequate to identify floristic and structural groupings of terrestrial flora as 

required by a Level 2 survey, with replication of quadrats through plant community types 

and  additional  foot  searching  allowed  for  identification  of  native  and  introduced  taxa.  

Lower intensity of survey over areas  where access  was  more  difficult.  Lower density  of 

sampling in western and far southern parts due to limited access and previously established 

sites (historical data).  Moderate level of searching for CS flora taxa over potential areas of 

impact (mainly historical data).  

Completeness and mapping reliability. 

Minor limitation. 

Vegetation  survey  of  Study  Area  considered  complete;  additional  searching  of  footprints 

and surrounds for certain CS flora taxa may be required. Mapping reliability good as high 

resolution  aerial  photography  was  used,  235  new  quadrats  were  established  (total  370 

quadrats  used  in  analysis),  and  foot  and  vehicle  transecting  was  employed;  fire  history 

affected  some  vegetation  patterns  discernible  on  aerial  photography.    Statistical  analysis 

returned generally strong groups, however several VTs contained either moderate levels of 

variation or appeared very similar to other groups suggesting additional statistical analysis 

may be warranted. 

Resources and experience of personnel. 

No limitation. 

Adequate  resources  and  taxonomists  with  appropriate  expertise  in  Northern  Sandplain 

flora  were  utilised.    Woodman  Environmental  personnel  with  adequate  experience  in  the 

Northern  Sandplains  area  were  utilised,  mentoring  given  to  less  experienced  team 

members. 

Remoteness and/or access problems. 

Minor limitation. 

Access to the Study Area was considered adequate given the compact nature of the Study 

Area, occurrence of local tracks and proximity of public roads.  Access was more difficult 

in the far southern and western parts of the Study Area. 

 

 


Tronox Management Pty Ltd 

 

Cooljarloo West Mineral Sands Mine 

 

 

Flora and Vegetation Assessment 

Woodman Environmental Consulting Pty Ltd 

 

30.



 

4.

 

RESULTS 

4.1

 

Flora of the Study Area 

In total, 1156 discrete vascular flora taxa and 1 putative hybrid have been recorded within or 

immediately  adjacent  to  the  Study  Area,  representing  86  families  and  318  genera.    This 

includes  1063  native  taxa,  and  93  introduced  (weed)  taxa.    The  families  with  the  highest 

number  of  taxa  were  Myrtaceae  (134  taxa),  Proteaceae  (104  taxa),  Fabaceae  (98  taxa), 

Cyperaceae (67 taxa) and Asteraceae (64 taxa).  A full list of taxa is presented in Appendix E.   

 

A total of 641 flora taxa were recorded during surveys in 2012, of which 65 are introduced.  



This  includes  81  native  plant  taxa  (including  8  with  incomplete  identifications)  and  34 

introduced taxa which have not previously been recorded within the Study Area.   



4.1.1

 

Conservation Significant Flora Taxa 

A  total  of  67  discrete  CS  flora  taxa,  including  five  potential  CS  flora  taxa  (those  taxa  with 

indeterminate identifications that possibly represent CS flora) have been recorded from within 

the Study Area during both the 2012 and historical surveys (Table 9).  This total includes four 

T-DRF taxa, as listed by DPaW (Strijk 2013; DPaW 2013a).  A total of 23 CS flora taxa were 

recorded  during  the  current  (Spring  2012)  surveys.    Locations  of  the  CS  flora  known  from 

within the Study Area are shown in Figures 7.1 - 7.5, and presented in Appendix H.   

 

Table 9 indicates the number of locations, the equivalent number of populations and the VTs 



in  which  these  taxa  have  been  recorded  to  occur  within  the  Study  Area.    Note  that  records 

from  Cleared  (C)  or  Rehabilitated  (R)  areas  are  historical  records;  the  vegetation  in  these 

areas are now either cleared, or have been cleared and rehabilitated.  The listing of vegetation 

types includes all VTs in which these CS flora taxa have been recorded; the preferred habitat 

of  each  of  these  taxa  (the  most  common  VTs  in  which  these  taxa  have  been  recorded)  are 

further described in Appendix I. 

 

The source data of these taxa and location records has been taken from all historical  studies 



summarised in Section 2.5 (where specific locational data is available), results of searches of 

relevant  DPaW    databases  (DEC  2012)  and  the  Tronox  Iluka  Database  (Tronox  2013b).    A 

dash (‘-’) indicates that no point location data is available. 

 

Table 9: 



Summary  of  Conservation  Significant  Taxa  Known  from  within  the  Study 

Area

 

Taxon  



Conservation 

Code (DPaW 

2012c) 

Number of 

Locations 

Recorded in 

the Study Area 

Total Number of 

Populations 

Known in the 

Study Area 

Vegetation 

Types in 

Which Present 

Allocasuarina grevilleoides 

P3 




Andersonia gracilis 

T-DRF (VU) 

1094 

39 


1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 9b, 

17, 18, C, R 



Angianthus micropodioides 

P3 


30 

15 


2, 5, 13 

Anigozanthos humilis subsp

chrysanthus 

P4 


17, 18 



Anigozanthos viridis subsp. 

terraspectans 

T-DRF (VU) 

57 

22 


1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9b, 

17, 18 C, R 



Anigozanthos viridis subsp

?terraspectans 

T-DRF (VU) 




1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   102


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə