United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə1/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
United Nations Development Programme 
 
Project title: Building Capacities to Address Invasive Alien Species to Enhance the Chances of Long-term Survival 
of Terrestrial Endemic and Threatened Species on Taveuni Island, Surrounding Islets and Throughout Fiji 
Country: Fiji 
Implementing Partner: Biosecurity 
Authority of Fiji (Ministry of Economy, 
Public Enterprises, Public Services and 
Communication) 
Management Arrangements: 
National Implementation Modality 
(NIM)  
UNDAF/Country Program OutcomeUNDAF for the Pacific Sub-region 2013-2017 UNDAF Outcome Area 1: 
Environmental management, climate change and disaster risk management 
 
UNDAF Outcome 1.1: Improved Resilience of PICTs, with a particular focus on communities, through integrated 
implementation of sustainable environmental management, climate change adaptation/mitigation, and disaster 
risk management 
UNDP Strategic Plan Output: UNDP Strategic Plan Environment and Sustainable Development Primary Outcome 
2: Output  2.5. Legal and regulatory frameworks, policies  and institutions enabled to  ensure the  conservation, 
sustainable  use,  access  and  benefit  sharing  of  natural  resources,  biodiversity  and  ecosystems,  in  line  with 
international conventions and national legislation 
UNDP Social and Environmental Screening Category: 
Moderate 
UNDP Gender Marker: 
Atlas Project ID/Award ID number: 00084576 
Atlas Output ID/Project ID number: 00092525 
UNDP-GEF PIMS ID number: 5589 
GEF ID number: 9095 
Planned start date: July 2017 
Planned end date: June 2022 
LPAC date: March 2017 
Brief project description: Invasive alien species (IAS) are the greatest threat to biodiversity in the Pacific Islands. 
Numerous IAS have been introduced to Fiji, with significant impacts on natural landscapes and biodiversity. The 
recent  introduction  of  Giant  Invasive  Iguana  –  GII  (Iguana  iguana)  –  to  Fiji  represents  the  first  established 
population of this species in the Pacific and is a potential bridgehead to some of the world’s most isolated island 
ecosystems. GII have already caused harm throughout  the Caribbean where they are spreading fast and have 
significant  detrimental  effects,  including  on  native  biodiversity,  agriculture  and  tourism.  Although  there  are 
several national and local-level initiatives to address IAS in Fiji, these efforts, lack adequate capacity and an overall 
comprehensive strategy to ensure a systematic and effective protection of biodiversity-rich and important areas. 
An effective, systematic and comprehensive eradication effort against GII, before populations grow beyond the 
point where they can be controlled is currently lacking and urgently needed.  
 
The preferred solution requires a suite of preventative measures to reduce IAS incursion and establishment, that 
will  be  introduced  by  this  project,  including:  (i)  Strengthened  IAS  policy,  institutions  and  coordination  at  the 
national  level  to  reduce  the  risk  of  IAS  entering  Fiji,  including  a  comprehensive  multi-sectorial  coordination 

2 | 
P a g e
 
 
mechanism to ensure the best possible use of resources and capacities for prevention, management, eradication, 
awareness and restoration, and capacity building of biosecurity staff; (ii) Improved IAS prevention and surveillance 
operations at the island level on Taveuni, Qamea, Matagi and Laucala to reduce potential for pest species to enter 
and  establish  within  the  four-island  group  and  move  between  these  islands;  (iii)  Implementation  of  a 
comprehensive eradication plan for GII based on comprehensive survey and public outreach on Taveuni and an 
increase in removal effort of GII on the islands of Qamea, Matagi, and Laucala; and (iv) Strengthened knowledge 
management  and  awareness  raising  that  targets  the  general  public,  tour  operations  and  visitors,  so  as  to 
safeguard the nation from IAS.  
F
INANCING 
P
LAN
 
GEF Trust Fund  
USD 3,502,968 
UNDP TRAC resources 
USD  
Cash co-financing to be administered by UNDP 
USD  
(1)
 
Total Budget administered by UNDP   USD 3,502,968 
P
ARALLEL CO
-
FINANCING 
(all other co-financing that is not cash co-financing administered by UNDP) 
UNDP   USD   101,096 
Government  USD 26,763,418 
(2)
 
Total co-financing  USD 26,864,514 
(3)
 
Grand-Total Project Financing (1)+(2)  USD 30,367,482 
S
IGNATURES
 
Signature: print name below 
 
Agreed by 
Government 
Date/Month/Year: 
 
Signature: print name below 
 
Agreed by 
Implementing 
Partner 
Date/Month/Year: 
 
Signature: print name below 
 
Agreed by UNDP  Date/Month/Year: 
 
 
 

3 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
I.
 
T
ABLE OF 
C
ONTENTS
 
I.
 
Table of Contents ............................................................................................................................................... 3
 
II.
 
Development Challenge ..................................................................................................................................... 6
 
III.
 
Strategy ............................................................................................................................................................ 14
 
IV.
 
Results and Partnerships.................................................................................................................................. 18
 
V.
 
Feasibility ......................................................................................................................................................... 50
 
VI.
 
Project Results Framework .............................................................................................................................. 57
 
VII.
 
Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) Plan ........................................................................................................... 62
 
VIII.
 
Governance and Management Arrangements ................................................................................................ 66
 
IX.
 
Financial Planning and Management ............................................................................................................... 69
 
X.
 
Total Budget and Work Plan ............................................................................................................................ 72
 
XI.
 
Legal Context ................................................................................................................................................... 79
 
XII.
 
Annexes ............................................................................................................................................................ 80
 
 
 
 

4 | 
P a g e
 
 
List of Abbreviations  
 
AFL 
Airports Fiji Limited 
BAF 
Biosecurity Authority of Fiji 
CI 
Conservation International 
CTS 
Chief Technical Specialist 
DOE 
Department of Environment 
EDRR 
Early Detection and Rapid Response 
EDP 
Emergency Response Plan 
FIIT 
Four island IAS Taskforce 
FIST 
Fiji Invasive Species Taskforce 
FNU 
Fiji National University 
FRCA 
Fiji Revenue and Customs Authority 
GEF 
Global Environment Facility 
GII 
Giant Invasive Iguana 
GMO 
Genetically Modified Organisms 
GoF 
Government of Fiji 
IAS 
Invasive Alien Species 
IBA 
Important Bird Area 
IUCN 
International Union for the Conservation of Nature 
KBA 
Key Bird Area 
MDG 
Millennium Development Goal 
MEAs 
Multilateral Environmental Agreements 
MEPEPSC 
Ministry of Economy, Public Enterprises, Public Services and Communications 
MOE 
Ministry of Environment 
MTR 
Mid-Term Review 
NBSAP 
National Biodiversity Strategy and Action Plan 
NEC 
National Environment Council 
NGO 
Non-Governmental Organization 
NISFSAP 
National Invasive Species Framework and Strategic Action Plan 
PAO 
Project Administrative and Finance Officer 
PC 
Project Coordinator 
PILN 
Pacific Invasive Learning Network 
PIP 
Pacific Invasive Partnership 
PIR 
Project Implementation Review 
PIU 
Project Implementation Unit 
PPG 
Project Preparation Grant 
SDG 
Sustainable Development Goal 
SIP 
Stakeholder Involvement Plan 
SPC 
Secretariat of the Pacific Community 
SPREP 
Secretariat of Pacific Regional Environment Program 
TE 
Terminal Evaluation 

5 | 
P a g e
 
 
UNDP 
United Nations Development Programme 
UNDP CO 
United Nations Development Programme Country Office 
UNDP RTA 
United Nations Development Programme Regional Technical Advisor 
USP 
University of South Pacific 
WPA 
Women’s Plan of Action 
WWF 
World Wide Fund for Nature 
 
 
 

6 | 
P a g e
 
 
II.
 
D
EVELOPMENT 
C
HALLENGE 
 
 
Fiji is an archipelago nation comprised of 332 islands situated in the southern Pacific Ocean. The country 
covers a total area of some 194,000 km
2
, of which the total land area is 18,376 km
2
. The two largest islands 
of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu comprise more than 85% of the total land area. The third largest of the Fijian 
islands is Taveuni at 434 km
2
. The geographic complexity and isolated nature of Pacific islands have led to 
the development of extremely high levels of terrestrial endemism. More than 946 endemic species are 
currently  recorded  from  Fiji’s  terrestrial  and  freshwater  ecosystems  (with  fewer  than  20  currently 
documented from Fiji’s marine ecosystems). About 23% of Fiji’s 1,769 vascular plant species are endemic, 
including an endemic family of primitive tree (Degeneraceae) and all of Fiji’s 24 native palm species, with 
many species endemic to a single island or site. Fiji’s 27 endemic bird species (or approximately 25% of 
the bird species in the country) include the Fiji petrel (Pseudobulweria macgillivrayi), the red-throated 
lorikeet (Charmosyna amabilis) – which are both listed as critically endangered by IUCN – as well as the 
silktail  (Lamprolia  victoriae),  Ogea  monarch  (Mayrornis  versicolor)  and  black-faced  shrikebill 
(Clytorhynchus nigrogularis), all of which are listed as vulnerable to extinction by IUCN. Reptiles unique to 
Fiji include the Fijian copper-headed skink (Emoia parkeri), Fiji burrowing snake (Ogmodon vitianus), Lau 
central  banded  iguana  (Brachylophus  fasciatus),  Fiji  banded  iguana  (Brachylophus  bulabula),  and  Fiji 
crested  iguana  (Brachylophus  vitiensis);  are  all  threatened  with  extinction.  Of  Fiji’s  known  216  native 
species of land snails, 77% are endemic. In addition, Fiji is home to a range of other unique species of 
mammals (11.7% are endemic), amphibians (67% are endemic), fish and invertebrates.  
 
The isolated nature and extreme vulnerability of island ecosystems and species to impacts such as habitat 
destruction  and  invasive  alien  species  (IAS)  has  resulted  in  many  species  of  this  region  becoming 
endangered,  as  outlined  above.  Much  of  Fiji’s  native  forests  have  been  impacted  and  modified  by 
deforestation,  commercial  and  subsistence  agriculture,  plantation  timber  production  and/or  IAS.  As 
biodiversity is a significant source of revenue for Fiji (including tourism) and a direct source of income and 
livelihood for local communities, the spread of IAS has potential to cause significant economic impacts. 
As  an example,  Fiji’s  gross  earnings  from  tourism  for  the  first  quarter  of  2009,  estimated  at  USD 83.8 
million, is at potential threat from IAS.  
 
The sub-section of the northern division of Fiji that is being considered as an important biosecurity area 
under the project includes Taveuni Island and the surrounding islets of Qamea, Matagi and Laucala. This 
region has retained significant forest and wetland ecosystems across its full altitudinal range, and endemic 
and other native species are better protected in Taveuni than in many other areas of Fiji. Taveuni has not 
yet been severely impacted by some of the numerous IAS that are established on the larger islands of Viti 
Levu and Vanua Levu, such as mongoose (Herpestes javanicus). However, the Giant Invasive Iguana or GII 
(Iguana iguana), an aggressive invasive pest, was recently introduced to nearby Qamea. GII was imported 
illegally into Fiji in 2000, and the first free-living record is from 2009. The introduction of GII is cause for 
concern given that Taveuni is considered one of Fiji’s “conservation strongholds”. Taveuni is one of only 
three large islands with no mongoose in the oceanic Pacific. The absence of the mongoose has resulted in 
the retention not only of many of Taveuni’s endemic fauna species but also Fijian endemics that have 

7 | 
P a g e
 
 
been extirpated or are highly threatened on the larger islands of Viti Levu and Vanua Levu, including the 
endangered Fiji banded iguana (Brachylophus bulabula), the endangered Fijian ground frog (Platymantis 
vitianus), the near-threatened Fijian tree frog (Platymantis vitiensis), and several lizard species that do not 
occur on islands with mongoose. The  endangered Viti or  barred tree-skink (Emoia trossula)  persists  in 
Taveuni, whereas it has been extirpated from Viti Levu and Vanua Levu by mongoose predation. Taveuni 
is  one  of  only  two  remaining  large  forested  landscapes  in  the  Oceanic  Pacific  that  extends  from  the 
mountains  to  the  sea.  There  are  three  terrestrial  protected  areas  on  Taveuni,  namely  Taveuni  Forest 
Reserve (11,160 ha), Ravilevu Nature Reserve (4,108 ha), and Bouma National Heritage Park (3,769 ha). 
The  island  is  an  IUCN/BirdLife  recognized  Key  Biodiversity  Area  (KBA),  and  Taveuni’s  Highlands  are  a 
BirdLife International recognized Important Bird Area (IBA). This IBA supports the majority of the world’s 
silktails (Lamprolia victoria). Bird species endemic to Fiji breed in this IBA, namely the critically endangered 
red-throated  lorikeet  (Charmosyna  amabilis),  the  vulnerable  friendly  ground-dove  (Alopecoenas  stairi
and black-faced shrikebill (Clytorhynchus nigrogularis). Threatened endemic plants include the critically 
endangered Syzygium phaeophyllumAlsmithia longipes and Neuburgia macroloba (endemic to Taveuni). 
Several  invertebrate  and  mammal  species  are  endemic  to  Taveuni  island  itself,  including  the  critically 
endangered  Fijian  monkey-faced  bat  (Mirimiri  acrodonta)  and  Taveuni  beetle  (Xixuthrus  terribilis),  the 
former of which is known only from a few specimens from the summit forests of the island. It is possible 
that other endemics are present that are yet to be discovered. For example, a species of endemic blind 
snake (Ramphotyphlops spp.), known from only one specimen, was recently rediscovered on the island. 
To the east of Taveuni, and in close proximity to it, lie the islands of Qamea (3,400 ha), Laucala (1,000 ha) 
and Matagi (97 ha). Both Qamea and Laucala are well forested with distinct populations of several bird 
species. Laucala has been identified as a KBA, and at Qamea a mangrove forest reserve has been proposed 
but not yet adopted. A distinct population of the Fijian endemic orange dove (Ptilinopus victor) is present 
on Qamea and Laucala. A number of land snails are present on Qamea, including two Fijian endemics, the 
endangered flax snail (Placostylus ochrostoma) and Omphalotropis hispida, known only from the original 
description of the type specimen from Qamea. 
 
Threats and Impacts of Invasive Alien Species 
 
IAS are considered to be possibly the greatest threat to biodiversity in the Pacific Islands. Numerous IAS 
have been introduced to Fiji, with significant impacts on natural landscapes and biodiversity. Introductions 
of IAS continue apace. The recent introduction of GII to Fiji represents the first established population of 
GII in the Pacific and is a potential bridgehead to some of the world’s most isolated island ecosystems. GII 
have already caused harm throughout the Caribbean where they are spreading fast and have been shown 
to  have  significant  detrimental  effects,  including  on  native  biodiversity,  agriculture  and  tourism,  once 
population densities become very high. They are also considered a health risk at high densities as they are 
a  potential  source  of  Salmonella.  Invasion  by  GII  may  adversely  affect  other  fauna  through  predation, 
competition, and transmission of parasites and diseases. Moreover, populations of GII may support larger 
populations of exotic predators, with possible cascading effects to native species. GII have been reported 
to feed on plants, bird eggs, chicks and snails, posing a potential threat to endemic biota, and they may 
also compete with other iguanids and ground-nesting birds for nesting areas. GII are vastly more fecund 
and  aggressive  than  Fiji  central  banded  iguana  (Brachylophus  bulabula)  and  could  impact  on  remnant 

8 | 
P a g e
 
 
small island populations of native iguana at high GII densities. For example, in the Lesser Antilles, where 
the endangered Iguana delicatissima co-occurs with the introduced GII, the latter has displaced the native 
ones, in part by out-breeding it. Fiji’s native Brachylophus iguanids occupy similar niches and habitats to 
GII  and  could  also  be  displaced  by  it.  GII  also  poses  a  risk  to  Fiji  banded  iguana  through  the  possible 
transmission of iguana-specific diseases, parasites and pathogens. In addition, GII could pose a threat to 
local  food  security  as  they  eat  crops  such  as  taro  (
Colocasia  esculenta
), 
cassava  (
Manihot  esculenta
leaves,  bele  (
Abelmoschus  manihot)
,  tomatoes,  cabbage,  beans  and  yams.  Because  GII  burrow  in 
foreshore areas and eat mangroves voraciously, they may also damage and undermine the resilience of 
natural mangrove ecosystems to storm surges if allowed to reach high densities. In Fiji, GII is known to 
have  established  on  three  islands  adjacent  to  one  another,  Qamea  (where  GII  was  first  introduced), 
Laucala  and  Matagi.  The  proximity  of  these  islands  to  Taveuni,  “Fiji’s  conservation  stronghold”,  is  of 
particular concern. Taveuni has not yet been severely impacted by IAS, but significant high-risk IAS species 
such as the mongoose and GII are present on nearby islands. Given this and Qamea’s proximity to Taveuni, 
Fiji’s 2013 State of the Birds Report notes that it “would be a biodiversity conservation disaster” if GII were 
to spread to Taveuni. Given that GII has been known to proliferate and expand its range to catastrophic 
levels under similar climatic conditions present in Fiji, they could be expected to spread to other islands if 
not prevented, where they would pose a very real threat to Fiji’s two threatened native iguanid species 
as GII populations increased.  
 
Introduced alien predators, including mongooses (Herpestes javanicus and Herpestes fuscus), rats (Rattus 
spp.), feral cats (Felis cattus)  and feral pigs have had devastating effects on avifauna and  other native 
animals in Fiji. For example, the small Indian mongoose (Herpestes javanicus), introduced intentionally to 
control rats in the 1880s, preys on many vertebrates and is believed to be responsible for the decline, 
extirpation or extinction of ground-nesting birds, reptiles and amphibians. Additionally, invasive plants, 
herbivores, insects and diseases impact on crops, livestock, horticulture, tourism, fisheries and forests, 
threatening  Fiji’s  economy,  human  health  and  agriculture.  Fiji  is  typical  of  remote  islands  in  the 
susceptibility of its terrestrial biodiversity to IAS. Invasive species typically replace indigenous fauna and 
flora through competition, predation, and elimination of natural regeneration, introduction of diseases 
and parasites and smothering of forests. Mammalian IAS, such as rats, feral cats and other predators, can 
be devastating to avifauna and small fauna, reducing levels of recruitment.  
 
Fiji’s Fifth National Report to the Convention on Biological Diversity highlights the increasing importance 
of  preventing  spread  of  IAS:  “Travel  within  the  Fiji  group  is  increasing  rapidly  and  there  is  a  need  for 
measures to be introduced to prevent the spread of established invasive species within Fiji’s 300+ islands”.  
The nature of the IAS threat has changed dramatically as a result of increased trade and movement of 
people through development of tourism and industrial offshore fisheries. This has increased the number 
of pathways for IAS introduction. This impact is seen in natural areas as well as in productive landscapes. 
Likely pathways of entry of IAS into Fiji include tourism, travel and transport (including plants, animals and 
their  products,  containers  and  packing  materials,  vehicles/boats,  machinery,  shipping  and  personal 
effects)  and  production  sectors  (including  agriculture,  forestry,  wildlife  trade/pets  and  aquaculture). 
Examples of IAS not yet present in Fiji that could have a major negative impact in the country include the 
brown tree snake (Boiga irregularis), ants, beetles, mites, Asian gypsy moth and giant African land snail. 

9 | 
P a g e
 
 
The brown tree snake has established a population of 3 million in Guam, causing species extinctions, as 
well as power outages and health problems. It poses a significant threat to Fiji’s biodiversity if it were to 
invade and successfully establish in the country. The Asian gypsy moth and giant African land snail are 
known to prey vociferously on more than 500 different plant species and also pose a significant potential 
threat to Fiji’s flora if introduced.  
 
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   ...   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə