United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə16/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17


There is no comprehensive IAS 
informational sources 
developed at the national level, 
without informed decision-
making on prevention
management and awareness of 
IAS in Fiji will remain under 
capacitated.  
The development, population 
and enabled access to the 
national database will support 
IAS prevention and 
management across multi-
sectorial efforts and allow both 
managers and policy makers to 
better understand IAS and 
improve development and 
implementation of regulations, 
policy and field actions 
throughout the country to 
address IAS concerns by 
complying both existing and 
new IAS information for the 
nation into one database that 
policy makers and managers 
can readily access. 
4  
CR 4: Capacities for management and implementation  
4.1. 
Existence 
and 
mobilization 
of resources 
by relevant 
organization
s 
The funding 
sources for 
these resources 
are partially 
identified and 
the resource 
requirements 
are partially 
addressed  

While BAF is able to mobilize 
reasonable resources for the 
tasks it currently undertakes, 
there is requirement for 
additional resources as and 
when its requirements are 
assessed based on the need for 
a more comprehensive 
biosecurity program that 
expands beyond pre-border and 
border preventive measures 
More efforts are needed to 
leverage additional revenue to 
support biosecurity.  
1,2,4 
4.2. 
Availability 
of required 
technical 
skills and 
technology 
transfer 
The required 
technical skills 
and technology 
needs are 
known, but 
application 
limited to pre-
border and 

Technical skills limited to pre-
border and border surveillance 
and preventive measures and 
limited risk assessment and 
rapid response plans 
Training of frontline staff on 
basic tools and techniques of 
prevention and control of IAS 
and expansion to inter-island 
movement as well as enhanced 
capacity in GII eradication will 
enhance skills and coverage  
2, 3, 4 
                                                                 
18
 
This indicator is modified from the standard template to reflect the situation in Fiji as follows: The availability of biosecurity 
and IAS information for decision-making is lacking (0); Some biosecurity and IAS  information exists but it is not sufficient to 
support decision-making processes (1): biosecurity and IAS  information is made available to decision-makers but the process 
to update this information is not functioning properly (2) and Political and administrative decision-makers obtain and use 
updated biosecurity and IAS  information to make decisions (3)
 

 
 
152 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
border 
prevention
 19
 
CR 5: Capacities to monitor and evaluate  
5.1. 
Adequacy of 
the 
biosecurity 
monitoring 
process 
Irregular 
monitoring is 
being done 
without an 
adequate 
monitoring 
framework 
detailing what 
and how to 
monitor a 
particular 
activity or 
program 

Any monitoring data records are 
at best scattered in notebooks 
or non-existent 
Development of a 
comprehensive IAS clearing 
house and database for Fiji as 
well as the NISFSAP 
development process should 
support monitoring gap 
identification and 
determination of how best to 
address any gaps that are 
identified. Gaps in monitory 
will likely be addressed 
through the BAF strategy 
development and 
implementation. 

5.2. 
Adequacy of 
the 
biosecurity 
evaluation 
process 
Presently none 
or no 
evaluations are 
being conducted 
without an 
adequate 
evaluation plan; 
including the 
necessary 
resources 

Components of the current 
biosecurity system are reviewed 
as part of the review of other 
systems such as international 
port reviews, etc., but no 
comprehensive biosecurity 
review system appears to exist 
currently. 
Establishment of a national IAS 
committee and the 
development of both the 
NISFSAP and BAF multi-year 
strategy should support both 
the mechanism and the 
specific strategies) for 
comprehensive biosecurity 
monitoring and evaluation 

Total Score 
14/45 
 
 
 
 
HACT micro assessment 
-
 
To be submitted during Project Inception
 
                                                                 
19
 
This indicator is modified from the standard template to reflect the situation in Fiji as follows: The necessary required 
technical skills and technology are not available and the needs are not identified (0); The required technical skills and 
technology needs are known, but application is limited; (1); The required technical skills and technology needs are known but 
their access depend on foreign sources (2); and The required technical skills and technologies are available and there is a 
national-based mechanism for updating the required skills and for upgrading the technologies (3)
 
 

 
 
153 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
                                                                 
[1]
 1. Sustainable development pathways; 2. Inclusive and effective democratic governance; 3. Resilience building 
[2]
  Sustainable  production  technologies,  access  to  modern  energy  services  and  energy  efficiency,  natural  resources  management,  extractive  industries, 
urbanization, citizen security, social protection, and risk management for resilience
 
A
NNEX 
16
 
 
P
ROGRAM 
QA
 
A
SSESSMENT
:
 
D
ESIGN 
&
 
A
PPRAISAL
 
O
VERALL 
P
ROGRAM
 
E
XEMPLARY 
(5) 

 
H
IGH 
(4) 

 
S
ATISFACTORY 
(3) 

 
N
EEDS 
I
MPROVEMENT 
(2) 

 
I
NADEQUATE 
(1) 

 
70-72 points 
60-69 points 
46-59 points 
30-45 points 
24-29 points 
DECISION
 

 
APPROVE – the program is of sufficient quality to continue as planned. 

 
APPROVE WITH QUALIFICATIONS – the program has issues that must be addressed before the country program document can be cleared for submission 
to the Executive Board.  

 
DISAPPROVE – the program has significant issues that require substantial revision before it is reviewed again.
 
RATING CRITERIA  
(For each question, select the option from 1-3 that best reflects the program)
 
S
TRATEGIC
 
 
1.
 
Is the program’s analysis of the issues rigorous and credible, and does the Theory of Change specify an evidence-
based and plausible change process/pathway?  

 
3: The program has an analysis and theory of change with a clear and plausible change pathway backed by credible 
evidence that has been used to define the program priorities. The CPD describes why the program’s strategy is the 
best approach at this point in time. 

 
2: The program has an analysis and theory of change backed by some evidence that has been used to define the 
program priorities.  

 
1: The program is described in generic terms and analysis is not backed by credible evidence. There are no citations 
of evaluations, assessments, research or data. Program priorities are poorly articulated.  
  3 


Evidence Refer to Figure 3.  
2.
 
Does the CPD adequately describe UNDP’s comparative advantage in the chosen program priorities?  

 
3: Analysis has been conducted on the role of other partners in the areas that the program intends to work, and 
credible evidence supports the proposed engagement of UNDP and partners through the program, including 
through evaluations and past lessons learned (i.e., what has worked in similar contexts.)  

 
2: Some analysis has been conducted on the role of other partners in the areas that the program intends to work, 
and relatively limited evidence supports the proposed engagement of UNDP and partners through the program.  

 
1: No analysis has been conducted on the role of other partners in the areas that the program intends to work to 
inform the design of the role envisioned by UNDP and other partners through the program. 



Evidence 
on roles of other partners 
defined as per table on page 
47 .History of supporting 
biodiversity conservation .Key 
partners such as Airport Fiji 
Limited, Fiji Inland Revenue 
and Customs Authority have 
been heavily involved in 
formulation consultations  
Is the program thematically aligned with the UNDP Strategic Plan?  

 
3: Program priorities explicitly reflect one or more areas of development work
[1]
 as specified in the Strategic Plan 
(SP.) It integrates among program priorities one or more of the proposed new and emerging areas
[2]
 and the 
program’s RRF includes at least one SP outcome indicator per program outcome. 

 
2: Program priorities are consistent with the three areas of development work as specified in the SP. The program’s 
RRF includes at least one SP outcome indicator per program outcome.  

 
1: Some program priorities clearly fall outside of the three areas of development work as specified in the SP 
without any justifiable programmatic rationale. 



Evidence 
UNDAF Outcome(s): UNDAF for 
the Pacific Sub-region 2013-2017 
– Outcome Area 1: 
Environmental management, 
climate change and disaster risk 
management 
 
UNDP Strategic Plan 
Environment and Sustainable 
Development Primary Outcome: 
Output 2.5. Legal and regulatory 
frameworks, policies and 
institutions enabled to ensure the 
conservation, sustainable use
access and benefit sharing of 
natural 
resources, biodiversity 
and ecosystems, in line with 
international conventions and 
national legislation
 
 
3.
 
