Types of jambu



Yüklə 82.13 Kb.
Pdf просмотр
tarix18.08.2017
ölçüsü82.13 Kb.

SulangLexTopics021-v1     

 

 

Types of jambu 

by  


David Mead 

 

 



 

 

 



 

 

 



2013 

Sulang Language Data and Working Papers: 

Topics in Lexicography, no. 21 

 

 



 

 

Sulawesi Language Alliance 



http://sulang.org/

 


 

LANGUAGES 

 

  Language of materials  :  English 



 

 

ABSTRACT 



 

Jambu is an Indonesian cover term for several tropical fruit trees. Most of 

these trees belonging to the genus Syzygium, although the term jambu is 

now also applied to two New World species introduced into Indonesia. This 

article provides brief descriptions along with pictures to help lexicographers 

correctly identify nine principal species grown for their fruits, flowers or 

leaves.   

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 



 

Malay apple; Java apple; Water apple; Malabar plum; Java plum; Indonesian 

laurel; Clove; Cashew; Guava; Other species. 

 

 



VERSION HISTORY 

 

Version 1    [16 May 2013]    Drafted January 2002, revised 2010, 2012, 



2013; formatted for publication May 2013. 

 

 



© 2002–2013 by David Mead 

Text is licensed under terms of the Creative Commons 

Attribution-

NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

 license. Images are licensed 

as individually noted in the text. 

 


 

 

Types of jambu 

by  

David Mead 



Jambu is an Indonesian cover term for several tropical fruit trees, most of them belonging 

to the genus S

YZYGIUM

,

1



 although it is now also applied to two New World species 

introduced into Indonesia. This article provides brief descriptions along with pictures to 

help you correctly identify nine principal species grown for their fruits, flowers or leaves.  

Like Indonesian jambu air, the English terms ‘water apple’ and ‘rose apple’ (and the 

related ‘pomarosa’) are generic terms that can refer to several different species. Therefore 

in a dictionary you should be sure to identify plants by scientific name once a positive 

identification has been made. As a further aid to disambiguation, the following table 

summarizes various English and Indonesian common names that I encountered during the 

course of compiling this guide.  

 

S



YZYGIUM MALACCENSE

 

Malay apple, Malay rose 



apple, mountain apple 

jambu bol, jambu mérah, 

jambu dersana, jambu 

darsana, jambu susu 

 

S



YZYGIUM SAMARANGENSE

 

Java apple, wax apple 



jambu semarang, jambu air 

semarang 

 

S



YZYGIUM AQUEUM

 

water apple, water cherry, 



watery rose apple 

jambu air 

 

S



YZYGIUM JAMBOS

 

Malabar plum, pomarosa, 



rose apple 

jambu mawar, jambu air 

mawar, jambu kraton 

 

S



YZYGIUM CUMINI

 

Java plum, jambolan 



jamblang, jambu jamblang, 

jambu keling, jambu juwét, 

duwét  

 

S



YZYGIUM AROMATICUM

 

clove 



céngkéh 

 

S



YZYGIUM

 

POLYANTHUM



 

Indonesian laurel (tree), 

Indonesian bay leaf, Indian 

bay leaf (leaves) 



pohon salam (tree), daun 

salam (leaves) 

 

A



NACARDIUM OCCIDENTALE

 

cashew 



jambu mété, jambu médé, 

jambu ménté, jambu monyét  

 

P



SIDIUM GUAJAVA

 

guava, apple guava, 



common guava 

jambu batu, jambu biji, 

jambu siki, jambu klutuk 

 

                                                



1

 Formerly classified as genus E

UGENIA

. The Malay term is from Sanskrit jambu (Jones 2007:133), which 



Monier-Williams (1899:412) defines as ‘the rose apple tree (E

UGENIA JAMBOLANA

 or another species).’  


 

 



 

Malay apple 

Malay apple, Malay rose apple, mountain apple = jambu bol, jambu mérah, jambu 



dersana, jambu darsana, jambu susu = S

YZYGIUM MALACCENSE



 (L.) Merr. & L. M. 

Perry 


This tree is distinguished by its pinkish-purple to dark red flowers, and pear-shaped fruits 

that are 2 to 4 inches long, longer than they are wide. Fruits are red, though some have 

pink or white stripes, and in one variety (the ‘white-fruited Malay apple,’ Indonesian 

jambu susu) it is entirely ivory-white. 

Some sources identify this tree under the synonym E

UGENIA MALACCENSIS

 L. This tree is 

said to be native to Malaysia, though now widely cultivated throughout Indonesia. 

     


 

L:  © 2012 Andres Hernandez S. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

 license.  

R: © 2007 Forest & Kim Starr. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution 3.0 Unported

 license. 

    


 

L:  © 2008 

www.tradewindsfruit.com

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2006 Philip Cordrey. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 


 

 



 

Java apple 

Java apple, wax apple = jambu semarangjambu air semarang = S

YZYGIUM 

SAMARANGENSE



 (Blume) Merr. & L. M. Perry 

This species can be distinguished from S.

 MALACCENSE

 in that S.

 SAMARANGENSE

 has 


yellowish-white flowers, and fruits that are only 1-1/3 to 2 inches long, wider than they are 

long. This tree is indigenous from Malaysia to the Andaman and Nicobar Islands. While 



jambu semarang doesn’t appear in Kamus Besar, it is the name supported by the 

Indonesian version of Wikipedia

2

 and other web sites. Sometimes it is referred to under 



the now disused synonyms S

YZYGIUM JAVANICUM

 Miq. or E

UGENIA JAVANICA

 Lam. 

     


 

L:  © 2008 

www.tradewindsfruit.com

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2007 Mohanraj K. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Atribusi-BerbagiSerupa 2.5 Generik

 license. 

      


  

 

L:  © 2006 B. Navez. Licensed under the Creative Commons 



Atribusi-BerbagiSerupa 3.0 Unported

 license. 

R: © 2012 David Mead. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

 license. 

                                                

2

 Wikipedia Bahasa Indonesia, s.v. “Jambu semarang,” 



http://id.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jambu_semarang

 

(accessed January 16, 2013). 



 

 



 

Water apple 

water apple, water cherry, watery rose apple = jambu air = S

YZYGIUM AQUEUM

 (Burm. 

f.) Alston 

Fruits of this tree vary from red to light red to white. They are very similar to the Java 

apple described above, but are typically even smaller, only 5/8 to 3/4 inches long. This 

species occurs naturally from southern India to eastern Malaysia.  

    


 

L:  © 2009 

www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2009 

www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

   


 

L:  © 2009 

www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2009 

www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 


 

 



 

Malabar plum 

Malabar plum, pomarosa, rose apple = jambu mawarjambu air mawarjambu kraton = 

S

YZYGIUM JAMBOS 



(L.) Alston  

Flowers are large, white, and showy. Fruits are nearly round or only slightly pear-shaped, 

1-1/2 to 2 inches in diameter. Immature fruits are reddish-blushed, but the skin turns 

greenish, pale yellow or white as the fruits ripen. The calyx at the tip of the fruit is 

persistent, tough, green and prominent. This fruit is indigenous to Indonesia and Malaysia. 

       


 

L:  © 2008 

www.tradewindsfruit.com

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2008 

www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

      


 

L:  © 2008 

www.tradewindsfruit.com

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2012 Jon Richfield. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 license. 


 

 



 

Java plum 

Java plum, jambolan = jamblangjambu jamblangjambu keling, jambu juwét, duwét = 

S

YZYGIUM CUMINI



 (L.) Skeels  

The fruits of this tree somewhat resemble grapes but are even more oblong, and turn from 

green to light magenta, finally to dark purple or almost black as they ripen. Children like 

to eat the fruits, which turn their mouths purplish-black. The species name is not spelled 

CUMINII

 as in older editions of Kamus Besar. Synonyms include S



YZYGIUM JAMBOLANUM

 

DC. and E



UGENIA JAMBOLANA

 Lam.  


      

 

L:  © 2009 Mauro Guanandi. Licensed under the Creative Commons 



Attribution 2.0 Generic

 license. 

R: © 2010 Mauricio Mercadante. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

 license. 

    


 

L:  © 2008 

www.tradewindsfruit.com

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2010 Ton Rulkens. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

 license. 


 

 



 

Indonesian laurel 

Indonesian laurel (tree), Indonesian bay leaf, Indian bay leaf (leaves) = pohon salam (tree), 



daun salam (leaves) = S

YZYGIUM


 

POLYANTHUM



 (Wight) Waplers 

Round fruits (about 1/2 inch in diameter) are red to purple-black when ripe, edible, and 

like the Java plum a favorite of children. However, the tree is better known for its leaves, 

which are used in cooking similar to bay leaves.  

This tree is sometimes identified by its synonym E

UGENIA POLYANTHA

 Wight. The 

Javanese name is manting.  

   

 

L:  © 2009 



www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2009 

www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

           

 

L:  © 2011 Ahmad Fuad Morad. Licensed under the Creative Commons 



Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

 license. 

R: © 2012 David Mead. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

 license.   


 

 



 

Clove 

clove = céngkéh = S

YZYGIUM AROMATICUM

 (L.) Merr. & L. M. Perry 

The clove tree is known for its aromatic dried flower buds. If the buds are not picked, the 

flowers will bloom and develop into small, oblong, dark fruits with little pulp. Cloves are 

native to the Maluku Islands, and of course had an important role in the spice trade which 

brought Arab merchants and later European explorers to Indonesia. 

       


 

L:  2005. Public domain. 

R: Photo by Forest & Kim Starr. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution 3.0 Unported

 license. 

     


 

L:  © 2012 David Mead. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

 license.   

R: © 2013 David Mead. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported

 license.   

 


 

 



 

Cashew 

cashew = 



jambu mété, jambu médé, jambu ménté, jambu monyét

 = A


NACARDIUM 

OCCIDENTALE

 L. 

Cashew trees are native to northeastern Brazil, but were brought by the Portuguese to 



India in the sixteenth century and are now widely planted in other parts of the world, 

including Southeast Asia and Africa. Although not a S

YZYGIUM

 species, it is easy to see 



how cashews are related to jambu in a folk classification.  

The fruit of the cashew tree consists of an edible, pear-shaped pseudocarp (false fruit, in 

English the ‘cashew apple’), and the kidney-shaped drupe containing a single seed, the 

cashew nut.  

      

 

L:  © 2009 



www.natureloveyou.sg

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 

R: © 2011 Andres Hernandez S. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

 license. 

       


 

L:  © 2009 Abhishek Jacob. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Generic

 license. 

R: © 2004 Femto. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 license. 


 

 

10 



 

Guava 

guava, apple guava, common guava = jambu batu, jambu biji, jambu siki, jambu klutuk, 



jambu kelutuk = P

SIDIUM GUAJAVA

 L. 

The guava, also called ‘apple guava’ or ‘common guava’ to distinguish it from other 



P

SIDIUM


 species, is native to tropical America. It was introduced by the Spanish into the 

Philippines and by the Portuguese into India.  

In Indonesia there are two varieties, one with pink flesh and one with white flesh. There is 

also a small-fruited variety (fruits smaller than or barely exceeding 1 inch in diameter) 

called jambu biji kecil or jambu cina, which some consider to be a separate species, 

P. 


PUMILUM

 Vahl. The name jambu k(e)lutuk comes from Javanese.  

      

 

L:  © 2008 Mauro Guanandi. Licensed under the Creative Commons 



Attribution 2.0 Generic

 license. 

R: © 2009 Ria Tan. Licensed under the Creative Commons 

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic

 license. 

 

     



          

 

L:  © 2006 Rajesh Dangi. Licensed under the Creative Commons 



Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported

 license. 

R: © 2008 

www.tradewindsfruit.com

. Copyright protected. Used by permission. 


 

 

11 



 

Other species 

Worldwide there are more than 1100 species of S

YZYGIUM

, with the greatest diversity 



found between Malaysia and Australia—not to mention likely additional species which 

haven’t even been described yet. In light of such factors, it is not possible to provide a 

comprehensive guide to this ‘large, difficult genus.’ Given the near certainty that you will 

come across other species, some of the clues which may help you determine that a tree is a 

S

YZYGIUM


 species (or not, as the case may be) are the following characteristics: 

 



leaves are opposite; 

 



flowers occur in loose, branching clusters; 

 



stamens are numerous; 

 



fruits are succulent (tender, juicy), often ‘crowned’ at the apex (tip) by the persistent 

calyx; 


 

fruits are usually one-seeded (rarely two or more), the seed relatively large in 



relation to the fruit. 

Following usage in Australia, an unidentified S

YZYGIUM

 species could be referred to in 



English as a ‘brush cherry’ or a ‘lilly pilly,’ and in Indonesian possibly as a jambu hutan.  

In at least one case, the Indonesian term jambu is applied to a minor tree of Sumatra, 

namely D

IOSPYROS DIEPENHORSTII



 Miq., which according to some sources is known as 

jambu dipo. In actuality, this tree is a kind of persimmon, and it should be noted that 

persimmons differ on a number of the above-given characteristics. For example persimmon 

leaves are alternate, stamens are not prominent, and if the fleshy, gummy or leathery fruit 

is crowned with a persistent calyx, it will always be at the stem end not at the apex. 

Having said that much, I herewith leave persimmons and the related ebonies to a later 

treatment. 



References 

Jones, Russell. 2007. Loan-words in Indonesian and Malay. Leiden: KITLV Press. 

Monier-Williams, Monier. 1899. A Sanskrit-English dictionary etymologically and 

philologically arranged with special reference to cognate Indo-European languages

With the collaboration of Professor E. Leumann, Professor C. Cappeller, and other 

scholars. Oxford: Clarendon. [Reprinted 1956.] 

Tim penyusun kamus. 2001. Kamus besar bahasa Indonesia, 3rd ed. Jakarta: Balai 



Pustaka. 

Document Outline

  • Types of jambu
  • Malay apple
  • Java apple
  • Water apple
  • Malabar plum
  • Java plum
  • Indonesian laurel
  • Clove
  • Cashew
  • Guava
  • Other species
  • References



Поделитесь с Вашими друзьями:


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2019
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə