United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə15/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17

Standard 2: Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation 
 
2.1  
Will  the  proposed  Project  result  in  significant
13 
greenhouse  gas  emissions  or  may  exacerbate 
climate change?  
No 
                                                                 
13
 In  regards  to  CO
2,
  ‘significant  emissions’  corresponds  generally  to  more  than  25,000  tons  per  year  (from  both  direct  and 
indirect sources). [The Guidance Note on Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation provides additional information on GHG 
emissions.] 

 
 
145 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
2.2 
Would the potential outcomes of the Project be sensitive or vulnerable to potential impacts of 
climate change?  
Yes 
2.3 
Is  the  proposed  Project  likely  to  directly  or  indirectly  increase  social  and  environmental 
vulnerability to climate change now or in the future (also known as maladaptive practices)? 
For example, changes to land use planning may encourage further development of floodplains, 
potentially increasing the population’s vulnerability to climate change, specifically flooding 
No 
Standard 3: Community Health, Safety and Working Conditions 
 
3.1 
Would  elements  of  Project  construction,  operation,  or  decommissioning  pose  potential  safety 
risks to local communities? 
No 
3.2 
Would  the  Project  pose  potential  risks  to  community  health  and  safety  due  to  the  transport, 
storage, and use and/or disposal of hazardous or dangerous materials (e.g. explosives, fuel and 
other chemicals during construction and operation)? 
No 
3.3 
Does the Project involve large-scale infrastructure development (e.g. dams, roads, buildings)? 
No 
3.4 
Would failure of structural elements of the Project pose risks to communities? (e.g. collapse of 
buildings or infrastructure) 
No 
3.5 
Would the proposed Project be susceptible to or lead to increased vulnerability to earthquakes, 
subsidence, landslides, and erosion, flooding or extreme climatic conditions? 
No 
3.6 
Would  the  Project  result  in  potential  increased  health  risks  (e.g.  from  water-borne  or  other 
vector-borne diseases or communicable infections such as HIV/AIDS)? 
No 
3.7 
Does the Project pose potential risks and vulnerabilities related to occupational health and safety 
due  to  physical,  chemical,  biological,  and  radiological  hazards  during  Project  construction, 
operation, or decommissioning? 
No 
3.8 
Does  the  Project  involve  support  for  employment  or  livelihoods  that  may  fail  to  comply  with 
national  and  international  labor  standards  (i.e.  principles  and  standards  of  ILO  fundamental 
conventions)?  
No 
3.9 
Does the Project engage security personnel that may pose a potential risk to health and safety of 
communities and/or individuals (e.g. due to a lack of adequate training or accountability)? 
No 
Standard 4: Cultural Heritage 
 
4.1 
Will the proposed Project result in interventions that would potentially adversely impact sites, 
structures, or objects with historical, cultural, artistic, traditional or religious values or intangible 
forms of culture (e.g. knowledge, innovations, practices)? (Note: Projects intended to protect and 
conserve Cultural Heritage may also have inadvertent adverse impacts) 
No 
4.2 
Does  the  Project  propose  utilizing  tangible  and/or  intangible  forms  of  cultural  heritage  for 
commercial or other purposes? 
No 
Standard 5: Displacement and Resettlement 
 
5.1 
Would  the  Project  potentially  involve  temporary  or  permanent  and  full  or  partial  physical 
displacement? 
No 
5.2 
Would  the  Project  possibly  result  in  economic  displacement  (e.g.  loss  of  assets  or  access  to 
resources  due  to  land  acquisition  or  access  restrictions  –  even  in  the  absence  of  physical 
relocation)?  
No 

 
 
146 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
5.3 
Is there a risk that the Project would lead to forced evictions?
14
 
No 
5.4 
Would the proposed Project possibly affect land tenure arrangements and/or community based 
property rights/customary rights to land, territories and/or resources?  
No 
Standard 6: Indigenous Peoples 
 
6.1 
Are indigenous peoples present in the Project area (including Project area of influence)? 
No 
6.2 
Is it likely that the Project or portions of the Project will be located on lands and territories claimed 
by indigenous peoples? 
No 
6.3 
Would  the  proposed  Project  potentially  affect  the  rights,  lands  and  territories  of  indigenous 
peoples (regardless of whether Indigenous Peoples possess the legal titles to such areas)?  
No 
6.4 
Has there been an absence of culturally appropriate consultations carried out with the objective 
of achieving FPIC on matters that may affect the rights and interests, lands, resources, territories 
and traditional livelihoods of the indigenous peoples concerned? 
No 
6.4 
Does  the  proposed  Project  involve  the  utilization  and/or  commercial  development  of  natural 
resources on lands and territories claimed by indigenous peoples? 
No 
6.5 
Is there a potential for forced eviction or the whole or partial physical or economic displacement 
of indigenous peoples, including through access restrictions to lands, territories, and resources? 
No 
6.6 
Would the Project adversely affect the development priorities of indigenous peoples as defined 
by them? 
No 
6.7 
Would the Project potentially affect the traditional livelihoods, physical and cultural survival of 
indigenous peoples? 
No 
6.8 
Would  the  Project  potentially  affect  the  Cultural  Heritage  of  indigenous  peoples,  including 
through the commercialization or use of their traditional knowledge and practices? 
No 
Standard 7: Pollution Prevention and Resource Efficiency 
 
7.1 
Would the Project potentially result in the release of pollutants to the environment due to routine 
or  non-routine  circumstances  with  the  potential  for  adverse  local,  regional,  and/or  trans 
boundary impacts?  
No 
7.2 
Would the proposed Project potentially result in the generation of waste (both hazardous and 
non-hazardous)? 
No 
7.3 
Will  the  proposed  Project  potentially  involve  the  manufacture,  trade,  release,  and/or  use  of 
hazardous chemicals and/or materials? Does the Project propose use of chemicals or materials 
subject to international bans or phase-outs? 
For  example,  DDT,  PCBs  and  other  chemicals  listed  in  international  conventions  such  as  the 
Stockholm Conventions on Persistent Organic Pollutants or the Montreal Protocol  
No 
7.4  
Will the proposed Project involve the application of pesticides that may have a negative effect on 
the environment or human health? 
No 
7.5 
Does the Project include activities that require significant consumption of raw materials, energy, 
and/or water?  
No 
                                                                 
14
 
Forced evictions include acts and/or omissions involving the coerced or involuntary displacement of individuals, groups, or 
communities from homes and/or lands and common property resources that were occupied or depended upon, thus eliminating 
the ability of an individual, group, or community to reside or work in a particular dwelling, residence, or location without the 
provision of, and access to, appropriate forms of legal or other protections.
 

 
 
147 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
Annex 15 
 
1) Results of the capacity assessment of the project implementing partner;  
and 2) HACT micro assessment 
 
Results of the capacity assessment of the project implementing partner 
UNDP CAPACITY ASSESSMENT SCORECARD (FROM MONITORING GUIDELINES OF CAPACITY DEVELOPMENT IN 
GEF OPERATIONS) http://www.undp.org/content/dam/aplaws/publication/en/publications/environment-
energy/www-ee-library/mainstreaming/monitoring-guidelines-of-capacity-development-in-gef-
operations/Monitoring%20Capacity%20Development-design-01.pdf 
 
At the project level 
Project Cycle Phase: CEO Endorsement  
Date: September 25, 2016 
Capacity 
Result / 
Indicator
15
 
Staged 
Indicators 
Score 
Comments 
Next Steps 
Contribution  
to which  
Outcome 
CR 1: Capacities for engagement 
1.1. Degree 
of 
legitimacy/ 
mandate of 
lead 
biosecurity 
organization
s 
Authority and 
legitimacy of 
lead 
organization 
responsible for 
biosecurity 
management 
recognized by 
stakeholders 

The Biosecurity Promulgation of 
2008 recognizes and mandates 
the Biosecurity Authority of Fiji 
(BAF) to prevent the 
introduction and spread of 
animal and plant diseases and 
pests and manage quarantine 
controls at borders to minimize 
the risk of exotic pests and 
diseases entering the country.  
Constitution and early 
notification of a National IAS 
Committee with clear Terms of 
Reference would go a long way 
in close supervision and project 
monitoring.  

1.2 Existence 
of 
operational 
co-
management 
mechanisms 
for 
biosecurity 
Some co-
management 
mechanisms are 
formally 
established 
through 
agreements, 
MOUs, etc.  
 

BAF has established a number of 
MOUs with some of its key 
partners to facilitate and 
support the prevention of 
introduction of pests and 
diseases into the country, 
including IAS, but no-formal 
cooperation mechanisms 
beyond a few government 
partners and sectors and is 
largely ad-hoc and a 
coordination function needs to 
be institutionalized to facilitate 
effective coordination. A 
national coordinating body is 
absent, even though the existing 
The establishment of the 
national coordinating body, 
preparation of NISFSAP and re-
activation of the Fiji Invasive 
Species taskforce will facilitate 
determining key stakeholders 
and their individual and 
collective roles and 
responsibility for biosecurity 
related actions in the country 
and institute a mechanism that 
will facilitate effective 
coordination.  
1  
                                                                 
15
 
All  capacity  result/indicators  follow  standard  template,  with  exception  that  the  focus  is  on  “biosecurity”  rather  than 
environment, in general 

 
 
148 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
National Environment Council 
established by legislation could 
serve that function.  
1.3. 
Existence of 
cooperation 
with 
stakeholder 
groups for 
biosecurity 
Stakeholders are 
identified, but 
their 
participation in 
decision-making 
is limited 

BAF participates with a few 
partner agencies to ensure 
biosecurity at key international 
airports and seaports, but 
cooperation with stakeholder 
groups beyond this is very 
limited, especially with 
research, scientific and non-
governmental entities 
Based on NISFSAP, 
development of supportive 
legislative framework, 
regulations and MOUs to 
support participation of key 
stakeholders in decision-
making on biosecurity issues in 
the country 

CR 2: Capacities to generate, access and use information and knowledge 
2.1. Degree 
of 
biosecurity 
awareness of 
stakeholders 
Some 
stakeholders are 
aware about 
global 
biosecurity and 
IAS issues, but 
not of possible 
solutions
16
 
 

At national level, stakeholders 
have basic understanding of 
biosecurity and IAS concerns, 
with buy-in limited to a few 
sectors. There is overall limited 
knowledge to identify IAS and 
address biosecurity issues, with 
most stakeholders unable to 
adequately participate in 
prevention and control. At the 
local-level, stakeholders have 
little or no understanding of 
global environmental issues. 
Expansion of biosecurity 
outreach, initially to the four 
islands to enhance awareness 
and capacity of community to 
actively become partners in in 
prevention and control of IAS 
movement. Based on initial 
trailing in four islands, its 
extension nationally 
3, 4 
2.2. Access 
and 
sharing of 
biosecurity 
related  
information 
by 
stakeholders 
The biosecurity 
information 
needs are 
identified but 
the information 
management 
infrastructure is 
inadequate  

There are no comprehensive IAS 
informational sources 
developed at the national level, 
without which prevention, 
management and awareness of 
IAS in Fiji will remain under 
capacitated as existing 
knowledge and information will 
Development of database 
regarding IAS present on these 
four islands, established 
invasive species for each 
island. A national IAS database 
will be based on the successful 
completion of the four-island 
group IAS database. This 
1, 4 
                                                                 
16
 This indicator is slightly modified from standard template, as follows: Stakeholders are not aware about global biosecurity 
and IAS issues and their related possible solutions (0); Some stakeholders are aware about global biosecurity and IAS but not 
about the possible solutions (1); Stakeholders are aware about biosecurity and IAS issues and the possible solutions but do not 
know how to participate (2) and Stakeholders are aware about biosecurity and IAS issues and are actively participating in the  
implementation of related solutions (3).
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
149 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
not be readily accessible to all 
stakeholders and no 
comprehensive source of 
information will exist. 
database will support IAS 
prevention and management 
across multi-sectorial efforts 
and allow both managers and 
policy makers to better 
understand IAS and improve 
development and 
implementation of regulations, 
policy and field actions 
throughout the country to 
address IAS concerns by 
complying both existing and 
new IAS information for the 
nation into one database that 
policy makers and managers 
can readily access.  
2.3 Extent of 
inclusion/use 
of  traditional 
knowledge in 
biosecurity  
decision-
making 
Traditional 
knowledge is 
ignored and not 
taken into 
account into 
relevant 
participative 
decision-making 
process
 
 

Traditional knowledge, 
especially in regards to native 
biota could be used to augment 
outreach messages throughout 
the country and support 
sustainable use of native species 
Traditional knowledge should 
be taken into consideration for 
the development of IAS 
awareness strategy and 
campaign(s). What native biota 
are/were beneficial and how 
these may be being impacted 
by non-natives can be used to 
focus IAS awareness material 
to relevant topics which will be 
supported by local 
communities 

2.4. 
Existence of 
biosecurity 
awareness 
and 
education 
programs 
Biosecurity 
education 
programs are 
partially 
developed and 
partially 
delivered  

Programs are available, 
particularly to reach 
international visitors, but 
outreach to local and rural 
populations are minimal or non-
existent. For the majority of 
local stakeholders there is no 
comprehensive outreach effort 
to reach such communities. 
There is no comprehensive 
strategies exist for the nation or 
specific islands/island groups 
Targeted outreach and 
education programs would be 
developed for citizenry, 
particularly to ensure the 
management of inter islands 
transfer of IAS  
3, 4 
2.5. Extent of 
the 
linkage 
between  
research/sci
ence 
and 
biosecurity 
policy 
development 
No linkage exist 
between 
biosecurity 
policy and 
science/research 
strategies and 
programs 

Virtual absent are linkages with 
research and scientific 
institutions 
The NISFSAP would provide the 
framework for helping to 
identify gaps, research needs 
for policy development and to 
identify institutions that could 
undertake biosecurity related 
science and research and 
facilitate linkages with policies 

CR 3: Capacities to strategy, policy and legislation development 
3.1. Extent of 
the 
The biosecurity 
planning and 

Some efforts are being made to 
under IAs risk assessment and 
The NISFSAP will provide the 
overall planning framework 
1, 4 

 
 
150 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
biosecurity 
planning and 
strategy 
development 
process 
strategy 
development 
process is not 
adequately 
coordinated and 
does not 
produce 
comprehensive 
biosecurity plans 
and strategies 
emergency responses, although 
not comprehensive. While 
biosecurity promulgation act 
exists, there is no clear 
comprehensive strategy or 
coverage. There is no overall IAS 
multi-party planning document 
for biosecurity in the country, 
resulting in an under-
capacitated IAS management 
system that does not support 
synergistic, multi-party use of 
resources including cross-
agency planning and action 
implementation.  
and strategy for biosecurity in 
the country and the national 
coordinating body and FIST will 
oversee coordination of the 
planning and implementation  
3.2. 
Existence of 
an adequate 
Biosecurity 
policy and 
regulatory 
frameworks 
Some relevant 
biosecurity 
policy and 
regulatory 
frameworks 
exists, but few 
are 
comprehensive, 
and are not 
adequately 
implemented 
and enforced 
them
17
 

Gaps in legislation and policy 
should be identified as part of 
the stakeholder consultations in 
development of the NISFSAP. 
Gaps should be clearly 
documented in the NISFSAP and 
anticipated avenues for 
addressing any gaps provided 
through stakeholder input. Gaps 
such as the lack of biosecurity 
inspection services for domestic 
flights are already known and 
concepts on how to resolve such 
issues should be part of the 
NISFSAP development with clear 
timelines spelled out in the BAF 
strategy 
Establishment of a national 
level IAS committee to 
coordinate activities 
throughout the nation is 
essential to improving existing 
components into a 
comprehensive framework. 
Development of a NISFSAP to 
guide IAS efforts. Development 
or re-engagement of an IAS 
taskforce, made up of 
local/regional experts, who can 
inform and support the 
national IAS committee is 
essential. Development of a 
biosecurity authority multi-
year strategy, so that 
comprehensive and clear 
planning are available for the 
lead agency involved in IAS 
prevention and management. 
Determination through the 
NISFSAP development process 
of potential gaps in existing 
policy, legislation and 
regulations in regards to IAS 

                                                                 
17
 
This indicator is modified from  the standard template to reflect the situation in  Fiji as follows: The  biosecurity policy and 
regulatory frameworks are insufficient; they do not provide an enabling environment (0); Some relevant  biosecurity  policies 
and laws exist but few are comprehensive, and not adequately implemented and enforced (1); Adequate biosecurity policy and 
legislation frameworks exist but there are problems in implementing and enforcing them (2); and Adequate policy and legislation 
frameworks are implemented and provide an adequate enabling environment; a compliance and enforcement mechanism is 
established and functions (3)
 
 
 

 
 
151 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
prevention and management 
and addressing these gaps 
through the national IAS body 
and BAF multi-year strategy 
3.3. 
Adequacy of 
the 
environment
al 
information 
available for 
decision-
making 
Some 
biosecurity and 
IAS information 
is available to 
decision-makers 
but is not 
sufficient to 
support decision 
making
 18
 
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə