United Nations Development Programme Project title



Yüklə 4.84 Kb.
PDF просмотр
səhifə17/17
tarix21.08.2017
ölçüsü4.84 Kb.
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17

1: The program’s selection of outcomes and indicative outputs are not clearly justified in terms of a program theory 
of change. There is no or limited relationship between the program’s narrative and selected priority areas and the 
results framework. 

  2 

Evidence 
As per page 19 links between 
components, 
outcomes, 
outputs and barriers . Also 
reflected in log frame IV.  
 
12.
 
Are the indicators selected to monitor the results of the program appropriate with fully populated baselines and 
milestones? 

 
3: Outcomes and indicative outputs are accompanied by SMART, results-oriented indicators that measure the key 
expected changes identified in the theory of change, each with credible data sources and fully populated baselines, 
milestones and targets, including appropriate use of gender sensitive, sex-disaggregated and/or target group-
focused indicators where appropriate. The RRF includes all relevant IRRF indicators at the outcome and output 
levels. 

 
2: Outcomes and indicative outputs are accompanied by SMART, results-oriented indicators with specified data 
sources. Most baselines and targets populated. Some use of gender sensitive, sex-disaggregated and/or target 
group focused indicators, but there is scope to improve further. The RRF includes some relevant IRRF indicators. 

 
1: Indicators not appropriately specified with corresponding baselines and targets. No gender sensitive, sex-
disaggregated or target group-focused indicators. No clear inclusion of relevant IRRF indicators in the RRF. 



Evidence 
 
Log Frame outcome 4 
indicator page 63 –gender 
indicators. Log Frame 
indicators linked to IRRF 
indicator 2.5.1 Number of 
countries with legal, policy and 
institutional frameworks in place 
for conservation, sustainable use
and access and benefit sharing of 
natural resources, biodiversity 
and ecosystems
 
 
13.
 
Are the monitoring arrangements adequate?  

 
3: Provides details on data sources to be used for monitoring all program indicators, including responsibilities for 
data collection with timing and cost of direct data collection activities specified. Highlights particular issues 
regarding availability, quality, frequency or reliability of selected data sources, and appropriate plans to address 
these (e.g., systems strengthening, use of proxies, etc.) Plans are in place for generating appropriate analytics from 
available data, and ensuring adequate staff capabilities for enhanced M&E. Key risks relating to M&E are included 
in the program risk log. 

 
2: Provides details on data sources identified in the RRF, with a particular focus on sources for which direct data 
collection is required or for which existing M&E or statistical systems need to be strengthened, with a budget 
allocated for these activities. Appropriate plans are in place to address major data gaps or weaknesses, with some 
reference to use of data for analytics and ensuring adequate staff capacities for enhanced M&E. 

 
1: Does not identify the main data sources to be used in tracking program results or consider their quality. Does not 
clearly identify who will participate in generating data or using it for monitoring.  
3 
2 
1 
Evidence 
 
Project Results Framework 
(pages 54 – 58) notes of 
relevant means of verification 
under outcome 1 & 2 
Page 113 Data specialist 
recruited each year through 
out project & log frame page 
60 (BAF data base) 
14.
 
Is there an adequate, realistic and costed evaluation plan?  

 
3: Detailed plans are provided for an appropriate set of strategic evaluations, including final and mid-term 
evaluations, with timing and relevant partners specified. A realistic estimate of the costs is provided, with expected 
funding source(s) identified. UNDP contributions towards the cost of evaluation are included in the program 
budget. Program design takes into account evaluation requirements. 

 
2: An appropriate set of strategic evaluations are listed with timing and relevant partners specified. A realistic cost 
estimate is provided for each evaluation, even if a funding sources are not provided, and included in the budget. 

 
1: Insufficient details are provided to judge the suitability of evaluations planned. Some details are missing on the 
timing, evaluation type, relevant partners, or estimated cost of the evaluations, or stated costs are unrealistic. 
  3 
2 
1 
Evidence 
Table 3: Monitoring and 
Evaluation Budget page 68 & 
69 
15.
 
Have the key program risks and opportunities been identified, linked to the assumptions in the theory of change, 
with clear plans stated to respond?  

 
3: Program risks and opportunities fully described in the CPD, based on comprehensive analysis which references 
key assumptions made in the project’s theory of change. Clear and complete plan in place to manage and mitigate 
each risk and take advantage of opportunities. 

 
2: Program risks and opportunities identified in the CPD. Clear plan in place to manage and mitigate risks.  

 
1: Some risks identified in CPD, but no or inadequate response measures identified. 


 

Evidence 
Table 2 project risks and 
management outlines risks 
and management measures –
page 53 
E
FFICIENT
 
 
16. Does the program document include explicit consideration of strategies for scaling up to achieve greater impact? 

 
3: The CPD specifically mentions potential for scaling up to achieve greater impact with available resources
20
. The 
results framework includes suitable indicators to monitor changes in the scale of benefits achieved over time
21


 
2: The CPD includes some consideration of current or future opportunities for scaling up to achieve greater impact 
with available resources. 

 
1: The CPD does not consider strategies for scaling up in the program priorities or results framework. 
 

  2 

Evidence 
Page 55 IV. Sustainability and 
scaling up  
17.
 
Does the CPD provide a convincing account as to how the expected size and scope of the results can feasibly be 
delivered with the available resources and resource mobilization opportunities?  

 
3: The size and scope of the program is very congruent with the indicative resources available for the program and 
resource mobilization opportunities emerging from donor intelligence. The CPD outlines a “Plan B” to scale down 
the expected results if there are challenges raising the required funds. 

 
2: The size and scope of the program is consistent with the indicative resources available for the program and 
resource mobilization opportunities emerging from donor intelligence. While the CPD does not outline a “Plan B” to 



Evidence 
Page 69: Section X total 
budget and work-plan. 
Further budgetary notes 
provided 

 
 
156 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
scale down the expected results if there are challenges raising the required funds, it is reasonably likely that the 
country office will have the flexibility to adjust the program if needed. 

 
1: The size and scope of the program is not congruent with the indicative resources available for the program 
and/or with the resource mobilization opportunities emerging from donor intelligence. It is not likely that the 
program will be able to mobilize the required resources to implement the program. 
E
FFECTIVE
 
 
18.
 
Has the proposed program adequately used evaluation findings and other outcome-level evidence from other/prior 
program performance?  

 
3: Knowledge and lessons learned backed by credible evidence from evaluation, analysis, corporate 
policies/strategies, and monitoring have been explicitly used, with appropriate referencing, to develop the 
program’s theory of change and justify the approach used by the program over alternatives. 

 
2: The program design references knowledge and lessons learned backed by evidence from evaluation, analysis, 
corporate policies/strategies, and monitoring and/or other sources, but these references have not been explicitly 
used to develop the program’s theory of change or justify the approach used by the program over alternatives. 

 
1: There is only scant, or no, mention of knowledge and lessons learned informing the program design. Existing 
references are not backed by evidence. 
  3 


Evidence 
 
The project takes into 
account lessons learnt from 
other projects but does not 
specifically make mention of 
this  
19.
 
Has the program effectively identified targeted groups/areas and are strategies in place for regular engagement 
throughout implementation to ensure voice and participation?  

 
3: Target groups/areas are clearly specified and the theory of change explains why these group will be targeted. 
The program has a strategy to identify and engage target groups/areas through program monitoring, governance 
and/or other means to ensure the program remains relevant to their needs. 

 
2: Some target groups/areas are mentioned in the CPD in broad terms. The program mentions how it will engage 
targeted groups/areas throughout implementation. 

 
1: The target groups/areas are not specified in the CPD. The program does not have a written strategy to identify or 
engage the target groups/areas throughout implementation. 

  2 

Evidence 
Page 42 – 44 Table 1: 
Stakeholder Involvement Plan 
notes stakeholders, roles, 
potential role in project as 
well as involvement 
mechanism/strategies  
20. Has the CPD integrated adequate analysis and explicit measures to promote and utilize South-South and Triangular 
Cooperation?  

 
3: South-South and Triangular Cooperation opportunities are fully described in the CPD, based on up-to-date and 
comprehensive demands assessment and demand-supply matching results. Clear indication of measurable results 
to be achieved through South-South and Triangular Cooperation in the CPD. 

 
2: Specific South-South and Triangular Cooperation opportunities are described in the CPD, based on consideration 
of demand and UNDP comparative advantage. Some indication of measurable results to be achieved through 
South-South and Triangular Cooperation in the CPD. 

 
1: CPD may refer to South-South and Triangular Cooperation but does not give specific plans for how it will be used. 
There is no evidence to support why or why not South-South and Triangular Cooperation has been opted. 

  2 

Evidence 
 
Page 50 South – South 
Cooperation -project specific 
to Fiji but has implications for 
rest of Pacific. Experiences in 
biosecurity important of rest 
of Pacific islands 
S
USTAINABILITY 
&
 
N
ATIONAL 
O
WNERSHIP
 
21. Have national partners proactively engaged in the design of the program?  

 
3: The program has been developed jointly by UNDP and a range of national partners (government, donors, civil 
society, beneficiaries, etc.), with credible evidence of this provided in the CPD. 

 
2: The program has been developed by UNDP in consultation with national partners (esp. government), with some 
evidence of this mentioned in the CPD. 

 
1: The program has been developed by UNDP with limited or no engagement with national partners. There is little 
to no mention of engagement with national partners on the program design in the CPD. 



Page 41 stakeholder 
engagement notes wide 
range of stakeholders during 
PPG stage 
22. Are key institutions and systems identified, and is there a strategy to ensure the sustainability of results (i.e., to ensure 
that results last and even grow beyond UNDP’s engagement?)  

 
3: The program has a strategy for strengthening capacities of national institutions integrated throughout the 
program, which is reflected in the identification of outcomes, indicative outputs and indicators. 

 
2: The CPD has identified indicative outputs that will be undertaken to strengthen capacity of national institutions, 
but these outputs are not part of a comprehensive strategy and it is not clear how capacity and sustainability of 
results will be measured. 

 
1: There is mention in the program document of capacities of national institutions to be strengthened through the 
program, but there is no evidence of a specific strategy, measurement or incorporation into the results framework. 



Evidence 
Outputs under outcome 1 are 
nationally oriented, Outputs 
under outcome 2 are focused 
on prevention and 
surveillance on four islands, 
Outcome 3 is on eradication 
of GII on 4 islands and 
outcome 4 is on knowledge 
management  
They are strategically 
positioned and linked to 
sustainability. 
23. Does the program include a strategy for using nationally-owned data sources and working with partners to strengthen 
national statistical systems and capacities? 

 
3: The RRF includes some relevant country-specific outcome and output indicators that will be monitored using 
nationally-owned data sources. The M&E section includes an analysis of the availability and quality of existing 
national data sources and states clear plans for how UNDP will work with partners to strengthen national M&E and 
statistical systems where needed, in a way that contributes towards sustainable country capacities.  

 
2: The RRF includes some relevant country-specific outcome and output indicators that will be monitored using 
nationally-owned data sources. The M&E section includes some consideration of the quality of relevant national 
data sources and states plans for how UNDP will work with partners to strengthen these, with some consideration 
of building sustainable country capacities. 

 
1: The RRF does not include relevant country-specific outcome or output indicators or does not identify relevant 
national sources to be used in monitoring. The M&E section may include some plans to develop M&E systems 
required for program monitoring, but does not address weaknesses in the broader national statistical system or 
capacities. 



Evidence 
 
Under outcome 2 outputs 
include database collation, 
clearing house mechanism 
established for executing 
agency -page 29 

 
 
157 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Annex 17 
 
Gender Analysis and Action Plan 
 
Gender equality is one of 17 Global Goals that make up the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. 
According to the Global Gender Gap Report released by the World Economic Forum (WEF) in 2015
22
, Fiji 
was ranked 121 on the Gender Gap Index (GGI) among 145 countries polled.  
  
Fiji has made considerable progress in recognizing gender issues in relation to legal and human rights and 
gender  and  development,  as  reflected  in  legislative  and  policy  progress  since  1988
23
.  It  has  made 
commitments to eight major international agreements and programs for action on gender equality and 
advancement of women. It is committed to achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), 
including  those  associated  directly  or  indirectly  with  the  status  of  women  and  gender  equality.  The 
National  Gender  Policy
24
 provides  a  framework  for  including  gender  perspectives  in  all  activities  of 
government and civil society, thereby promoting full and equal participation of men and women in the 
development process. The policy is consistent with the Government’s commitment to implementing the 
Women’s  Plan  of  Action  (WPA  2010-2019)  based  on  the  Beijing  Platform  for  Action,  and  with  Fiji’s 
commitment to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women.  
 
Despite, these efforts, gender inequality in Fiji persists amidst high rates of economic growth. Women 
participation in economic activities and decision-making is much less, than men, although in terms of 
health and survival, and enrollment in primary, secondary and tertiary education there is little gender 
differences  between  men  and  women.  Although  recent  indicators  show  little  difference  in  the 
educational  levels  and  achievements  of  men  and  women,  and  despite  government  commitments  to 
gender equality, occupational discrimination in the Fiji Islands labor markets are strong and persistent.  
 
About 39% of women in Fiji aged 15 years and over are categorized as economically active. One third of 
those  involved  in  informal  sector  economic  activities  are  women,  and  women  form  30%  of  the  non-
agricultural workforce. Around 78% of all informal sector activity in Fiji involves agriculture, forestry and 
fishing,  and  one  third  of  those  involved  in  such  activities  are  women.  Women  actively  participate  in 
almost all aspects of agricultural production in Fiji, including farming, marketing, food processing and 
distribution, and export processing. Rural women typically farm land that belongs to their male relatives 
as father-to-son inheritance practice tend to make it difficult, if not impossible, for women to own land. 
iTaukei (native Fijian) women are frequently excluded from formal inheritance rights to customary land
tend  to  have  no  rights  to  land  other  than  those  permitted  by  their  fathers  or  husbands,  and  do  not 
customarily receive land rents
25
. Consequently few women own businesses, because the inheritance laws 
practiced by both major ethnic groups (iTaukei and Fijian of Indian descent) usually also exclude women 
from inheriting other fixed assets. 
                                                                 
22
 
World Economic Forum, The Global Gender Gap Report, 2015
 
23
 
Asian Development Bank. Country Gender Assessment (2006).  
24
 
Fiji National Gender Policy, Ministry for Social Welfare, Women and Poverty Alleviation, 2014 
25
 
http://asiapacific.unwomen.org/en/countries/fiji/co/fiji
 

 
 
158 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
 
Role and participation of women in biosecurity-related activities 
 
While the  proportion of women  in  the  economically active  population  and civil  service  has  increased 
since 1988, employment opportunities for women are concentrated in a small part of the labour market 
and  in  the  civil  service  in  the  Ministries  of  Health  and  Education.  Women’s  share  in  the  central 
government service is around 30%, a significant proportion of which are on the daily or weekly wage 
basis.  This  reflects  the  different  terms  of  employment  in  the  civil  service.  However,  in  terms  of  the 
Biosecurity Authority of Fiji, around 43% of technical staff are women, who participate in aspects related 
to disease management, emergency responses, awareness and outreach, surveillance, prevention and 
management  of  IAS  and  biosecurity  related  activities.  This  figure  is  above  the  national  average. 
Consequently,  women  staffers  will  benefit  immensely  from  the  training,  capacity  development,  new 
technologies and tools that would be used by the project. 
 
Role and participation of men and women in biodiversity conservation  
 
In the selected four-Island area of the project, Gender is a key dimension in sustainable conservation, 
management,  agriculture  and  livelihoods  and  use  of  biodiversity  resources.  Women  and  men  have 
complementary knowledge and perceptions of their natural environment and the biodiversity around 
them as a result of gender differences in functions, responsibilities, needs, social relations, behaviors, 
resource  accessibility,  ownership,  and  awareness.  Gender  and  social  differences,  which  are  location-
specific  and  socially  constructed  and  can  be  changed,  strongly  influence  the  way  women  and  men 
experience environmental and socioeconomic changes. 
Men  and  women  undertake  different  roles,  responsibilities  and  task  in  biodiversity  conservation, 
management  and  livelihoods  in  the  four-island  site.  Women  play  a  critical  role  in  maintaining  and 
sustaining  local-level  biodiversity,  including  the  domestication of wild  plants,  genetic  manipulation of 
plants  and  animals,  and  seed  management.  Despite  their  lack  of  adequate  representation  in  local 
committees and decision-making, women are more involved in natural resource management than men. 
Women are involved in the collection of wild species.  
In terms of natural disasters and the impacts of climate change, women experience their impacts in ways 
that  are  distinct  from men.  Rising  sea  levels  and  changes  in  air  and  water  temperature  have  distinct 
impacts  on  women’s  traditional  economic,  agricultural  and  fishing  duties,  as  do  the  impacts  of  over-
fishing. Women also face an increased vulnerability to violence and deprivation after natural disasters. It 
is  vital  that  communities  respect  and  utilize  women’s  unique  skills,  and  give  women  a  voice  in  how 
communities rebuild after disasters. Temporary and/or permanent displacement as a result of climate 
change and natural disaster place women in vulnerable economic and social positions, as communities 
struggle to adapt to the changes in their natural environments
 
It is essential therefore to incorporate gender perspectives into the project based activities in the four-
island  area.  Assimilating  gender  perspectives  makes  one  more  conscious  of  the  impact  of  gender  in 
defining  roles  and  responsibilities,  the  division  of  labor,  needs,  knowledge,  and  inequalities,  and  the 
differences  inherent  in  the  unequal  power  relations  between  men  and  women  in  terms  of  land 

 
 
159 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
ownership, resource use and access. This can help to lessen the impact on women (in particular, if IAS, 
including  GII,  establish  and  increase  substantially  in  numbers  that  could  cause  potentially  significant 
impacts on local agriculture, livelihoods, and health.  
Strategy/Action Plan for Gender Mainstreaming in project 
Special mechanisms are envisaged under the project to promote the role of women in various activities. 
These include in particular the following: 
Gender Mainstreaming Objective   Gender Mainstreaming Activity 
Gender mainstreaming Target 
To enhance capacity, skills and 
competence of women in 
technical aspects related to 
biosecurity  
Participation in technical training 
programs, study tours and other 
skills development activities 
At least 40% of technical and 
front-line staff in BAF and 
partner agencies trained under 
the project are women 
To enhance knowledge and 
awareness of rural women of the 
risks and impacts of IAS on native 
ecosystems and biodiversity, 
agriculture, tourism and human 
health 
Participation of women in 
biosecurity outreach activities 
At least 40% of people benefiting 
from the outreach program and 
various project initiatives are 
women 
To encourage active participation 
of women in delivery of outreach 
at Taveuni and encourage 
greater participation of women  
Recruitment of women from 
local communities (iTaukei and 
Fijian of Indian descent) as part 
of Outreach teams in Taveuni  
At least 20% of Outreach team 
members are women.  
To enhance and measure 
women’s participation in project-
related activities 
Use of gender-sensitive 
indicators and collection of sex-
disaggregated data for 
monitoring project outcomes and 
impacts.  
 
Gender disaggregated data 
included in Results Framework 
for measuring (i) capacity 
enhancement; and (ii) outreach 
and awareness  
Enhancing women’s role in 
project-related activities 
The outreach and 
communication strategy will 
include specific efforts to 
encourage women’s role  
Outreach and communication 
strategy will be designed with a 
gender focus 
Improve women’s role in 
decision-making 
Promote adequate 
representation and active 
participation of women decision-
making bodies.  
 
Women representation in project 
specific committees (e.g. 
National multi-sectoral 
coordinating committee, FIST, 
FIIT, etc.) and participation 
technical workshops, strategic 
planning events (e.g. NISFSAP, 
EDRR, GII eradication plan, 
outreach plan), etc. would be 
increased 
Enhanced role of women in 
biosecurity-related aspects 
Encouragement of qualified 
women applicants for positions, 
under BAF rules and regulations.  
 
Recruitment of new biosecurity 
and technical staff maintained at 
40% or more 
 

 
 
160 | 
P a g e
 
 
 
Annex 17 
 
Co-financing letters 
 
 
(Separate File) 
1   ...   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17


Verilənlər bazası müəlliflik hüququ ilə müdafiə olunur ©azkurs.org 2016
rəhbərliyinə müraciət

    Ana səhifə