Is UNDP working with other UN agencies to achieve joint results?  

 
3: The program includes up to four outcomes which exactly match the relevant UNDAF outcomes. The CPD explains 
UNDP’s role in relation to other UN agencies in achieving these results, based on comparative advantage. Priorities 
for strengthening partnerships with other UN agencies are clearly identified. 

 
2: The program includes up to four outcomes which exactly match the relevant UNDAF outcomes. Some 
explanation is given of the roles of UNDP and other UN agencies in achieving these results, and of the partnerships 
required for this. 
1: Some program outcomes may not be directly aligned with the UNDAF outcomes. There is not a clear explanation 
of the roles of UNDP and other agencies in achieving joint results. 
3 
2 
1 
Evidence 
Project executed by 
Government and supported 
by UNDP. UNEP not stationed 
in Fiji  
 
R
ELEVANT
 
 
4.
 
Is the proposed program responsive to national priorities?  

 
3: There is credible evidence that all of the proposed program outcomes and indicative outputs are fully responsive 
to national priorities. 

 
2: There is some evidence that the proposed program outcomes and indicative outputs contribute to national 
priorities. 



Evidence 
Page 13: is aligned with the 
strategic priorities of the 
National Biodiversity Strategy 

 
 
154 | 
P a g e
 
 
 

 
1: There is no evidence that the program responds to national priorities. 
and Action Plan (NBSAP) of 
2007 and its Implementation 
Framework that identifies 
control of IAS as critical to the 
success of biodiversity 
conservation and proposes 
priority actions 
Page 10: Biosafety Authority of 
Fiji (BAF) through the 
Biosecurity Promulgation of 
2008  
The Fiji Invasive Species 
Taskforce (FIST) constituted by 
the National Environment Council 
(NEC) under the National 
Environment Management Act of 
2005, and convened under the 
chairmanship of BAF will advise 
and facilitate the coordination of 
the project
.
 
5.
 
Does the CPD consistently apply an issue-based approach to its rationale, program priorities, partnerships and 
monitoring and evaluation?  

 
3: The program rationale elaborates on multidimensional development issues in describing the development 
context of the country. Program priorities involve collaborative and integrated multi-sectoral work (e.g., around 
target groups or geographic areas) and the engagement of partners to complement UNDP expertise. M&E 
frameworks are built around a broad range of evidence that facilitate understanding of interconnections among 
development results and challenges in different areas. 

 
2: The program rational describes the development context of the country, exploring at least some 
interconnections among identified development challenges. Program priorities are defined as collaborative and 
multi-sectoral areas of work, including by engaging partners to complement UNDP expertise. M&E frameworks 
help understand the interconnection of development results and challenges. 

 
1: The program rationale mostly describes a list of development challenges, without exploring their 
interconnections, and the country profile is not clear. Program priorities are mostly formulated on a 
sectoral/practice base and without a clear role for partners. The M&E framework relies mostly on sectoral 
evidence. 
  3 
2 
1 
Evidence 
 
Outputs 1.3 & outcome 4.3 
involves cross-sectoral approach 
to training & capacity building. 
Pages 23 – 45 elaborate on issues 
based approach 
6.
 
Has adequate gender analysis been conducted for the proposed program, and has the design of the program 
addressed the results of the gender analysis?  

 
3: Gender analysis has been conducted, and gender equality concerns are fully and consistently reflected in the 
program rationale, priority areas and corresponding RRF through at least one gender-specific outcome, and 
indicative outputs and indicators, where appropriate, and at least 15% of the budget allocated for gender specific 
results. 

 
2: Gender analysis has been partially conducted, and gender equality concerns are reflected in the program 
rationale, priority areas and corresponding RRF through gender-specific outcomes, and/or indicative outputs and 
indicators, where appropriate. 

 
1: Program priorities do not consider gender-specific needs or issues.  

  2 

Evidence 
Page 46 – 51 mainstreaming 
gender describes mechanisms 
to promote role of women in 
activities  
S
OCIAL 
&
 
E
NVIRONMENTAL 
S
TANDARDS
 
8. Has the program adequately considered the potential risks and opportunities related to gender equality and women’s 
empowerment?  

 
3: The CPD explicitly describes how women will benefit from program opportunities and benefits. The CPD has 
identified and fully addressed any relevant risks related to potential gender inequality and discrimination against 
women and girls. 

 
2: The CPD mentions how it intends to consider how women will benefit from program opportunities and benefits. 
The CPD has identified and partially addressed any relevant risks related to potential gender inequality and the 
situation of women and girls. 

 
1: The CPD does not describe how women will benefit from program opportunities and benefits. It does not 
identify or address relevant risks related to potential gender inequality and the situation of women and girls. 

  2 

Evidence 
Social and Environment 
screening Report assessment 
(page 138) rules out risks to 
females 
9. Does the program apply a human rights based approach adequately and evenly across the program? 

 
3: Strong evidence that the program actively promotes the fulfillment of human rights and prioritizes the principles 
of accountability, meaningful participation, and non-discrimination. Any potential adverse impacts on enjoyment of 
human rights were rigorously identified and assessed and any relevant appropriate mitigation and management 
measures incorporated into program rational, strategy, and results and resource framework.  

 
2: Partial evidence that the program promotes the fulfillment of human rights and the principles of accountability, 
meaningful participation, and non-discrimination were considered. Potential adverse impacts on enjoyment of 
human rights were identified and assessed and any relevant appropriate mitigation and management measures 
incorporated into the program rationale, strategy, and results and resources framework.  

 
1: No evidence that opportunities to promote the fulfillment of human rights were considered in the program, 
including consideration of the principles of accountability, meaningful participation and non-discrimination. Limited 
evidence that potential adverse impacts on enjoyment of human rights were considered. 



Evidence 
Page 71 

 structure includes 
northern division task force, Fiji 
Invasive Species Task Force. 
Page 138 Social and 
Environmental Risk Screening 

Human Rights Checklist 
10.  Does  the  program  consider  potential  environmental  opportunities  and  adverse  impacts,  applying  a  precautionary 
approach?  

 
3: Strong evidence that opportunities to enhance environmental sustainability and integrate poverty-environment 
linkages were fully considered and integrated in program strategy and design as relevant. Strong evidence that 
potential adverse environmental impacts have been considered, and avoided where possible, in the program 
design. The risk management approach includes potential environmental risks and how the program will ensure 
appropriate assessment is conducted and management measures put in place.  

 
2: Partial evidence that opportunities to strengthen environmental sustainability and poverty-environment linkages 
were considered as relevant. Partial evidence that potential adverse environmental impacts have been considered, 
and avoided where possible, in the program design. The risk management approach considers potential 
environmental risks and management measures.  

 
1: No evidence that opportunities to strengthen environmental sustainability and poverty-environment linkages 
were considered. Limited or no evidence that potential adverse environmental impacts and risks were adequately 
considered.  

  2 

Evidence 
Social and Environmental Risk 
Screening on page 133 on 
biodiversity conservation and 
sustainable natural resource 
management 
Staff will be trained to identify 
and native species. Risk 
assessment of eradication plan 
will be developed as per page 
54
 

 
 
155 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
                                                                 
20
 
i.e., through significant geographic or target group coverage, strategic partnership strategies for up-scaling UNDP pilots or innovations, and/or contribution to 
policy change that can effect results at scale. 
21
 For example, indicators related to policy-making processes do not measure just the adoption and implementation of a policy, but also its intended benefits on 
target groups.
 
M
ANAGEMENT 
&
 
M
ONITORING
 
11.
 
Are the program’s outcomes and indicative outputs at an appropriate level and relate clearly to the theory of change 
and selected priority areas as described in the narrative?  

 
3: The program’s proposed outcomes and indicative outputs are at an appropriate level and relate in a clear way to 
the program’s theory of change. There is a strong congruence between the CPD rational, program priorities and 
results framework. 

 
2: The program’s proposed outcomes and indicative outputs are at an appropriate level and are consistent with the 
program’s theory of change. There is general coherence between the CPD narrative and the results framework. 

 
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə