United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə14/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17
Part A. Integrating Overarching Principles to Strengthen Social and Environmental Sustainability 
QUESTION 1: How Does the Project Integrate the Overarching Principles in order to Strengthen Social and Environmental Sustainability? 
Briefly describe in the space below how the Project mainstreams the human-rights based approach  
Human rights, as laid down in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and other international human rights instruments, are not infringed by the project. The project 
interventions would on the longer-term help sustain the livelihood of local communities that would result in poverty alleviation, improvement of living conditions and 
sustainable development of natural resources, by reducing the threat of IAS on native biodiversity, agricultural productivity and food security, health and trade. In this 
way it will safeguard the economic and social rights of the local communities will also took care of cultural and biological values of the local communities. Staff recruited 
for outreach efforts on the four-islands will comprise of a mix of iTaukei (native Fijians) and Fijian of Indian descent ancestries so that different communities, including 
poor and marginalized segments of these populations can be engaged in the language with which they are most comfortable. The project impacts would expedite right 
to environmental protection. The project will promote greater participation and inclusion of local communities, sectors and other important stakeholders in biosecurity 
and IAS management through delivery of training for communities and sector stakeholders, communications campaigns and inclusion of IAS themes into education 
curricula, to promote strengthened awareness of IAS issues and public participation in prevention and management of IAS. Oversight and accountability for project 
activities at the four islands would rests with the Four-Island IAS Taskforce that would include representatives of the iTaukei Affairs from the district (or sub-district) 
level who are mandated to ensure the protection, and economic and social development of native Fijian communities. This mechanism will facilitate resolution of specific 
grievances or concerns that may arise during project implementation. 
Briefly describe in the space below how the Project is likely to improve gender equality and women’s empowerment 

 
 
137 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
The project incorporates several measures to enhance the role of women. Special mechanisms are envisaged under the project to promote the role of women in various 
activities, such as:  
(i)
 
Capacity building and training activities related to biosecurity (including frontline staff) would ensure that these include specifically women (at least 40% 
women will participate in training events);  
(ii)
 
Efforts will be made to encourage women’s participation in outreach activities (at least 40% of population targeted by outreach program would be women) 
and actively attend outreach events and participating in various project initiatives;  
(iii)
 
Outreach teams at Taveuni will include local women mobilizers who would be involved in the outreach promotion to encourage greater participation of 
women from local communities in biosecurity activities;  
(iv)
 
Outreach and communication strategy will include a specific gender focus;  
(v)
 
Use of gender-sensitive indicators and collection of sex-disaggregated data for monitoring project outcomes and impacts;  
(vi)
 
Encouragement of qualified women applicants for positions within BAF, under government rules and regulations; and  
(vii)
 
Promotion of adequate representation and active participation of women in project specific committees, technical workshops, strategic planning events, 
etc.  
Briefly describe in the space below how the Project mainstreams environmental sustainability 
The objective of the project is to enhance the chances of the long-term survival of terrestrial endemic and threatened species on Taveuni Island and surrounding islets 
by building national and local capacity to prevent, detect, control and manage Invasive Alien Species. IAS of high risk to biodiversity, food security, livelihoods, health 
and trade would be prevented from entering Fiji resulting in reduced threats to endemic and threatened species within Fiji. This would be achieved through: 
(i)
 
Increasing awareness of travelling public, tourism operators, importers and shipping agents of the risks posed by IAS and the need for biosecurity 
measures that would reduce the risks of new introductions of IAS, resulting in reduced threats to endemic and threatened species, as well as reduced 
threats to food security, livelihoods, health and trade. 
 
(ii)
 
Building improved recognition on importance of biosecurity and control of IAS, including improved funding in Fiji that would help further reduce risk of 
invasive species introductions.  
(iii)
 
Strengthened measures for prevention, detection, control of entry of IAS of high risk to biodiversity and economic sectors into Taveuni and surrounding 
islets would also be put in place. 
 
(iv)
 
Increased capacity of Biosecurity Officers within the country as well as enhanced measures for detection, surveillance, monitoring and control of IAS in 
the country, all of which would enhance environmental security and sustainability. 
(v)
 
Compilation of a “black list” of IAS species that pose a high risk to native biodiversity, livelihoods, food security and health in Fiji that will be used to 
support cost-effective measures for improved prevention of these IAS from entering Fiji. 
 
 
 

 
 
138 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Part B. Identifying and Managing Social and Environmental Risks 
QUESTION  2:  What  are  the  Potential 
Social and Environmental Risks?  
Note: Describe briefly potential social and 
environmental 
risks 
identified 
in 
Attachment  1  –  Risk  Screening  Checklist 
(based on any “Yes” responses). 
QUESTION  3:  What  is  the  level  of  significance  of  the 
potential social and environmental risks? 
Note: Respond to Questions 4 and 5 below before proceeding 
to Question 6 
QUESTION 6: What social and environmental assessment and management measures 
have been conducted and/or are required to address potential risks (for Risks with 
Moderate and High Significance)? 
Risk Description 
Impact  and 
Probability 
(1-5) 
Significance 
(Low, 
Moderate, 
High) 
Comments 
Description  of  assessment  and  management  measures  as  reflected  in  the  Project 
design.  If  ESIA  or  SESA  is  required  note  that  the  assessment  should  consider  all 
potential impacts and risks. 
Risk 1: Conflicts of interest and different 
priorities of stakeholders may constrain 
implementation of activities  
 
I = 3 
P = 2 
Low 
Resistance of local 
communities to 
killing/eradication of GII 
that has been to some 
extent exacerbated by 
animal rights groups 
Referred 
to 
SESP 
Attachment  1:  Principle 
1, Questions 5 
Management Measures: Interest will be fostered among stakeholders by 
making the economic case for prevention and control IAS. This would be 
supported by the outreach efforts to create awareness to the impacts of GII 
(as evidenced from other countries in the Caribbean where GII has not be 
controlled, and the impact of other IAS in Fiji itself) on local agriculture, 
biodiversity and economy, if nothing is done to eradicate it from the four 
islands site and prevent its spread elsewhere in Fiji. Through the knowledge 
management component and by outreach to the communities on the four 
islands site under components 3 and 4, the project will build strong 
awareness of the impacts of GII on food security, livelihoods, human health 
and native biodiversity and of the costs of these impacts to local people, if 
nothing is done to eradicate GIIs. The project will also target the outreach to 
NGOs and animal rights groups to create awareness of the potential larger 
impacts to native wildlife and local economy if GIIs are not removed from the 
four islands 
Risk 2: Government officials and 
community organizations do not have 
the capacity to meet their full 
obligations related to the project 
I = 3 
P = 2 
Moderate 
Project preparation 
reveals that state 
government entities and 
local communities may 
not have the capacity to 
ensure the twin benefits 
of conservation and IAS 
eradication. 
Management Measures: A needs assessment for capacity building of 
government, district and local community organizations would be 
undertaken, following which a comprehensive training strategy and plan for 
frontline staff and local communities would be designed and developed early 
during project implementation. International experts will be hired to facilitate 
the conduct of the training programs, as well as staff will be able to 
participate in regional training programs. Training programs would be 
regularly evaluated for their effectiveness and adjusted to meet the needs. In 
addition, BAF will recruit additional front line staff who would be sufficiently 
trained and posted to improve its capacity on the four islands site for 

 
 
139 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Referred 
to 
SESP 
Attachment  1:  Principle 
1, Question 6 
reducing the potential for unwanted non-native species to enter and establish 
within the country or portions of the country for those IAS which are already 
established but not wide spread. A comprehensive strategy for GII eradication 
would be developed and implemented, along with specialized training to 
improve staff skills at survey and detection of GIIs and in improved 
eradication methods.  
Risk 3: Implementation of project 
initiatives within or near critical habitats 
in the landscapes; e.g. protected forests 
and national parks may threaten 
biodiversity conservation.  
I = 2 
P = 2 
Low 
Project interventions in 
terms of eradication of 
IAS are likely to occur 
within and adjacent to 
protected areas and 
critical habitats.  
Referred 
to 
SESP 
Attachment  1:  Principle 
3,  Standard  1,  Question 
1.2  
Management Measures: The primary objective of GII eradication is to 
conserve natural species and biodiversity within the four islands and hence is 
likely to improve conservation outcomes. The project is designed to 
strengthen prevention, detection, control and management of IAS in the 
demonstration areas, which include critical habitats, and environmentally 
sensitive areas that are a priority to protect from IAS, therefore the project’s 
activities should enhance protection for these areas from IAS compared to 
business as usual. Because these areas are environmentally sensitive, any 
control measures implemented under the project will be assessed to ensure 
they do not have any negative impacts on these areas. 
While, it might be necessary to remove IAS from existing protected areas and 
forest reserves, these actions are aimed at exclusively removing the 
introduced GII and protect native species. Non-chemical methods (e.g. 
trapping, shooting etc.) would be used to selectively remove the GII, so as to 
protect native species and habitats and minimize any risk to non-target 
species. The GII eradication plan would be assessed for its impact on critical 
habitats and biodiversity and management action instituted to manage any 
potential environmental and social impacts. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
140 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Risk 4: Eradication activities of GII under 
the project may pose a risk to native 
endangered species (Fiji banded iguana; 
Brachylophus bulabula) if not conducted 
properly. 
I = 2 
P = 1 
Low 
Because juveniles of the 
native and invasive 
Iguana species are similar 
in appearance, there is 
potential for inadvertent 
removal of native Iguanas 
during the eradication 
process  
 
Referred 
to 
SESP 
Attachment  1:  Principle 
3,  Standard  1,  Question 
1.4 
Management Measures: the project will ensure that all personnel involved in 
eradication are properly trained in identification and distinction of the two 
species (there are differences in morphology and behavior). The project will 
also support awareness campaigns to increase public understanding of the 
differences between the native and invasive iguana and the risks posed by the 
invasive. A risk assessment of the eradication plan developed by the project 
will be conducted, and corresponding management and mitigation measures 
incorporated into the eradication plan. 
Risk 5: Natural disasters and climate 
change may affect implementation and 
results of project initiatives. 
 
 
I = 1 
P = 1 
Low 
While, this is very 
unlikely, climate change 
may raise the threat of 
IAS by increasing the 
frequency/severity of 
fires, floods, and other 
natural events and 
thereby decreasing 
ecosystem resilience and 
creating conditions where 
invasive species can more 
easily become 
established.  
Referred to SESP 
Attachment 1: Principle 
3, Standard 2, Question 
2.2 
Management Measures: The project is designed to increase resilience of 
natural ecosystems to climate impacts by reducing the threat of invasive alien 
species that could exacerbate the threat of climate change on native 
biodiversity and ecosystems. Climatic parameters will be considered during 
the undertaking of IAS risk assessments as well as during the preparation of 
the NISFSAP. 
 
QUESTION 4: What is the overall Project risk categorization?  
Select one (see 
SESP
 for guidance) 
 
Comments 

 
 
141 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Low Risk 
 
 
Moderate Risk 

A  risk  assessment  of  the  GII  eradication  plan  would  also  be  undertaken  to 
assess  potential  eradication  risk  and  its  management.  Part  of  the  risk 
management  would include  assessment  of social and environmental  risks. If 
potential  environmental  and  social  impacts  are  identified  during  the 
assessment, specific measures would be instituted to address such concerns.  
High Risk 
 
 
 
 
QUESTION  5:  Based  on  the  identified  risks  and  risk 
categorization, what requirements of the SES are relevant? 
N/A 
 
Check all that apply 
Comments 
Principles 1: Human Rights 

Referred to SESP Attachment 1: Principle 1. Question 5 and 6. 
Principle 2: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment 
 
 
Principle 3: Environmental Sustainability: 

Referred  to  SESP  Attachment  1:  Principle  3.  Standard  1, 
Question 1.2 
Standard 1: Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Natural Resource Management 

Referred  to  SESP  Attachment  1:  Principle  3.  Standard  1, 
Question 1.2 and 1.4 
Standard 2: Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation 

Referred  to  SESP  Attachment  1:  Principle  3:  Standard  2, 
Question 2.2 
Standard 3: Community Health, Safety and Working Conditions 
 
 
Standard 4: Cultural Heritage 
 
 
Standard 5: Displacement and Resettlement 
 
 
Standard 6: Indigenous Peoples 
 
 
Standard 7: Pollution Prevention and Resource Efficiency 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
142 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
143 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
SESP Attachment 1: Social and Environmental Risk Screening Checklist 
 
Checklist Potential Social and Environmental Risks 
 
Principles 1: Human Rights 
Answer  
(Yes/No) 
1. 
Could  the  Project  lead  to  adverse  impacts  on  enjoyment  of  the  human  rights  (civil,  political, 
economic, social or cultural) of the affected population and particularly of marginalized groups? 
No 
2.  
Is there likelihood that the Project would have inequitable or discriminatory adverse impacts on 
affected populations, particularly people living in poverty or marginalized or excluded individuals 
or groups?
 12
  
No 
3. 
Could  the  Project  potentially  restrict  availability,  quality  of  and  access  to  resources  or  basic 
services, in particular to marginalized individuals or groups?  
No 
4. 
Is  there  likelihood  that  the  Project  would  exclude  any  potentially  affected  stakeholders,  in 
particular marginalized groups, from fully participating in decisions that may affect them? 
No 
5. 
 Are there measures or mechanisms in place to respond to local community grievances?  
Yes 
6. 
Is there a risk that duty-bearers do not have the capacity to meet their obligations in the Project? 
Yes 
7. 
Is there a risk that rights-holders do not have the capacity to claim their rights?  
No 
8. 
Have  local  communities  or  individuals,  given  the  opportunity,  raised  human  rights  concerns 
regarding the Project during the stakeholder engagement process? 
No 
9. 
Is there a risk that the Project would exacerbate conflicts among and/or the risk of violence to 
project-affected communities and individuals? 
No 
Principle 2: Gender Equality and Women’s Empowerment 
 
1. 
Is  there  likelihood  that  the  proposed  Project  would  have  adverse  impacts  on  gender  equality 
and/or the situation of women and girls?  
No 
2. 
Would  the  Project  potentially  reproduce  discriminations  against  women  based  on  gender, 
especially regarding participation in design and implementation or access to opportunities and 
benefits? 
No 
3. 
Have women’s groups/leaders raised gender equality concerns regarding the Project during the 
stakeholder engagement process and has this been included in the overall Project proposal and 
in the risk assessment? 
No 
3. 
Would the Project potentially limit women’s ability to use, develop and protect natural resources, 
taking into account different roles and positions of women and men in accessing environmental 
goods and services? 
 
For  example,  activities  that  could  lead  to  natural  resources  degradation  or  depletion  in 
communities who depend on these resources for their livelihoods and well being 
No 
Principle  3:  Environmental  Sustainability:  Screening  questions  regarding  environmental  risks  are 
encompassed by the specific Standard-related questions below 
 
                                                                 
12
 
Prohibited grounds of discrimination include race, ethnicity, gender, age, language, disability, sexual orientation, religion, 
political or other opinion, national or social or geographical origin, property, birth or other status including as an indigenous 
person or as a member of a minority. References to “women and men” or similar is understood to include women and men, 
boys  and  girls,  and  other  groups  discriminated  against  based  on  their  gender  identities,  such  as  transgender  people  and 
transsexuals.
 

 
 
144 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
 
Standard 1: Biodiversity Conservation and Sustainable Natural Resource Management 
 
1.1  
Would  the  Project  potentially  cause  adverse  impacts  to  habitats  (e.g.  modified,  natural,  and 
critical 
habitats) 
and/or 
ecosystems 
and 
ecosystem 
services? 
 
For  example,  through  habitat  loss,  conversion  or  degradation,  fragmentation,  hydrological 
changes 
No 
1.2  
Are any Project activities proposed within or adjacent to critical habitats and/or environmentally 
sensitive  areas,  including  legally  protected  areas  (e.g.  nature  reserve,  national  park),  areas 
proposed  for  protection,  or  recognized  as  such  by  authoritative  sources  and/or  indigenous 
peoples or local communities?  
Yes 
1.3 
Does the Project involve changes to the use of lands and resources that may have adverse impacts 
on habitats, ecosystems, and/or livelihoods? (Note: if restrictions and/or limitations of access to 
lands would apply, refer to Standard 5) 
No 
1.4 
Would Project activities pose risks to endangered species? 
Yes 
1.5  
Would the Project pose a risk of introducing invasive alien species?  
No 
1.6 
Does the Project involve harvesting of natural forests, plantation development, or reforestation?  
No 
1.7  
Does the Project involve the production and/or harvesting of fish populations or other aquatic 
species? 
No 
1.8  
Does  the  Project  involve  significant  extraction,  diversion  or  containment  of  surface  or  ground 
water? 
 
For example, construction of dams, reservoirs, river basin developments, groundwater extraction 
No 
1.9 
Does  the  Project  involve  utilization  of  genetic  resources?  (e.g.  collection  and/or  harvesting, 
commercial development).  
No 
1.10  Would the Project generate potential adverse trans-boundary or global environmental concerns? 
No 
1.11  Would the Project result in secondary or consequential development activities, which could lead 
to adverse social and environmental effects, or would it generate cumulative impacts with other 
known existing or planned activities in the area? 
 
For  example,  a  new  road  through  forested  lands  will  generate  direct  environmental  and  social 
impacts (e.g. felling of trees, earthworks, potential relocation of inhabitants). The new road may 
also  facilitate  encroachment  on  lands  by  illegal  settlers  or  generate  unplanned  commercial 
development  along  the  route,  potentially  in  sensitive  areas.  These  are  indirect,  secondary,  or 
induced impacts that need to be considered. Also, if similar developments in the  same-forested 
area  are  planned,  then  cumulative  impacts  of  multiple  activities  (even  if  not  part  of  the  same 
Project) need to be considered. 
No 
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə